Kaiser Bottom Fish OnlineFree trialNew StuffHow It WorksContact UsTerms of UseHome
Specializing in Canadian Stocks
SearchAdvanced Search
Welcome Guest User   (more...)
Home / Education
Education
 

SDLRC - Scientific Articles all years by Author - Ko-Kq


The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation
The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation is compiled by Patricia Sheahan who publishes on a monthly basis a list of new scientific articles related to diamonds as well as media coverage and corporate announcementscalled the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service that is distributed as a free pdf to a list of followers. Pat has kindly agreed to allow her work to be made available as an online digital resource at Kaiser Research Online so that a broader community interested in diamonds and related geology can benefit. The references are for personal use information purposes only; when available a link is provided to an online location where the full article can be accessed or purchased directly. Reproduction of this compilation in part or in whole without permission from the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is strictly prohibited. Return to Diamond Resource Center
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Media/Corporate References by Name for all years
A B C D-Diam Diamonds Diamr+ E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Tips for Users
Posted/Published Reference CodesThe SDLRC provides 3 types of references identified in the reference code. DS for scientific article, DM for a media article, and DC for a corporate announcement. Consider DS0512-0001. The DS stands for "diamond scientific". 05 stands for 2005, the year the reference was posted. 12 represents the month the reference was posted. For all years prior to 2015 the default month is 12. -0001 is the reference's identifier and it does not mean anything. The number below the refence code, ie 2015, is the year the article was published. Note that the posted year may sometimes be later than the published year.
Sort OrderReferences are sorted by the "author" name and when the reference was posted to the compilation.
Most RecentIf the reference code is highlighted yellow, the reference was made available through the most recent monthly compilation of new literature. Use this to check out new references. When new references are posted, we make it our priority to track down an online link and obtain an abstract. With regard to older references, tracking down an abstract and an online link is a work in progress.
Link to external location of article: If the title has a link, it means we have found a location online where you can either retrieve the full article free, or purchase access to it. The Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is not a technical article procurement service; if you want a restricted article, you must deal directly with the vendor who controls the copyright to the article.
Searching this page for a specific term or authorIn your Firefox browser click Edit in the menu bar and then Find. In the Find box that shows up at the bottom of the web page enter your search term. Firefox will highlight all occurrences. This is particularly helpful when the author you are seeking was not the lead author by whom the compilation is sorted.
Sending or sharing a referenceThe left column (Posted/Published) has an embedded hyperlink for each reference. In Firefox, if you right click on it, you can obtain the link url for that reference's location within the page, which you can copy and paste into an email or any other document. You can also use the "share this link" option to tweet, facebook etc the link.
Author Index
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years - Ko-Kq
Posted/
Published
AuthorTitleSourceRegionKeywords
DS202006-0927
2020
Ko, B.Ko, B., Prakapenka, V., Kunz, M., Prescher, C., Leinenweber, K., Shim, S-H.Mineralogy and density of Archean volcanic crust in the mantle transition zone.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 305, 13p. PdfMantledensity

Abstract: The composition of Archean volcanic crust can be characterized by a higher Mg/Si ratio than modern mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), because of the higher degree melting from the warmer mantle in the Archean. Although modern MORB may become less dense than the surrounding mantle beneath the mantle transition zone (MTZ), the Mg-rich composition of Archean volcanic crust may result in the different density, and therefore different sinking behavior near the MTZ. In order to understand the compositional effect of Archean volcanic crust on the sinking behaviors and the scale of mantle mixing in the Archean, we investigated the mineralogy and density of Archean volcanic crust near the MTZ (470-910 km-depth). We conducted experiments at 19-34 GPa and 1400-2400 K using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) combined with in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). The in-situ XRD and the chemical analysis revealed that Archean volcanic crust forms garnet and ringwoodite (84 and 16 vol%, respectively), which gradually transforms to Brg and CaPv (82 and 18 vol%, respectively) at 23-25 GPa and 1800 K. Our in-situ XRD experiments allowed us to measure the volumes of stable phases and to estimate their densities at high pressure and temperature. The results suggest that Archean volcanic crust maintains greater density than the pyrolitic mantle in the Archean regardless of temperature at 20-34 GPa (570-850 km-depth), promoting further sinking into the deeper mantle in the Archean. We also considered the density of the subducting slab in the Archean. The density model showed that the subducting slab is still denser or at least equally dense as the surrounding pyrolitic mantle in the Archean.
DS202008-1410
2020
Ko, B.Ko, B., Prakapenka, V., Kunz, M., Prescher, C., Leinenweber, K., Shim, S-H.Mineralogy and density of Archean volcanic crust in the mantle transition zone.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 305, 13p. PdfMantlesubduction

Abstract: The composition of Archean volcanic crust can be characterized by a higher Mg/Si ratio than modern mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), because of the higher degree melting from the warmer mantle in the Archean. Although modern MORB may become less dense than the surrounding mantle beneath the mantle transition zone (MTZ), the Mg-rich composition of Archean volcanic crust may result in the different density, and therefore different sinking behavior near the MTZ. In order to understand the compositional effect of Archean volcanic crust on the sinking behaviors and the scale of mantle mixing in the Archean, we investigated the mineralogy and density of Archean volcanic crust near the MTZ (470-910 km-depth). We conducted experiments at 19-34 GPa and 1400-2400 K using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) combined with in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). The in-situ XRD and the chemical analysis revealed that Archean volcanic crust forms garnet and ringwoodite (84 and 16 vol%, respectively), which gradually transforms to Brg and CaPv (82 and 18 vol%, respectively) at 23-25 GPa and 1800 K. Our in-situ XRD experiments allowed us to measure the volumes of stable phases and to estimate their densities at high pressure and temperature. The results suggest that Archean volcanic crust maintains greater density than the pyrolitic mantle in the Archean regardless of temperature at 20-34 GPa (570-850 km-depth), promoting further sinking into the deeper mantle in the Archean. We also considered the density of the subducting slab in the Archean. The density model showed that the subducting slab is still denser or at least equally dense as the surrounding pyrolitic mantle in the Archean.
DS1989-0425
1989
Ko, J.Finger, L.W., Ko, J., Hazen, R.M., Gasparik, T., Hemley, R.J.Crystal chemistry of phase B and an anhydrous analogue:implications for water storage in the upper mantleNature, Vol. 341, No. 6238, Sept. 14, pp. 40-142GlobalMantle, Geochemistry
DS1993-1810
1993
Ko, J.Zhang, J., Ko, J., Hazen, C.T., Prewitt, C.T.high pressure crystal chemistry of KAlSi3O8 hollanditeAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 78, pp. 493-9.GlobalPetrology, ultra high pressure (UHP)
DS1992-1310
1992
Kobashi, K.Ruan, J., Kobashi, K., Choyke, W.J.On the band -A emission and boron related luminescence in diamondApplied Phys. Letters, Vol. 60, No. 25, June 22, pp. 3138-3140. # HZ 537GlobalDiamond morphology, Luminescence
DS200712-1103
2007
Kobayahsi, K.Usui, T., Kobayahsi, K., Nakamura, E., Helmstaedt, H.Trace element fractionation in deep subduction zones inferred from a lawsonite eclogite xenolith from the Colorado Plateau.Chemical Geology, Vol. 239, 3-4, April 30, pp. 336-351.United States, Colorado PlateauSubduction
DS1990-1441
1990
Kobayash, K.Takama, T., Tsuchiya, K., Kobayash, K.Measurement of the structure factors of diamondAct. Cryst. A., Vol. 46, June 1, pp. 514-517GlobalCrystallography, Diamond morphology
DS200512-0534
2004
Kobayashi, E.King, R.L., Bebout, G.E., Kobayashi, E., Van der Klauw, S.N.G.C.Ultrahigh pressure metabasaltic garnets as probes into deep subduction zone chemical weathering.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 5, pp. Q12J14 10.1029/2004 GC000746MantleSubduction, eclogite
DS2003-1401
2003
Kobayashi, K.Usui, T., Nakamura, E., Kobayashi, K., Maruyama, S., Helmstaedt, H.Fate of the subducted Farallon plate inferred from eclogite xenoliths in the ColoradoGeology, Vol. 31, 7, July, pp. 589-592.Colorado Plateau, New Mexico, WyomingSubduction
DS200412-1805
2004
Kobayashi, K.Shimizu, K., Nakamara, E., Kobayashi, K., Maruyama, S.Discovery of Archean continental and mantle fragments inferred from xenocrysts in komatiites, the Belingwe greenstone belt, ZimbGeology, Vol. 32, 4, pp. 285-288.Africa, ZimbabweXenocrysts
DS200412-2028
2003
Kobayashi, K.Usui, T., Nakamura, E., Kobayashi, K., Maruyama, S., Helmstaedt, H.Fate of the subducted Farallon plate inferred from eclogite xenoliths in the Colorado Plateau.Geology, Vol. 31, 7, July, pp. 589-592.United States, ColoradoSubduction
DS200512-0535
2005
Kobayashi, K.King, R.L., Bebout, G.E., Kobayashi, K., Nakamura, E., Van der Klauw, S.N.G.C.Ultrahigh pressure metabasaltic garnets as probes into deep subduction zone chemical cycling.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 5, Q12J14, doi:10.1029/2004 GC000746TechnologyUHP
DS200612-0861
2006
Kobayashi, K.Manya, S., Kobayashi, K., Maboko, M.A., Nakamura, E.Ion microprobe zircon U Pb dating of the late Archean metavolcanics and associated granites of the Musoma Mara greenstone belt, northeast Tanzania: implicationsJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 45, 3, pp. 355-366.Africa, TanzaniaCraton, geochronology, not specific to diamonds
DS200612-1455
2006
Kobayashi, K.Usui, T., Kobayashi, K., Nakamura, E., Helmstaedt, H.Trace element fractionation in deep subduction zones inferred from a lawsonite eclogite xenolith from the Colorado Plateau.Chemical Geology, in press available,United States, Colorado PlateauEclogite, subduction, Farallon plate, coesite
DS200712-1067
2007
Kobayashi, K.Tang, Y-J., Zhang, H-F., Nakamura, E., Moriguti, T., Kobayashi, K., Ying, J-F.Lithium isotopic systematics of peridotite xenoliths from Hannuoba, North Chin a Craton: implications for melt rock interaction in considerably thinned mantle lithospheric mantle.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 71, 17, Sept. 1, pp. 4327-4341.ChinaGeochronology
DS200712-1225
2007
Kobayashi, K.Zhang, H-F., Nakamura, E., Sun, M., Kobayashi,K., Zhang, J., Yang, J-F., Tang, Y-J.Transformation of subcontinental lithospheric mantle through peridotite melt reaction: evidence from a highly fertile mantle xenolith from the North Chin a Craton.International Geology Review, Vol. 49, 7, July pp. 658-679.ChinaMelting
DS200812-0833
2008
Kobayashi, K.Ota, T., Kobayashi, K., Kunihiro, T., Nakamura, E.Boron cycling by subducted lithosphere, insights from Diamondiferous tourmaline from the Kochetav ultrahigh pressure metamorphic belt.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 72, 14, pp. 3531-3541.Russia, KazakhstanCoesite, UHP
DS201012-0888
2010
Kobayashi, K.Zhang, H-F., Nakamura, E., Kobayashi, K., Ying, J-F., Tang, Y-J.Recycled crustal melt injection into lithospheric mantle: implication from cumulative composite and pyroxenite xenoliths.International Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 99, pp. 1167-1186.ChinaNorth China craton
DS201802-0255
2018
Kobayashi, K.Neave, D.A., Shorttle, O., Oeser, M., Weyer, S., Kobayashi, K.Mantle derived trace element variability in olivines and their melt inclusions.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 483, 1, pp. 90-104.Europe, Icelandolivines

Abstract: Trace element variability in oceanic basalts is commonly used to constrain the physics of mantle melting and the chemistry of Earth's deep interior. However, the geochemical properties of mantle melts are often overprinted by mixing and crystallisation processes during ascent and storage. Studying primitive melt inclusions offers one solution to this problem, but the fidelity of the melt-inclusion archive to bulk magma chemistry has been repeatedly questioned. To provide a novel check of the melt inclusion record, we present new major and trace element analyses from olivine macrocrysts in the products of two geographically proximal, yet compositionally distinct, primitive eruptions from the Reykjanes Peninsula of Iceland. By combining these macrocryst analyses with new and published melt inclusion analyses we demonstrate that olivines have similar patterns of incompatible trace element (ITE) variability to the inclusions they host, capturing chemical systematics on intra- and inter-eruption scales. ITE variability (element concentrations, ratios, variances and variance ratios) in olivines from the ITE-enriched Stapafell eruption is best accounted for by olivine-dominated fractional crystallisation. In contrast, ITE variability in olivines and inclusions from the ITE-depleted Háleyjabunga eruption cannot be explained by crystallisation alone, and must have originated in the mantle. Compatible trace element (CTE) variability is best described by crystallisation processes in both eruptions. Modest correlations between host and inclusion ITE contents in samples from Háleyjabunga suggest that melt inclusions can be faithful archives of melting and magmatic processes. It also indicates that degrees of ITE enrichment can be estimated from olivines directly when melt inclusion and matrix glass records of geochemical variability are poor or absent. Inter-eruption differences in olivine ITE systematics between Stapafell and Háleyjabunga mirror differences in melt inclusion suites, and confirm that the Stapafell eruption was fed by lower degree melts from greater depths within the melting region than the Háleyjabunga eruption. Although olivine macrocrysts from Stapafell are slightly richer in Ni than those from Háleyjabunga, their overall CTE systematics (e.g., Ni/(Mg/Fe), Fe/Mn and Zn/Fe) are inconsistent with being derived from olivine-free pyroxenites. However, the major element systematics of Icelandic basalts require lithological heterogeneity in their mantle source in the form of Fe-rich and hence fusible domains. We thus conclude that enriched heterogeneities in the Icelandic mantle are composed of modally enriched, yet nonetheless olivine-bearing, lithologies and that olivine CTE contents provide an incomplete record of lithological heterogeneity in the mantle. Modally enriched peridotites may therefore play a more important role in oceanic magma genesis than previously inferred.
DS201904-0752
2019
Kobayashi, M.Kobayashi, M., Sumino, H., Burgess, R., Nakai, S., Iizuka, T., Nagao, J. Kagi, H., Nakamura, M., Takahashi, E., Kogiso, T., Ballentine, C.J.Halogen heterogeneity in the lithosphere and evolution of mantle halogen abundances inferred from intraplate mantle xenoliths. Kilbourne HoleGeochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 20, 2, pp. 952-973.United States, New Mexicoxenoliths

Abstract: Elemental and isotopic compositions of volatile species such as halogens, noble gases, hydrogen, and carbon can be used to trace the evolution of these species in the Earth. Halogens are important tracers of subduction recycling of surface volatiles into the mantle: however, there is only limited understanding of halogens in the mantle. Here we provide new halogen data of mantle xenoliths from intraplate settings. The mantle xenoliths show a wide range of halogen elemental ratios, which are expected to be related to later processes after the xenoliths formed. A similar primary halogen component is present in the xenoliths sampled from different localities. This suggests that the mantle has the uniform halogen composition over a wide scale. The halogen composition in the convecting mantle is expected to have remained constant over more than 2 billion years, despite subduction of iodine-rich halogens. We used mass balance calculations to gain understanding into evolution rate of I/Cl ratio in the mantle. Calculations suggest that, in order to maintain the I/Cl ratio of the mantle over 2 Gyr, the I/Cl ratio of the subducted halogens must be no more than several times higher than the present-day mantle value.
DS201504-0203
2015
Kobayashi, T.Janak, M., Froitzheim, N., Yoshida, K., Sasinkova, V., Nosko, M., Kobayashi,T., Hirajima, T., Vrabec, M.Diamond in metasedimentary crustal rocks from Pohorje, eastern Alps: a window to deep continental subductionJournal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 33, 5, pp. 495-512.Europe, SloveniaSubduction
DS201112-0335
2011
Kobayasji, K.Fourie, P.H., Zimmermana, U., Beukes, N.J., Naidoo, T., Kobayasji, K., Kosler, J., Nakamura, Tait, TheronProvenance and reconnaissance study of detrital zircons of the Paleozoic Cape Supergroup: revealing the interaction of Kalahari and Rio de la Plat a cratons.International Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 100, 2, pp. 527-541.Africa, South Africa, South America, BrazilGeochronology
DS1975-1102
1979
Kobelski, B.J.Kobelski, B.J., Gold, D.P., Deines, P.Variations in Stable Isotope Compositions for Carbon and Oxygen in Some South African Kimberlites.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 40, PP.South Africa, LesothoBenfontein, De Beers, Wesselton, Monastery, National, Premier
DS1994-0929
1994
Koberski, U.Koberski, U., Keller, J.Cathodluminescence observations of natrocarbonatites and related peralkaline nephelinites at Oldoinyo LengaiCarbonatite volcanism, Ed. Bell, K., Keller, J., pp. 87-99.TanzaniaPetrology - Carbonatite volcanism., Deposit -Oldoinyo Lengai
DS1950-0332
1957
Kobets, N.V.Kobets, N.V., Komarov, B.V.Some Problems of Methodology in Prospecting for Primary Diamond Methods by Aeromethods.Akad. Nauk Sssr Izv. Geol. Ser., PP. 80-86.Russia, YakutiaKimberlite, Geophysics, Airmag
DS1999-0601
1999
Kobilkina, O.V.Ripp, G.S., Kobilkina, O.V.Genesis of rare earth and barium, strontium mineralization in West Transbaikalia carbonatites.Stanley, SGA Fifth Biennial Symposium, pp. 671-74.RussiaMineralogy, Carbonatite
DS1991-1693
1991
Kobilsek, B.Tardy, Y., Kobilsek, B., Paquet, H.Mineralogical composition and geographical distribution of African and Brazilian periatlantic laterites. the influence of continental drift and tropical paleoclimesJournal of Sth. African Earth Sciences, Vol. pp. 283-295Africa, Brazil, India, AustraliaLaterites, Mineralogy
DS1989-0806
1989
Kobluk, D.R.Kobluk, D.R., Vyas, A.H.An inexpensive, high pressurerecision, computer interfaced microscope stageGeobyte, Vol. 4, No. 2, April pp. 55-62. Database # 17828GlobalPrograms -Microscope digitizing
DS201012-0552
2010
Kobussen, A.O'Neill, C.J., Kobussen, A., Lenardic, A.The mechanics of continental lithosphere-asthenosphere coupling.Lithos, Vol. 120, 1-2, Nov. pp. 55-62.MantleGeodynamics
DS201012-0553
2010
Kobussen, A.O'Neill, C.J., Kobussen, A., Lenardic, A.The mechanics of continental lithosphere - asthenosphere coupling.Lithos, in press available, 30p.EuropeGeophysics - geodynamics
DS201112-0531
2010
Kobussen, A.Kobussen, A.Composition, structure, and evolution of the lithospheric mantle beneath Southern Africa.Thesis: Macquarie University Phd. , Africa, southern AfricaThesis: note availability based on request to author
DS201708-1693
2017
Kobussen, A.Kobussen, A.Application of machine learning tecniques to exploration: an example using self-organizing maps for garnet data.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, OralTechnologyindicator minerals
DS201709-2058
2017
Kobussen, A.Stachel, T., Harris, J.W., Hunt, L., Muehlenbachs, K., Kobussen, A., EIMFArgyle diamonds - how subduction along the Kimberley Craton edge generated the World's biggest diamond deposit.Economic Geology, 50p. By permission of authorAustraliadeposit - Argyle

Abstract: Based on the mineral inclusion content, diamonds from the Argyle Mine, Western Australia, derive primarily (~90%) from eclogitic sources with a minor peridotitic contribution from both harzburgitic and lherzolitic lithologies. The eclogitic inclusions cover a large compositional range and show in part unusually high concentrations of mantle incompatible elements (P, Ti, Na and K). Coherent trends in major elements (e.g., of Ti or Na versus Mg-number) suggest that the eclogitic diamond source was created by a single process, namely igneous fractionation. Calculated bulk rock REEN patterns match a section of oceanic crust reaching from lavas and sheeted dykes to upper gabbros. Positive Eu anomalies for garnet and clinopyroxene, with calculated bulk rock REEN patterns similar to upper (non-layered) gabbros, are strong evidence for plagioclase accumulation, which is characteristic for the gabbroic portions of oceanic crust. Linking previously published oxygen isotope analyses of eclogitic garnet inclusions with their major element composition reveals a correlation between d18O (mean of +7.2‰) and Na content, consistent with coupled 18O and Na enrichment during low temperature alteration of oceanic crust. The carbon isotopic composition of Argyle eclogitic diamonds forms a normal distribution around a d13C value of -11‰, indicative of mixing and homogenization of mantle and crustal (organic matter) derived carbon prior to diamond precipitation. Previously published noble gas data on Argyle diamonds support this two component model. Inclusion and nitrogen-in-diamond based thermometry indicate an unusually hot origin of the eclogitic diamond suite, indicative of derivation from the lowermost 25 km (about 180-205 km depth) of the local lithospheric mantle. This is consistent with emplacement of an oceanic protolith during subduction along the Kimberley Craton margin, likely during the Halls Creek Orogeny (about 1.85 Ga). For Argyle eclogitic diamonds the relationship between the rate of platelet degradation and mantle residence temperature indicates that both temperature and strain play an important role in this process. Therefore, ubiquitous platelet degradation and plastic deformation of Argyle diamonds are consistent with derivation from a high temperature environment (softening the diamond lattice) close to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (inducing strain). In combination, the Argyle data set represents a uniquely strong case for a subduction origin of an eclogitic diamond source followed by mixing of mantle and crustal components during diamond formation. Some lherzolitic inclusions show a similarity in incompatible element enrichments (elevated P, Na and K) to the eclogitic suite. The presence of a mildly majoritic lherzolitic garnet further supports a link to eclogitic diamond formation, as very similar majoritic components were found in two eclogitic garnet inclusions. The carbon isotopic composition of peridotitic diamonds shows a mode between -5 to -4 ‰ and a tail extending towards the eclogitic mode (-11 ‰). This suggests the presence of multiple generations of peridotitic diamonds, with indications for an origin linked to the eclogitic suite being restricted to diamonds of lherzolitic paragenesis. Argyle diamonds – how subduction along the Kimberley Craton edge generated the world's biggest diamond deposit.
DS201810-2357
2018
Kobussen, A.Moss, S.W., Kobussen, A., Powell, W., Pollock, K.Kimberlite emplacement and mantle sampling through time at A154N kimberlite volcano, Diavik Diamond mine: lessons from the deep.Mineralogy and Petrology, doi.org/10.1007/ s00710-018-0630-7 14p.Canada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Diavik

Abstract: The Diavik Diamond Mine in the NWT of Canada has produced in excess of 100 million carats from 3 kimberlite pipes since mining commenced in 2002. Here, we present new findings from deep (>400 m below surface) mining, sampling and drilling work in the A154N kimberlite volcano that require a revision of previous geological and emplacement models and provide a window into how the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) below Diavik was sampled by kimberlite magmas through time. Updated internal geological models feature two volcanic packages interpreted to represent two successive cycles of explosive eruption followed by active and passive sedimentation from a presumed crater-rim, both preceded and followed by intrusions of coherent kimberlite. Contact relationships apparent among the geological units allow for a sequential organization of as many as five temporally-discrete emplacement events. Representative populations of mantle minerals extracted from geological units corresponding to four of the emplacement events at A154N are analyzed for major and trace elements, and provide insights into the whether or not kimberlites randomly sample from the mantle. Two independent geothermometers using clinopyroxene and garnet data indicate similar source depths for clinopyroxenes and G9 garnets (130-160 km), and suggest deeper sampling with time for both clinopyroxene and garnets. Harzburgite is limited to 110-160 km, and appears more prevalent in early, low-volume events. Variable ratios of garnet parageneses from the same depth horizons suggest random sampling by passing magmas, but deeper garnet sampling through time suggests early preferential sampling of shallow/depleted SCLM. Evaluations of Ti, Zr, Y and Ga over the range of estimated depths support models of the SCLM underlying the central Slave terrane.
DS200512-0549
2004
Kobussen, A.F.Kobussen, A.F., Chistensen, N., Thybo, H.The search for the source of the anomalously high upper mantle seismic velocities of the Siberian Craton: evidence from xenoliths.Geological Society of America Annual Meeting ABSTRACTS, Nov. 7-10, Paper 57-1, Vol. 36, 5, p. 146.RussiaGeophysics - seismics, anisotropy
DS200612-0716
2006
Kobussen, A.F.Kobussen, A.F., Christensen, Nl., Thybo, H.Constraints on seismic velocity anomalies beneath the Siberian Craton from xenoliths and petrophysics.Tectonophysics, Vol. 425, 1-4, pp. 123-135.RussiaGeophysics - seismics
DS200712-0554
2006
Kobussen, A.F.Kobussen, A.F., Christensen, N.I., Thybo, H.Constraints on seismic velocity anomalies beneath the Siberian Craton from xenoliths and petrophysics.Tectonophysics, Vol. 425, 1-4, Oct. 13, pp. 123-135.RussiaGeophysics - seismics, Udachnaya, peridotite, eclogites
DS200812-0582
2008
Kobussen, A.F.Kobussen, A.F., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., Shee, S.R.Ghosts of lithospheres past: imaging an evolving lithospheric mantle in southern Africa.Geology, Vol. 36, 7, July pp. 515-518.Africa, South AfricaGeophysics - seismics
DS200912-0267
2009
Kobussen, A.F.Griffin, W.L., Kobussen, A.F., Babu, E.V.S.S.K., O'Reilly, S.Y., Norris, R., Sengupta, P.A translithospheric suture in the vanished 1 Ga lithospheric root of South India: evidence from contrasting lithospheric sections in the Dharwar Craton.Lithos, In press available, 31p.IndiaKimberlites - xenoliths
DS200912-0390
2009
Kobussen, A.F.Kobussen, A.F., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y.Cretaceous, thermo-chemical modification of the Kaapvaal cratonic lithosphere, South Africa.Lithos, In press - available 28p.Africa, South AfricaGeothermometry
DS201012-0251
2009
Kobussen, A.F.Griffin, W.L., Kobussen, A.F., Babu, E.V.S.S.K., O'Reilly, S.Y., Norris, R., Sengupta, P.A translithospheric suture in the vanished 1 Ga lithospheric root of South India: evidence from contrasting lithosphere sections in the Dharwar craton.Lithos, Vol. 112 S pp. 1109-1119.IndiaKimberlites and garnet geotherms
DS201812-2797
2018
Kobussen, A.F.Das, H., Kobussen, A.F., Webb, K.J., Phillips, D., Maas, R., Soltys, A., Rayner, M.J., Howell, D.Bunder deposit: The Bunder diamond project, India: geology, geochemistry, and age of Saptarshi lamproite pipes.Society of Economic Geology Geoscience and Exploration of the Argyle, Bunder, Diavik, and Murowa Diamond Deposits, Special Publication no. 20, pp. 201-222.Indiadeposit - Bunder
DS201812-2822
2018
Kobussen, A.F.Jaques, A.L., Luguet, A., Smith, C.B., Pearson, D.G., Yaxley, G.M., Kobussen, A.F.Argyle deposit: Nature of the mantle beneath the Argyle AK1 lamproite pipe: constraints from mantle xenoliths, diamonds, and lamproite geochemistry.Society of Economic Geology Geoscience and Exploration of the Argyle, Bunder, Diavik, and Murowa Diamond Deposits, Special Publication no. 20, pp. 119-144.Australia, western Australiadeposit - Argyle
DS201812-2830
2018
Kobussen, A.F.Kobussen, A.F., Howell, D., Shu, Q., Smith, C.B.Bunder deposit: A study of garnet and chromian spinel xenocrysts from the Atri South ultramafic intrusion, Bundelkhand craton, India.Society of Economic Geology Geoscience and Exploration of the Argyle, Bunder, Diavik, and Murowa Diamond Deposits, Special Publication no. 20, pp. 223-236.Indiadeposit - Bunder
DS201812-2860
2018
Kobussen, A.F.Pearson, D.G., Liu, J., Smith, C.B., Mather, K.A., Krebs, M.Y., Bulanova, G.P., Kobussen, A.F.Murowa deposit: Characteristics and origin of the mantle root beneath the Murowa diamond mine: implications for craton and diamond formation.Society of Economic Geology Geoscience and Exploration of the Argyle, Bunder, Diavik, and Murowa Diamond Deposits, Special Publication no. 20, pp. 403-424.Africa, Zimbabwedeposit - Murowa
DS201812-2886
2018
Kobussen, A.F.Smith, C.B., Bulanova, G.P., Kobussen, A.F., Burnham, A., Chapman, J.G., Davy, A.T., Sinha, K.K.Bunder deposit: Diamonds from the Atri South pipe, Bunder lamproite field, India, and implications for the nature of the underlying mantle.Society of Economic Geology Geoscience and Exploration of the Argyle, Bunder, Diavik, and Murowa Diamond Deposits, Special Publication no. 20, pp. 237-252.Indiadeposit - Bunder
DS201812-2887
2018
Kobussen, A.F.Stachel, T., Harris, J.W., Hunt, L., Muehlenbachs, K., Kobussen, A.F., Edinburgh Ion Micro-Probe facilityArgyle deposit: Argyle diamonds: how subduction along the Kimberley craton edge generated the world's biggest diamond deposit.Society of Economic Geology Geoscience and Exploration of the Argyle, Bunder, Diavik, and Murowa Diamond Deposits, Special Publication no. 20, pp. 145-168.Australia, western Australiadeposit - Argyle
DS200912-0391
2009
Kobykin, N.I.Kobykin, N.I.Russian/Engish diamond industry geotechnical diversified dictionary.Available from Kobykin Moscow +7 926-057-5788, 416p. 35,000 termsDictionary
DS1993-0835
1993
Kobyklin, O.I.Kobyklin, O.I.Equipment and technology for grease concentration and special methods of diamond separation.Diamonds of Yakutia, pp. 173-174.Russia, YakutiaMineral processing, Mining -grease concentration
DS2002-0392
2002
Kobylkina, O.V.Doroshkevich, A.G., Kobylkina, O.V., Ripp, G.S.Role of sulfates in the formation of carbonatites in the western Transbaikal regionDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 387A,9, pp. 131-4.RussiaCarbonatite
DS1985-0737
1985
Koch, E.F.Wong, J., Koch, E.F., Hejna, C.I., Garbauskas, M.F.Atomic and microstructural characterization of metal impurities in synthetic diamondsJournal of Applied Physics, Vol. 58, No. 9, Nov. 1, pp. 3388-3393GlobalDiamond Morphology
DS1985-0738
1985
Koch, E.F.Wong, J., Koch, E.F., Hejna, C.L., Garbausk, M.F.Atomic and Microstructural Characterization of Metal Impurities in Synthetic Diamonds.Journal of APPLIED PHYSICS, Vol. 58, No. 9, Nov. 1, PP. 3388-3393.GlobalSynthetic Diamond
DS1900-0677
1908
Koch, F.J.Koch, F.J.The Search for Diamonds in CaliforniaManufacturer Jeweller., Vol. 42, MAY 28TH. P. 926; P. 950.United States, California, West Coast, MontanaDiamond Occurrences
DS201212-0362
2012
Koch, F.W.Koch, F.W., Wiens, D.A., Nyblade, A.A., Nyblade, P.J.Upper mantle anisotropy beneath the Cameroon Volcanic Line and Congo Craton from shear wave splitting measurements.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 190, 1, pp. 75-86.Africa, CameroonGeophysics - seismics
DS201212-0363
2012
Koch, F.W.Koch, F.W., Wiens, D.A., Nyblade, A.A., Shore, P.J., Tibi, R., Ateba, B., Tabod, C.T., Nnange, J.M.Upper mantle anisotropy beneath the Cameroon Volcanic Line and Congo Craton from shear wave splitting measurements.Geophysical Journal International, in press availableAfrica, CameroonGeophysics - seismics
DS1990-0850
1990
Koch, G.S. Jr.Koch, G.S. Jr.Geological problem solving with LOTUS 1-2-3Pergamon Press, Publishing series Computer Methods in the Geosciences, June, 234p. 0-080369413 (H) $ United States 60.00 approxGlobalComputer, Book _ Lotus 1-2-3 problems
DS2003-1495
2003
Koch, M.Woodland, A.B., Koch, M.Variation in oxygen fugacity with depth in the upper mantle beneath the KaapvaalEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 214, 1-2, pp. 295-310.South AfricaGeochronology
DS200412-2140
2003
Koch, M.Woodland, A.B., Koch, M.Variation in oxygen fugacity with depth in the upper mantle beneath the Kaapvaal craton, Southern Africa.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 214, 1-2, pp. 295-310.Africa, South AfricaGeochronology
DS1993-1142
1993
Koch, R.D.Nokleberg, W.J., Bundtzen, T.K., Grybeck, D., Koch, R.D., EreminMetallogenesis of maIn land Alaska and the Russian northeastUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open file, No. 93-339, approx. $ 48.00Alaska, RussiaBook -table of contents, Metallogeny, alluvials, placers, lode, chromite, gold, platinum group elements (PGE)
DS201809-2001
2018
Koch, T.E.Brenker, F.E., Koch, T.E., Prior, D.J., Lilly, K., Krot, A.N., Bizzarro, M., Frost, D.Fe rich Ferropericlase in super deep diamonds and the stability of high FeO wadsleyite. Implications on the composition and temperature of the Earth's transition zone.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractMantlediamond inclusions

Abstract: The high amount of Fe-rich ferropericlase inclusions found in diamonds of a potential super-deep origin questions the bulk chemical model of the Earth [e.g., 1]. Although this might be due to a biased sampling of the lower mantle, it is worth to further address this discrepancy. A limiting factor of the Fe-content of the Earth´s deep mantle (TZ and lower mantle) is a correlation of the depths of the observed main mantle discontinuities with the (Fe,Mg)SiO4 phase diagram. In particular, the 520 kmdiscontinuity is related to the phase transformation of wadsleyite (assuming Fa10) to ringwoodite. The existing phase diagrams suggest a stability limit of wadsleyite =Fa40 [e.g., 2,3], which limits the Fe-content of the Earth´s transition zone. Here we report on a discovery of Fe-rich wadsleyite grains (up to Fa56) in the high-pressure silicate melt droplets within Fe,Ni-metal in shock veins of the CB (Bencubbin-like) metal-rich carbonaceous chondrite QC 001 [4], which were identified using HR-EDX, nano-EBSD and TEM. Although the existence of such Fe-rich wadsleyite in shock veins may be due to the kinetic reasons, new theoretical and experimental studies of the stability of (Fe,Mg)SiO4 at high temperature (> 1800 K) are clearly needed. This may have significant impact on the temperature and chemical estimates of the Earth´s transition zone.
DS200412-1023
2004
Koch Muller, M.Koch Muller, M., Matsyuk, S.S., Wirth, R.Hydroxyl in omphacites and omphacitic clinopyroxenes of upper mantle to lower crustal origin beneath the Siberian platform.American Mineralogist, Vol.89, 7, pp. 921-931.Russia, SiberiaMineralogy, Mir, Zagadochnaya, Udachnaya
DS200812-0564
2008
Koch0Mueller, M.Khisina, N., Wirth, R., Matsyuk, S., Koch0Mueller, M.Microstructural features and OH bearing nanoinclusions in 'wet' olivine from mantle nodules in kimberlites.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 20, 6. pp. 1067-1078.MantleNodule - petrology
DS201412-0570
2014
Kochelek, K.McMillan, N.J., Rees, S., Kochelek, K., McManus, C.Geological applications of laser-induced breakdown spectrocopy.Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research, Vol. 38, 3, pp. 329-343.Africa, Tanzania, MadagascarRubies
DS1990-0851
1990
Kochemasov, G.G.Kochemasov, G.G., Chuprov, A.I.The Bangui magnetic anomaly in central Africa in the light of new geological evidenceInternational Geology Review, Vol. 1, No. 2, Feb. pp. 151-161Central AfricaCraton, Geophysics -Magnetics Ban
DS201710-2209
2017
Kochergin, Y.Ackerman, L., Slama, J., Haluzova, E., Magna, T., Rapprich, V., Kochergin, Y., Upadhyay, D.Hafnium isotope systematics of carbonatites and alkaline silicate rocks from south and west India.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractIndiadeposit - Amba Dongar
DS201707-1300
2017
Kochergina, Y.V.Ackerman, L., Magna, T., Rapprich, V., Upadhyay, D., Kratky, O., Cejkova, B., Erban, V., Kochergina, Y.V., Hrstka, T.Contrasting petrogenesis of spatially related carbonatites from Samalpatti and Sevattur, Tamil Nadu, India.Lithos, Vol. 284-285, pp. 257-275.Indiacarbonatite - Samalpatti, Sevattur

Abstract: Two Neoproterozoic carbonatite suites of spatially related carbonatites and associated silicate alkaline rocks from Sevattur and Samalpatti, south India, have been investigated in terms of petrography, chemistry and radiogenic–stable isotopic compositions in order to provide further constraints on their genesis. The cumulative evidence indicates that the Sevattur suite is derived from an enriched mantle source without significant post-emplacement modifications through crustal contamination and hydrothermal overprint. The stable (C, O) isotopic compositions confirm mantle origin of Sevattur carbonatites with only a modest difference to Paleoproterozoic Hogenakal carbonatite, emplaced in the same tectonic setting. On the contrary, multiple processes have shaped the petrography, chemistry and isotopic systematics of the Samalpatti suite. These include pre-emplacement interaction with the ambient crustal materials with more pronounced signatures of such a process in silicocarbonatites. Calc-silicate marbles present in the Samalpatti area could represent a possible evolved end member due to the inability of common silicate rocks (pyroxenites, granites, diorites) to comply with radiogenic isotopic constraints. In addition, Samalpatti carbonatites show a range of C–O isotopic compositions, and d13CV-PDB values between + 1.8 and + 4.1‰ found for a sub-suite of Samalpatti carbonatites belong to the highest values ever reported for magmatic carbonates. These heavy C–O isotopic signatures in Samalpatti carbonatites could be indicative of massive hydrothermal interaction with carbonated fluids. Unusual high-Cr silicocarbonatites, discovered at Samalpatti, seek their origin in the reaction of pyroxenites with enriched mantle-derived alkali-CO2-rich melts, as also evidenced by mantle-like O isotopic compositions. Field and petrographic observations as well as isotopic constraints must, however, be combined with the complex chemistry of incompatible trace elements as indicated from their non-uniform systematics in carbonatites and their individual fractions. We emphasise that, beside common carriers of REE like apatite, other phases may be important for incompatible element budgets, such as mckelveyite–(Nd) and kosmochlor, found in these carbonatites. Future targeted studies, including in-situ techniques, could help further constrain temporal and petrologic conditions of formation of Sevattur and Samalpatti carbonatite bodies.
DS201801-0001
2017
Kochergina, Y.V.Ackerman, L., Magna, T., Rapprich, V., Upadhyay, D., Kratky, O., Cejkova, B., Erban, V., Kochergina, Y.V., Hrstka, T.Contrasting petrogenesis of spatially related carbonatites from Samalpatti and Sevattur, Tamil Nadu, India: insights from trace element and isotopic geochemistry.Carbonatite-alkaline rocks and associated mineral deposits , Dec. 8-11, abstract p. 31-33.Indiadeposit - Samalpatti, Sevattur

Abstract: The Tamil Nadu region in southern India hosts several carbonatite bodies (e.g., Hogenakal, Samalpatti, Sevattur, Pakkanadu-Mulakkadu) which are closely associated with alkaline silicate rocks such as syenites, pyroxenites or dunites (e.g, Kumar et al., 1998; Schleicher et al., 1998; Srivastava, 1998). This is in contrast to the carbonatite occurrences in north-western India associated with the Deccan Trap basalts (e.g., Amba Dongar) or Proterozoic Newania dolomitic carbonatites. We have studied two, spatially related, Neoproterozoic carbonatite-silico(carbonatite) suites in association with alkaline silicate rocks (e.g., pyroxenite, gabbro) from Sevattur and Samalpatti in terms of petrography, chemistry and radiogenic-stable isotopic compositions in order to provide constraints on their genesis and evolution. In these two bodies, several different carbonatite types have been reported previously with striking differences in their trace element and isotopic compositions (Srivastava, 1998; Viladkar and Subramanian, 1995; Schleicher et al., 1998; Pandit et al., 2002). Collected data for previously poorly studied calcite carbonatites from the Sevattur representing the first carbonatite magmas on this locality, indicate similar geochemical characteristics to those of dolomitic carbonatites, such as high LREE/HREE ratios, very high Sr and Ba contents, large amounts of apatite and magnetite, identical Sr-Nd-C-O isotopic compositions. Thus, they were derived from an enriched mantle source without significant post-emplacement modifications through crustal contamination and hydrothermal overprint, in agreement with previous studies (e.g., Schleicher et al., 1998). Detailed microprobe analyses revealed that high levels of some incompatible elements (e.g., REE, Y, Sr, Ba) cannot be accounted by matrix calcite hosting only significant amounts of SrO (~0.6-1.2 wt.%). On the other hand, abundant micro- to nano-scale exsolution lamellae and/or inclusions of mckelveyite-(Nd) appear to host a significant fraction of LREE in parallel with apatite. Distribution of Sr is most likely influenced also by common but heterogeneously dispersed barite and strontianite. Newly acquired as well as detailed inspection of available geochemical data permits distinguish two different types of carbonatites in Samalpatti: (1) Type I similar to Sevattur carbonatites in terms of mineralogy, trace element and radiogenic-stable isotopic compositions and (2) Type II with remarkably low concentrations of REE and other incompatible trace elements, more radiogenic Sr isotopic compositions and extremely variable C–O isotopic values. The petrogenesis of the Type II seems to be intimately associated with the presence of silicocarbonatites and abundant silicate mineral domains. Instead of liquid immiscible separation from a silicate magma, elevated SiO2 contents observed in silico-carbonatites may have resulted from the interaction of primary carbonatitic melts and crustal rocks prior to and/or during magma emplacement. Arguments for such hypothesis include variable, but radiogenic Sr isotopic compositions correlated with SiO2 and other lithophile elements (e.g., Ti, Y, Zr, REE). Calc-silicate marbles present in the Samalpatti area could represent a possible evolved crustal end member for such process due to the inability of common silicate rocks (pyroxenites, granites, diorites) to comply with radiogenic isotopic constraints. The wide range of C-O isotopic compositions found in Samalpatti carbonatites belong to the highest values ever reported for magmatic carbonates and can be best explained by massive hydrothermal interaction with carbonated fluids. Unusual high-Cr silicocarbonatites were discovered at Samalpatti forming centimetre to decimetre-sized enclaves enclosed in pyroxenites with sharp contacts at hand specimen scale. Detailed microprobe analyses revealed peculiar chemical compositions of the Mgamphibole with predominantly sodic composition embaying and replacing Na-Cr-rich pyroxene (kosmochlor), accompanied by the common presence of Cr-spinel and titanite. Such association have been reported for hydrous metasomatism by Na-rich carbonatitic melts at upper mantle conditions (Ali and Arai, 2013). However, the mineralogy and the mode of occurrence of Samalpatti Mg–-r-rich silicocarbonatites argue against such origin. We explain the petrogenesis of these rocks through the reaction of pyroxenites with enriched mantle-derived alkali-CO2-rich melts, as also evidenced by mantle-like O and Hf isotopic compositions.
DS1987-0538
1987
Kocherzhinskii, Yu.A.Novikov, N.V., Kocherzhinskii, Yu.A., Shulman, L.A., et al.Physical properties of diamond. Handbook. in accordance with the State office of standard reference data.(Russian)Nauka Dumka Kiev, (Russian), 188pRussiaBlank
DS1985-0363
1985
Kochetkov, A.YA.Kovalskiy, V.V., Kochetkov, A.YA., Lazebnik, K.A.Petrologic and geochemical features of the plutonic evolution of substances in kimberlite and mafic magmatic systems.(Russian)Akad. Nauk SSSR Sib. Otd. Yakutsk Fil. (Russian), 200pRussiaBlank
DS200712-0555
2006
Kochhar, N.Kochhar, N.Diamonds in obducted oceanic crust kimberlites.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 68, 3, p. 565.IndiaGenesis
DS1994-1682
1994
Kochin, G.G.Staritskii, Y.G., Kochin, G.G.Ore types of metallic and non-metallic mineral deposits in the cover of the Russian PlatformGeology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 36, No. 2, pp. 124-133RussiaMetallogeny
DS1996-1361
1996
Kochkin, G.B.Staritskii, Yu.G., Kochkin, G.B., Yanova, E.O.Regularities of spatial distribution of the major minerals in the Russian Platform coverGeology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 38, No. 1, pp. 66-77RussiaModels, genesis, Uranium, Rare earths
DS200712-0478
2007
Kochmann, D.Jaglinski, T., Kochmann, D., Stone, D., Lakes, R.S.Composite materials with viscoelastic stiffness greater than diamond.Science, No. 5812, Feb. 2, pp. 620-621.TechnologyChemistry
DS200612-0717
2006
Koch-Mueller, M.Koch-Mueller, M., Matsyuk, S.S., Rhede, D., Wirth, R., Khistina, N.Hydroxyl in mantle olivine xenocrysts from the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 33, 4, pp. 276-287.RussiaMineral chemistry - Udachnaya
DS200912-0373
2008
Koch-Mueller, M.Khisina, N., Wirth, R., Matsyuk, S., Koch-Mueller, M.Microstructural features and OH bearing nanoinclusions in 'wet' olivine from mantle nodules in kimberlites.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 20, 6,Africa, South AfricaOlivine
DS2003-0733
2003
Koch-Muller, M.Koch-Muller, M., Dera, M., Fei, Y., Reno, B., Sobolev, N., Hauri, E.OH in synthetic and natural coesiteAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 88, 10, Oct. pp. 1436-45.GlobalMineralogy - coesite
DS200412-1024
2003
Koch-Muller, M.Koch-Muller, M., Dera, M., Fei, Y., Reno, B., Sobolev, N., Hauri, E., Wysoczanski, R.OH in synthetic and natural coesite.American Mineralogist, Vol. 88, 10, Oct. pp. 1436-45.TechnologyMineralogy - coesite
DS200412-1025
2004
Koch-Muller, M.Koch-Muller, M., Matsyuk, S.S., Wirth, R.Hydroxyl in omphacites and omphacitic clinopyroxenes of upper mantle to lower crustal origin beneath the Siberian Platform.American Mineralogist, Vol. 89, June pp. 921-931.Russia, YakutiaSpectroscopy, Mir, Zagadochnaya, Udachnaya pipes
DS201012-0151
2010
Koch-Muller, M.Deon, F., Koch-Muller, M., Rhede, D., Wirth, R.Water and iron effect on the P-T-x coordinates of the 410 km discontinuity in the Earth upper mantle.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, in press available, 14p.MantleUHP
DS201112-0265
2011
Koch-Muller, M.Deon, F., Koch-Muller, M., Rhede, D., Wirth, R.Water and iron effect on the P-T-x coordinates of the 410 km discontinuity in the Earth upper mantle.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 161, 4, pp. 653-666.MantlePetrology
DS201804-0707
2017
Koch-Muller, M.Kidane, A.T., Koch-Muller, M., Wiedenbeck, M., de Wit, M.J.Tracking sources of selected diamonds from southern Africa based on carbon isotopic and chemical impurities. River Ranch, Swartruggens, Klipspringer, PremierSouth African Journal of Geology, Vol. 120, 3, pp. 371-384.Africa, Zimbabwe, South Africadiamond morphology

Abstract: The morphological, chemical impurities and carbon isotope properties of diamonds may reveal subtle details of their mantle source and growth characteristics, supporting efforts towards identifying their original place of harvesting. Here we investigate the mantle carbon and nitrogen sources and growth patterns from selected diamonds mined from four kimberlites: macro-sized diamonds from River Ranch kimberlite in Zimbabwe and the Swartruggens and Klipspringer kimberlitic deposits from South Africa, and micro-sized diamonds from the Klipspringer and Premier kimberlite intrusions in South Africa. Type IaAB diamonds are found in all the samples; Type IaB diamonds only occur in samples from the Swartruggens, River Ranch and Premier kimberlites. A single Type II diamond (nitrogen below the detection limit) was also observed in the River Ranch and Premier kimberlites. Both the micro- and macro-sized diamonds from Klipspringer have similar nitrogen contents. Based on the % B-defect, the diamonds from Klipspringer are grouped into low- and high-nitrogen aggregates (i.e. % of B-defect <40% and >56%, respectively) that likely represent two different diamond forming episodes. Time averaged mantle storage temperatures for Type IaAB diamonds are calculated to have been: 1060°C for Swartruggens; 1190°C for River Ranch; 1100°C (low aggregated); and 1170°C (highly aggregated) for Klipspringer, and 1210°C for Premier diamonds. The CL-images of the River Ranch, Klipspringer and Premier diamonds reveal multi-oscillatory growth zones. The carbon isotopic analyses on the diamonds reveal an average d13CVPDB value of: -4.5‰ for Swartruggens; -4.7‰ for River Ranch; -4.5‰ for Klipspringer; and -3‰ for Premier. With the exception of the diamond from Premier, the average d13C value of the diamonds are similar to the average d13C value of the mantle (-5‰), which is similar to the occurrence of diamonds in the other kimberlites. The internal carbon isotopic variation of individual diamonds from Swartruggens, Klipspringer and Premier are less than 4‰, which is similar to the variability of most other diamond occurrences reported from elsewhere in the world. Up to 6.7‰ internal carbon isotopic variation was observed in a single diamond from River Ranch. The internal carbon isotopic studies of the diamonds reveal that the primary carbon in the Swartruggens and Klipspringer was derived from an oxidation of CH4-bearing fluid, whereas in the River Ranch the primary carbon was derived from the reduction of carbonate-or CO2-bearing fluids. The Swartruggens diamonds also reveal a secondary carbon sourced from a reduction of CO2- or carbonate-rich fluid or melt. Diamonds from Klipspringer exhibit a cyclic change in d13C values that reflects fluctuation in a complex mantle perturbation system or periodic change in fugacity of the mantle. Based on this study, we conclude that, in principle, a selected range of diamond signatures might be used to fingerprint their origins; especially when linked to their other physical properties such as a low temperature magnetic signature.
DS201809-2083
2018
Koch-Muller, M.Schulze, K., Marquardt, H., Kawazoe, T., Boallaran, T.B., McCammon, C., Koch-Muller, M., Kurnosov, A., Marquardt, K.Seismically invisable water in Earth's transition zone?Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 498, pp. 9-16.Mantlewater

Abstract: Ringwoodite, the dominant mineral at depths between 520 km and 660 km, can store up to 2-3 wt.% of water in its crystal structure, making the Earth's transition zone a plausible water reservoir that plays a central role in Earth's deep water cycle. Experiments show that hydration of ringwoodite significantly reduces elastic wave velocities at room pressure, but the effect of pressure remains poorly constrained. Here, a novel experimental setup enables a direct quantification of the effect of hydration on ringwoodite single-crystal elasticity and density at pressures of the Earth's transition zone and high temperatures. Our data show that the hydration-induced reduction of seismic velocities almost vanishes at conditions of the transition zone. Seismic data thus agree with a wide range of water contents in the transition zone.
DS201901-0016
2019
Koch-Muller, M.Chebotarev, D.A., Veksler, I.V., Wohlgemuth-Uberwasser, C., Doroshkevich, A.G., Koch-Muller, M.Experimental study of trace element distribution between calcite, fluorite and carbonatitic melt in the systemCaCO3+CaF2+Na2CO3+-Ca3(P04)2 at 100MPa.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 174, 4, doi.org/10. 1007/s00410-018-1530-x 13p.Mantlecarbonatite

Abstract: Here we present an experimental study of the distribution of a broad range of trace elements between carbonatite melt, calcite and fluorite. The experiments were performed in the CaCO3 + CaF2 + Na2CO3 ± Ca3(PO4)2 synthetic system at 650-900 °C and 100 MPa using rapid-quench cold-seal pressure vessels. Starting mixtures were composed of reagent-grade oxides, carbonates, Ca3(PO4)2 and CaF2 doped with 1 wt% REE-HFSE mixture. The results show that the distribution coefficients of all the analyzed trace elements for calcite and fluorite are below 1, with the highest values observed for Sr (0.48-0.8 for calcite and 0.14-0.3 for fluorite) and Y (0.18-0.3). The partition coefficients of REE gradually increase with increasing atomic number from La to Lu. The solubility of Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta in the synthetic F-rich carbonatitic melts, which were used in our experiments, is low and limited by crystallization of baddeleyite and Nb-bearing perovskite.
DS201510-1777
2014
Koctizin, Yr.A.Koctizin, Yr.A.Trace element composition of primitive mantle - non-chondrite model.Deep-seated magmatism, its sources and plumes, Proceedings of XIII International Workshop held 2014., Vol. 2014, pp. 39-65.MantleGeochronology - isotope data
DS1975-0403
1976
Koczynski, T.A.Scholz, C.H., Koczynski, T.A., Hutchins, D.G.Evidence for Incipient Rifting in Southern AfricaGeophys. Journal of Roy. Astron. Soc., Vol. 44, PP. 135-144.BotswanaSesimicity, Geotectonics, Geophysics
DS1984-0415
1984
Kodama, K.P.Kodama, K.P.Palaeomagnetism of Granitic Intrusives from the Precambrian basement Under Eastern Kansas; Orienting Drill Cores Using Secondary Magnetization components.Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, Vol. 76, No. 2, PP. 273-287.United States, Kansas, Central StatesMid Continent
DS201911-2507
2019
Kodama, S.Akam, C., Simandl, G.J., Lett, R., Paradis, S., Hoshino, M., Kon, Y., Araoka, D., Green, C., Kodama, S., Takagi, T., Chaudhry, M.Comparison of methods for the geochemical determination of rare earth elements: Rock Canyon Creek REE-F-Ba deposit case study, SE British Columbia, Canada.Geochemistry: Exploration, Environment, Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 414-430.Canada, British Columbiageochemistry

Abstract: Using Rock Canyon Creek REE-F-Ba deposit as an example, we demonstrate the need for verifying inherited geochemical data. Inherited La, Ce, Nd, and Sm data obtained by pressed pellet XRF, and La and Y data obtained by aqua regia digestion ICP-AES for 300 drill-core samples analysed in 2009 were compared to sample subsets reanalysed using lithium metaborate-tetraborate (LMB) fusion ICP-MS, Na2O2 fusion ICP-MS, and LMB fusion-XRF. We determine that LMB ICP-MS and Na2O2 ICP-MS accurately determined REE concentrations in SY-2 and SY-4, and provided precision within 10%. Fusion-XRF was precise for La and Nd at concentrations exceeding ten times the lower detection limit; however, accuracy was not established because REE concentrations in SY-4 were below the lower detection limit. Analysis of the sample subset revealed substantial discrepancies for Ce concentrations determined by pressed pellet XRF in comparison to other methods due to Ba interference. Samarium, present in lower concentrations than other REE compared, was underestimated by XRF methods relative to ICP-MS methods. This may be due to Sm concentrations approaching the lower detection limits of XRF methods, elemental interference, or inadequate background corrections. Aqua regia dissolution ICP-AES results, reporting for La and Y, are underestimated relative to other methods.
DS1985-0211
1985
Kodina, L.A.Galimov, E.M., Kaminsky, F.V., Kodina, L.A.New Dat a on Isotopic Composition of Carbon of CarbonadoGeochemistry International (Geokhimiya)., No. 5, MAY PP. 723-725.RussiaGeochemistry
DS1985-0212
1985
Kodina, L.A.Galinov, E.M., Kaminskiy, F.V., Kodina, L.A.New Dat a on Carbonado Carbon Isotope CompositionsGeochemistry International, Vol. 22, No. 9, pp. 18-21Russia, BrazilLonsdaleite, Morphology
DS200812-0438
2008
Kodoenyi, J.Guzmics, T., Zajacz, Z., Kodoenyi, J., Halter, W., Szabo, C.LA ICP MS study of apatite and K feldspar hosted primary carbonatite melt inclusions in clinopyroxenite xenoliths from lamprophyres, Hungary: implicationsGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 72, 7, pp. 1864-1886.Mantle, Europe, HungaryCarbonatite, melts
DS200812-0437
2008
Kodolanyi, J.Guzmics, T., Kodolanyi, J., Kovacs, I., Szabo, C., Bali, E., Ntaflos, T.Primary carbonatite melt inclusions in apatite and in K feldspar of clinopyroxene rich mantle xenoliths hosted in lamprophyre dikes, Hungary.Mineralogy and Petrology, In press available, 18p.Europe, HungaryLamprophyre, dykes
DS201212-0227
2012
Kodors, C.Gao, C., McAndrews, J.H., Wang, X., Menzies, J., Turton, C.L., Wood, B.D., Pei, J., Kodors, C.Glaciation of North America in the James Bay Lowland, Canada, 3-5 Ma.Geology, Vol. 40, 11, pp. 975-978.Canada, Ontario, James Bay LowlandsGeomorphology
DS1992-0578
1992
Kodra, A.Gjata, K., Kornprobst, J., Kodra, A., et al.Hot subduction close to a ridge? Example of garnet pyroxenite inclusions In the serpentine breccia (in French)Soc. Geol. de France, Bulletin. Huitieme series, (in French), Vol. 163, No. 4, pp. 469-476.AlbaniaXenoliths, Mantle
DS1995-0979
1995
Koeber, I.C.Koeber, I.C.Meteoritic impacts: diamonds everywhereNature, Vol. 378, No. 6552, Nov. 2, p. 17.GlobalMeteorites
DS1995-0980
1995
Koeber, I.C.Koeber, I.C.Meteorite impacts -diamonds everywhereNature, Vol. 378, No. 6552, Nov. 2, pp. 17-18.GlobalMeteorites
DS1994-1447
1994
Koeberi, C.Reimold, W.U., Koeberi, C., Bishop, J.Roter Kam M impact crater, Namibia: geochemistry of basement rocks andbrecciasGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 58, No. 12, June pp. 2685-1716NamibiaBreccia, Geochemistry
DS2002-0873
2002
KoeberlKononova, V.A., Kurat, Embey-Isztin, Pervov, KoeberlGeochemistry of metasomatised spinel peridotite xenoliths from the Darigana Plateau, southeast MongoliaMineralogy and Petrology, Vol.75,1-2,pp. 1-21.MongoliaXenoliths
DS2002-0864
2002
Koeberl, B.Koeberl, B.Mineralogical and geochemical aspects of impact cratersMineralogical magazine, Vol. 66,5, pp. 745-68.GlobalGeochemistry - impact craters
DS1994-0930
1994
Koeberl, C.Koeberl, C.African meteorite impact craters: characteristics and geologicalimportanceJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 18, No. 4, May pp. 263-296AfricaCraters, Meteorite
DS1994-1547
1994
Koeberl, C.Schrauder, M., Koeberl, C.Trace element analyses of fluid bearing fibrous diamonds from Jwaneng by neutron activation analysis.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 58A, pp. 811-812. AbstractBotswanaGeochemistry, Deposit -Jwaneng
DS1996-1261
1996
Koeberl, C.Schrauder, M., Koeberl, C., Navon, O.Trace element analyses of fluid bearing diamonds from Jwaneng, BotswanaGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 60, No. 23, Dec. 1, pp. 4711-24.BotswanaGeochemistry - diamonds, Deposit - Jwaneng
DS1997-0610
1997
Koeberl, C.Koeberl, C., Masaitis, V.L., Shafranovsky, GilmourDiamonds from the Popigal impact structure, RussiaGeology, Vol. 25, No. 11, Nov. pp. 967-970.Russia, SiberiaMineralogy impact diamonds, Sample techniques
DS2002-0371
2002
Koeberl, C.Deksissa, D.J., Koeberl, C.Geochemistry and petrography of gold quartz tourmaline veins of the Okote area: implications for gold exploreMineralogy and Petrology, Vol.75,1-2, pp. 101-22.Ethiopia, southernGold, geochemistry, Deposit - Okote
DS2002-0865
2002
Koeberl, C.Koeberl, C.Mineralogical and geochemical aspects of impact cratersMineralogical Magazine, Vol.66, 6, pp. 745-68.GlobalCraters
DS200412-1082
2004
Koeberl, C.Lana, C., Reimold, W.U., Gibson, R.L., Koeberl, C., Siegesmund, S.Nature of the Archean midcrust in the core of the Vredfort dome, Central Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 68, 3, pp. 623-42.Africa, South AfricaCraton, not specific to diamonds
DS200412-1234
2004
Koeberl, C.Maruoka, T., Kurat, G., Dobosi, G., Koeberl, C.Isotopic composition of carbon in diamonds of diamondites: record of mass fractionation in the mantle.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol.68, 7, pp. 1635-1644.MantleGeochronology
DS200512-0550
2005
Koeberl, C.Koeberl, C.Impact tectonics. structural and tectonic aspects of impact craters.Springer, 552p. $ 169. ISBN 3-540-24181-7Book - impact craters
DS200612-0718
2006
Koeberl, C.Koeberl, C.Impact process on the Early Earth.Elements, Vol. 3, no. 4, August pp. 211-216.MantleCraters, shocked minerals
DS200912-0572
2008
Koeberl, C.Pati, J.K., Reimold, W.U., Koeberl, C., Pati, P.The Dhala structure, Bundelk hand Craton, central India - eroded remnant of a lare Paleoproterozoic impact structure.Meteorites and Planetary Science, Vol. 43, pp. 1383-1398.IndiaImpact structure
DS201012-0351
2010
Koeberl, C.Ketcham, R.A., Koeberl, C.New clues on the origin of carbonado diamond from three dimensional textural analysis.Geological Society of America Abstracts, 1/2p.Africa, Central African RepublicCarbonado
DS201212-0364
2012
Koeberl, C.Koeberl, C., Claeys, P., Hecht, L., McDonald, I.Geochemistry of impactites.Elements, Vol. 8, 1, Feb. pp. 37-42.TechnologyPGM, isotopes
DS201312-0469
2013
Koeberl, C.Ketchum, R.A., Koeberl, C.New textural evidence on the origin of carbonado diamond: an example of 3-D petrography using x-ray computed tomography.Geosphere, Vol. 9, pp. 1336-1347.TechnologyCarbonado
DS201312-0686
2008
Koeberl, C.Pati, J.K., Reimold, W U., Koeberl, C., Pati, P.The Dhala structure, Bundelk hand craton, central India - eroded remnant of a large Paleoproterozoic impact structure.Meteorites and Planetary Science, Vol. 40, 8, pp. 1383-1398.IndiaImpact structure
DS201412-0731
2014
Koeberl, C.Reimold, W.U., Koeberl, C.Impact structures in Africa: a review.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 93, pp. 57-175.AfricaImpacts - review
DS201707-1361
2017
Koeberl, C.Saha, A., Ganguly, S., Ray, J., Koeberl, C., Thoni, M., Sarbajna, C., Sawant, S.S.Petrogenetic evolution of Cretaceous Samchampi Samteran alkaline complex, Mikir Hills, northeast India: implications on multiple melting events of heterogeneous plume and metasomatized sub continental lithospheric mantle.Gondwana Research, Vol. 48, pp. 237-256.Indiacarbonatite

Abstract: The Samchampi (26° 13'N: 93° 18'E)-Samteran (26° 11'N: 93° 25'E) alkaline complex (SSAC) occurs as an intrusion within Precambrian basement gneisses in the Karbi-Anglong district of Assam, Northeastern India. This intrusive complex comprises a wide spectrum of lithologies including syenite, ijolite-melteigite, alkali pyroxenite, alkali gabbro, nepheline syenite and carbonatite (nepheline syenites and carbonatites are later intrusives). In this paper, we present new major, trace, REE and Sr-Nd isotope data for different lithologies of SSAC and discuss integrated petrological and whole rock geochemical observations with Sr-Nd isotope systematics to understand the petrogenetic evolution of the complex. Pronounced LILE and LREE enrichment of the alkaline-carbonatite rocks together with steep LREE/HREE profile and flat HREE-chondrite normalized patterns provide evidence for parent magma generation from low degree partial melting of a metasomatized garnet peridotite mantle source. LILE, HFSE and LREE enrichments of the alkaline-silicate rocks and carbonatites are in agreement with the involvement of a mantle plume in their genesis. Nb-Th-La systematics with incompatible trace element abundance patterns marked by positive Nb-Ta anomalies and negative K, Th and Sr anomalies suggest contribution from plume-derived OIB-type mantle with recycled subduction component and a rift-controlled, intraplate tectonic setting for alkaline-carbonatite magmatism giving rise to the SSAC. This observation is corroborated by enriched 87Sr/86Srinitial (0.705562 to 0.709416) and 143Nd/144Ndinitial (0.512187 to 0.512449) ratios for the alkaline-carbonatite rocks that attest to a plume-related enriched mantle (~ EM II) source in relation to the origin of Samchampi-Samteran alkaline complex. Trace element chemistry and variations in isotopic data invoke periodic melting of an isotopically heterogeneous, metasomatized mantle and generation of isotopically distinct melt batches that were parental to the different rocks of SSAC. Various extents of plume-lithosphere interaction also accounts for the trace element and isotopic variations of SSAC. The Srinitial and Ndinitial (105 Ma) isotopic compositions (corresponding to eNd values of - 6.37 to - 1.27) of SSAC are consistent with those of Sung Valley, Jasra, Rajmahal tholeiites (Group II), Sylhet Traps and Kerguelen plateau basalts.
DS201012-0395
2010
Koehm, D.Koehm, D., Lindenfeld, M., Rumpker, G., Aanyu, K., Haines, S., Passchier, C.W., Sachu, T.Active transgression faults in rift transfer zones: evidence for complex stress fields and implications for crustal fragmentation processes in the western branchInternational Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 99, 7, pp. 1633-1642.Africa, East AfricaEast African Rift
DS201012-0444
2010
Koehm, D.Link, K., Koehm, D., Barth, M.G., Tiberindwa, J.V., Barifaijo, E., Aanyu, K., Foley, S.F.Continuous cratonic crust between the Congo and Tanzania blocks in western Uganda.International Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 99, 7, pp. 1559-1573.Africa, Uganda, TanzaniaGeophysics - seismics
DS201501-0028
2014
Koehn, D.Salomon, E., Koehn, D., Passchier, C.Brittle reactivation of ductile shear zones in NW Namibia in relation to South Atlantic rifting. Tectonics, Vol. 34, pp. 70-85.Africa, NamibiaTectonics
DS201312-0866
2013
Koelemeijer, P.Soldati, G., Koelemeijer, P., Boschi, L., Deuss, A.Constraints on core-mantle boundary topography from normal mode splitting.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 14, 5, pp. 1333-1342.MantleHeterogeneity
DS201806-1231
2018
Koelemeijer, P.Koelemeijer, P., Schuberth, B.S.A., Davies, D.R., Deuss, A., Ritsema, J.Constraints on the presence of post-perovskite in Earth's lowermost mantle from tomographic geodynamic model comparisons.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 494, pp. 226-238.Mantleperovskite

Abstract: Lower mantle tomography models consistently feature an increase in the ratio of shear-wave velocity () to compressional-wave velocity () variations and a negative correlation between shear-wave and bulk-sound velocity () variations. These seismic characteristics, also observed in the recent SP12RTS model, have been interpreted to be indicative of large-scale chemical variations. Other explanations, such as the lower mantle post-perovskite (pPv) phase, which would not require chemical heterogeneity, have been explored less. Constraining the origin of these seismic features is important, as geodynamic simulations predict a fundamentally different style of mantle convection under both scenarios. Here, we investigate to what extent the presence of pPv explains the observed high ratios and negative - correlation globally. We compare the statistical properties of SP12RTS with the statistics of synthetic tomography models, derived from both thermal and thermochemical models of 3-D global mantle convection. We convert the temperature fields of these models into seismic velocity structures using mineral physics lookup tables with and without pPv. We account for the limited tomographic resolution of SP12RTS using its resolution operator for both and structures. This allows for direct comparisons of the resulting velocity ratios and correlations. Although the tomographic filtering significantly affects the synthetic tomography images, we demonstrate that the effect of pPv remains evident in the ratios and correlations of seismic velocities. We find that lateral variations in the presence of pPv have a dominant influence on the / ratio and - correlation, which are thus unsuitable measures to constrain the presence of large-scale chemical variations in the lowermost mantle. To explain the decrease in the / ratio of SP12RTS close to the CMB, our results favour a pPv-bearing CMB region, which has implications for the stability field of pPv in the Earth's mantle.
DS202006-0924
2020
Koelemeijer, P.Jones, T.D., Maguire, R.R., van Keken, P.E., Ritsema, J., Koelemeijer, P.Subducted oceanic crust as the origin of seismically slow lower-mantle structures.Progress in Earth and Planetary Science , Vol. 7, 16p. PdfMantlegeophysics - seismics

Abstract: Mantle tomography reveals the existence of two large low-shear-velocity provinces (LLSVPs) at the base of the mantle. We examine here the hypothesis that they are piles of oceanic crust that have steadily accumulated and warmed over billions of years. We use existing global geodynamic models in which dense oceanic crust forms at divergent plate boundaries and subducts at convergent ones. The model suite covers the predicted density range for oceanic crust over lower mantle conditions. To meaningfully compare our geodynamic models to tomographic structures, we convert them into models of seismic wavespeed and explicitly account for the limited resolving power of tomography. Our results demonstrate that long-term recycling of dense oceanic crust naturally leads to the formation of thermochemical piles with seismic characteristics similar to the LLSVPs. The extent to which oceanic crust contributes to the LLSVPs depends upon its density in the lower mantle for which accurate data is lacking. We find that the LLSVPs are not composed solely of oceanic crust. Rather, they are basalt rich at their base (bottom 100-200 km) and grade into peridotite toward their sides and top with the strength of their seismic signature arising from the dominant role of temperature. We conclude that recycling of oceanic crust, if sufficiently dense, has a strong influence on the thermal and chemical evolution of Earth’s mantle.
DS201212-0365
2012
Koelemeijer, P.J.Koelemeijer, P.J., Deuss, A., Trampert, J.Normal mode sensitivity to Earth's D layer and topography on the core-mantle boundary: what we can and cannot see.Geophysical Journal International, in press availableMantleGeophysics - seismics
DS201212-0366
2012
Koelemeijer, P.J.Koelemeijer, P.J., Deuss, A., Trampert, J.Normal mode sensitivity to Earth's D layer and topography on the core-mantle boundary: what we can and cannot see.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 190, 1, pp. 553-568.MantleD layer
DS2002-0591
2002
KoelsovGolovin, A.V., Sharygin, V.V., Pokhilenko, N.P., Malkovets, V.G., KoelsovSecondary melt inclusions in olivine from unaltered kimberlites of the Udachnaya East pipe, Yakutia.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 388,1,pp. 93-96.Russia, YakutiaPetrology, deposit - Udachnaya
DS201911-2534
2019
Koemets, I.Ishi, T., Huang, R., Myhill, R., Fei, H., Koemets, I., Liu, Z., Maeda, F., Yuan, L., Wang, L., Druzhbin, D., Yamamoto, T., Bhat, S., Farla, R., Kawazoe, T., Tsujino, N., Kulik, E., Higo, Y., Tange, H., Katsura, T.Sharp 660 km discontinuity controlled by extremely narrow binary post-spinel transition.Nature Geosciences, Vol. 12, pp. 869-872.Mantlediscontinuity

Abstract: The Earth’s mantle is characterized by a sharp seismic discontinuity at a depth of 660?km that can provide insights into deep mantle processes. The discontinuity occurs over only 2?km—or a pressure difference of 0.1?GPa—and is thought to result from the post-spinel transition, that is, the decomposition of the mineral ringwoodite to bridgmanite plus ferropericlase. Existing high-pressure, high-temperature experiments have lacked the pressure control required to test whether such sharpness is the result of isochemical phase relations or chemically distinct upper and lower mantle domains. Here, we obtain the isothermal pressure interval of the Mg-Fe binary post-spinel transition by applying advanced multi-anvil techniques with in situ X-ray diffraction with the help of Mg-Fe partition experiments. It is demonstrated that the interval at mantle compositions and temperatures is only 0.01?GPa, corresponding to 250?m. This interval is indistinguishable from zero at seismic frequencies. These results can explain the discontinuity sharpness and provide new support for whole-mantle convection in a chemically homogeneous mantle. The present work suggests that distribution of adiabatic vertical flows between the upper and lower mantles can be mapped on the basis of discontinuity sharpness.
DS202009-1635
2020
Koemets, I.Koemets, I., Satta, N., Marquardt, H., Kiseeva, E.S., Kurnosov, A., Stachel, T., Harris, J.W., Dubrovinsky, L.Elastic properties of majorite garnet inclusions in diamonds and the seismic signature of pyroxenites in the Earth's upper mantle.American Mineralogist, Vol. 105, pp. 984-991. pdfMantlediamond inclusions

Abstract: Majoritic garnet has been predicted to be a major component of peridotite and eclogite in Earth's deep upper mantle (>250 km) and transition zone. The investigation of mineral inclusions in diamond confirms this prediction, but there is reported evidence of other majorite-bearing lithologies, intermediate between peridotitic and eclogitic, present in the mantle transition zone. If these lithologies are derived from olivine-free pyroxenites, then at mantle transition zone pressures majorite may form monomineralic or almost monomineralic garnetite layers. Since majoritic garnet is presumably the seismically fastest major phase in the lowermost upper mantle, the existence of such majorite layers might produce a detectable seismic signature. However, a test of this hypothesis is hampered by the absence of sound wave velocity measurements of majoritic garnets with relevant chemical compositions, since previous measurements have been mostly limited to synthetic majorite samples with relatively simple compositions. In an attempt to evaluate the seismic signature of a pyroxenitic garnet layer, we measured the sound wave velocities of three natural majoritic garnet inclusions in diamond by Brillouin spectroscopy at ambient conditions. The chosen natural garnets derive from depths between 220 and 470 km and are plausible candidates to have formed at the interface between peridotite and carbonated eclogite. They contain elevated amounts (12-30%) of ferric iron, possibly produced during redox reactions that form diamond from carbonate. Based on our data, we model the velocity and seismic impedance contrasts between a possible pyroxenitic garnet layer and the surrounding peridotitic mantle. For a mineral assemblage that would be stable at a depth of 350 km, the median formation depth of our samples, we found velocities in pyroxenite at ambient conditions to be higher by 1.9(6)% for shear waves and 3.3(5)% for compressional waves compared to peridotite (numbers in parentheses refer to uncertainties in the last given digit), and by 1.3(13)% for shear waves and 2.4(10)% for compressional waves compared to eclogite. As a result of increased density in the pyroxenitic layer, expected seismic impedance contrasts across the interface between the monomineralic majorite layer and the adjacent rocks are about 5-6% at the majorite-eclogite-interface and 10-12% at the majoriteperidotite-boundary. Given a large enough thickness of the garnetite layer, velocity and impedance differences of this magnitude could become seismologically detectable.
DS201412-0947
2014
Koenig, A.E.Verplank, P.L., Kettler, R.M., Blessington, M.J., Lowers, H.A., Koenig, A.E., Farmer, G.L.Rare earth element and niobium enrichments in the Elk Creek carbonatite, USA.30th. International Conference on Ore Potential of alkaline, kimberlite and carbonatite magmatism. Sept. 29-, http://alkaline2014.comUnited States, NebraskaCarbonatite
DS1860-0297
1878
Koenig, G.A.Koenig, G.A.Mineralogical NotesAcademy Natural Sciences Philadelphia Proceedings, PP. 292-293.United States, Arkansas, PennsylvaniaDiamond Occurrence
DS1860-0708
1891
Koenig, G.A.Koenig, G.A.Diamonds Found in MeteoritesPhiladelphia Enquirer., GlobalMeteorite
DS1950-0282
1956
Koenig, J.B.Koenig, J.B.The Elliott County, Kentucky Intrusion. In: the Petrography of Certain Igneous Dikes of Kentucky.Kentucky Geological Survey Bulletin. Ser. 9, No. 21, 57P.United States, Appalachia, KentuckyPetrography, Related Rocks
DS1950-0283
1956
Koenig, J.W.Koenig, J.W.Bibliography of the Geology of MissouriMissouri Bureau of Geology And Mines, 48P.Missouri, United States, Central StatesAlnoite
DS1982-0509
1982
Koenig, J.W.Proctor, P.D., Koenig, J.W.Selected Structural Basins of the Midcontinent, United States (us)U.m.r. Journal, No. 3, University MISSOURI, ROLLA, 120P.GlobalMid-continent
DS1995-0203
1995
Koepenick, K.W.Brantley, S.L., Koepenick, K.W.Measured carbon dioxide emissions from Oldoinyo Lengai and the skewed distribution of passive volcanic fluxesGeology, Vol. 23, No. 10, October pp. 933-936.TanzaniaCarbonatite, Deposit -Oldoinyo Lengai
DS2001-0615
2001
Koerner, T.Koerner, T., Sinden, S., Kramm, U.Mineral chemistry in fenites of Kalk field carbonatite Complex and bearing on composition of fenitising fluid.Journal of South African Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 1, p. A 23 (abs)NamibiaCarbonatite, Kalkfield Complex
DS1910-0292
1912
Koert, W.Koert, W.Ergemisse der Neueren Geologischen Forschung in Den Deutsch afrikanischen Schutzgebieten.Beitr. Geol. Erf. Deuts. Schutzgeb., Vol. 1, PP. 3-5; PP. 83-93; PP. 147-150.Southwest Africa, NamibiaBiography, Littoral Diamond Placers
DS200812-1016
2008
KoesterSchilling, M.E., Carlson, R.W., Viveira Conceicao, R., Dantas, Bertotto, KoesterRe-Os isotope contraints on subcontinental lithosphere mantle evolution of southern South America.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 268, 1-2, April 15, pp. 89-101.South America, RodiniaGeochronology - xenoliths
DS201911-2518
2019
Koester, E.de Almeida Morales, B.A., de Almeida, D.D.P.M., Koester, E., da Rocha, A.M.R., Dorneles, N.T., da Rosa, M.B., Martins, A.A.Mineralogy, whole-rock geochemistry and C, O isotopes from Passo Feio carbonatite, Sul-Riograndense shield, Brazil.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 94, 102208 13p. PdfSouth America, Brazilcarbonatite

Abstract: Carbonatites are peculiar igneous rocks, consisting mainly of greater than 50% carbonate minerals, which arouse an economic interest due to the potentiality of high phosphate content and Light Rare Earth Elements (LREE) associated with their occurrence. The Passo Feio Carbonatite (PFC) is located 17?km Southwest of Caçapava do Sul city and constitutes NW dipping body, which is interposed with Passo Feio Formation metamorphic rocks. The PFC varies texturally from massive to foliated, being mainly composed of calcites and dolomites and on a smaller scale by apatites, phlogopites and tremolites. The opaque minerals correspond to hematites, magnetites, pyrites and barites, while the accessory minerals are represented by zircons, monazites- (Ce) and aeschynites- (Ce). Probably those REE mineral phases correspond to a hydrothermal stage, with the REE remobilization from apatites into those latter REE-rich mineral phases - this hypothesis is corroborated by geochemistry, mineral chemistry and microtextures found. Considering the results of mineral chemistry and taking into account the textural criteria, it was possible to classify carbonatite as an alvikite, with geochemical patterns that do not indicate economic potential for REE. However, soil geochemistry showed an important enrichment in REE, reflecting a probable concentration of monazites- (Ce) and aeschynites- (Ce), and because of this, it was possible to establish a zone in which the Passo Feio Carbonatite would probably be extended. In the stable isotope analyzes, the d13C values varied between -4.14 and -3.89‰ while those of d18O between 10.01 and 11.32‰ which can be attributed to the cooling of the magma itself, without suggesting metamorphic processes or subsequent changes. The deformation found in this carbonatite was probably developed in late-magmatic conditions, guided by tectonics associated with horizontal movements in shear zones. Thus, this work suggests that this carbonatite was the product of the reactivation of mantle sources, within a post-collision magmatic context of the Sul-Riograndense Shield.
DS1995-0981
1995
Koester, S.H.Koester, S.H., Cipar, J.J., et al.The western Wyoming seismic refraction profileEos, Vol. 76, No. 46, Nov. 7. p.F400. Abstract.WyomingGeophysics -seismic
DS200712-0092
2007
Koga, K.Bolfan-Casanova, N., Bali, E., Koga, K.Pressure and temperature dependence of water solubility in forsterite: implications for the activity of water in the Earth's mantle.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A106.MantleWater
DS201112-0408
2011
Koga, K.Hammouda, T., Andrault, D., Koga, K., Katsura, T., Martin, M.Ordering in double carbonates and implications for processes at subduction.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 161, 3, pp. 439-450.MantleSubduction
DS201412-0258
2014
Koga, K.Gaetani, G., O'Leary, J., Koga, K., Hauri, E., Rose-Koga, E., Monteleone, B.Hydration of mantle olivine under variable water and oxygen fugacity conditions.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 167, 2, pp. 1-14.MantleOlivine
DS1998-0774
1998
Koga, K.T.Koga, K.T., Shimizu, N., Grove, T.L.Disequilibrium trace element re-distribution during garnet to spinel faciestransformation.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 443-5.GlobalGeochemistry - trace element, chondrite, Petrology - experimental
DS2003-0734
2003
Koga, K.T.Koga, K.T., Van Orman, J.A., Walter, M.J.Diffusive relaxation of carbon and nitrogen isotope heterogeneity in diamond: a newPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 139, 1-2, Sept. 30, pp. 35-43.GlobalPetrology, experimental, geothermometry, zoning
DS200412-1026
2003
Koga, K.T.Koga, K.T., Van Orman, J.A., Walter, M.J.Diffusive relaxation of carbon and nitrogen isotope heterogeneity in diamond: a new thermochronometer.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 139, 1-2, Sept. 30, pp. 35-43.TechnologyPetrology, experimental, geothermometry, zoning
DS200412-2075
2004
Koga, K.T.Walter, M.J., Kubo, A., Yoshino, T., Brodholt, J., Koga, K.T., Ohishi, Y.Phase relations and equation of state aluminous Mg silicate perovskite and implications for Earth's lower mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 222, 2, pp. 501-516.MantlePerovskite
DS200812-0075
2008
Koga, K.T.Bali, E., Bolfan-Casanova, N., Koga, K.T.Pressure and temperature dependence of H solubility in forsterite: an implication to water activity in the Earth interior.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 268, no. 3-4, April. 30, pp. 354-363.MantleWater
DS200812-0255
2009
Koga, K.T.Dalou, C., Koga, K.T., Hammouuda, T., Poitrasson, F.Trace element partitioning between carbonatitic melts and mantle transition zone minerals: implications for the source of carbonatites.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 73, 1, pp. 239-255.MantleCarbonatite
DS200912-0146
2009
Koga, K.T.Dalou, C., Koga, K.T., Hammouda, T., Poitrasson, F.Trace element partitioning between carbonatitic melts and mantle transition zone minerals: implications for the source of carbonatites.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 73, 1, Jan. pp. 239-255.MantleCarbonatite
DS201212-0140
2012
Koga, K.T.Dalou, C., Koga, K.T., Shimizu, N., Boulon, J., Devidal, J-L.Experimental determination of F and Cl partitioning between lherzolite and basaltic melt.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 163, 4,TechnologyLherzolite petrology
DS201212-0445
2012
Koga, K.T.Martin, A.M., Laporte, D., Koga, K.T., Kawamoto, T., Hammouda, T.Experimental study of the stability of a dolomite + coesite assemblage in contact with peridotite: implications for sediment-mantle interaction and diamond formation during subduction.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 53, 2, pp. 391-417.TechnologyUHP, diamond genesis
DS201212-0446
2012
Koga, K.T.Martin, A.M., Laporte, D., Koga, K.T., Kawamoto, T., Hammouda, T.Experimental stidy of the stability of a dolomite + coesite assembalge in contact with peridotite: implications for sediment-mantle interaction and diamond formation during subduction.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 53, 2, pp. 391-417.MantleSubduction
DS201312-0117
2013
Koga, K.T.Cabral, R.A., Jackson, M.A., Rose-Kaga, E.F., Koga, K.T., Whitehouse, MJ., Antonelli, M.A., Farquhar, J., Day, J.M.D., Hauri, E.H.Anomalous sulphur isotopes in plume lavas reveal deep mantle storage of Archean crust.Nature, Vol. 496, April 25, pp. 490-493.Mantle, Cook IslandsSubduction
DS1988-0362
1988
Kogan, B.S.Kogan, B.S., Ginzburg, L.N., Burenkov, E.K.Investigation of the spatial structures of geochemical fields for prospecting purposesInternational Geology Review, Vol. 30, No. 10, October pp. 1141-1146. Database # 1787RussiaComputer, Program -GEOSCAN Geochemistry
DS2003-1329
2003
Kogan, M.G.Steblov, G.M., Kogan, M.G., King, R.W., Scholz, C.H., Burgmann, R., FrolovImprint of the North American plate in Siberia revealed by GPSGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 18, 1924 DOI.1029/2003GLO17805Russia, Siberia, Northwest Territories, EurasiaGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-1918
2003
Kogan, M.G.Steblov, G.M., Kogan, M.G., King, R.W., Scholz, C.H., Burgmann, R., Frolov, D.I.Imprint of the North American plate in Siberia revealed by GPS.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 18, 1924 DOI.1029/2003 GLO17805Russia, Siberia, Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeophysics - seismics
DS1998-1270
1998
KogarkoRyabchikov, I., Brooks, C.K., Kogarko, Nielsen, SolovovaTertiary picrites from Greenland: modelling sources and petrogenesis from melt inclusion compositions.Mineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 1306-7.GreenlandMagnesian melts, Plume
DS1998-1381
1998
KogarkoSolovova, I.P., Ryabchikov, I.D., Kogarko, KononkovaInclusions in minerals of the Palaborwa carbonatite complex, South AfricaGeochemistry International, Vol. 36, No. 5, pp. 377-388.South AfricaCarbonatite, Deposit - Palabora
DS1986-0107
1986
Kogarko, L.Brey, G.P., Kogarko, L.Solubility of CO2 in kimberlitic and carbonatitic meltsProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, p. 163GlobalBlank
DS1986-0109
1986
Kogarko, L.Brey, G.P., Nickel, K.G., Kogarko, L.Garnet pyroxene equilibration temperatures in the system CaO MgO Al2O3 SiO2(CMAS)prospects for simplified T-independent lherzolite barometry and an eclogitebarometerContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 92, No. 4, pp. 448-455GlobalLherzolite, Eclogite
DS1991-0172
1991
Kogarko, L.Brey, G.P., Doroshev, A., Kogarko, L.The join pyrope knorringite-experimental constraints for a new geothermo barometer for coexisting garnet and spinelProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 26-28GlobalMineralogy
DS1991-0576
1991
Kogarko, L.Girnis, A., Solovova, I., Ryabchikov, I., Kogarko, L.Petrogenesis of Prairie Creek lamproites: constraints from melt inclusion sand high pressure experimentsProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, p. 513ArkansasLamproite, Deposit -Prairie Creek
DS1991-0897
1991
Kogarko, L.Kogarko, L., Keller, J.Alkaline and carbonatitic magmatism of the earth and related ore deposits.International Geological Correlation Programme (IGCP)Proposal Project 314. 1991-1995Episodes, Vol. 14, No. 1, March p. 77GlobalCarbonatite, Magma
DS1991-1634
1991
Kogarko, L.Solovova, I., Girnis, A., Kogarko, L., Ryabchikov, I.A study of Micro inclusions in minerals of Spanish lamproitesProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, p. 564GlobalLamproite, Melt inclusions
DS1995-0982
1995
Kogarko, L.Kogarko, L., Woolley, A.R.Alkaline rocks and carbonatites of the world. Part 2. Former USSRChapman and Hall Book, 225p. approx. $ 200.00Russia, Kola, Ukraine, Karelia, Anabar, VitiM., Cameroon, Chad, CongoAlkaline rocks, Carbonatite
DS200512-0551
2003
Kogarko, L.Kogarko, L.Two stage model of carbonatite origin: evidence from metasomatised mantle xenoliths. Fernando de Naronha.Periodico di Mineralogia, (in english), Vol. LXX11, 1. April, pp. 127-134.South America, BrazilGenesis
DS201212-0238
2012
Kogarko, L.Ghobadi, M., Gerdes, A., Kogarko, L., Brey, G.New dat a on the composition and hafnium isotopes of zircons from carbonatites of the Khibiny Massif.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 446, 1, pp. 1083-1085.RussiaCarbonatite
DS201810-2321
2018
Kogarko, L.Ghobadi, M., Gerdes, A., Kogarko, L., Hoefer, H., Brey, G.In situ LA-ICPMS isotopic and geochronological studies on carbonatites and phoscorites from the Guli Massif, Maymecha-Kotuy, polar Siberia.Geochemistry International, Vol. 56, 8, pp. 766-783.Russia, Siberiacarbonatite

Abstract: In this study we present a fresh isotopic data, as well as U-Pb ages from different REE-minerals in carbonatites and phoscorites of Guli massif using in situ LA-ICPMS technique. The analyses were conducted on apatites and perovskites from calcio-carbonatite and phoscorite units, as well as on pyrochlores and baddeleyites from the carbonatites. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios obtained from apatites and perovskites from the phoscorites are 0.70308-0.70314 and 0.70306-0.70313, respectively; and 0.70310-0.70325 and 0.70314-0.70327, for the pyrochlores and apatites from the carbonatites, respectively. Furthermore, the in situ laser ablation analyses of apatites and perovskites from the phoscorite yield eNd from 3.6 (±1) to 5.1 (±0.5) and from 3.8 (±0.5) to 4.9 (±0.5), respectively; eNd of apatites, perovskites and pyrochlores from carbonatite ranges from 3.2 (±0.7) to 4.9 (±0.9), 3.9 (±0.6) to 4.5 (±0.8) and 3.2 (±0.4) to 4.4 (±0.8), respectively. Laser ablation analyses of baddeleyites yielded an eHf(t)d of +8.5 (± 0.18); prior to this study Hf isotopic characteristic of Guli massif was not known. Our new in situ eNd, 87Sr/86Sr and eHf data on minerals in the Guli carbonatites imply a depleted source with a long time integrated high Lu/Hf, Sm/Nd, Sr/Rb ratios. In situ U-Pb age determination was performed on perovskites from the carbonatites and phoscorites and also on pyrochlores and baddeleyites from carbonatites. The co-existing pyrochlores, perovskites and baddeleyites in carbonatites yielded ages of 252.3 ± 1.9, 252.5 ± 1.5 and 250.8 ± 1.4 Ma, respectively. The perovskites from the phoscorites yielded an age of 253.8 ± 1.9 Ma. The obtained age for Guli carbonatites and phoscorites lies within the range of ages previously reported for the Siberian Flood Basalts and suggest essentially synchronous emplacement with the Permian-Triassic boundary.
DS201905-1050
2019
Kogarko, L.Kogarko, L., Veselovsky, R.V.Geodynamic regimes of carbonatite formation according to the Paleo-reconstruction method.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 484, 1, pp. 25-27.Russiacarbonatite

Abstract: Three models of geodynamic regimes of carbonatite formation are now actively being developed because of the high trace metal potential of this rock type: carbonatite melt generation within the lithosphere mantle; carbonatite relation to orogenic zones; the formation of carbonatite complexes as a result of the ascent of deep mantle plumes. The application for the first time of a modern model of “absolute” paleotectonic reconstructions combined with databases (both our own and published) demonstrates the general relationship of occurrences of the Phanerozoic carbonatite magmatism to Large Low S-wave Velocity Provinces: those are allocated in the lower mantle and are zones of generation of deep mantle plumes.
DS200812-0135
2008
Kogarko, L.A.N.A.Bragmann, G.A.E.A., Ryabchikov, I.A.D.A., Kogarko, L.A.N.A.Os isotope geochemistry of mantle peridotites from Sal Island, Cape Verde Archipelago.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 419, 2, pp. 325-328.EuropeGeochronology
DS200812-0583
2008
Kogarko, L.A.N.A.Kogarko, L.A.N.A.Kimberlite magmatism in the Earth's history: diamond potential and genesis.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 418, 1, pp. 73-75.MantleMagmatism
DS1975-0782
1978
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Problems of Carbonatite Genesis in Relation to the Regime Of Magmatic Gas Phase of Alkaline Magmas.I Symposio International De Carbonatitos, PP. 199-203RussiaPetrology, Genesis
DS1982-0342
1982
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Petrova, YE.N., Krigman, L.D.Strontium Fractionation During Melilite Crystallization in The System Nepheline-diopside-apatite.Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 153, No. 1-6, PP. 210-212.RussiaIsotope, Crystallography
DS1985-0352
1985
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Geochemistry of the Alkaline Rocks of the Eastern Part of The Baltic Shield, Kola Peninsula.Conference Report of The Meeting of The Volcanic Studies Gro, 1P. ABSTRACT.RussiaPetrography, Nepheline Syenites
DS1988-0363
1988
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Karpenko, S.F., Lyalikov, A.V., Teptelev, M.P.Isotopic criteria for the origin of meymechite magmatismDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 301, No. 4, July-Aug. pp. 128-131RussiaGeochronology, Meymechite
DS1988-0364
1988
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Kramm, U., Dudkin, O.B., Minakov, F.V.Age and genesis of carbonatites of the Khibiny alkalic pluton as inferred from rubidium-strontium isotope dataDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 289, No. 1-6, January pp. 196-198RussiaBlank
DS1988-0365
1988
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Ryabchikov, I.D.Geochemical evidence for mantle differentiationGeochemistry International, Vol. pp. 65-76RussiaGeochemistry, Mantle
DS1988-0366
1988
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Turkov, V.A., Ryabchikov, I.D., Kolesov, G.M.Composition of the earth's primary mantle, as inferred from the study ofnodulesDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 290, No. 1-6, March pp. 145-148RussiaMantle, Chemistry
DS1988-0651
1988
Kogarko, L.N.Solovova, I.P., Kogarko, L.N., Ryabchikov, I.D., et al.Spanish high pressureotassium magmas and evidence of their generation depth ( as inferred from thermobarogeochemical data)Dokl. Acad. Sciences USSR Earth Science Section, Vol. 303, No. 6, pp. 101-103GlobalUltrapotassic -lamproite like, Magma
DS1988-0652
1988
Kogarko, L.N.Solovova, I.P., Kogarko, L.N., Ryabchikov, I.D., Naumov, V.B.high pressureotassium magmas of Spain and evidence of their formation depth from thermobaro geochemical data.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 303, No. 1, pp. 182-185GlobalLamproite, Geothermometry
DS1989-1319
1989
Kogarko, L.N.Ryabchikov, I.D., Brey, G., Kogarko, L.N., Bulatov, V.K.Partial melting of carbonated peridotite at 50 KBAR.(Russian)Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), No. 1, pp. 3-9RussiaCarbonatite, Peridotite
DS1989-1320
1989
Kogarko, L.N.Ryabchikov, I.D., Brey, G., Kogarko, L.N., Bulatov, V.K.Partial melting of carbonatized peridotite at 50 kbarGeochemistry International, Vol. 26, No. 8, pp. 1-6RussiaLherzolite, Experimental petrology
DS1989-1430
1989
Kogarko, L.N.Solovova, I.P., Ghirnis, A.V., Kogarko, L.N., Ryabchik.., I.D.Geochemical pecularities of Prior Creek lamproites based on dat a of studyof Micro inclusions inolivines.(Russian) (Prairie CreekArk.?)Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), No. 10, October pp. 1449-1459RussiaLamproite, Geochemistry
DS1990-0852
1990
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Ore forming potential of alkaline magmasLithos, Special Issue, Vol. 25, No. 4, pp. 167-176RussiaAlkaline rocks, Genesis
DS1991-0173
1991
Kogarko, L.N.Brey, G.P., Kogarko, L.N., Ryabchik, I.D.Carbon dioxide in kimberlitic meltsNeues Jarhb. Min, No. 4, pp. 159-168GlobalExperimental petrology, CO2
DS1991-0898
1991
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Plant, D.A., Henderson, C.M.B., Kjarsgaard, B.A.Sodium rich carbonate inclusions in perovskite and calzirtite from the Guli intrusive Ca-carbonatite, Polar SiberiaContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 109, No. 1, pp. 124-129Russia, SiberiaCarbonatite, Carbonate inclusions
DS1992-0881
1992
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Ryabukhin, V.A., Volynets, M.P.Cape Verde Island carbonatite geochemistryGeochemistry International, Vol. 29, No. 12, pp. 62-74GlobalCarbonatite
DS1993-0836
1993
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Geochemical characteristics of oceanic carbonatites from the Cape VerdeIslands.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 96, No. 3, Sept. pp. 119-125.GlobalCarbonatite, Geochemistry
DS1993-0849
1993
Kogarko, L.N.Kramm, U., Kogarko, L.N., Kononova, V.A., Vartiainen, H.The Kola alkaline province of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) and Finland: precise rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) agesLithos, Vol. 30, No. 1, April pp. 33-44Russia, Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), FinlandAlkaline rocks, Geochronology
DS1993-1355
1993
Kogarko, L.N.Ryabchikov, I.D., Kogarko, L.N., Kurat, G.Metallic alloys in upper mantle peridotites from Cape Verde IslandsTerra Abstracts, IAGOD International Symposium on mineralization related to mafic, Vol. 5, No. 3, abstract supplement p. 46.GlobalMantle, Peridotites
DS1994-0931
1994
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Geochemical model of formation of world's largest apatite and rare metal deposits related with alkaline.9th. IAGOD held Beijing, Aug.12-18., pp. 712-715. abstractRussia, Kola PeninsulaAlkaline rocks, Khibina, Lovozero complexes
DS1994-0932
1994
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.The trends of evolution of ultramafic alkaline magmas on the example of Kugda Massif, Maimecha-Kotui Province, Polar Siberia.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstract Volume, Vol. 19, p. PosterRussia, Polar SiberiaAlkaline rocks, Kugda Massif
DS1994-0933
1994
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Rudchenko, N.A., Zakharov, M.V.Geochemistry of alkali magmatism along the Clarion FractureGeochemistry International, Vol. 31, No. 3, pp. 12-36.Russia, Kola PeninsulaGeodynamics, Tectonics
DS1994-0949
1994
Kogarko, L.N.Kramm, U., Kogarko, L.N.neodymium and Strontium isotope signatures of the Khibin a and Lovozero agpaitic Kola alkaline province.Lithos, Vol. 32, No. 3-4, July pp. 225-242.Russia, Kola PeninsulaGeochronology, alkaline rocks
DS1995-0983
1995
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Henderson, M., Pacheco, A.H.Primary Ca-rich carbonatite magma and carbonate silicate sulphide liquidimmiscibility in upper mantle.Geological Society Africa 10th. Conference Oct. Nairobi, p. 113-4. Abstract.GlobalCarbonatite, Deposit -Montana Clara
DS1995-0984
1995
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Kononova, V.A., Orlova, M.P., Woolley, A.R.Alkaline rocks and carbonatites of the world: Part Two former USSR. ...Sakhalin, Primorye, AnadyrChapman and Hall, pp. 1-240.GlobalEast Sayan, Kuznetsk Minusinsk, East Tuva, Baikal, Aldan, Sette Daban, Chukotka, Kamchatka, Omolon
DS1995-0985
1995
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Kononova, V.A., Orlova, M.P., Woolley, A.R.Alkaline rocks and carbonatites of the world: Part Two former USSRChapman and Hall, pp. 1-240.Russia, Kola, Karelia, Kanin-Timan, UkraineCaucasus, Armenia, Azerbaian, Georgia, Urals, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kirgystan, Tadzikistan
DS1995-0986
1995
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Pacheco, H., Henderson, C.M.B.Primary Calcium rich carbonatite magma, carbonate -silicate -sulphide liquid immiscibility in the upper mantle.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 121, No. 3, pp. 267-274.GlobalCarbonatite
DS1995-0987
1995
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Ukhanov, A.V., Nikolskaya, N.E.New dat a on the content of platinum group elements (PGE) in the ijolite carbonatite association Guli and Kigda intrusions.Geochemistry International, Vol. 32, No. 6, pp. 144-152.Russia, SiberiaIjolite, Carbonatite, Maymecha-Kotuy Province
DS1995-1024
1995
Kogarko, L.N.Krigman, L.D., Kogarko, L.N., Vekster, I.V.Melilite melt equilibrium and the role of melilite in the evolution of ultralkaline magmas.Geochemistry International, Vol. 32, No. 8, Aug. 1, pp. 91-101.GlobalMelilites
DS1996-0764
1996
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Geochemical models of supergiant apatite and rare metal deposits related to alkaline magmatism.Geochemistry International, Vol. 33, No. 4, April, pp. 129-RussiaGeochemistry alkaline magma, Apatite, carbonatite, rare earth elements (REE).
DS1996-0765
1996
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Ryabchikov, I.D.Geochemical dat a on conditions of meymechite-magma generation in PolarSiberia.Geochemistry International, Vol. 33, No. 11, pp. 119-129.Russia, SiberiaPicrites, khatangites, Petrology
DS1996-0766
1996
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Titayeva, N.A.Thorium isotope dat a on the In homogeneity of the mantle sources of alkali magmatism in the Cape Verde Island.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 342, No. 4, May pp. l52-154.GlobalAlkaline rocks, Mantle magmatism
DS1997-0611
1997
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Role of CO2 on differentiation of ultramafic alkaline series: liquidimmiscibility in carbonate bearing ...Mineralogical Magazine, No. 407, August pp. 549-56.GlobalAlkaline rocks, Phonolite dykes
DS1997-0612
1997
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Suddaby, P., Watkins, P.Geochemical evolution of carbonatite melts in Polar SiberiaGeochemistry International, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 113-118.RussiaCarbonatite, Guli Massif, Maimecha Kot
DS1998-0775
1998
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Alkaline magmatism in the early history of the EarthPetrology, Vol. 6, No. 3, pp. 230-236MantleAlkaline rocks, Oxidation
DS1998-0776
1998
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Alkaline magmatism in the early history of the EarthPetrology, Vol. 6, No. 3, June, pp. 230-236.MantleMagmatism, Alkaline rocks
DS1998-1491
1998
Kogarko, L.N.Turkov, V.A., Kogarko, L.N., Brooks, C.K., Nielsen, T.F.Comparison of the picrite evolution from East and West Greenland ( melt inclusion data).Mineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 1549-50.GreenlandPicrites, Magmatism
DS1999-0304
1999
Kogarko, L.N.Henderson, C.M.B., Kogarko, L.N., Plant, D.A.Extreme closed system fractionation of volatile rich ultrabasic peralkaline melt inclusions .. djerfisheriteMineralogical Magazine, Vol. 63, No. 3, June, pp. 433-GlobalKugda alkaline complex
DS2000-0509
2000
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Ryabchikov, I.D.Geochemical evidence for meimechite magma generation in the subcontinental lithosphere of Polar Siberia.Journal of Asian Earth Science, Vol. 18, No.2, Apr. pp.195-203.Russia, SiberiaGeochemistry, Meimechite
DS2000-0510
2000
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Williams, C.T., Woolley, A.R.Loparite in the Lovozero Massif, Kola Pen.: evidence for hidden layering in giant peralkaline intrusion.Igc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.Russia, Kola PeninsulaLamprophyre - loparite
DS2001-0616
2001
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Alkaline magmatism in the history of the earthAlkaline Magmatism -problems mantle source, pp. 5-15.MantleAlkaline rocks, Magmatism
DS2001-0617
2001
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Kurat, G., Ntaflos, T.Carbonate metasomatism of the oceanic mantle beneath Fernando de Noronha Island, Brasil.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 140, No. 5, pp. 577-87.BrazilMetasomatism
DS2001-0618
2001
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Ryabchikov, I.D., Brey, Santin, PachecoMantle rocks uplifted to crustal levels: diffusion profiles in minerals spinel plagioclase lherzolitesGeochemistry International, Vol. 39, No. 4, pp. 311-26.GlobalLherzolites, Tallante area
DS2002-0866
2002
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Williams, C.T., Wooley, A.R.Chemical evolution and petrogenetic implications of loparite in layered agpaitic Lovozero Complex.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 74, No. 1, pp. 1-24.Russia, Kola PeninsulaGeochemistry, Deposit - Lovozero
DS2002-0867
2002
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Williams, C.T., Woolley, A.R.Chemical evolution and petrogenetic implications of ioparite in the layered agpaitic complex, Kola Peninsula.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol.74, No.1, pp. 1-24.Russia, Kola PeninsulaLayered complex, Lovozero Complex
DS2002-1377
2002
Kogarko, L.N.Ryabchikov, I.D., Solovova, I.P., Kogarko, L.N., Bray, G.P., Ntaflos, Th.Thermodynamic parameters of generation of meymechites and alkaline picrites in theGeochemistry International, Vol. 40, 11, pp. 1031-41.RussiaPicrites, meymechites
DS2002-1771
2002
Kogarko, L.N.Zaitsev, V.A., Kogarko, L.N.Composition of minerals in the lamprophyllite Group from alkaline massifs worldwideGeochemistry International, Vol.40,4,pp.313-22.GlobalAlkaline rocks, Lamprophyres
DS200412-1027
2004
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.New geochemical criterion of rare metal mineralization in the giant Lovozero pluton ( Kola Peninsula).Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 394, 1, Jan-Feb. pp. 89-91.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS200412-1028
2004
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Slutsky, A.B.Carbonate silicate sulphide liquid immiscibility in the metasomatized upper mantle.Lithos, ABSTRACTS only, Vol. 73, p. S60. abstractMantleCarbonatite
DS200512-0552
2001
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Alkaline magmatism in the history of the Earth.Alkaline Magmatism and the problems of mantle sources, pp. 5-15.Magmatism
DS200512-0553
2002
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.The role of sulphide carbonate silicate and carbonate silicate liquid immiscibility in the genesis of Ca-carbonatites.Deep Seated Magmatism, magmatism sources and the problem of plumes., pp. 69-79.Carbonatite
DS200512-0554
2004
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Kurat, G., Ntaflos, T.Carbonate metasomatism of the oceanic mantle beneath Fernando de Noronha Island, Brazil.Deep seated magmatism, its sources and their relation to plume processes., pp. 29-47.South America, BrazilMetasomatism
DS200612-0073
2006
Kogarko, L.N.Bailey, J.C., Sorensen, H., Andersen, T., Kogarko, L.N., Rose-Hansen, J.On the origin of microrhythmic layering in arfvedsonite lujavrite from the Ilimaussaq alkaline complex, South Greenland.Lithos, in press availableEurope, GreenlandAlkalic
DS200612-0719
2006
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Alkaline magmatism and enriched mantle reservoirs: mechanisms, time and depth of formation.Geochemistry International, Vol. 44, 1, pp. 3-10.MantleMagmatism
DS200612-0720
2005
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.The role of global fluids in the genesis of mantle heterogeneities and alkaline magmatism.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 46, 12, pp. 1213-1224.MantleMagmatism
DS200612-0721
2006
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Enriched mantle reservoirs are the source of alkaline magmatism.Vladykin: VI International Workshop, held Mirny, Deep seated magmatism, its sources and plumes, pp. 46-58.RussiaMagmatism
DS200612-0722
2005
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Williams, C.T., Woolley, A.R.Petrogenetic implications and chemical evolution of loparite in the layered, peralkaline Lovozero complex, Kola Peninsula, Russia.Problems of Sources of deep magmatism and plumes., pp. 92-113.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkalic
DS200612-0978
2006
Kogarko, L.N.Nielsen, T.F.D.,Turkov, V.A., Solovova, I.P., Kogarko, L.N., Ryabchikov, I.D.A Hawaiian beginning for the Iceland plume: modelling of reconnaissance dat a for olivine hosted melt inclusions in Palaeogene picrite lavas East Greenland.Lithos, in press availableEurope, GreenlandPicrite, melting
DS200612-1334
2005
Kogarko, L.N.Solovova, I.P., Girnis, A.V., Kogarko, L.N., Kononkova, N.N., Stoppa, F., Rosaatelli, G.Compositions of magma and carbonate silicate liquid immiscibility in the Vulture alkaline igneous complex, Italy.Lithos, Vol. 85, 1-4, Nov-Dec. pp. 113-128.Europe, ItalyCarbonatite
DS200712-0556
2007
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Kurat, G., Ntaflos, T.Henrymeyerite in the metasomatized upper mantle of eastern Antarctica.The Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 45, 3, pp. 497-501.AntarcticaMetasomatism
DS200712-0557
2007
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Kurat, G., Ntaflos, T.Henrymeyerite in the metasomatized upper mantle of eastern Antarctica.The Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 45, 3, pp. 497-501.AntarcticaMetasomatism
DS200712-0558
2006
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Williams, C.T., Woolley, A.R.Compositional evolution and cryptic variation in pyroxenes of the peralkaline Lovozero intrusion, Kola Peninsula, Russia.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 70, 4, pp. 347-359.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkalic
DS200712-0781
2006
Kogarko, L.N.Nielsen, T.F.D., Turkov, V.A., Solovoa, I.P., Kogarko, L.N., Ryabchikov, I.D.A Hawaiian beginning for the Iceland plume: modeling of reconnaissance olivine hosted melt inclusions in Palaeogene picrite lavas from east Greenland.Lithos, Vol. 92, 1-2, Nov, pp. 83-104.Europe, GreenlandPicrite
DS200812-0624
2008
Kogarko, L.N.Lahaye, Y., Kogarko, L.N., Brey, G.P.Isotopic (Nd, Hf, Sr) composition of super large rare metal deposits from the Kola Peninsula using in-situ LA MC ICPMS9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractRussia, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Khibina, Lovosero
DS200812-0984
2007
Kogarko, L.N.Ryabchikov, I.D., Kogarko, L.N.Thermodynamic analysis of magnetite + titanite + clinopyroxene equilibration temperatures in apatite bearing intrusion of the Khibin a alkaline complex.Vladykin Volume 2007, pp. 5-19.RussiaPetrology - Khibina
DS200812-0985
2008
Kogarko, L.N.Ryabchikov, L.D., Kogarko, L.N., Brugmann, G.Mantle sources of highly reduced melts in peridotites from Sal Island, cape Verde Archipelago.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., 2008 pp. 25-31.Europe, Cape Verde IslandsPeridotite
DS200912-0392
2009
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Diamond potential and origin of kimberlites.alkaline09.narod.ru ENGLISH, May 10, 2p. abstractMantleMetasomatism
DS200912-0656
2009
Kogarko, L.N.Ryabichikov, I.D., Kogarko, L.N., Solovova, I.P.Physicochemical conditions of magma formation at the base of the Siberian plume: insights from the investigation of melt inclusions in the meymechites and alkali picrites of the Maimecha KotuiPetrology, Vol. 17, 3, May pp. 287-199.RussiaPicrite
DS201012-0396
2010
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Mineralogy of carbonatized mantle beneath Antarctica ( Oasis Jetty).International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 555.AntarcticaMetasomatism
DS201012-0397
2009
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Asavin, A.M.Oceanic potassic magmas: an example of the Atlantic Ocean.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., pp.20-34.MantleAlkaline rocks, magmatism
DS201012-0646
2010
Kogarko, L.N.Ryabchikov, I.D., Kogarko, L.N.A new version of the spinel olivine pyroxene oxybarometer and extreme redox differentiation in magmatic systems of mantle sources.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 430, 2, pp. 248-251.MantleMagmatism
DS201012-0647
2010
Kogarko, L.N.Ryabchikov, I.D., Kogarko, L.N.Redox potential of mantle magmatic systems.Petrology, Vol. 18, 3, pp. 239-251.MantleMagmatism - oxygen fugacity
DS201112-0126
2011
Kogarko, L.N.Buikin, A.I., Verchovsky, A.B., Grinenko, V.A., Kogarko, L.N.The first stepwise crushing dat a on C, N and Ar isotopic and elemental ratios in Guli carbonatites.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.596.Russia, YakutiaMaymecha-Kotuy magmatic complex
DS201112-0532
2011
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Zartman, R.E.A Pb isotope investigation of the Guli Massif, Maymecha Kotuy alkaline ultramafic complex, Siberian flood basalt province, Polar Siberia.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., pp. 76-95.Russia, SiberiaMetasomatism, geochronology
DS201112-0894
2010
Kogarko, L.N.Ryabchikova, I.D., Kogarko, L.N.Thermodynamic analysis of mineral assemblages in magnetite bearing nepheline syenites ( Khibiny pluton).Vladykin, N.V., Deep Seated Magmatism: its sources and plumes, pp. 54-74.RussiaThermometry
DS201112-0984
2011
Kogarko, L.N.Solovova, I.P., Girnis, A.V., Kogarko, L.N., Kononkova, N.N.Compositions of magmas and carbonate silicate liquid immiscibility in the Vulture alkaline igneous complex, Italy.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., pp. 150-170.Europe, ItalyCarbonatite
DS201312-0491
2013
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Ryabchikov, I.D.Diamond potential versus oxygen regime of carbonatites.Petrology, Vol. 21, 4, pp. 316-335.Russia, Ukraine, UzbekistanDeposit - Chermogovka, Chagatai
DS201312-0492
2013
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Ryabchikov, I.D., Kuzmin, D.V.High-Ba mica in olivinites of the Guli Massif ( Meimecha-Kotui province Siberia).Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 53, 11, pp. 1209-1215.Russia, SiberiaGuli Massif
DS201312-0493
2013
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Sorokhtina, N.V., Kononkova, N.N., Klimovich, I.V.Uranium and thorium in carbonatitic minerals from the Guli Massif, Polar Siberia.Geochemistry International, Vol. 51, 10, pp. 767-776.RussiaCarbonatite
DS201312-0494
2012
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Williams, C.T., Woolley, A.R.Compositional evolution and cryptic variation in pyroxenes of the peralkaline Loverzero intrusion, Kola Peninsula Russia.Vladykin, N.V. ed. Deep seated magmatism, its sources and plumes, Russian Academy of Sciences, pp. 5-22Russia, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Lovozero
DS201312-0766
2012
Kogarko, L.N.Ryabchikov, I.D., Kogarko, L.N.Oxygen potential and PGE geochemistry of alkaline ultramafic complexes.Vladykin, N.V. ed. Deep seated magmatism, its sources and plumes, Russian Academy of Sciences, pp. 23-39.RussiaGeochemistry - alkaline rocks
DS201412-0078
2014
Kogarko, L.N.Buikin, A.I., Verchovsky, A.B., Sorokhtina, N.V., Kogarko, L.N.Composition and sources of volatiles and noble gases in fluid inclusions in pyroxenites and carbonatites of the Seblyar Massif, Kola Peninsula.Petrology, Vol. 22, 5, p. 507-520.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkalic
DS201412-0465
2014
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Geochemical features of radioactive elements in ultramafic-alkaline rocks ( example - largest in the globe Guli complex).Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., pp. 22-31.RussiaGuli complex
DS201412-0466
2014
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Conditions of accumulation of radioactive metals in the process of differentiation of ultrabasic alkaline-carbonatite rock associations.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 56, 4, pp. 262-271.Russia, Siberia, UkraineCarbonatite
DS201412-0467
2014
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Conditions of accumulation of radioactive metals in the process of differentiation of ultrabasic alkaline-carbonatite rock associations.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 56, 4, pp. 230-238.Russia, Polar Siberia, UkraineCarbonatite
DS201412-1021
2014
Kogarko, L.N.Zartman, R.E., Kogarko, L.N.A Pb isotope investigation of the Lovozero agpaitic nepheline syenite, Kola Peninsul, Russia.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 453, 1, pp. 25-28.Russia, Kola PeninsulaGeochronology
DS201510-1778
2015
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Fractionation of zirconium and hafnium during evolution of a highly alkaline magmatic system, Lovozero massif, Kola Peninsula.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 463, 2, pp. 792-794.Russia, Kola PeninsulaLovozero Masdif
DS201510-1779
2014
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Geochemical features of radioactive elements in ultramafic-alkaline rocks ( example - largest in the globe Guli complex). Deep-seated magmatism, its sources and plumes, Proceedings of XIII International Workshop held 2014., Vol. 2014, pp. 22-31.Russia, SiberiaDeposit - Guli Complex
DS201605-0816
2016
Kogarko, L.N.Buikin, A.I., Verchovsky, A.B., Kogarko, L.N., Grinenko, V.A., Kuznetsova, O.V.The fluid phase evolution during the formation of carbonatite of the Guli Massif: evidence from the isotope ( C, N, Ar) data.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 466, 2, Feb. pp. 135-137.RussiaCarbonatite

Abstract: The first data on variations of the isotope composition and element ratios of carbon, nitrogen, and argon in carbonatites of different generations and ultrabasic rocks of the Guli massif obtained by the method of step crushing are reported. It is shown that early carbonatite differs significantly from the later ones by the concentration of highly volatile components, as well as by the isotope compositions of carbon (CO2), argon, and hydrogen (H2O). The data obtained allow us to conclude that the mantle component predominated in the fluid at the early stages of formation of rocks of the Guli massif, whereas the late stages of carbonatite formation were characterized by an additional fluid source, which introduced atmospheric argon, and most likely a high portion of carbon dioxide with isotopically heavy carbon.
DS201608-1417
2016
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.Zirconium and hafnium fractionation in differeniation of alkali carbonatite magmatic systems.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 58, 3, pp. 173-181.Russia, UkraineGuli Complex, Chernigov Massif

Abstract: Zirconium and hafnium are valuable strategic metals which are in high demand in industry. The Zr and Hf contents are elevated in the final products of magmatic differentiation of alkali carbonatite rocks in the Polar Siberia region (Guli Complex) and Ukraine (Chernigov Massif). Early pyroxene fractionation led to an increase in the Zr/Hf ratio in the evolution of the ultramafic–alkali magmatic system due to a higher distribution coefficient of Hf in pyroxene with respect to Zr. The Rayleigh equation was used to calculate a quantitative model of variation in the Zr/Hf ratio in the development of the Guli magmatic system. Alkali carbonatite rocks originated from rare element-rich mantle reservoirs, in particular, the metasomatized mantle. Carbonated mantle xenoliths are characterized by a high Zr/Hf ratio due to clinopyroxene development during metasomatic replacement of orthopyroxene by carbonate fluid melt.
DS201705-0891
2017
Kogarko, L.N.Zartman, R.E., Kogarko, L.N.Lead isotopic evidence for interaction between plume and lower crust during emplacement of peralkine Lovozero rocks and related rare-metal deposits, East Fennoscandia, Kola Peninsula, Russia.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 172, 32p.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite

Abstract: The Lovozero alkaline massif—an agpaitic nepheline syenite layered intrusion—is located in the central part of the Kola Peninsula, Russia, and belongs to the Kola ultramafic alkaline and carbonatitic province (KACP) of Devonian age. Associated loparite and eudialyte deposits, which contain immense resources of REE, Nb, Ta, and Zr, constitute a world class mineral district. Previous Sr, Nd, and Hf isotope investigations demonstrated that these rocks and mineral deposits were derived from a depleted mantle source. However, because the Sr, Nd, and Hf abundances in the Kola alkaline rocks are significantly elevated, their isotopic compositions were relatively insensitive to contamination by the underlying crustal rocks through which the intruding magmas passed. Pb occurring in relatively lower abundance in the KACP rocks, by contrast, would have been a more sensitive indicator of an acquired crustal component. Here, we investigate the lead isotopic signature of representative types of Lovozero rocks in order to further characterize their sources. The measured Pb isotopic composition was corrected using the determined U and Th concentrations to the age of the crystallization of the intrusion (376?±?28 Ma, based on a 206Pb/204Pb versus 238U/204Pb isochron and 373?±?9 Ma, from a 208Pb/204Pb versus 232Th/204Pb isochron). Unlike the previously investigated Sr, Nd, and Hf isotopes, the lead isotopic composition plot was well outside the FOZO field. The 206Pb/204Pb values fall within the depleted MORB field, with some rocks having lower 207Pb/204Pb but higher 208Pb/204Pb values. Together with other related carbonatites having both lower and higher 206Pb/204Pb values, the combined KACP rocks form an extended linear array defining either a?~2.5-Ga secondary isochron or a mixing line. The projection of this isotopic array toward the very unradiogenic composition of underlying 2.4-2.5-Ga basaltic rocks of the Matachewan superplume and associated Archean granulite facies country rock provides strong evidence that this old lower crust was the contaminant responsible for the deviation of the Lovozero rocks from a presumed original FOZO lead isotopic composition. Evaluating the presence of such a lower crustal component in the Lovozero rock samples suggests a 5-10% contamination by such rocks. Contamination by upper crustal rock is limited to only a negligible amount.
DS201707-1311
2017
Kogarko, L.N.Buikin, A.I., Kogarko, L.N., Hopp, J., Trieloff, M.Light noble gas dat a in Guli massif carbonatites reveal the subcontinental lithospheric mantle as primary fluid source.Geochemistry International, Vol. 55, 5, pp. 457-464.Russiacarbonatite - Guli

Abstract: For better understanding of the fluid phase sources of carbonatites of Guli alkaline-ultrabasic intrusion (Maymecha-Kotuy complex) we have studied isotope composition of He and Ne in the carbonatites of different formation stages. The data definitely point to the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) as a primary source of fluid phase of Guli carbonatites. The absence of plume signature in such a plume-like object (from petrological point of view) could be explained in terms that Guli carbonatites have been formed at the waning stage of plume magmatic activity with an essential input of SCLM components.
DS201906-1304
2019
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Veselovskiy, R.V.Geodynamic origin of carbonatites from the absolute paleotectonic reconstructions. Maymecha-KotuyJournal of Geodynamics, Vol. 125, pp. 13-21.Russia, Siberiacarbonatites

Abstract: Geodynamic origin of carbonatites is debated for several decades. One of hypotheses links their origin to large-volume mantle plumes rising from the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Some evidence exists for temporal and spatial relationships between the occurrences of carbonatites and large igneous provinces (LIPs), and both carbonatites and LIPs can be related to mantle plumes. A good example is the carbonatites of the Maymecha-Kotuy Province in the Polar Siberia, which were formed at the same time as the Siberian superplume event at ca. 250 Ma. In this study we use a recently published absolute plate kinematic modelling to reconstruct the position of 155 Phanerozoic carbonatites at the time of their emplacement. We demonstrate that 69% of carbonatites may be projected onto the central or peripheral parts of the large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the lowermost mantle. This correlation provides a strong evidence for the link between the carbonatite genesis and the locations of deep-mantle plumes. A large group of carbonatites (31%) has no obvious links to LLSVPs and, on the contrary, they plot above the "faster-than-average S-wave" zones in the deep mantle, currently located beneath North and Central America and China. We propose that their origin may be associated with remnants of subducted slabs in the mantle.
DS201910-2274
2019
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N.A new geochemical criterion for rare-metal mineralization of high-alkalic magmas ( Lovozero deposit, Kola peninsula.)Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 487, 2, pp. 922-924.Russia, Kola Peninsuladeposit - Lovozero

Abstract: Detailed studies have shown that a change in the eudialyte occurrence forms (and the moment of its crystallization) is a new geochemical criterion for rare metal ore content in alkalic magmas (eudialyte ores). A new principle of the presence of ores in alkalic magmas has been formulated: a prerequisite for the formation of an ore deposit is early saturation of alkalic magmas with an ore mineral. If the ore component concentration is significantly lower than the cotectic (saturation), then melt saturation and crystallization of an ore mineral will take place at later stages of rock formation in a small volume of the interstitial melt, when the phenomena of convective?gravity differentiation and segregation of mineral phases in the form of ore deposits are hampered. This leads to dispersion of the ore components in the form of xenomorphic grains of accessory minerals. Rocks of the differentiated complex (lower zone of the Lovozero deposit) and rocks of the Khibiny massif contain xenomorphic eudialyte and are not promising for eudialyte ores. Eudialyte deposits are associated with the upper zone of the Lovozero intrusion where euhedral early eudialyte occurs. The initial magma is saturated with eudialyte after crystallization of about 80% of the intrusion. The proposed criterion is applicable to the largest alkalic massifs in the world. The Ilimaussaq massif (Greenland), the rocks of which contain early crystallized, euhedral eudialyte, hosts a superlarge eudialyte ore deposit. Unlike the Khibiny massif and the Pilanesberg alkalic complex, the rocks of which contain late xenomorphic eudialyte, this massif has no deposits of this type.
DS202001-0024
2019
Kogarko, L.N.Kogarko, L.N., Veselovskiy, R.V.Geodynamic origin of carbonatites from the absolute paleoproterozoic reconstructions. Maymecha-KotuyJournal of Geodynamics, Vol. 125, pp. 13-21.Russia, Siberiacarbonatite

Abstract: Geodynamic origin of carbonatites is debated for several decades. One of hypotheses links their origin to large-volume mantle plumes rising from the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Some evidence exists for temporal and spatial relationships between the occurrences of carbonatites and large igneous provinces (LIPs), and both carbonatites and LIPs can be related to mantle plumes. A good example is the carbonatites of the Maymecha-Kotuy Province in the Polar Siberia, which were formed at the same time as the Siberian superplume event at ca. 250 Ma. In this study we use a recently published absolute plate kinematic modelling to reconstruct the position of 155 Phanerozoic carbonatites at the time of their emplacement. We demonstrate that 69% of carbonatites may be projected onto the central or peripheral parts of the large low shear-wave velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the lowermost mantle. This correlation provides a strong evidence for the link between the carbonatite genesis and the locations of deep-mantle plumes. A large group of carbonatites (31%) has no obvious links to LLSVPs and, on the contrary, they plot above the "faster-than-average S-wave" zones in the deep mantle, currently located beneath North and Central America and China. We propose that their origin may be associated with remnants of subducted slabs in the mantle.
DS202001-0041
2019
Kogarko, L.N.Sorokhtina, N.V., Kogarko, L.N., Zaitsev, V.A., Kononkova, N.N., Asavin, A.M.Sulfide mineralization in the carbonatites and phoscorites of the Guli Massif, Polar Siberia, and their noble metal potential.Geochemistry International, Vol. 57, 11, pp. 1125-1146.Russia, Siberiacarbonatite

Abstract: We report the first combined investigation (neutron activation, X-ray fluorescence, and electron microprobe analysis) of mineral forms of Au and Ag and noble metal distribution in the sulfide-bearing phoscorites and carbonatites of the Guli alkaline ultrabasic massif (Polar Siberia) and magnetite and sulfide separates from these rocks. The highest noble metal contents were observed in the sulfide separates from the carbonatites: up to 2.93 Pt, 61.6 Au, and 3.61 ppm Ag. Pyrrhotite, djerfisherite, chalcopyrite, and pyrite are the most abundant sulfides and the main hosts for Au and Ag. The latest assemblage of chalcopyrite, Ag-rich djerfisherite, lenaite, sternbergite, and native silver shows significant Ag concentrations. The wide occurrence of K sulfides and presence of multiphase inclusions in pyrrhotite consisting of rasvumite, K?Na–Ca carbonate, carbocernaite, strontianite, galena, chalcopyrite, sternbergite, lenaite, and native silver suggest that the sulfides were formed at high activities of K, Na, Sr, LREE, F, Cl, and S. Chlorine shows high complex-forming capacity to Ag and could be an agent of noble metal transport in the carbonatites. Crystallization of the early djerfisherite–pyrrhotite assemblages of the phoscorites and carbonatites began at a temperature not lower than 500°C and continued up to the formation of late Ag-bearing sulfides at temperatures not higher than 150°C. The carbonatite-series rocks could be enriched in Au and Ag during late low-temperature stages and serve as a source for Au placers.
DS200912-0393
2009
Kogarko, N.Kogarko,N.,Lahaye, Y., Brey, G.P.Plume related mantle source of super large rare metal deposits from the Lovozero and Khibin a massifs on the Kola Peninsula, east Baltic Shield: Sr, Nd, Hf isotope ssytematics.Mineralogy and Petrology, in press availableEurope, Baltic Shield, Kola PeninsulaAlkalic
DS200712-0559
2007
Kogarko, N.L.Kogarko, N.L., Zartman, R.Isotopic signatures of the Siberian flood basalts and alkaline magmatism of Polar Siberia ( age, genetic link, heterogeneity of mantle sources).Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A503.Russia, SiberiaGeochronology
DS1988-0367
1988
Kogbe, C.A.Kogbe, C.A., Afilaka, J.O.Review of Africa's solid mineral resource potentialJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 589-600AfricaDiamonds pp. 597-598. chart p. 599, Brief description
DS1990-0853
1990
Kogbe, C.A.Kogbe, C.A., Burollet, P.F.A review of continental sediments in AfricaJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 10, No. 1/2 pp. 1-26Africa, Central, WestTectonics, Continental complexes
DS1990-0854
1990
Kogbe, C.A.Kogbe, C.A., Lang, J.Great African continental complexes. Special issue -major African continental Phanerozoic complexes and dynamics of sedimentationJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 10, No. 1/2 pp. 1-400AfricaContinetal complexes, Sediments
DS2003-1360
2003
Kogisko, T.Tatsumi, Y., Kogisko, T.The subduction factory: its role in the evolution of the Earth's crust and mantleIn: Intra-Oceanic subduction systems: tectonic and magmatic processes. eds., Geological Society of London Special P. 219, pp. 55-80.MantleBlank
DS2001-0619
2001
Kogiso, T.Kogiso, T., Hirschmann, M.M.Experimental study of clinopyroxenite partial melting and the origin of ultra calcic melt inclusions.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 142, No. 3, Dec. pp. 347-60.GlobalPetrology
DS2001-0620
2001
Kogiso, T.Kogiso, T., Hirschmann, M.M.Experimental study of clinopyroxenite partial melting and the origin of ultra calcite melt inclusions.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 142, pp. 347-60.GlobalPetrology - melt inclusions
DS2003-0589
2003
Kogiso, T.Hirschmann, M.M., Kogiso, T., Baker, M.B., Stolper, E.M.Alkalic magmas generated by partial melting of garnet pyroxeniteGeology, Vol. 31, 6, June pp. 481-4.GlobalBlank
DS2003-0590
2003
Kogiso, T.Hirschmann, M.M., Kogiso, T., Baker, M.B., Stolper, M.Alkalic magmas generated by partial melting of garnet pyroxeniteGeology, Vol. 31, 6, June pp. 481-5.GlobalMagmatism
DS200412-0835
2003
Kogiso, T.Hirschmann, M.M., Kogiso, T., Baker, M.B., Stolper, E.M.Alkalic magmas generated by partial melting of garnet pyroxenite.Geology, Vol. 31, 6, June pp. 481-4.TechnologyAlkalic
DS200512-0555
2004
Kogiso, T.Kogiso, T., Hirschmann, M.M., Pertermann, M.High pressure partial melting of mafic lithologies in the mantle.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 45, 12, Dec. pp. 2407-2422.MantleUHP
DS200712-0560
2006
Kogiso, T.Kogiso, T., Hirschmann, M.M.Partial melting experiments of bimineralic eclogite and the role of recycled mafic oceanic crust in the genesis of ocean island basalts.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, In press availableMantleEclogite - experimental petrology
DS200812-1039
2008
Kogiso, T.Senda, R., Kogiso, T., Suzuki, K., Suzuki, T., Uesugi, K., Takeuchi, A., Sukari, Y.Detection of sub micro scale highly siderophile element nugget in kimberlite by synchrontron radiation X ray fluoresence analysis.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A847.Europe, GreenlandSpectroscopy
DS200912-0475
2009
Kogiso, T.Maruyama, S., Hasegawa, A., Santosh, M., Kogiso, T., Omori, S., Nakamura, H., Kawai, K., Zhao, D.The dynamics of big mantle wedge, magma factory, and metamorphic-metasomatic factory in subduction zones.Gondwana Research, Vol. 16, 3-4, pp. 414-430.MantleSubduction
DS201610-1880
2016
Kogiso, T.Kondo, N., Yoshino, T., Matsukage, K., Kogiso, T.Major element composition in an early enriched reservoir: constarints from 142 Nd/144 Nd isotope systematics in the earth Earth and high pressure melting experiments of a primitive peridotite,Progress in Earth and Planetary Science, Vol. 3, 25, Aug. 22MantleExperimental petrology

Abstract: The Accessible Silicate Earth (ASE) has a higher 142Nd/144Nd ratio than most chondrites. Thus, if the Earth is assumed to have formed from these chondrites, a complement low-142Nd/144Nd reservoir is needed. Such a low-142Nd/144Nd reservoir is believed to have been derived from a melt in the early Earth and is called the Early Enriched Reservoir (EER). Although the major element composition of the EER is crucial for estimating its chemical and physical properties (e.g., density) and is also essential for understanding the origin and fate of the EER, which are both major factors that determine the present composition of the Earth, it has not yet been robustly established. In order to determine the major element composition of the EER, we estimated the age and pressure-temperature conditions to form the EER that would best explain its Nd isotopic characteristics, based on Sm-Nd partitioning and its dependence on pressure, temperature, and melting phase relations. Our estimate indicates that the EER formed within 33.5 Myr of Solar System formation and at near-solidus temperatures and shallow upper-mantle pressures. We then performed high-pressure melting experiments on primitive peridotite to determine the major element composition of the EER at estimated temperature at 7 GPa and calculated the density of the EER. The result of our experiments indicates that the near-solidus melt is iron-rich komatiite. The estimated density of the near-solidus melt is lower than that of the primitive peridotite, suggesting that the EER melt would have ascended in the mantle to form an early crust. Given that high mantle potential temperatures are assumed to have existed in the Hadean, it follows that the EER melt was generated at high pressure and, therefore, its composition would have been picritic to komatiitic. As the formation age of the EER estimated in our study precedes the last giant, lunar-forming impact, the picritic to komatiitic crust (EER) would most likely have been ejected from the Earth by the last giant impact or preceding impacts. Thus, the EER has been lost, leaving the Earth more depleted than its original composition.
DS201904-0752
2019
Kogiso, T.Kobayashi, M., Sumino, H., Burgess, R., Nakai, S., Iizuka, T., Nagao, J. Kagi, H., Nakamura, M., Takahashi, E., Kogiso, T., Ballentine, C.J.Halogen heterogeneity in the lithosphere and evolution of mantle halogen abundances inferred from intraplate mantle xenoliths. Kilbourne HoleGeochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 20, 2, pp. 952-973.United States, New Mexicoxenoliths

Abstract: Elemental and isotopic compositions of volatile species such as halogens, noble gases, hydrogen, and carbon can be used to trace the evolution of these species in the Earth. Halogens are important tracers of subduction recycling of surface volatiles into the mantle: however, there is only limited understanding of halogens in the mantle. Here we provide new halogen data of mantle xenoliths from intraplate settings. The mantle xenoliths show a wide range of halogen elemental ratios, which are expected to be related to later processes after the xenoliths formed. A similar primary halogen component is present in the xenoliths sampled from different localities. This suggests that the mantle has the uniform halogen composition over a wide scale. The halogen composition in the convecting mantle is expected to have remained constant over more than 2 billion years, despite subduction of iodine-rich halogens. We used mass balance calculations to gain understanding into evolution rate of I/Cl ratio in the mantle. Calculations suggest that, in order to maintain the I/Cl ratio of the mantle over 2 Gyr, the I/Cl ratio of the subducted halogens must be no more than several times higher than the present-day mantle value.
DS200512-0556
2005
Koglin, D.E.Jr.Koglin, D.E.Jr., Ghias, S.R., King, S.D., Jarvis, G.T., Lowman, J.P.Mantle convection with reversing mobile plates: a benchmark study.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 6, doi. 10.1029/2005 GC000924MantleTectonics, convection
DS1995-0988
1995
Kogut, A.Kogut, A., Hagni, R.D., et al.Genetic relationship of the fluorite deposits to the carbonatite intrusionat Okorusu N-C Namibia...Geological Society of America (GSA) Abstracts, Vol. 27, No. 6, abstract p. A 379.NamibiaGeochemistry, Carbonatite
DS1997-0463
1997
Kogut, A.Hagni, R.D., Kogut, A.Variations in ores, host rocks and ore controls for the carbonatite related fluorspar deposits at Okoruso.Geological Society of America (GSA) Abstracts, Vol. 29, No. 4, Apr. p. 18.NamibiaCarbonatite
DS1994-0697
1994
Kogut, A.I.Hagni, R.D., Kogut, A.I., Schneider, G.I.C.Geology of the Okorusu carbonatite related fluorite deposit north centralNamibia.Geological Society of America Abstracts, Vol. 26, No. 5, April p. 18. Abstract.NamibiaCarbonatite
DS1995-0719
1995
Kogut, A.I.Hagni, R.D., Kogut, A.I., Schneider, G.I.C.The fluorite deposits of the Okorusu alkaline igneous and carbonatitecomplex, north central Namibia.Geological Society Africa 10th. Conference Oct. Nairobi, p. 129-30. Abstract.NamibiaAlkaline rocks, carbonatite, Deposit -Okorusu
DS1997-0464
1997
Kogut, A.I.Hagni, R.D., Kogut, A.I., Schneider, G.I.C.Mineralogical flurospar deposits at Okorusu north central NamibiaGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstracts, POSTER.NamibiaCarbonatite, Flurospar
DS201603-0433
2016
Kohl, I.E.Young, E.D., Kohl, I.E., Warren, P.H., Rubie, D.C., Jacobson, S.A., Morbidelli, A.Oxygen isotopic evidence for vigorous mixing during the moon forming giant impact.Science, Vol. 6272, pp. 493-496.MantleMeteorite

Abstract: Earth and the Moon are shown here to have indistinguishable oxygen isotope ratios, with a difference in ?'17O of -1 ± 5 parts per million (2 standard error). On the basis of these data and our new planet formation simulations that include a realistic model for primordial oxygen isotopic reservoirs, our results favor vigorous mixing during the giant impact and therefore a high-energy, high-angular-momentum impact. The results indicate that the late veneer impactors had an average ?'17O within approximately 1 per mil of the terrestrial value, limiting possible sources for this late addition of mass to the Earth-Moon system.
DS202005-0744
2020
Kohl, I.E.Labidi, J., Barry, P.H., Bekaert, D.V., Broadley, M.W., Marty, B., Giunta, T., Warr, O., Sherwood Lollar, B., Fischer, T.P., Avice, G., Caracusi, A., Ballentine, C.J., Halldorsson, S.A., Stefansson, A., Kurz, M.D., Kohl, I.E., Young, E.D.Hydrothermal 15N15N abundances constrain the origins of mantle nitrogen.Nature, Vol. 580, 7803 pp. 367-371. Mantlenitrogen

Abstract: Nitrogen is the main constituent of the Earth’s atmosphere, but its provenance in the Earth’s mantle remains uncertain. The relative contribution of primordial nitrogen inherited during the Earth’s accretion versus that subducted from the Earth’s surface is unclear1,2,3,4,5,6. Here we show that the mantle may have retained remnants of such primordial nitrogen. We use the rare 15N15N isotopologue of N2 as a new tracer of air contamination in volcanic gas effusions. By constraining air contamination in gases from Iceland, Eifel (Germany) and Yellowstone (USA), we derive estimates of mantle d15N (the fractional difference in 15N/14N from air), N2/36Ar and N2/3He. Our results show that negative d15N values observed in gases, previously regarded as indicating a mantle origin for nitrogen7,8,9,10, in fact represent dominantly air-derived N2 that experienced 15N/14N fractionation in hydrothermal systems. Using two-component mixing models to correct for this effect, the 15N15N data allow extrapolations that characterize mantle endmember d15N, N2/36Ar and N2/3He values. We show that the Eifel region has slightly increased d15N and N2/36Ar values relative to estimates for the convective mantle provided by mid-ocean-ridge basalts11, consistent with subducted nitrogen being added to the mantle source. In contrast, we find that whereas the Yellowstone plume has d15N values substantially greater than that of the convective mantle, resembling surface components12,13,14,15, its N2/36Ar and N2/3He ratios are indistinguishable from those of the convective mantle. This observation raises the possibility that the plume hosts a primordial component. We provide a test of the subduction hypothesis with a two-box model, describing the evolution of mantle and surface nitrogen through geological time. We show that the effect of subduction on the deep nitrogen cycle may be less important than has been suggested by previous investigations. We propose instead that high mid-ocean-ridge basalt and plume d15N values may both be dominantly primordial features.
DS1999-0371
1999
Kohl, T.Kohl, T.Transient thermal effects below complex topographiesTectonophysics, Vol. 306, No. 3-4, June 20, pp. 311-24.GlobalGeothermometry, Lithosphere
DS1975-0783
1978
Kohler, A.Kohler, A.New Ashton Diamonds Gem QualityThe Age (melbourne), Oct. 14TH.Australia, Western Australia, Kimberley RegionCra Report, Production
DS2002-1043
2002
Kohler, H.Meiner, B., Detersm P., Strikantappa, C., Kohler, H.Geochronological evolution of the Moyar, Bhavani, Palghat shear zones: implications for east Gondwana..Precambrian Research, Vol. 114, No. 1-2, pp. 149-75.India, southernGeochronology, Gondwana - correlations
DS200412-0884
2003
Kohler, J.Iverson, N.R., Cohen, D., Hooyer, T.S., Fischer, U.H., Jackson, M., Moore, P.L., Lappegard, G., Kohler, J.Effects of basal debris on glacier flow.Science, No. 5629, July 4, pp. 81-83.TechnologyGeomorphology
DS201012-0398
2009
Kohler, J.Kohler, J., Schonenberger, J., Upton, B., Markl, G.Halogen and trace element chemistry in the Gardar Province, South Greenland: subduction related mantle metasomatism and fluid exsolution from alkalic melts.Lithos, Vol. 113, pp. 731-747.Europe, GreenlandMetasomatism
DS1989-0807
1989
Kohler, J.L.Kohler, J.L., Elsworth, D., Alexander, S.S.Mining on the moonEarth and Mineral Sciences (Penn. State), Vol. 58, No. 1, pp. 6-9. Database # 17691MoonOverview, Economics
DS1989-0174
1989
Kohler, T.Brey, G., Kohler, T., Nickel, K.Geothermobarometry in natural four-phase lherzolites:experimentsfrom10-60kb, new thermo barometers and applicationDiamond Workshop, International Geological Congress, July 15-16th. editors, pp. 8-10. AbstractSouth AfricaGeothermometry, Geobarometry Kaapval crat
DS1990-0235
1990
Kohler, T.Brey, G.P., Kohler, T.Geothermobarometry in four phase Lherzolites II. New thermobarometers, and practical assessment of existing thermobarometersJournal of Petrology, Vol. 31, pt. 6, pp. 1353-1378GlobalGeothermobarometry, Lherzolites
DS1990-0236
1990
Kohler, T.Brey, G.P., Kohler, T., Nickel, K.New pyroxene geothermobarometers and testing of existing calibrationsTerra, Abstracts of Experimental mineralogy, petrology and, Vol. 2, December abstracts p. 67GlobalGeothermobarometers, Lherzolites
DS1990-0237
1990
Kohler, T.Brey, G.P., Kohler, T., Nickel, K.G.Geothermobarometry in four phase lherzolites I. experimental results from10 to 60 kbJournal of Petrology, Vol. 31, pt. 6, pp. 1313-1352GlobalGeothermobarometry, Lherzolites
DS1990-0855
1990
Kohler, T.P.Kohler, T.P., Brey, G.P.Calcium exchange between olivine and clinopyroxene calibrated as a geothermobarometer for natural peridotites from 2 to 60 kb with applicationsGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 54, pp. 2375-2388GlobalGeothermobarometry, Experimental peridotite
DS200712-0561
2007
Kohlmann, F.Kohlmann, F., Kohn, B.P., Gleadow, A.J.W., Osadetz, K.G.Low temperature thermochronology of Phanerozoic kimberlites and Archean basement, Slave Province, Canada.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A505.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeothermometry - Ekati, Jericho, Muskox
DS201012-0491
2010
Kohlstadt, D.L.Mei, S., Suzuki, A.M., Kohlstadt, D.L., Dixon, N.A., Durham, W.B.Experimental constraints on the strength of the lithospheric mantle.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 115, B8, B08204.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS1990-0971
1990
Kohlstedt, D.L.Mackwell, S.J., Kohlstedt, D.L.Diffusion of hydrogen in olivine: implications for water in the mantleJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 95, B4, April 10, pp. 5079-5088GlobalMantle, Olivine
DS1991-1391
1991
Kohlstedt, D.L.Quan Bai, Kohlstedt, D.L.The solubility of hydrogen in olivineEos, Spring Meeting Program And Abstracts, Vol. 72, No. 17, April 23, p. 143GlobalMantle, Experimental petrology
DS1991-1426
1991
Kohlstedt, D.L.Riley, G.N., Jr., Kohlstedt, D.L.Kinetics of melt migration in upper mantle type rocksEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 105, pp. 500-521CaliforniaMantle, San Carlos, Melt migration
DS1992-0324
1992
Kohlstedt, D.L.Daines, M.J., Kohlstedt, D.L.Kenetics and dynamics of melt migration in upper mantle rocksV.m. Goldschmidt Conference Program And Abstracts, Held May 8-10th. Reston, p. A 25. abstractMantleMelt, Geochemistry
DS1992-1245
1992
Kohlstedt, D.L.Quan Bai, Kohlstedt, D.L.Substantial hydrogen solubility in olivine and implications for water storage in the mantleNature, Vol. 357, No. 6380, June 25, pp. 672-674GlobalMantle minerals, hydrology, Water in the evolution of the earth
DS1996-0635
1996
Kohlstedt, D.L.Hirth, G., Kohlstedt, D.L.Water in the oceanic upper mantle: implications for rheology, melt extraction and evolution of lithosphereEarth and Plan. Sci. Letters, Vol. 144, No. 1-2, Oct. 1, pp. 93-MantleTectonics, geodynamics, Rheology
DS2002-0868
2002
Kohlstedt, D.L.Kohlstedt, D.L.Partial melting and deformationPlastic Deformation of Minerals and Rocks, Geological Society of America, No. 51, Chapter 5, pp.121-34.MantleGeodynamics
DS2003-0587
2003
Kohlstedt, D.L.Hiraga, T., Anderson, I.M., Kohlstedt, D.L.Chemistry of grain boundaries in mantle rocksAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 88, 7 July, pp. 1015-19.MantleSTEM, EDX, chemical segregation, Geochemistry
DS2003-0588
2003
Kohlstedt, D.L.Hiraga, T., Anderson, I.M., Kohlstedt, D.L.Chemistry of grain boundaries in mantle rocksAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 88, pp. 1015-19.MantleBlank
DS2003-0597
2003
Kohlstedt, D.L.Holtzman, B.K., Kohlstedt, D.L., Zimmerman, M.E., Heidelbach, F., Hiraga, T.Melt segregation and strain partitioning: implications for seismic anisotropy and mantleScience, No. 5637, August 29,p. 1227-29.MantleGeophysics - seismic
DS200412-0833
2003
Kohlstedt, D.L.Hiraga, T., Anderson, I.M., Kohlstedt, D.L.Chemistry of grain boundaries in mantle rocks.American Mineralogist, Vol. 88, 7 July, pp. 1015-19.MantleSTEM, EDX, chemical segregation Geochemistry
DS200412-0845
2003
Kohlstedt, D.L.Holtzman, B.K., Kohlstedt, D.L., Zimmerman, M.E., Heidelbach, F., Hiraga, T., Hustoft, J.Melt segregation and strain partitioning: implications for seismic anisotropy and mantle flow.Science, No. 5637, August 29,p. 1227-29.MantleGeophysics - seismic
DS200412-0957
2004
Kohlstedt, D.L.Karner, G.D., Taylor, B., Driscoll, N.W., Kohlstedt, D.L.Rheology and deformation of the lithosphere at continental margins.Colombia University Press, 384p. approx $ 50.00 mh230 @colombia.eduMantleBook - large scale deformation
DS200412-1029
2002
Kohlstedt, D.L.Kohlstedt, D.L.Partial melting and deformation.Plastic Deformation of Minerals and Rocks, Geological Society of America, Mineralogy and Geochemistry Series, No. 51, Chapter 5, pp.121-34.MantleGeodynamics
DS200612-0502
2006
Kohlstedt, D.L.Groebner, N., Kohlstedt, D.L.Deformation induced metal melt networks in silicates: implications for core mantle interactions in planetary bodies.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 245, 3-4, May 30, pp. 571-580.MantleMelting
DS200712-0238
2007
Kohlstedt, D.L.Demouchy, S., Mackwell, S.J., Kohlstedt, D.L.Influence of hydrogen on Fe Mg interdiffusion in (Mg,Fe)O and implications for Earth's lower mantle.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 154, 3m pp. 279-289.MantleMineralogy
DS200712-0439
2007
Kohlstedt, D.L.Hiraga, T., Hirschmann, M.M., Kohlstedt, D.L.Equilibrium interface segregation in the diopside forsterite system II: applications of interface enrichment to mantle geochemistry.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 71, 5, pp. 1281-1289.MantleGeochemistry
DS200712-0459
2007
Kohlstedt, D.L.Hustoft, J., Scott, T., Kohlstedt, D.L.Effect of metallic melt on the viscosity of peridotite.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 260, 1-2, pp. 355-360.MantleMelting
DS200712-0460
2007
Kohlstedt, D.L.Hustoft, J., Scott, T., Kohlstedt, D.L.Effect of metallic melt on the viscosity of peridotite.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 260, 1-2, pp. 355-360.MantleMelting
DS200912-0394
2009
Kohlstedt, D.L.Kohlstedt, D.L., Holtzman, B.K.Shearing melt out of the Earth: an experimentalist's perpective on the influence of deformation on melt extraction.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 37, pp. 561-593.MantleMelting - review
DS200912-0300
2009
Kohlstedy, D.L.Hiraga, T., Kohlstedy, D.L.Systematic distribution of incompatible elements in mantle peridotite: importance of intra and inter granular melt like components.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 158, 2, pp. 149-167.MantlePeridotite
DS200912-0071
2009
KohnBraun, J., Burbidge, D.R., Gesto, Sandford, Gleadow, Kohn, CumminsConstraints on the current rate of deformation and surface uplift of the Australian continent from a new seismic database and low T thermochronological data.Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 56, 2, pp. 99-110.AustraliaGeophysics - seismic
DS201112-1098
2011
KohnWalter, M.J., Kohn, Arajuo, Bulanova, Smith, Gaillou, Wang, Steele, ShireyDeep mantle cycling of oceanic crust: evidence from diamonds and their mineral inclusions.Science, Vol. 334, 6052, pp. 51-52.MantleDiamond inclusions
DS201712-2702
2017
Kohn, B.Mackintosh, V., Kohn, B., Gleadow, A., Tian, Y.Phanerozoic morphotectonic evolution of the Zimbabwean craton: unexpected outcomes from a multiple low temperature thermochronology study.Tectonics, Vol. 36, 10, in press availableAfrica, Zimbabwecraton, geothermometry

Abstract: The fragmentary Phanerozoic geological record of the anomalously elevated Zimbabwe Craton makes reconstructing its history difficult using conventional field methods. Here we constrain the cryptic Phanerozoic evolution of the Zimbabwe Craton using a spatially extensive apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He (AHe), apatite fission track (AFT), and zircon (U-Th)/He (ZHe) data set. Joint thermal history modeling reveals that the region experienced two cooling episodes inferred to be the denudational response to surface uplift. The first and most significant protracted denudation period was triggered by stress transmission from the adjacent ~750-500 Ma Pan-African orogenesis during the amalgamation of Gondwana. The spatial extent of this rejuvenation signature, encompassing the current broad topographic high, could indicate the possible longevity of an ancient topographic feature. The ZHe data reveal a second, minor denudation phase which began in the Paleogene and removed a kilometer-scale Karoo cover from the craton. Within our data set, the majority of ZHe ages are younger than their corresponding AHe and AFT ages, even at relatively low eU. This unexpectedly recurrent age “inversion” suggests that in certain environments, moderately, as well as extremely, damaged zircons have the potential to act as ultra-low-temperature thermochronometers. Thermal history modeling results reveal that the zircon radiation damage accumulation and annealing model (ZRDAAM) frequently overpredicts the ZHe age. However, the opposite is true for extremely damaged zircons where the ZHe and AHe data are also seemingly incompatible. This suggests that modification of the ZRDAAM may be required for moderate to extreme damage levels.
DS2002-0869
2002
Kohn, B.F.Kohn, B.F., Green, P.F.Low temperature thermochronology: from tectonics to Lands cape evolutionTectonophysics, Vol. 349,No.1-4, pp. 1-4.GlobalGeothermometry
DS1998-1104
1998
Kohn, B.P.Osadetz, K.G., Kohn, B.P., Feinstein, S., Price, R.A.Aspects of foreland belt thermal and geological history fission track data: age Lewis thrust, Flathead fault..Reservoir, Vol. 25, No. 1.p.9 abstract.AlbertaGeochronology
DS2002-0579
2002
Kohn, B.P.Gleadow, A.J., Kohn, B.P., Brown, R.W., O'Sullivan, P.B., Raza, A.Fission track thermotectonic imaging of the Australian continentTectonophysics, Vol. 349, No. 1-4, pp. 5-21.AustraliaGeothermometry
DS2002-0870
2002
Kohn, B.P.Kohn, B.P., Gleadow, A.J.W., Brown, R.W., Gallagher, K., O'Sullivan, P.B.Shaping the Australian crust over the last 300 million years: insights from fission trackAustralian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 49,4,August pp. 697-718.AustraliaTectonics, Geothermometry
DS200512-0656
2004
Kohn, B.P.Lorencak, M., Kohn, B.P., Osadetz, K.G., Gleadow, A.J.W.Combined apatite fission track and U Th/He thermochronology in a slowly cooled terrane: results from a 3440 m deep drill hole in the southern Canadian shield.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 227, 1-2, Oct. 30, pp. 87-104.Canada, OntarioSudbury Igneous Complex shield
DS200512-1171
2005
Kohn, B.P.Weber, U.D., Kohn, B.P., Gleadow, A.J.W., Nelson, D.R.Low temperature Phanerozoic history of the northern Yilgarn Craton, western Australia.Tectonophysics, Vol. 400, 1-4, May 11, pp. 127-151.AustraliaGeothermometry
DS200712-0452
2006
Kohn, B.P.Hu, S., Raza, A., Min, K., Kohn, B.P., Reiners, Ketcham, Wang, GleadowLate Mesozoic and Cenozoic thermotectonic evolution along a transect from the north Chin a craton through the Qinling orogen into the Yangtze craton, central.Tectonics, Vol. 25, 6, TC6009ChinaGeothermometry
DS200712-0561
2007
Kohn, B.P.Kohlmann, F., Kohn, B.P., Gleadow, A.J.W., Osadetz, K.G.Low temperature thermochronology of Phanerozoic kimberlites and Archean basement, Slave Province, Canada.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A505.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeothermometry - Ekati, Jericho, Muskox
DS201801-0017
2017
Kohn, B.P.Giuliani, A., Campeny, M., Kamenetsky, V.S., Afonso, J.C., Maas, R., Melgarejo, J.C., Kohn, B.P., Matchen, E.L., Mangas, J., Goncalves, A.O., Manuel, J.Southwestern Africa on the burner: Pleistocene carbonatite volcanism linked to deep mantle upwelling in Angola.Geology, Vol. 45, 11, pp. 971=974.Africa, Angolacarbonatite - Catanda

Abstract: The origin of intraplate carbonatitic to alkaline volcanism in Africa is controversial. A tectonic control, i.e., decompression melting associated with far-field stress, is suggested by correlation with lithospheric sutures, repeated magmatic cycles in the same areas over several million years, synchronicity across the plate, and lack of clear age progression patterns. Conversely, a dominant role for mantle convection is supported by the coincidence of Cenozoic volcanism with regions of lithospheric uplift, positive free-air gravity anomalies, and slow seismic velocities. To improve constraints on the genesis of African volcanism, here we report the first radiometric and isotopic results for the Catanda complex, which hosts the only extrusive carbonatites in Angola. Apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He and phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar ages of Catanda aillikite lavas indicate eruption at ca. 500-800 ka, more than 100 m.y. after emplacement of abundant kimberlites and carbonatites in this region. The lavas share similar high-µ (HIMU)-like Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotope compositions with other young mantle-derived volcanics from Africa (e.g., Northern Kenya Rift; Cameroon Line). The position of the Catanda complex in the Lucapa corridor, a long-lived extensional structure, suggests a possible tectonic control for the volcanism. The complex is also located on the Bié Dome, a broad region of fast Pleistocene uplift attributed to mantle upwelling. Seismic tomography models indicate convection of deep hot material beneath regions of active volcanism in Africa, including a large area encompassing Angola and northern Namibia. This is strong evidence that intraplate late Cenozoic volcanism, including the Catanda complex, resulted from the interplay between mantle convection and preexisting lithospheric heterogeneities.
DS201012-0079
2010
Kohn, C.C.Bulanova, G.P., Walter, M.J., Smith, C.B.,Kohn, C.C.,Armstrong, L.S., Blundy, J.,Gobbo, L.Mineral inclusions in sublithospheric diamonds from Collier 4 kimberlite pipe, Juina, Brazil: subducted protoliths, carbonated melts and primary kimberlite ..Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 160, 4, pp. 489-50.South America, BrazilMagmatism
DS1950-0029
1950
Kohn, J.A.Kohn, J.A.Observations on the Slijper DiamondGems And Gemology, Vol. 6, No. 11, NOVEMBER PP. 347-348.GlobalDiamonds, Notable
DS1991-1645
1991
Kohn, M.J.Spear, F.S., Peacock, S.M., Kohn, M.J., Florence, F.P., Menard, T.Computer programs for petrologic P-T-t path calculationsAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 76, No. 11, 12 November-December pp. 2009-2012GlobalComputer, Program -petrologic P-T-t
DS2003-0718
2003
Kohn, M.J.King, R.L., Kohn, M.J., Eiler, J.M.Constraints on the petrologic structure of the subduction zone slab mantle interface fromGeological Society of America Bulletin, Vol. 115, 9, pp. 1097-1109.CaliforniaSubduction zone
DS200412-1006
2003
Kohn, M.J.King, R.L., Kohn, M.J., Eiler, J.M.Constraints on the petrologic structure of the subduction zone slab mantle interface from Franciscan Complex exotic ultramafic bGeological Society of America Bulletin, Vol. 115, 9, pp. 1097-1109.United States, CaliforniaSubduction zone
DS201412-0089
2013
Kohn, M.J.Caddick, M.J., Kohn, M.J.Garnet: witness to the evolution of destructive plate boundaries.Elements, Vol. 9, 6, Dec. pp. 427-432.MantleSubduction, metamorphism, geothermometry
DS202006-0928
2020
Kohn, M.J.Korsakov, A.V., Kohn, M.J., Perraki, M.Applications of raman spectroscopy in metamorphic petrology and tectonics. ( mentions diamond)Elements, Vol. 16, pp. 105-110.Mantlespectroscopy, geothermalbarometry

Abstract: Raman spectroscopy is widely applied in metamorphic petrology and offers many opportunities for geological and tectonic research. Minimal sample preparation preserves sample integrity and microtextural information, while use with confocal microscopes allows spatial resolution down to the micrometer level. Raman spectroscopy clearly distinguishes mineral polymorphs, providing crucial constraints on metamorphic conditions, particularly ultrahigh-pressure conditions. Raman spectroscopy can also be used to monitor the structure of carbonaceous material in metamorphic rocks. Changes in structure are temperature-sensitive, so Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material is widely used for thermometry. Raman spectroscopy can also detect and quantify strain in micro-inclusions, offering new barometers that can be applied to understand metamorphic and tectonic processes without any assumptions about chemical equilibrium.
DS201112-0026
2010
Kohn, S.Araujo, D., Ribeiro, D., Bulanonva, G., Smith, C., Walter, M., Kohn, S.Diamond inclusions from the Juina-5 kimberlite, Brazil.5th Brasilian Symposium on Diamond Geology, Nov. 6-12, abstract p. 43.South America, Brazil, Mato GrossoDiamond inclusions
DS201412-0816
2014
Kohn, S.Shiry, S., Hauri, E., Thomson, A., Bulanova, G., Smith, C., Kohn, S., Walter, M.Water content of stishovite, majorite and perovskite inclusions in Juin a superdeep diamonds.Goldschmidt Conference 2014, 1p. AbstractSouth America, BrazilDeposit - Juina
DS201605-0855
2016
Kohn, S.Kohn, S.Developments in FTIR spectroscopy of diamond ( part 1): nitrogen aggregation in zoned diamonds, the timing of diamond growth and the thermal history of the lithosphere.DCO Edmonton Diamond Workshop, June 8-10TechnologyFTIR spectroscopy
DS201705-0841
2017
Kohn, S.Kohn, S., Speich, L., Smith, C., Bulanova, G.Developments in FTIR spectroscopy of diamonds and better constraints on diamond thermal histories.European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2017, Vienna April 23-28, 1p. 16438 AbstractAfrica, Zimbabwe, Australia, South America, BrazilDeposit - Murowa, Argyle, Machado River

Abstract: Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a commonly-used technique for investigating diamonds. It gives the most useful information if spatially-resolved measurements are used [1]. In this contribution we discuss the best way to acquire and present FTIR data from diamonds, using examples from Murowa (Zimbabwe), Argyle (Australia) and Machado River (Brazil). Examples of FTIR core-to-rim line scans, maps with high spatial resolution and maps with high spectral resolution that are fitted to extract the spatial variation of different nitrogen and hydrogen defects are presented. Model mantle residence temperatures are calculated from the concentration of A and B nitrogen-containing defects in the diamonds using known times of annealing in the mantle. A new, two-stage thermal annealing model is presented that better constrains the thermal history of the diamond and that of the mantle lithosphere in which the diamond resided. The effect of heterogeneity within the analysed FTIR volume is quantitatively assessed and errors in model temperatures that can be introduced by studying whole diamonds instead of thin plates are discussed. The kinetics of platelet growth and degradation will be discussed and the potential for two separate, kinetically-controlled defect reactions to be used to constrain a full thermal history of the diamond will be assessed. [1] Kohn, S.C., Speich, L., Smith, C.B. and Bulanova, G.P., 2016. FTIR thermochronometry of natural diamonds: A closer look.
DS201705-0881
2017
Kohn, S.Tabassum, N., Kohn, S., Smith, C., Bulanova, G.The water concentations and OH in corporation mechanism of silicate inclusions in diamonds. What information do they provide?European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2017, Vienna April 23-28, 1p. 16735 AbstractAustralia, Canada, Russia, IndiaDiamond inclusions
DS1991-0899
1991
Kohn, S.C.Kohn, S.C., Dupree, R., Mortuza, M.G., Henderson, C.M.B.An NMR study of structure and ordering in synthetic K2gSi5O12, a leuciteanaloguePhys. Chem. Minerals, Vol. 18, pp. 144-152GlobalMineral chemistry, Leucite
DS1995-0989
1995
Kohn, S.C.Kohn, S.C., Henderson, C.M.B., Dupree, R.Si-Al order in leucite revisited: new information from an analcite derivedanalogue.American Mineralogist, Vol. 80, July-Aug. No. 7-8, pp. 705-714.GlobalMineralogy, Leucite
DS200512-0557
2005
Kohn, S.C.Kohn, S.C., Roome, B.M., Smith, M.E., Howes, A.P.Testing a potential mantle geohygrometer; the effect of dissolved water on the intracrystalline partitioning of Al in orthopyroxene.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, In Press,MantleNAMS, water solubility
DS200612-0491
2006
Kohn, S.C.Grant, K.J., Kohn, S.C., Brooker, R.A.Solubility and partitioning of water in synthetic forsterite and enstatite in the system MgO SiO2 and H2Al2O3.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 151, 6, pp. 651-664.TechnologyPetrology
DS200712-0380
2007
Kohn, S.C.Grant, K.J., Brooker, R.A., Kohn, S.C., Wood, B.J.The effect of oxygen fugacity on hydroxyl concentrations and speciation in olivine: implications for water solubility in the upper mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 261, 1-2, pp. 217-229.MantleWater
DS200912-0395
2009
Kohn, S.C.Kohn, S.C., Bulanova, G.P.Growth of diamonds in subduction zones? Evidence from zoning of nitrogen defects.Goldschmidt Conference 2009, p. A676 Abstract.MantleSubduction
DS200912-0702
2009
Kohn, S.C.Smith, C.B., Bulanova, G.P., Kohn, S.C., Milledge, H.J., Hall, A.E., Griffin, B.J., Pearson, D.G.Nature and genesis of Kalimantan diamonds.Lithos, In press available, 38p.Indonesia, KalimantanAlluvials, diamond morphology
DS201112-0533
2011
Kohn, S.C.Kohn, S.C., Walter, M.J., Araujo, D., Bulanova, G.P., Smith, C.B.Subducted oceanic crust exhumed from the lower mantle.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1213.South America, BrazilJuina diamonds
DS201212-0017
2012
Kohn, S.C.Arajo, D.P., Bulanova, G.P., Walter, M.J., Kohn, S.C., Smith, C.B., Gaspar, J.C., WangJuina-5 kimberlite ( Brazil): a source of unique lower mantle diamonds.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractSouth America, BrazilDeposit - Juina-5
DS201212-0096
2012
Kohn, S.C.Bulanova, G.P., Marks, A., Smith, C.B., Kohn, S.C., Walter, M.J., Gaillou, E., Shiry, S.B., Trautman, R., Griffin, B.J.Diamonds from Sese and Murowa kimberlites ( Zimbabwe) - evidence of extreme peridotitic lithosphere depletion and Ti-REE metasomatism.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractAfrica, ZimbabweDeposit - Sese, Murowa
DS201212-0367
2012
Kohn, S.C.Kohn, S.C., McKay, A.P., Smith, C.B., Bulanova, G.P., Walter, M.J., Marks, A.The thermal history of Archean lithosphere. Constraints from FTIR studies of zoning in diamonds.emc2012 @ uni-frankfurt.de, 1p. AbstractAfrica, ZimbabweDeposit - Murowa
DS201212-0675
2012
Kohn, S.C.Smith, C.B., Bulanova, G.P., Walter, M.U., Kohn, S.C., Mikhail, S., Gobbo, L.Origin of diamonds from the Dachine ultramafic, French Guyana.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractSouth America, French GuianaDeposit - Dachine
DS201212-0728
2012
Kohn, S.C.Thomson, A.R., Walter, M.J., Kohn, S.C., Russell, B.C., Bulanova, G.P., Araujo, D., Smith, C.B.Evidence for the role of carbonate melts in the origin of superdeep diamond inclusions from the Juina-5 kimberlite, Brazil.Goldschmidt Conference 2012, abstract 1p.South America, BrazilDeposit - Juina-5
DS201312-0111
2013
Kohn, S.C.Burnham, A.D., Kohn, S.C., Potoszil, C., Walter, M.J., Bulanova, G.P., Thomson, A.R., Smith, C.B.The redox state of diamond forming fluids: constraints from Fe3/Fe2+ of garnets.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractMantleGeothermometry
DS201312-0495
2013
Kohn, S.C.Kohn, S.C., Wibberley, E., Smith, C.B., Bulanova, G.P., Walter, M.J.Platelet degradation in diamonds. Insights from infrared microscopy and implications for the thermal evolution of cratonic mantle.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractMantleDiamond crystallography
DS201312-0817
2013
Kohn, S.C.Shirey, S.B., Hauri, E.H., Thomason, A.R., Bulanova, G.P., Smith, C.B., Kohn, S.C., Walter, M.J.Water content of inclusions in superdeep diamonds.Goldschmidt 2013, 1p. AbstractSouth America, BrazilDeposit - Collier4
DS201312-0912
2013
Kohn, S.C.Thomson, A.R., Walter, M.J., Kohn, S.C., Bulanova, G.P., Smith, C.B.An experimental investigation of the formation mechanisms of superdeep diamonds.Goldschmidt 2013, 1p. AbstractSouth America, BrazilDeposit - Collier 4, Juina5
DS201412-0930
2014
Kohn, S.C.Thomson, A.R., Kohn, S.C., Bulanova, G.P., Smith, C.B., Araujo, D., Walter, M.J.Origin of sub-lithopheric diamonds from the Juina-5 kimberlite ( Brazil): constraints from carbon isotopes and inclusion compositions.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 168, pp. 1081-1091.South America, BrazilDeposit - Juina-5
DS201502-0113
2014
Kohn, S.C.Thomson, A.R., Kohn, S.C., Bulanova, G.P., Smith, C.B., Araujo, D., EMIF, Walter, M.J.Origin of sub-lithospheric diamonds from the Juina-5 kimberlite ( Brazil): constraints from carbon isotopes and inclusion compositions.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 168, pp. 1081-1110.South America, BrazilDeposit - Juina-5
DS201510-1813
2015
Kohn, S.C.Walter, M.J., Thomson, A.R., Wang, W., Lord, O.T., Ross, J., McMahon, S.C., Baron, M.A., Melekhova, E., Kleppe, A K., Kohn, S.C.The stability of hydrous silicates in Earth's lower mantle: experimental constraints from the systems MgO-SiO2-H2O and MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2).Chemical Geology, Vol. 418, pp. 16-29.MantleExperimental petrology

Abstract: We performed laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments on bulk compositions in the systems MgO-SiO2-H2O (MSH) and MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O (MASH) that constrain the stability of hydrous phases in Earth’s lower mantle. Phase identification by synchrotron powder diffraction reveals a consistent set of stability relations for the high-pressure, dense hydrous silicate phases D and H. In the MSH system phase D is stable to ~ 50 GPa, independent of temperature from ~ 1300 to 1700 K. Phase H becomes stable between 35 and 40 GPa, and the phase H out reaction occurs at ~ 55 GPa at 1600 K with a negative dT/dP slope of ~ -75 K/GPa. Between ~ 30 and 50 GPa dehydration melting occurs at ~ 1800K with a flat dT/dP slope. A cusp along the solidus at ~ 50 GPa corresponds with the intersection of the subsolidus phase H out reaction, and the dT/dP melting slope steepens to ~ 15 K/GPa up to ~ 85 GPa.
DS201512-1900
2015
Kohn, S.C.Burnham, A.D., Thomson, A.R., Bulanova, G.P., Kohn, S.C., Smith, C.B., Walter, M.J.Stable isotope evidence for crustal recycling as recorded by superdeep diamonds.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 432, pp. 374-380.South America, BrazilDeposit - Juina-5, Collier-4, Machado River

Abstract: Sub-lithospheric diamonds from the Juina-5 and Collier-4 kimberlites and the Machado River alluvial deposit in Brazil have carbon isotopic compositions that co-vary with the oxygen isotopic compositions of their inclusions, which implies that they formed by a mixing process. The proposed model for this mixing process, based on interaction of slab-derived carbonate melt with reduced (carbide- or metal-bearing) ambient mantle, explains these isotopic observations. It is also consistent with the observed trace element chemistries of diamond inclusions from these localities and with the experimental phase relations of carbonated subducted crust. The 18O-enriched nature of the inclusions demonstrates that they incorporate material from crustal protoliths that previously interacted with seawater, thus confirming the subduction-related origin of superdeep diamonds. These samples also provide direct evidence of an isotopically anomalous reservoir in the deep (=350 km) mantle.
DS201602-0247
2016
Kohn, S.C.Thomson, A.R., Walter, M.J., Kohn, S.C., Brooker, R.A.Slab melting as a barrier to deep carbon subduction. ( super deep diamonds)Nature, Vol. 529, Jan. 7, pp. 76-94.MantleSubduction

Abstract: Interactions between crustal and mantle reservoirs dominate the surface inventory of volatile elements over geological time, moderating atmospheric composition and maintaining a life-supporting planet. While volcanoes expel volatile components into surface reservoirs, subduction of oceanic crust is responsible for replenishment of mantle reservoirs. Many natural, 'superdeep' diamonds originating in the deep upper mantle and transition zone host mineral inclusions, indicating an affinity to subducted oceanic crust. Here we show that the majority of slab geotherms will intersect a deep depression along the melting curve of carbonated oceanic crust at depths of approximately 300 to 700 kilometres, creating a barrier to direct carbonate recycling into the deep mantle. Low-degree partial melts are alkaline carbonatites that are highly reactive with reduced ambient mantle, producing diamond. Many inclusions in superdeep diamonds are best explained by carbonate melt-peridotite reaction. A deep carbon barrier may dominate the recycling of carbon in the mantle and contribute to chemical and isotopic heterogeneity of the mantle reservoir.
DS201608-1396
2016
Kohn, S.C.Burnham, A.D., Bulanova, G.P., Smith, C.B., Whitehead, S.C., Kohn, S.C., Gobbo, L., Walter, M.J.Diamonds from the Machado River alluvial deposit, Rondona, Brazil, derived from both lithospheric and sublithospheric mantle.Lithos, in press available, 15p.South America, BrazilMorphology, textures, chemistry

Abstract: Diamonds from the Machado River alluvial deposit have been characterised on the basis of external morphology, internal textures, carbon isotopic composition, nitrogen concentration and aggregation state and mineral inclusion chemistry. Variations in morphology and features of abrasion suggest some diamonds have been derived directly from local kimberlites, whereas others have been through extensive sedimentary recycling. On the basis of mineral inclusion compositions, both lithospheric and sublithospheric diamonds are present at the deposit. The lithospheric diamonds have clear layer-by-layer octahedral and/or cuboid internal growth zonation, contain measurable nitrogen and indicate a heterogeneous lithospheric mantle beneath the region. The sublithospheric diamonds show a lack of regular sharp zonation, do not contain detectable nitrogen, are isotopically heavy (d13CPDB predominantly - 0.7 to - 5.5) and contain inclusions of ferropericlase, former bridgmanite, majoritic garnet and former CaSiO3-perovskite. This suggests source lithologies that are Mg- and Ca-rich, probably including carbonates and serpentinites, subducted to lower mantle depths. The studied suite of sublithospheric diamonds has many similarities to the alluvial diamonds from Kankan, Guinea, but has more extreme variations in mineral inclusion chemistry. Of all superdeep diamond suites yet discovered, Machado River represents an end-member in terms of either the compositional range of materials being subducted to Transition Zone and lower mantle or the process by which materials are transferred from the subducted slab to the diamond-forming region.
DS201610-1913
2016
Kohn, S.C.Thomson, A.R., Kohn, S.C., Bulanova, G.P., Smith, C.B., Araujo, D., Walter, M.J.Trace element composition of silicate inclusions in sub-lithospheric diamonds from the Juina-5 kimberlite: evidence for diamond growth from slab melts.Lithos, in press available 17p.South America, BrazilDeposit - Juina-5

Abstract: The trace element compositions of inclusions in sub-lithospheric diamonds from the Juina-5 kimberlite, Brazil, are presented. Literature data for mineral/melt partition coefficients were collated, refitted and employed to interpret inclusion compositions. As part of this process an updated empirical model for predicting the partitioning behaviour of trivalent cations for garnet-melt equilibrium calibrated using data from 73 garnet-melt pairs is presented. High levels of trace element enrichment in inclusions interpreted as former calcium silicate perovskite and majoritic garnet preclude their origin as fragments of an ambient deep mantle assemblage. Inclusions believed to represent former bridgmanite minerals also display a modest degree of enrichment relative to mantle phases. The trace element compositions of ‘NAL’ and ‘CF phase’ minerals are also reported. Negative Eu, Ce, and Y/Ho anomalies alongside depletions of Sr, Hf and Zr in many inclusions are suggestive of formation from a low-degree carbonatitic melt of subducted oceanic crust. Observed enrichments in garnet and ‘calcium perovskite’ inclusions limit depths of melting to less than ~ 600 km, prior to calcium perovskite saturation in subducting assemblages. Less enriched inclusions in sub-lithospheric diamonds from other global localities may represent deeper diamond formation. Modelled source rock compositions that are capable of producing melts in equilibrium with Juina-5 ‘calcium perovskite’ and majorite inclusions are consistent with subducted MORB. Global majorite inclusion compositions suggest a common process is responsible for the formation of many superdeep diamonds, irrespective of geographic locality. Global transition zone inclusion compositions are reproduced by fractional crystallisation from a single parent melt, suggesting that they record the crystallisation sequence and melt evolution during this interaction of slab melts with ambient mantle. All observations are consistent with the previous hypothesis that many superdeep diamonds are created as slab-derived carbonatites interact with peridotitic mantle in the transition zone.
DS201611-2123
2016
Kohn, S.C.Kohn, S.C., Speich, L., Smith, C.B., Bulanova, G.P.FTIR thermochronometry of natural diamonds: a closer look.Lithos, in press available 34p.Africa, Zimbabwe, Australia, South America, BrazilDeposit - Murowa, Argyle, Machado River

Abstract: Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a commonly-used technique for investigating diamonds, that gives the most useful information if spatially-resolved measurements are used. In this paper we discuss the best way to acquire and present FTIR data from diamonds, using examples from Murowa (Zimbabwe), Argyle (Australia) and Machado River (Brazil). Examples of FTIR core-to-rim line scans, maps with high spatial resolution and maps with high spectral resolution that are fitted to extract the spatial variation of different nitrogen and hydrogen defects are presented. Model mantle residence temperatures are calculated from the concentration of A and B nitrogen-containing defects in the diamonds using known times of annealing in the mantle. A new, two-stage thermal annealing model is presented that better constrains the thermal history of the diamond and that of the mantle lithosphere in which the diamond resided. The effect of heterogeneity within the analysed FTIR volume is quantitatively assessed and errors in model temperatures that can be introduced by studying whole diamonds instead of thin plates are discussed. The spatial distribution of VN3H hydrogen defects associated with the 3107 cm- 1 vibration does not follow the same pattern as nitrogen defects, and an enrichment of VN3H hydrogen at the boundary between pre-existing diamond and diamond overgrowths is observed. There are several possible explanations for this observation including a change in chemical composition of diamond forming fluid during growth or kinetically controlled uptake of hydrogen.
DS201611-2142
2016
Kohn, S.C.Smith, C.B., Walter, M.J., Bulanova, G.P., Mikhail, S., Burnham, A.D., Gobbo, L., Kohn, S.C.Diamonds from Dachine, French Guiana: a unique record of Early Proterozoic subduction.Lithos, in press available 66p.South America, French GuianaDeposit - Dachine

Abstract: Diamonds from Dachine, French Guiana, are unique among worldwide diamond populations. The diamonds were transported to the surface in an unusual ultramafic extrusive magma with an affinity to boninite or komatiite, which was emplaced within an arc geological setting at ~ 2.2 Ga. Dachine diamonds have internal and external morphologies indicative of relatively rapid growth from carbon oversaturated fluids or melts, and exhibit internal features consistent with residence in a high-strain environment. On the basis of nitrogen (N) defects the diamonds are categorized as Type Ib-IaA. The unusually low aggregation state of N places severe constraints on the thermal history of the diamonds, effectively ruling out derivation in convecting mantle. The carbon and N isotopic compositions of Dachine diamonds are consistent with a sedimentary source of carbon, with the majority of diamonds having d13C values < - 25‰ and d15N values > + 4‰. The primary carbon was presumably deposited on an early Proterozoic seafloor. Sulphide inclusions have low Ni and Cr and are comparable to lithospheric eclogitic-type sulphide inclusions. Three garnet and one clinopyroxene inclusion are also eclogitic in composition, and one garnet inclusion has a majorite component indicating an origin around 250 km depth. The silicate inclusions are highly depleted in many incompatible trace elements (e.g. LREE, Nb, Hf, Zr), and modelling indicates an eclogitic source lithology that contained a LREE-enriched trace phase such as epidote or allanite, and an HFSE-rich phase such as rutile. Four of the five inclusions are unusually enriched in Mn, as well as Ni and Co, and modelling indicates a protolith with the bulk composition of subducted normal MORB plus about 10% ferromanganese crust component. We suggest a model wherein Dachine diamonds precipitated from remobilized sedimentary carbon at the slab-mantle interface from liquids derived ultimately by deserpentinization of slab peridotite at depths of ~ 200 to 250 km. These fluids may also trigger melting in wedge peridotite, resulting in a volatile-rich ultramafic melt that transports the diamonds rapidly to the surface. The process of diamond formation and exhumation from the slab mantle interface likely occurred in a Paleoproterozoic subduction zone and over a very limited timespan, likely less than a million years.
DS201712-2711
2016
Kohn, S.C.Nestola, F., Burnham, A.D., Peruzzo, L., Tauro, L., Alvaro, M., Walter, M.J., Gunter, M., Anzolini, C., Kohn, S.C.Tetragonal almandine-pyrope phase, TAPP: finally a name for it, the new name jeffbenite.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 80, pp. 1219-1232.Technologypyrope

Abstract: Jeffbenite, ideally Mg3Al2Si3O8, previously known as tetragonal-almandine-pyrope-phase (‘TAPP’), has been characterized as a new mineral from an inclusion in an alluvial diamond from Săo Luiz river, Juina district of Mato Grosso, Brazil. Its density is 3.576 g/cm3 and its microhardness is ~7. Jeffbenite is uniaxial (-) with refractive indexes ??=?1.733(5) and e?=?1.721(5). The crystals are in general transparent emerald green. Its approximate chemical formula is (Mg2.62Fe2+0.27)(Al1.86Cr0.16)(Si2.82Al0.18)O12 with very minor amounts of Mn, Na and Ca. Laser ablation ICP-MS showed that jeffbenite has a very low concentration of trace elements. Jeffbenite is tetragonal with space group I4Ż2d, cell edges being a?=?6.5231(1) and c?=?18.1756(3) Ĺ. The main diffraction lines of the powder diagram are [d (in Ĺ), intensity, hkl]: 2.647, 100, 2 0 4; 1.625, 44, 3 2 5; 2.881, 24, 2 1 1; 2.220, 19, 2 0 6; 1.390, 13, 4 2 4; 3.069, 11, 2 0 2; 2.056, 11, 2 2 4; 1.372, 11, 2 0 12. The structural formula of jeffbenite can be written as (M1)(M2)2(M3)2(T1)(T2)2O12 with M1 dominated by Mg, M2 dominated by Al, M3 dominated again by Mg and both T1 and T2 almost fully occupied by Si. The two tetrahedra do not share any oxygen with each other (i.e. jeffbenite is classified as an orthosilicate). Jeffbenite was approved as a new mineral by the IMA Commission on New Minerals and Mineral Names with the code IMA 2014-097. Its name is after Jeffrey W. Harris and Ben Harte, two world-leading scientists in diamond research. The petrological importance of jeffbenite is related to its very deep origin, which may allow its use as a pressure marker for detecting super-deep diamonds. Previous experimental work carried out on a Ti-rich jeffbenite establishes that it can be formed at 13 GPa and 1700 K as maximum P-T conditions.
DS201803-0478
2017
Kohn, S.C.Speich, L., Kohn, S.C., Wirth, R., Bulanova, G.P., Smith, C.B.The relationship between platelet size and the B' infrared peak of natural diamonds revisited. Type 1aLithos, Vol. 278-281, pp. 419-426.Technologydiamond morphology

Abstract: Platelets in diamond are extended planar defects that are thought to be generated during the nitrogen aggregation process in type Ia diamonds. They were subjected to intensive research during the 1980s and 1990s but the techniques used for observation of defects in diamond have improved since that time and new insights can be gained by further study. This study combines high resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, with an emphasis on the main platelet peak, and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) imaging. By performing TEM and FTIR analyses on volumes of diamond that were closely spatially related it is shown that the average platelet diameter, D, follows the relationship D=ax-b where x is the position of the platelet peak in the infrared spectrum, a is a constant and b is the minimum position of the platelet peak. The best fit to the data is obtained if a value of b=1360cm-1 is used, giving a fitted value of a=221. The observed variation in infrared (IR) peak width can also be explained in terms of this relationship. Additionally, platelet morphology was found to vary according to diameter with large platelets being more elongated. The tendency to become more elongated can be described by the empirical equation AR=11.9D+19.6+0.4 where AR is the aspect ratio. Using the relationships established here, it will be possible to study platelet abundance and size as a function of parameters such as nitrogen concentration, nitrogen aggregation and diamond residence time in the mantle. This work therefore will open up new methods for constraining the geological history of diamonds of different parageneses and from different localities.
DS201809-2050
2018
Kohn, S.C.Kohn, S.C., Speich, L., Bulanova, G.P., Smith, C.B., Gress, M.U., Davies, G.R.Modelling the temperature history of mantle lithosphere using FTIR maps of diamonds.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractAfrica, Zimbabwe. Australia, Canada, Northwest Territories, South Africa, Botswanadeposit - Murowa, Argyle, Diavik, Venetia, Orapa

Abstract: FTIR maps of diamond plates, cut through the centre of growth, contain abundant information about changing defect concentrations from core to rim. These data can, in principle, be interpreted in terms of the variation in conditions of diamond growth and the temperatures experienced by the diamond during the period of mantle residence between growth and exhumation. Many diamonds show multiple growth zones that can be observed by cathodoluminescence. Importantly, the combination of nitrogen concentration and nitrogen aggregation measured by FTIR can be used to determine whether the growth zones are of similar or very different ages (Kohn et al., 2016). In this study, we use automated fitting of several thousand individual spectra within each FTIR map to define a model temperature for each pixel using the Python program, QUIDDIT. We then use a two-stage aggregation model to constrain potential temperature-time histories for each diamond. To take full advantage of the temperature history recorded by zoned diamonds, radiometric ages of inclusions are required. If the growth ages of each zone and the date of exhumation are well-known, then a model temperature can be calculated for each zone. The combination of zone-specific ages and improved quality and processing of FTIR spectra is able to provide unique new insights into the thermal history of diamondbearing lithospheric mantle. For the first time we will be able to use the N defects in diamonds to work out whether a particular location in the lithosphere has heated or cooled over long periods of geological time. The implications for the mechanism of formation of lithosphere will be discussed. We will illustrate the approach using examples of zoned diamonds from Murowa (Zimbabwe), Argyle (Australia), Diavik (Canada), Venetia (South Africa) and Orapa (Botswana).
DS201812-2784
2018
Kohn, S.C.Bulanova, G.P., Smith, C.B., Pearson, D.G., Kohn, S.C., Davy, A.T., McKay, A., Marks, A.Murowa deposit: Diamonds from the Murowa kimberlites: formation within extremely depleted and metasomatized Zimbabwean peridotitic subcontinental mantle.Society of Economic Geology Geoscience and Exploration of the Argyle, Bunder, Diavik, and Murowa Diamond Deposits, Special Publication no. 20, pp. 425-Africa, Zimbabwedeposit - Murowa
DS201904-0781
2018
Kohn, S.C.Speich, L., Kohn, S.C., Bulanova, G.P., Smith, C.B.The behaviour of platelets in natural diamonds and the development of a new mantle thermometer.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 173, pp. 39-GlobalFTIR

Abstract: Platelets are one of the most common defects occurring in natural diamonds but their behaviour has not previously been well understood. Recent technical advances, and a much improved understanding of the correct interpretation of the main infrared (IR) feature associated with platelets (Speich et al. 2017), facilitated a systematic study of platelets in 40 natural diamonds. Three different types of platelet behaviour were identified here. Regular diamonds show linear correlations between both B-centre concentrations and platelet density and also between platelet size and platelet density. Irregular diamonds display reduced platelet density due to platelet breakdown, anomalously large or small platelets and a larger platelet size distribution. These features are indicative of high mantle storage temperatures. Finally, a previously unreported category of subregular diamonds is defined. These diamonds experienced low mantle residence temperatures and show smaller than expected platelets. Combining the systematic variation in platelet density with temperatures of mantle storage, determined by nitrogen aggregation, we can demonstrate that platelet degradation proceeds at a predictable rate. Thus, in platelet-bearing diamonds where N aggregation is complete, an estimate of annealing temperature can now be made for the first time.
DS201912-2825
2020
Kohn, S.C.Shirey, S.B., Smit, K.V., Pearson, D.G., Walter, M.J., Aulbach, S., Brenker, F.E., Bureau, H., Burnham, A.D., Cartigny, P., Chacko, T., Frost, D.J., Hauri, E.H., Jacob, D.E., Jacobsen, S.D., Kohn, S.C., Luth, R.W., Mikhail, S., Navon, O., Nestola, F., NimDiamonds and the mantle geodynamics of carbon: deep mantle carbon and evolution from the diamond record.IN: Deep carbon: past to present, Orcutt, Daniel, Dasgupta eds., pp. 89-128.Mantlegeodynamics

Abstract: The science of studying diamond inclusions for understanding Earth history has developed significantly over the past decades, with new instrumentation and techniques applied to diamond sample archives revealing the stories contained within diamond inclusions. This chapter reviews what diamonds can tell us about the deep carbon cycle over the course of Earth’s history. It reviews how the geochemistry of diamonds and their inclusions inform us about the deep carbon cycle, the origin of the diamonds in Earth’s mantle, and the evolution of diamonds through time.
DS202001-0039
2020
Kohn, S.C.Shirey, S.B., Smit, K.V., Pearson, D.G., Walter, M.J., Aulbach, S., Brenker, F.E., Bureau, H., Burnham, A.D., Cartigny, P., Chacko, T., Frost, D.J., Hauri, E.H., Jacob, D.E., Jacobsen, S.D., Kohn, S.C., Luth, R.W., Mikhail, S., Navon, O., Nestola, F., NimDiamonds and mantle geodynamics of carbon: IN: Deep Carbon: past to present. Editors Orcutt, Danielle, Dasgupta, pp. 89-128.Mantlegeodynamics

Abstract: The science of studying diamond inclusions for understanding Earth history has developed significantly over the past decades, with new instrumentation and techniques applied to diamond sample archives revealing the stories contained within diamond inclusions. This chapter reviews what diamonds can tell us about the deep carbon cycle over the course of Earth’s history. It reviews how the geochemistry of diamonds and their inclusions inform us about the deep carbon cycle, the origin of the diamonds in Earth’s mantle, and the evolution of diamonds through time.
DS202009-1665
2020
Kohn, S.C.Speich, L., Kohn, S.C.QUIDDIT - a software tool for automated processing of diamond IR spectra.Computers & Geosciences, doi: 10.1016/j.cageo. 2020.104558 available 30p. PdfGlobalQUIDDIT

Abstract: Goal: QUIDDIT (QUantification of Infrared-active Defects in Diamond and Inferred Temperatures) is a novel Python application for fast and automated processing of IR spectra of diamond. It was first developed for the work presented in previous studies (Kohn et al., 2016; Speich et al. 2017 and 2018) and has been used in our lab successfully. The goal of this project is to enhance the software and provide easy access to users in research and industry alike. Read the "Project Log" section for more information.
DS202010-1881
2020
Kohn, S.C.Speich, L., Kohn, S.C.QUIDDIT - Quantification of infrared active defects in diamond and inferred temperatures.Computers and Geosciences, Vol. 144, 7p. PdfGlobalFTIR

Abstract: QUIDDIT is a free Python software-package designed to process Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra of diamonds automatically and efficiently. Core capabilities include baseline correction, determination of nitrogen concentration, nitrogen aggregation state and model temperature and fitting of both the 3107 cm-1 and platelet (B’) peaks. These capabilities have allowed the authors to study platelet defects and their relationship to nitrogen aggregation in previous studies. Data visualisation, vital to interpreting and evaluating results, is another key component of the software. QUIDDIT can be applied to single spectra as well as linescan and 2-dimensional map data. Recently, additional features such as manual platelet peak and nitrogen fitting, custom batch peak fitting and two-stage aggregation modelling were made available. QUIDDIT has been used successfully for natural diamonds containing aggregated forms of nitrogen in the past and has since been adapted for the study of diamonds containing C-centres as well.
DS201709-2019
2017
Kohonen, F.J.Kohonen, F.J., Johnson, S.P., Wingate, M.T.D., Kirkland, C.L., Fletcher, I.R., Dunkley, D.J., Roberts, M.P., Sheppard, S., Muhling, J.R., Rasmussen, B.Radiogenic heating and craton margin plate stresses as drivers for intraplate orogeny.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 35, 6, pp. 631-661.Mantlegeothermometry

Abstract: The Proterozoic belts that occur along the margins of the West Australian Craton, as well as those in intraplate settings, generally share similar geological histories that suggest a common plate-margin driver for orogeny. However, the thermal drivers for intraplate orogenesis are more poorly understood. The Mutherbukin Tectonic Event records a protracted period of Mesoproterozoic reworking of the Capricorn Orogen and offers significant insight into both the tectonic drivers and heat sources of long-lived intraplate orogens. Mineral assemblages and tectonic fabrics related to this event occur within a 50 km-wide fault-bound corridor in the central part of the Gascoyne Province in Western Australia. This zone preserves a crustal profile, with greenschist facies rocks in the north grading to upper amphibolite facies rocks in the south. The P–T–t evolution of 13 samples from 10 localities across the Mutherbukin Zone is investigated using phase equilibria modelling integrated with in situ U–Pb monazite and zircon geochronology. Garnet chemistry from selected samples is used to further refine the P–T history and shows that the dominant events recorded in this zone are prolonged D1 transpression between c. 1,320 and 1,270 Ma, followed by D2 transtension from c. 1,210 to 1,170 Ma. Peak metamorphic conditions in the mid-crust reached >650°C and 4.4–7 kbar at c. 1,210–1,200 Ma. Most samples record a single clockwise P–T evolution during this event, although some samples might have experienced multiple perturbations. The heat source for metamorphism was primarily conductive heating of radiogenic mid- and upper crust, derived from earlier crustal differentiation events. This crust was thickened during D1 transpression, although the thermal effects persisted longer than the deformation event. Peak metamorphism was terminated by D2 transtension at c. 1,210 Ma, with subsequent cooling driven by thinning of the radiogenic crust. The coincidence of a sedimentary basin acting as a thermal lid and a highly radiogenic mid-crustal batholith restricted to the Mutherbukin Zone accounts for reworking being confined to a discrete crustal corridor. Our results show that radiogenic regions in the shallow to mid crust can elevate the thermal gradient and localize deformation, causing the crust to be more responsive to far-field stresses. The Mutherbukin Tectonic Event in the Capricorn Orogen was synchronous with numerous Mesoproterozoic events around the West Australian Craton, suggesting that thick cratonic roots play an important role in propagating stresses generated at distant plate boundaries.
DS1910-0066
1910
Kohr, H.F.Kohr, H.F.Those Arkansaw DiamondsTech. World., Vol. 13, MAY PP. 288-292.United States, Gulf Coast, Arkansas, PennsylvaniaBlank
DS1991-0900
1991
Kohrt, P.B.Kohrt, P.B.Alkalic rocks of the Judith Mountains, central MontanaGuidebook of the Central Montana Alkalic Province, ed. Baker, D.W., Berg. R., No. 100, 205p. $ 18.00MontanaJudith Mtns, Alkaline rocks
DS1975-0116
1975
Kohsmann, J.J.Kohsmann, J.J.Qualitative Correlation of Seismic Flux and Free Air Gravity with Crustal Structure of the Midcontinent of the United States.Msc. Thesis, Northern Illinois, Dekalb., GlobalMid-continent
DS1975-0896
1978
Kohsmann, J.J.Wolf, M.G., Mcginnis, L.D., Ervin, C.P., Kohsmann, J.J.Tectonic Implications of the Regional Free Air Gravity Field in the Midcontinent.Eos, Vol. 59, No. 4, P. 228.GlobalMid-continent
DS1987-0324
1987
Koide, Y.Kagami, H., Koide, Y.Evolution of the earth's mantle: as deduced from neodymium isotopes.*JAPChikyu Kagaku, *JAP, Vol.41, No. 1, (208) pp. 1-22JapanKimberlite
DS1987-0325
1987
Koide, Y.Kagami, H., Koide, Y.Evolution of the earth's mantle- considering neodymium isotope.*JPNChikyu Kagaku, *JPN., Vol. 41, No. 1, pp. 1-22JapanBlank
DS2002-0014
2002
Koijitani, H.Akogi, M., Yano, M., Suzuki, T., Koijitani, H.Phase transformation in calcium bearing silicates at high pressures and high temperatures.18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.76.MantleUHP mineralogy - diopside, hedenbergite
DS1992-0882
1992
Koike, J.Koike, J., Parkin, D.M., Mitchell, T.E.Displacement threshold energy for type-IIA diamondApplied Phys. Letters, Vol. 60, No. 12, March 23, pp. 1450-1452. # hk373GlobalNatural diamond morphology
DS1999-0393
1999
KoivistoLangenhorst, F., Shafranovsky, Masaitis, KoivistoDiscovery of impact diamonds in a Fennoscandian crater and evidence #NAME? solid state transformation.Geology, Vol. 27, No. 8, Aug. pp. 747-50.Finland, Baltic StatesDiamond genesis, Lappajarvi Crater
DS200412-1315
2004
Koivula, H.Milne, G.A., Mitrovica, J.X., Scherneck, H.G., Davis, J.L., Johansson, J.M., Koivula, H., Vermeer, M.Continuous GPS measurements of Post glacial adjustment in Fennoscandia: 2. modeling results.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 109, B2, 10.1029/2003 JB002619Europe, FennoscandiaGeophysics -
DS2000-0511
2000
Koivula, J.Koivula, J.The microworld of diamonds. Gemstone photomicrography ... 400 beautiful colour photographs.Gemworld International, 157p. approx. $ 100.00 United StatesGlobalBook - review Gems and Gemology Fall 2000 p. 277.
DS200712-0562
2007
Koivula, J.Koivula, J.Diamond with etched dislocation loops.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 43, 1, p.48.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201112-0946
2011
Koivula, J.Shen, A., Koivula, J., Shigley, J.Identification of extraterrestrial peridot by trace elements.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 47, 3, fall pp. 208-213.TechnologyGemstones
DS1984-0416
1984
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I.Gems Notes: Diamonds in Brasil, India, Philippines, SingaporGems And Gemology, Vol. 32, No. 2, SUMMER P. 121.Brazil, India, Philippines, SingaporeBlank
DS1984-0417
1984
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I.Gem News. the Golconda "d" Diamond Resurfaces. John Sinkankas Provides Information on Diamonds in Thailand. a Diamond Is Melted in Laboratory. Punch Jones Diamond.Gems And Gemology, Vol. 32, WINTER PP. 242-243.India, Thailand, Russia, United States, Great LakesDiamonds Notable
DS1984-0418
1984
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I.Gems News. DiamondsGems And Gemology, Vol. 32, No. 1, SPRING PP. 58-59.West Africa, Guinea, Australia, Namaqualand, South AfricaProspecting
DS1984-0419
1984
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Fryer, C.W.Identifying Gem Quality Synthetic Diamonds: an UpdateGems And Gemology, Vol. 20, No. 3, FALL PP. 146-158.GlobalSynthetic
DS1985-0353
1985
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I.Diamonds in Canada; Spring, 1985Gems And Gemology, SPRING, P. 57.Canada, Ontario, British ColumbiaReview Of Activities
DS1986-0314
1986
Koivula, J.I.Gubelin, E., Koivula, J.I.Photoatlas of inclusions in gemstones #2Gemological Institute of America (GIA), 532p. ISBN 3-85504-095-8GlobalDiamond morphology, Inclusions
DS1986-0315
1986
Koivula, J.I.Gubelin, E.J., Koivula, J.I.Photoatlas of inclusions in gemstones #1Zurich, ABC edition, 532pGlobalIllustrated catalogue, Gemology
DS1986-0451
1986
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I.Gems news:India -Tanna and Chatapur areas. Japan -largestsyntheticdiamond. South Africa - Diamond inclusions in pyrope.Sri Lanka - geological exploration dGems and Gemology, Vol. 22, No. 1, Spring pp. 54-55India, Japan, South Africa, Sri LankaNews items, Diamond morphology
DS1987-0356
1987
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I.De Beers-Botswana- and diamonds. Acquires DebswanaGems and Gemology, Vol. 23, No. 3, Fall p. 172-173BotswanaNews item, Debswana
DS1987-0357
1987
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I.Large diamond auctioned. 64.83 carat pear shaped. PhotographGems and Gemology, Vol. 23, No. 3, Fall p. 173GlobalNews item, Diamond 64
DS1987-0358
1987
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I.Cubic zirconia coated by synthetic diamond?Gems and Gemology, Vol. 23, No. 2, Summer p. 52GlobalNews item, Diamond synthesis -cubic
DS1987-0359
1987
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I.Filled diamonds.... filled to disguise cleavages and fracturesGems and Gemology, Vol. 23, No. 3, Fall p. 172GlobalNews item, Diamonds filled
DS1987-0360
1987
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I.Filled diamondsGems and Gemology, Vol. 23, Fall, p. 172GlobalBlank
DS1987-0361
1987
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I.Large diamond auctionedGems and Gemology, Vol. 23, Fall, p. 173GlobalBlank
DS1988-0368
1988
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Gem news: diamonds-China, activity in India, Filled -update, diamond examined with unusual inclusion,synthetic diamondsGems and Gemology, Vol. 24, No. 4, Winter p. 248-9China, IndiaNews item, Exploration activity
DS1989-0446
1989
Koivula, J.I.Fritsch, E., Connor, L., Koivula, J.I.A preliminary gemological study of synthetic diamond thin filmsGems and Gemology, Vol. 25, No. 2, Summer pp. 84-90GlobalDiamond Synthesis
DS1989-0808
1989
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Companies vie for Angola diamond rightsGems and Gemology, Vol. 25, No. 2, Summer p. 110AngolaNews item
DS1989-0809
1989
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Australian diamonds, 1989Gems and Gemology, Vol. 25, Summer p. 110AustraliaNews item, Capricorn Resources, alluv
DS1989-0810
1989
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Diamond exploration in Pilbara, AustraliaGems and Gemology - Gem News, Vol. 25, No. 4, Winter p. 244AustraliaNews item, Perilya/Noranda
DS1989-0811
1989
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Increased diamond output in BotswanaGems and Gemology - Gem News, Vol. 25, No. 4, Winter p. 244BotswanaNews item, Diamond production
DS1989-0812
1989
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Diamonds from ChinaGems and Gemology, Vol. 25, Summer p. 110ChinaNews item, Ashton
DS1989-0813
1989
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Ghana may privatize MinesGems and Gemology - Gem News, Vol. 25, No. 4, Winter p. 244GhanaNews item, Birim area production
DS1989-0814
1989
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Diamonds - filled diamond updateGems and Gemology - Gem News, Vol. 25, No. 4, Winter p. 244GlobalDiamond morphology, Diamond -filled
DS1989-0815
1989
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.A photolexicon of inclusion-related terms for today's Gemologist, PartCanadian Gemologist, Vol. X, No. 3, Autumn pp. 66-72GlobalInclusion, Terminology
DS1989-0816
1989
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Diamond cutting expands in MauritiusGems and Gemology - Gem News, Vol. 25, No. 4, Winter p. 244GlobalNews item, Diamond cutting
DS1989-0817
1989
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Deep space diamondsGems and Gemology, Vol. 25, Summer p. 110GlobalNews item, Meteorite
DS1989-0818
1989
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Diamond exploration in the west coast of South AfricaGems and Gemology - Gem News, Vol. 25, No. 4, Winter p. 244South AfricaNews item, Benguela Concessions
DS1989-0819
1989
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C., Fritsch, E., Fryer, C.W., HargettThe characteristics and identification of filled diamondsGems and Gemology, Vol. 25, No. 2, Summer pp. 68-83GlobalDiamond morphology, Filled diamonds
DS1990-0798
1990
Koivula, J.I.Kammerling, R.C., Kane, R.E., Koivula, J.I., McClure, S.F.An investigation of a suite of black diamond jewelryGems and Gemology, Vol. 26, Winter pp. 282-287GlobalDiamond morphology, Black diamond
DS1990-0799
1990
Koivula, J.I.Kammerling, R.C., Koivula, J.I., Kane, R.E.Gemstone enhancement and its detection in the 1980's.Diamond featured p.40-41, p. 45Gems and Gemology, Vol. 26, Spring pp. 32-49GlobalGemstones, Enhancements-diamond
DS1990-0856
1990
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Gem news: -Australians develop new technology for diamond explorationGems and Gemology, Vol. 26, Spring p. 106AustraliaNews item, Carr Boyd scanner
DS1990-0857
1990
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Chin a -cut diamonds sold in SingaporeGems and Gemology, Gem news, Vol. 26, Winter pp. 300ChinaNews item, Diamond cutting -China
DS1990-0858
1990
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Gem news: -Ghana considers private miningGems and Gemology, Vol. 26, Spring p. 105GhanaNews item, Ghana production
DS1990-0859
1990
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Gem news : -Filled diamonds updateGems and Gemology, Vol. 26, Spring p. 103GlobalNews item, Diamond enhancement -fill
DS1990-0860
1990
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Gem news: -Israeli-Japanese joint diamond polishing ventureGems and Gemology, Vol. 26, Spring p. 105GlobalNews item, Diamond polishing
DS1990-0861
1990
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Gem news: -Computer technology enhances new diamond sorterGems and Gemology, Vol. 26, Spring p. 105GlobalNews item, Diamond sorter
DS1990-0862
1990
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.De Beers announces world's largest synthetic diamond. 14.2 caratGems and Gemology, Gem news, Vol. 26, Winter pp. 300GlobalNews item, Synthetic diamond 14.2
DS1990-0863
1990
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.A photolexicon of inclusion related terms for today's Gemologist, part SOURCE[ Canadian GemologistCanadian Gemologist, Vol. X1, No. 2, Summer pp. 34-38GlobalPhotolexicon, Inclusions
DS1990-0864
1990
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.A photolexicon of inclusion related terms for today's Gemologist. PartThe Canadian Gemologist, Vol. XI, No. 1, Spring, pp. 2-7GlobalTerminology, Diamond Inclusions -gemmo
DS1990-0865
1990
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Guyana mining development. Ivan hoe Capital Corp. Kurupung-Enachu regionGems and Gemology, Gem news, Vol. 26, Winter pp. 300GuyanaNews item, Ivanhoe
DS1990-0866
1990
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Gem news: -kimberlites discovered in CanadaGems and Gemology, Vol. 26, Spring p. 105SaskatchewanNews item, Cameco/Uranerz
DS1990-0875
1990
Koivula, J.I.Kopf, R.W., Hurlburt, C.S., Koivula, J.I.Recent discoveries of large diamonds in Trinity County, CaliforniaGems and Gemology, Vol. 26, No. 3, Fall, pp. 212-219CaliforniaDiamonds, Trinity County
DS1991-0901
1991
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Australian marine search for stonesGems and Gemology, GEM NEWS section, Vol. 27, Summer pp. 117AustraliaNews item, Cambridge Gulf Exploration
DS1991-0902
1991
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Update on diamond mining in BrasilGems and Gemology, GEM NEWS section, Vol. 27, Summer pp. 117BrazilNews item, Alluvial -very brief
DS1991-0903
1991
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Large 'chameleon' diamondGems and Gemology, GEM NEWS section, Vol. 27, Summer pp. 116GlobalGem notes, Diamond -colour
DS1991-0904
1991
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.De Beers unveils Centenary diamondGems and Gemology, GEM NEWS section, Vol. 27, Summer pp. 116GlobalGem notes, Diamonds notable -Centenary
DS1991-0905
1991
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Diamonds -colored diamonds at Tucson mineral showGems and Gemology, Gem News, Vol. XXVII, Spring p. 46GlobalNews item, Coloured diamonds
DS1991-0906
1991
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.World record auction price set for diamondGems and Gemology, GEM NEWS section, Vol. 27, Summer pp. 117GlobalNews item, Diamond 101.84 ct
DS1991-0907
1991
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Jewelery quality diamond crystalsGems and Gemology, GEM NEWS section, Vol. 27, Summer pp. 117GlobalNews item, Diamond crystallography
DS1991-0908
1991
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Gem-quality synthetic diamonds from the USSRGems and Gemology, Gem News, Vol. XXVII, Spring p. 46RussiaNews item, Synthetic diamonds
DS1991-0909
1991
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Kammerling, R.C.Soviet production estimates updatedGems and Gemology, GEM NEWS section, Vol. 27, Summer pp. 116RussiaNews item, USSR production
DS1992-0821
1992
Koivula, J.I.Kammerling, R.C., Koivula, J.I., Kane, R.E., Fritsch, E.An examination of nontransparent CZ from RussiaGems and Gemology, Vol. 27, No. 4, pp. 240-246RussiaRelated information, CZ
DS1993-0837
1993
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I.chromium diopside in diamondLapidary Journal, Vol. 47, No. 8, November p. 16.GlobalDiamond inclusions
DS1994-1589
1994
Koivula, J.I.Shigley, J.E., Fritsch, E., Koivula, J.I., Sobolev, N.V.The gemological properties of Russian gem quality synthetic yellowdiamonds.Gems and Gemology, Vol. 29, Winter, pp. 228-248.RussiaSynthetic diamonds, Colour -yellow
DS2000-0891
2000
Koivula, J.I.Shigley, J.F., McClure, S.F., Koivula, J.I., Moses, T.New filling material for diamonds from OVED Diamond Company: a preliminarystudy.Gems and Gemology, Vol. 36, No. 2, Summer, pp. 147-53.GlobalDiamond - treatment
DS201412-0468
2014
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Skahwold, E.A.The microworld of diamonds: images from Earth's mantle.Rocks and Minerals, Jan-Feb. pp. 46-53.MantleDiamond morphology
DS201705-0842
2017
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I., Skalwold, E.A.Diamond: Intimate Portraits.lithographie.org, No. 19, pp. 54-61.TechnologyBook - diamond inclusions
DS201806-1232
2018
Koivula, J.I.Koivula, J.I.Cr-diopside in diamond. ( from Kimberley)Gems & Gemology, Vol. 54, 1, p. 73.Technologydiamond inclusions
DS201903-0540
2018
Koivula, J.I.Renfro, N.D., Koivula, J.I., Muyal, J., McClure, S.F., Schumacher, K., Shigley, J.E.Inclusions in natural, synthetic, and treated diamonds. Gems & Gemology, Vol. 54, 4, pp. 428-429.Globaldiamond inclusions
DS1986-0733
1986
Koivula, J.J.Shigley, J.E., Fritsch, E., Stockton, C.M., Koivula, J.J., FryerThe gemological properties of the Sumitomo gem quality synthetic yellowdiamondsGems and Gemology, Vol. 22, winter pp. 192-208GlobalSynthetic diamond
DS2000-0643
2000
Koivula, J.J.McClure, S.F., King, J.M., Koivula, J.J., Moses, T.M.A new lasering technique for diamondGems and Gemology, Vol. 36, No. 2, Summer, pp. 138-46.GlobalDiamond - treatment, laser enhancement
DS1980-0204
1980
Koizumi, M.Kuge, S., Koizumi, M., Miyamoto, Y., Takubo, H., Kume, S.Synthesis of Prismatic and Tabular Diamond CrystalsMineralogical Magazine., Vol. 43, PP. 579-581.GlobalResearch, Diamond Morphology, Synthetic
DS1983-0359
1983
Kojan, C.I.Kojan, C.I., Otter exploration nl.El 2074 - Final Report 1979-1983Northern Territory Geological Survey Open File Report, No. CR 83/146, 22P.Australia, Northern TerritoryProspecting, Sampling, Geochemistry, Photogeology, Arunta, Pinna
DS200912-0771
2009
Kojitani, H.Toyama, C., Muramatsu, Y., Kojitani, H., Yamamoto, J., Nakai, S., Kaneoka, I.Geochemical studies of kimberlites and their constituent minerals from Chin a and South Africa.Goldschmidt Conference 2009, p. A1343 Abstract.ChinaDeposit - Shandong, Liaoning
DS201212-0333
2012
Kojitani, H.Ishii, T., Kojitani, H., Akaogi, M.High pressure phase transitions and subduction behaviour of continent crust at pressure temperature conditions up to the upper part of the lower mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 357-358, pp. 31-41.MantleSubduction
DS201802-0218
2018
Kojitani, H.Akaogi, M., Kawahara, A., Kojitani, H., Yoshida, K., Anegawa, Y., Ishii, T.High pressure phase transitions in MgCr2O4 MgSiO4 composition: reactions between olivine and chromite with implications for ultrahigh pressure chromitites.American Mineralogist, Vol. 103, pp. 161-170.Mantlechromites
DS201610-1840
2016
Kok, Y.Aravanis, T., Chen, J., Fuechsle, M., Grujic, M., Johnston, P., Kok, Y., Magaraggia, R., Mann, A., Mann, L., McIntoshm S., Rheinberger, G., Saxey, D., Smalley, M., van Kann, F., Walker, G., Winterflood, J.VK1 tm - a next generation airborne gravity gradiometer.ASEG-PESA-AIG 2016 25th Geophysical Conference, Abstract 5p.TechnologyGradiometer

Abstract: The minerals exploration industry’s demand for a highly precise airborne gravity gradiometer has driven development of the VK1TM Airborne Gravity Gradiometer, a collaborative effort by Rio Tinto and the University of Western Australia. VK1TM aims to provide gravity gradient data with lower uncertainty and higher spatial resolution than current commercial systems. In the recent years of VK1TM development, there have been significant improvements in hardware, signal processing and data processing which have combined to result in a complete AGG system that is approaching competitive survey-ready status. This paper focuses on recent improvements. Milestone-achieving data from recent lab-based and moving-platform trials will be presented and discussed, along with details of some advanced data processing techniques that are required to make the most use of the data.
DS201805-0955
2018
Kokandakar, G.J.Kokandakar, G.J., Ghodke, S.S., Rathna, K., Laxman, B. M., Nagaraju, B., Bhosle, M.V., Kumar, K.V.Density, viscosity and velocity ( ascent rate) of alkaline magmas.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 91, pp. 135-146.IndiaAlkaline - Prakasam

Abstract: Three distinct alkaline magmas, represented by shonkinite, lamprophyre and alkali basalt dykes, characterize a significant magmatic expression of rift-related mantle-derived igneous activity in the Mesoproterozoic Prakasam Alkaline Province, SE India. In the present study we have estimated emplacement velocities (ascent rates) for these three varied alkaline magmas and compared with other silicate magmas to explore composition control on the ascent rates. The alkaline dykes have variable widths and lengths with none of the dykes wider than 1 m. The shonkinites are fine- to medium-grained rocks with clinopyroxene, phologopite, amphibole, K-feldspar perthite and nepheline as essential minerals. They exhibit equigranular hypidiomorphic to foliated textures. Lamprophyres and alkali basalts characteristically show porphyritic textures. Olivine, clinopyroxene, amphibole and biotite are distinct phenocrysts in lamprophyres whereas olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase form the phenocrystic mineralogy in the alkali basalts. The calculated densities [2.54-2.71 g/cc for shonkinite; 2.61-2.78 g/cc for lamprophyre; 2.66-2.74 g/cc for alkali basalt] and viscosities [3.11-3.39 Pa s for shonkinite; 3.01-3.28 Pa s for lamprophyre; 2.72-3.09 Pa s for alkali basalt] are utilized to compute velocities (ascent rates) of the three alkaline magmas. Since the lamprophyres and alkali basalts are crystal-laden, we have also calculated effective viscosities to infer crystal control on the velocities. Twenty percent of crystals in the magma increase the viscosity by 2.7 times consequently decrease ascent rate by 2.7 times compared to the crystal-free magmas. The computed ascent rates range from 0.11-2.13 m/sec, 0.23-2.77 m/sec and 1.16-2.89 m/sec for shonkinite, lamprophyre and alkali basalt magmas respectively. Ascent rates increase with the width of the dykes and density difference, and decrease with magma viscosity and proportion of crystals. If a constant width of 1 m is assumed in the magma-filled dyke propagation model, then the sequence of emplacement velocities in the decreasing order is alkaline magmas (4.68-15.31 m/sec) > ultramafic-mafic magmas (3.81-4.30 m/sec) > intermediate-felsic magmas (1.76-2.56 m/sec). We propose that SiO2 content in the terrestrial magmas can be modeled as a semi-quantitative "geospeedometer" of the magma ascent rates.
DS201805-0965
2018
Kokandakar, G.J.Nagaraju, B., Ghodke, S.S., Rathna, K., Kokandakar, G.J., Bhosle, M.V., Kumar, K.V.Fractal analysis of in situ host rock nepheline sysenite xenoliths in a micro- shonkinite dyke ( The Elchuru alkaline complex, SE India).Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 91, 3, pp. 263-272.Indiashonkinite

Abstract: Formation of the fragments of the wall-rock during dyking is one of the important manifestations of instantaneous magmatic events. This process is well documented at shallower depths of Earth’s crust but not at deeper levels. In this paper the in situ xenoliths of host rock nepheline syenite within a micro-shonkinite dyke emplaced at mid-crustal depths is described and the fractal theory applied to evaluate origin of the xenoliths. The nepheline syenite xenoliths are angular to oval shaped and sub-millimetre to ~50 cm long. The xenoliths are matrix supported with clasts and matrix being in equal proportions. Partly detached wall-rock fragments indicate incipient xenolith formation, which suggested that the model fragmentation processes is solely due to dyke emplacement. Fractal analytical techniques including clast size distribution, boundary roughness fractal dimension and clast circularity was carried out. The fractal data suggests that hydraulic (tensile) fracturing is the main process of host rock brecciation. However, the clast size and shape are further affected by postfragmentation processes including shear and thermal fracturing, and chemical erosion. The study demonstrates that dyking in an isotropic medium produces fractal size distributions of host rock xenoliths; however, post-fragmentation processes modify original fractal size distributions.
DS201804-0710
2018
Kokandakar, G.K.Kokandakar, G.K., Ghodke, S.S., Rathna, K., Kumar, K.V.Crustal growth along Proterozoic SE India: parameterization of mantle sources, melting, mechanism, and magma differentiation processes.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 91, 2, pp. 135-146.Indiamagmatism
DS201804-0711
2018
Kokandakar, G.K.Kokandakar, G.K., Ghodke, S.S., Rathna, K., Kumar, K.V.Density, viscosity and velocity (ascent rate) of alkaline magmas.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 91, 2, pp. 135-146.IndiaPrakasam alkaline province

Abstract: Three distinct alkaline magmas, represented by shonkinite, lamprophyre and alkali basalt dykes, characterize a significant magmatic expression of rift-related mantle-derived igneous activity in the Mesoproterozoic Prakasam Alkaline Province, SE India. In the present study we have estimated emplacement velocities (ascent rates) for these three varied alkaline magmas and compared with other silicate magmas to explore composition control on the ascent rates. The alkaline dykes have variable widths and lengths with none of the dykes wider than 1 m. The shonkinites are fine- to medium-grained rocks with clinopyroxene, phologopite, amphibole, K-feldspar perthite and nepheline as essential minerals. They exhibit equigranular hypidiomorphic to foliated textures. Lamprophyres and alkali basalts characteristically show porphyritic textures. Olivine, clinopyroxene, amphibole and biotite are distinct phenocrysts in lamprophyres whereas olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase form the phenocrystic mineralogy in the alkali basalts. The calculated densities [2.54-2.71 g/cc for shonkinite; 2.61-2.78 g/cc for lamprophyre; 2.66-2.74 g/cc for alkali basalt] and viscosities [3.11-3.39 Pa s for shonkinite; 3.01-3.28 Pa s for lamprophyre; 2.72-3.09 Pa s for alkali basalt] are utilized to compute velocities (ascent rates) of the three alkaline magmas. Since the lamprophyres and alkali basalts are crystal-laden, we have also calculated effective viscosities to infer crystal control on the velocities. Twenty percent of crystals in the magma increase the viscosity by 2.7 times consequently decrease ascent rate by 2.7 times compared to the crystal-free magmas. The computed ascent rates range from 0.11-2.13 m/sec, 0.23-2.77 m/sec and 1.16-2.89 m/sec for shonkinite, lamprophyre and alkali basalt magmas respectively. Ascent rates increase with the width of the dykes and density difference, and decrease with magma viscosity and proportion of crystals. If a constant width of 1 m is assumed in the magma-filled dyke propagation model, then the sequence of emplacement velocities in the decreasing order is alkaline magmas (4.68-15.31 m/sec) > ultramafic-mafic magmas (3.81-4.30 m/sec) > intermediate-felsic magmas (1.76-2.56 m/sec). We propose that SiO2 content in the terrestrial magmas can be modeled as a semi-quantitative “geospeedometer” of the magma ascent rates.
DS1992-0883
1992
Kokelaar, P.Kokelaar, P., Busby, C.Subaqueous explosive eruption and welding of pyroclastic depositsScience, Vol. 257, July 10, pp. 196-201CaliforniaMineral King metavolcanics, Volcanics
DS201810-2394
2018
Kokelj, S.V.Zolkos, S., Tank, S.E., Kokelj, S.V.Mineral weathering and the permafrost carbon-climate feedback. Peel PlateauGeophysical Research Letters, orchid.org/ 0000-0001-9945-6945Canada, Northwest Territoriespermafrost

Abstract: The origin of the complex pattern of SKS splitting over the western United States (U.S.) remains a long-lasting debate, where a model that simultaneously matches the various SKS features is still lacking. Here we present a series of quantitative geodynamic models with data assimilation that systematically evaluate the influence of different lithospheric and mantle structures on mantle flow and seismic anisotropy. These tests reveal a configuration of mantle deformation more complex than ever envisioned before. In particular, we find that both lithospheric thickness variations and toroidal flows around the Juan de Fuca slab modulate flow locally, but their co-existence enhances large-scale mantle deformation below the western U.S. The ancient Farallon slab below the east coast pulls the western U.S. upper mantle eastward, spanning the regionally extensive circular pattern of SKS splitting. The prominent E-W oriented anisotropy pattern within the Pacific Northwest reflects the existence of sustaining eastward intrusion of the hot Pacific oceanic mantle to beneath the continental interior, from within slab tears below Oregon to under the Snake River Plain and the Yellowstone caldera. This work provides an independent support to the formation of intra-plate volcanism due to intruding shallow hot mantle instead of a rising mantle plume.
DS1990-0867
1990
Koketso, H.Koketso, H., McDowall, G.Geophysical response of some kimberlite pipes in the Jwaneng area, southernBotswana52nd. Meeting Of The European Association Of Exploration Geophysicists, Vol. 52, pp. 195-196BotswanaGeophysics -magnetics, Jwaneng
DS1991-1103
1991
Koketso, H.McDowall, G., Koketso, H.Radon emanometry over some kimberlites and lamproites in southern and western BotswanaEuropean Journal of Exploration Geophysics, Abstract No. D009 p. 332BotswanaGeophysics -Radon, Lamproites
DS2000-0512
2000
Koketsu, K.Koketsu, K., Yoshii, T.A seismicity database and interactive retrieval tool: SeisviewComp. and Geosc., Vol. 26, No. 7, pp. 839-46.GlobalComputer - database, Geophysics - seismics
DS200612-0723
2006
Kokfelt, T.F.Kokfelt, T.F., Hoernle, K., Hauff, F., Fiebig, J., Werner, R., Garbe-Schonberg, D.Combined trace element and Pb Nd Sr and O isotope evidence for recycled oceanic crust ( upper and lower) in the Iceland mantle plume.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 47, 9, Sept. pp. 1705-1749.Europe, IcelandGeochronology, subduction
DS201212-0714
2012
Kokfelt, T.F.Szilas, K., Naeraa, T., Schersten, A., Stendal, H., Frei, R., Van Hinsberg, V.J., Kokfelt, T.F., Rosing, M.T.Origin of Mesoarchean arc related rocks with boninite-komatiite affinities from southern West Greenland.Lithos, in pressEurope, GreenlandBoninites
DS1996-0767
1996
Kokin, A.V.Kokin, A.V.A carbonate diapir in the terrigenous Verkhoyan suite in southeastYakutia.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 336, pp. 59-64.Russia, YakutiaCarbonatite, ankerite, parankerite, Deposit -Gornoozero-Leda zone
DS1986-0472
1986
Kokorev, A.A.Kuznetsov, O.L., Kokorev, A.A., Migunov, N.I., Seleznev, L.D.Determination of the boundaries of kimberlite pipes using the seismoelectric method. (Russian)Izvest. Vyssh. Uch. Zaved. Geol. I Razved.(Russian), Vol 1986, No. 4, pp. 113-117RussiaBlank
DS1860-0112
1870
Koksharov, N.I.Koksharov, N.I.Materialien Zur Mineralogie RusslandsSeries of Volumes, Vol. 5, 397P.; Vol. 6, 407P.; Vol. 7, 384P.; Vol. 10, 350P.RussiaMineralogy
DS1981-0244
1981
Kolata, D.R.Kolata, D.R.Structural Framework of the Mississippi Embayment of Southern Illinois.National Technical Information Service, PB81-231219. FICHE.GlobalMid Continent
DS1989-0820
1989
Kolata, D.R.Kolata, D.R., Nelson, W.J., Eidel, J.J.Tectonic history of the Illinois Basin- an overviewUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open file, United States Geological Survey (USGS)-Missouri G.S. Symp: Mineral resource potential of, p. 19-20. (abstract.)GlobalMidcontinent, Tectonics
DS1991-0910
1991
Kolata, D.R.Kolata, D.R., Heigold, P.C.Proterozoic crustal domain boundary in the southern part of the IllinoisBasinGeological Society of America, Abstract Volume, Vol. 23, No. 3, March p. 22GlobalGeophysics, Cocorp
DS1992-0884
1992
Kolata, D.R.Kolata, D.R., Keith, B.D., Drahovzal, J.A.Illinois Basin consortium program planIllinois Basin Series, 21pGlobalStructure, Kankakee Arch, Cincinnati Arch, New Madrid zone
DS1993-0647
1993
Kolata, D.R.Heigold, P.C., Kolata, D.R.Proterozoic crustal boundary in the southern part of the Illinois BasinTectonophysics, Vol. 217, pp. 307-319GlobalCocorp, Geophysics -seismics
DS1999-0450
1999
Kolata, D.R.McBride, J.H., Kolata, D.R.Upper crust beneath the central Illinois basin, United StatesGeological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 111, No. 3, Mar. pp. 375-94.GlobalGeophysics - seismics, New Madrid seismic zone, Precambrian basement
DS2003-0896
2003
Kolata, D.R.McBride, J.H., Kolata, D.R., Hildenbrand, T.G.Geophysical constraints on understanding the origin of the Illinois Basin and itsTectonophysics, Vol. 363, 1-2, Feb. 20, pp. 45-78.IllinoisGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics
DS2003-0897
2003
Kolata, D.R.McBride, J.H., Kolata, D.R., Hildenbrand, T.G.Geophysical constraints on understanding the origin of the Illinois basin and itsTectonophysics, Vol. 363, No. 1-2, Feb. 20, pp. 45-78.Illinois, IndianaGeophysics - seismics, New Madrift Rift system, Reelfoot Rift, Rough Creek Gra
DS200412-1254
2003
Kolata, D.R.McBride, J.H., Kolata, D.R., Hildenbrand, T.G.Geophysical constraints on understanding the origin of the Illinois Basin and its underlying crust.Tectonophysics, Vol. 363, 1-2, Feb. 20, pp. 45-78.United States, IllinoisGeophysics - seismics Tectonics
DS201212-0368
2012
Kolb, J.Kolb, J., Thrane, K., Bagas, L.Field relationship of high grade Neo- to Mesoarchean rocks of south East Greenland: tectonometamorphic and magmatic evolution.Gondwana Research, in pressEurope, GreenlandArchean
DS201511-1855
2015
Kolb, J.Kolb, J., Bagas, L., Fiorentini, M.L.Metallogeny of the North Atlantic Craton in Greenland. ( not specific to diamonds).Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 79, 4, pp. 815-855.Europe, GreenlandMetallogeny

Abstract: The North Atlantic Craton (NAC) extends along the coasts of southern Greenland. At its northern and southern margins, Archaean rocks are overprinted by Palaeoproterozoic orogeny or overlain by younger rocks. Typical granite-greenstone and granite-gneiss complexes represent the entire Archaean, with a hiatus from ~3.55-3.20 Ga. In the granulite- and amphibolite-facies terranes, the metallogeny comprises hypozonal orogenic gold and Ni-PGE-Cr-Ti-V in mafic-ultramafic magmatic systems. Gold occurrences are widespread around and south of the capital, Nuuk. Nickel mineralization in the Maniitsoq Ni project is hosted in the Norite belt; Cr and PGE in Qeqertarssuatsiaq, and Ti-V in Sinarsuk in the Fiskenćsset complex. The lower-grade metamorphic Isua greenstone belt hosts the >1000 Mt Isua iron deposit in an Eoarchaean banded iron formation. Major Neoarchaean shear zones host mesozonal orogenic gold mineralization over considerable strike length in South-West Greenland. The current metallogenic model of the NAC is based on low-resolution data and variable geological understanding, and prospecting has been the main exploration method. In order to generate a robust understanding of the metal endowment, it is necessary to apply an integrated and collective approach. The NAC is similar to other well-endowed Archaean terranes but is underexplored, and is therefore likely to host numerous targets for greenfields exploration.
DS201604-0632
2016
Kolb, J.Steenfelt, A., Kolb, J., Thrane, K.Metallogeny of South Greenland: a review of geological evolution, mineral occurrences and geochemical exploration data. Jurassic K dykes section 4.7( 1p.)Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 77, pp. 194-245.Europe, GreenlandKimberlite dykes
DS1990-0332
1990
Kolb Coe, P.Cimon, N., Kolb Coe, P., Quigly, T.M.A regression technique for estimating the time required to digitize mapsmanuallyInternational Journal of Geographical Information Systems, Vol. 4, No. 1, January-March pp. 51-54GlobalComputers, Digital maps
DS1998-0777
1998
Koleba, W.Koleba, W., Empson, J., Kruszewski, J.Metallic and industrial mineral assessment report on the exploration work in the Wandering River area.Alberta Geological Survey, MIN 19980019AlbertaExploration - assessment, Mineral Finders Inc.
DS2003-0735
2003
Kolebaba, M.Kolebaba, M.Deep infill crater model for Lac de Gras kimberlites: implications for diamond8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 1 POSTER abstractNorthwest TerritoriesKimberlite geology and economics
DS2003-0736
2003
Kolebaba, M.Kolebaba, M.Victoria Island diamond district, Nunavut - exploration history and updateCordilleran Exploration Roundup, p. 81 abstract.NunavutNews item, Diamonds North Resources Ltd.
DS200712-0563
2007
Kolebaba, M.Kolebaba, M.Diamond's North Pelly Bay diamond market: demonstrates the potential for success.PDAC 2007, Abstract, 1p.Canada, NunavutExploration
DS1998-0756
1998
Kolebaba, M.R.Kirkley, M.B., Kolebaba, M.R., Carlson, J.A., GonzalesKimberlite emplacement processes interpreted from Lac de Gras examples7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 429-431.Northwest TerritoriesKimberlite genesis, structure, tectonics, emplacement, Deposit - Lac de gras area
DS2003-0737
2003
Kolebaba, M.R.Kolebaba, M.R., Read, G.H., Kelsch, D., Kahlert, B.H.Diamondiferous kimberlites on Victoria Island, Canada: a northern extension of the8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 1 POSTER abstractNorthwest Territories, Victoria IslandKimberlite geology and economics
DS2003-0479
2003
KolesavGolovin, A.V., Sharygin, V.V., Pokhilenko, N.P., Malkovets, V.G., KolesavSecondary melt inclusions in olivine from unaltered kimberlites of the Udachnaya EastDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 388,1, pp. 93-96.Russia, YakutiaInclusions, Deposit - Udachnaya
DS201412-0469
2014
Kolesnichenko, M.Kolesnichenko, M., Zedgenizov, D., Ragozin, A., Litasov, K.Water content in olivines of mantle xenoliths from Udachnaya kimberlite pipe, Yakutia.V.S. Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy Siberian Branch Russian Academy of Sciences International Symposium Advances in high pressure research: breaking scales and horizons ( Courtesy of N. Poikilenko), Held Sept. 22-26, 2p. AbstractRussia, YakutiaDeposit - Udachnaya
DS201702-0222
2017
Kolesnichenko, M.V.Kolesnichenko, M.V., Zedgenizov, D.A., Litasov, K.D., Safonova, I.Y., Ragozin, A.L.Heterogenesous distribution of water in the mantle beneath the central Siberian Craton: implications for Udachnaya kimberlite pipe.Gondwana Research, in press available 18p.RussiaDeposit - Udachnaya

Abstract: The paper presents new petrographic, major element and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy data and PT-estimates of whole-rock samples and minerals of a collection of 19 relatively fresh peridotite xenoliths from the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe, which were recovered from its deeper levels. The xenoliths are non-deformed (granular), medium-deformed and highly deformed (porphyroclastic, mosaic-porphyroclastic, mylonitic) lherzolites, harzburgite and dunite. The lherzolites yielded equilibration temperatures (T) and pressures (P) ranging from 913 to 1324 °C and from 4.6 to 6.3 GPa, respectively. The non-deformed and medium-deformed peridotites match the 35 mW/m2 conductive continental geotherm, whereas the highly deformed varieties match the 45 mW/m2 geotherm. The content of water spans 2 ± 1-95 ± 52 ppm in olivine, 1 ± 0.5-61 ± 9 ppm in orthopyroxene, and 7 ± 2-71 ± 30 ppm in clinopyroxene. The amount of water in garnets is negligible. Based on the modal proportions of mineral phases in the xenoliths, the water contents in peridotites were estimated to vary over a wide range from < 1 to 64 ppm. The amount of water in the mantle xenoliths is well correlated with the deformation degree: highly deformed peridotites show highest water contents (64 ppm) and those medium-deformed and non-deformed contain ca. 1 ppm of H2O. The high water contents in the deformed peridotites could be linked to metasomatism of relatively dry diamondiferous cratonic roots by hydrous and carbonatitic agents (fluids/melts), which may cause hydration and carbonation of peridotite and oxidation and dissolution of diamonds. The heterogeneous distribution of water in the cratonic mantle beneath the Udachnaya pipe is consistent with the models of mantle plume or veined mantle structures proposed based on a trace element study of similar xenolithic suits. Mantle metasomatism beneath the Siberian Craton and its triggered kimberlite magmatism could be induced by mantle enrichment in volatiles (H2O, CO2) supplied by numerous subduction zones which surrounded the Siberian continent in Neoproterozoic-Cambrian time.
DS201706-1086
2017
Kolesnichenko, M.V.Kolesnichenko, M.V., Zedgenizov, D.A., Litasov, K.D., Safonova, I.Y., Ragozin, A.L.Heterogeneous distribution of water in the mantle beneath the central Siberian craton: implications from the Udachachnaya kimberlite pipe.Gondwana Research, Vol. 47, pp. 249-266.Russiadeposit - Udachnaya

Abstract: The paper presents new petrographic, major element and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy data and PT-estimates of whole-rock samples and minerals of a collection of 19 relatively fresh peridotite xenoliths from the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe, which were recovered from its deeper levels. The xenoliths are non-deformed (granular), medium-deformed and highly deformed (porphyroclastic, mosaic-porphyroclastic, mylonitic) lherzolites, harzburgite and dunite. The lherzolites yielded equilibration temperatures (T) and pressures (P) ranging from 913 to 1324 °C and from 4.6 to 6.3 GPa, respectively. The non-deformed and medium-deformed peridotites match the 35 mW/m2 conductive continental geotherm, whereas the highly deformed varieties match the 45 mW/m2 geotherm. The content of water spans 2 ± 1-95 ± 52 ppm in olivine, 1 ± 0.5-61 ± 9 ppm in orthopyroxene, and 7 ± 2-71 ± 30 ppm in clinopyroxene. The amount of water in garnets is negligible. Based on the modal proportions of mineral phases in the xenoliths, the water contents in peridotites were estimated to vary over a wide range from < 1 to 64 ppm. The amount of water in the mantle xenoliths is well correlated with the deformation degree: highly deformed peridotites show highest water contents (64 ppm) and those medium-deformed and non-deformed contain ca. 1 ppm of H2O. The high water contents in the deformed peridotites could be linked to metasomatism of relatively dry diamondiferous cratonic roots by hydrous and carbonatitic agents (fluids/melts), which may cause hydration and carbonation of peridotite and oxidation and dissolution of diamonds. The heterogeneous distribution of water in the cratonic mantle beneath the Udachnaya pipe is consistent with the models of mantle plume or veined mantle structures proposed based on a trace element study of similar xenolithic suits. Mantle metasomatism beneath the Siberian Craton and its triggered kimberlite magmatism could be induced by mantle enrichment in volatiles (H2O, CO2) supplied by numerous subduction zones which surrounded the Siberian continent in Neoproterozoic-Cambrian time.
DS201805-0953
2018
Kolesnichenko, M.V.Ivanov, A.V., Mukasa, S.B., Kamenetsky, V.S., Ackerman, M., Demonterova, E.I., Pokrovsky, B.G., Vladykin, N.V., Kolesnichenko, M.V., Litasov, K.D., Zedgenizov, D.A.Origin of high-Mg melts by volatile fluxing without significant excess of temperature.Chemical Geology, https://doi.org/ 10.1016/j .chemgeo. 2018.03.11Russiameimechites
DS201810-2339
2018
Kolesnichenko, M.V.Kolesnichenko, M.V., Zedgenizov, D.A., Ragozin, A.L., Litasov, K.D., Shatsky, V.S.The role of eclogites in the redistribution of water in the subcontinental mantle of the Siberian craton: results of determination of the water content in minerals from the Udachnaya pipe eclogites.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 59, 7, pp. 763-779.Russia, Siberiadeposit - Udachnaya

Abstract: A comprehensive study of 26 mafic mantle xenoliths from the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe was carried out. The contents of major and trace elements, equilibrium temperature parameters, and water content in the rock-forming minerals were determined. The temperatures of formation of the studied rocks are estimated at 800-1300 °C. According to IR spectroscopy data, the water content in clinopyroxenes from the studied eclogites varies from values below the detection limit to 99 ppm. The IR spectra of garnets lack bands of water. The water content in clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene from garnet websterite is 72 and 8 ppm, respectively. The water content in the average rock, calculated from the ratio of the rock-forming minerals, varies from a few to 55 ppm. No relationship among the water content, equilibrium temperatures, and rock composition is established. The low water contents in the eclogites are close to the earlier determined water contents in peridotites from the same pipe and are, most likely, due to the re-equilibration of the eclogites with the rocks of the peridotitic lithospheric mantle. The dehydration of the protolith during its subduction and the partial melting of eclogites before their removal by kimberlitic magma to the surface might be an additional cause of the low water contents in the mantle eclogite xenoliths.
DS1997-0321
1997
Kolesnik, N.Erinchek, Yu.M., Milshtein, E.D., Kolesnik, N., SaltykovThe deep structure of Diamondiferous kimberlite areas of SiberiaPapumem: 4th. Biennial SGA Meeting, pp. 763-766.Russia, SiberiaDiamond exploration, Platform, Tectonics, Rifting, Structure
DS1994-0934
1994
Kolesnik, V.N.Kolesnik, V.N., Vilkovsky, V.A.Chemical composition of natural pyrope an indicator of specific features deep seated petrogenesis peridotites.Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk. (Russian), Vol. 339, No. 1, Nov. pp. 73-76. #PX778RussiaGeochemistry, Peridotites
DS1985-0702
1985
Kolesnik, Y.M.Vishnevskiy, O.A., Kolesnik, Y.M., Vishnevskiy, A.S., Tkach, V.Pyrope with Crystalline Inclusions from Balta Deposits of The Central Bug Region, Dniester River Area.Dop. Akad. Nauk. Ukra. Ser. B., No. 4, PP. 9-14.Russia, UkraineKimberlite, Petrology, Inclusions
DS1984-0750
1984
Kolesnik, YU.N.Vishnevskiy, A.A., Kolesnik, YU.N., Kharkiv, A.D.Genesis of Kelphite Borders on Pyropes from KimberlitesMineral. Zhur., Vol. 6, No. 4, PP. 55-66.RussiaBlank
DS1990-0868
1990
Kolesnik, Yu.N.Kolesnik, Yu.N., Stepchenko, S.B., Bukhbinder, G.V., AndrosenkoThe orthopyroxene garnet geobarometer for peridotitesInternational Geology Review, Vol. 32, No. 3, March pp. 228-243RussiaPeridotites, Geobarometry
DS1991-0911
1991
Kolesnik, Yu.N.Kolesnik, Yu.N.Aluminum solubility in orthopyroxene in equilibrium with garnet; are interpretation of existing experimental dat a &petrogenetic implications garnet peridotite xenolithProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June, pp. 514-515ArkansasExperimental Petrology, Garnet peridotite xenolith
DS1995-0990
1995
Kolesnik, Yu.N.Kolesnik, Yu.N.Genetic classification of pyropes of the ultramafic rocksProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 282-284.RussiaClassification -ultramafics, Garnets -pyrope
DS1996-0768
1996
Kolesnik, Yu.N.Kolesnik, Yu.N., Vilkovsky, V.A.Composition of natural pyrope as an indicator of the deep seated petrogenesis of peridotites.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 342 No. 4, May, pp. 73-78.RussiaAlluvials, placers, Garnets
DS200612-0752
2006
Kolesnikov, G.V.Kurszlaukis, S., Mahotkin,I., Rotman, A.Y.,Kolesnikov, G.V., Makovchuk, I.V.Syn and post eruptive volcanic processes in the Yubileinaya kimberlite pipe, Yakutia,Emplacement Workshop held September, 5p. extended abstractRussia, YakutiaDeposit - Yubileinya , petrology
DS200912-0417
2009
Kolesnikov, G.W.Kurszlaukis, S., Mahotkin, I., Rotman, A.Y., Kolesnikov, G.W., Makovchuk, I.V.Syn and post eruptive volcanic processes in the Yubileinaya kimberlite pipe, Yakutia, Russia and implications for the emplacement of South African style kimberliteLithos, In press available, 36p.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Yubileinaya
DS1960-0853
1967
Kolesnikov, L.V.Kolesnikov, L.V., Frantsesson, YE. V.Thermomagnetic Analyses of the Ferromagnetic Minerals and Its Possible Use for Kimberlite Prospecting.Transactions ALL UNION Conference ON GEOL. of DIAMOND DEPOSITS., PERM., RussiaBlank
DS1992-0820
1992
Kolesnikov, S.K.Kaminsky, F.V., Kolesnikov, S.K., Petelina, N.A., Khamani, M., et al.Minerals associated with diamond in the Algerian Sahara.(Russian)Mineralogischeskiy Zhurnal, (Russian), Vol. 14, No. 3, pp. 15-25AlgeriaMineralogy, Silet
DS1993-0774
1993
Kolesnikov, S.K.Kaminsky, F.V., Roamnko, Ye.F., Kolesnikov, S.K., Salkhi, M.Lamproites of northern AlgeriaInternational Geology Review, Vol. 35, No. 3, March pp. 235-252AlgeriaLamproites, Review
DS1997-1040
1997
KolesovShubina, N.A., Ukhanov, A.V., Genshaft, Yu.S., KolesovTrace and major elements in peridotites beneath northwestern Spitsbergen: acontribution to mantle...Geochemistry International, Vol. 35, No. 1, pp. 17-31.GlobalMantle heterogeneity, Peridotites
DS1998-1344
1998
KolesovShiryaev, A.A., Galimov, E.M., Sobolev, N.V., KolesovTrace elements in inclusion free diamonds from Venezuela and Arkhangelskdeposits.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 811-13.Russia, Kola, VenezuelaDiamond formation, genesis, Mineral inclusions
DS2003-0478
2003
Kolesov, B.A.Golovin, A.V., Sharygin, V.V., Pkhilenko, N.P., Malkovets, V.G., Kolesov, B.A.Secondary melt inclusions in olivine from unaltered kimberlites of the Udachnaya EastDoklady Earth Sciences, Russia, YakutiaBlank
DS200412-0685
2003
Kolesov, B.A.Golovin, A.V., Sharygin, V.V., Pkhilenko, N.P., Malkovets, V.G., Kolesov, B.A., Sobolev, N.V.Secondary melt inclusions in olivine from unaltered kimberlites of the Udachnaya East pipe, Yakutia.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 388, 1, pp. 93-96.Russia, YakutiaGeochemistry - mineral chemistry
DS1988-0366
1988
Kolesov, G.M.Kogarko, L.N., Turkov, V.A., Ryabchikov, I.D., Kolesov, G.M.Composition of the earth's primary mantle, as inferred from the study ofnodulesDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 290, No. 1-6, March pp. 145-148RussiaMantle, Chemistry
DS1989-1075
1989
Kolesov, G.M.Muravyeva, N.S., Polyakov, A.I., Kolesov, G.M., Shubina, N.A., SerinComposition of upper mantle and evidence of mantle metasomatism in the Baykal rift zoneGeochemistry International, Vol. 26, No. 9, pp. 24-38RussiaMantle -Lherzolites, Petrology
DS1991-0056
1991
Kolesov, G.M.Balashov, Yu.A., Yegorov, O.S., Kolesov, G.M.The rare earth elements (REE) in Middle Bug basic and ultrabasic rocksGeochemistry International, Vol. 27, No. 10, pp. 124- 129RussiaHarzburgites -analyses, rare earth elements (REE) indicators
DS1991-1773
1991
Kolesov, G.M.Valter, A.A., Kolesov, G.M.Distribution of rare earth elements in astrobleme rocksGeochemistry International, Vol. 28, No. 1, pp. 1-11Russiarare earth elements (REE)., Geochemistry
DS200612-0628
2005
Kolesova, L.G.Ivanov, V.V., Kolesova, L.G., Khanchuk, A.I., Akatkin, V.N., Molchanova, G.B., Nechaev, V.P.Find of diamond crystals in Jurassic rocks of the Meymechite picrite complex in the Sikhote Alin Orogenic belt.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 404, 7, pp. 975-978.RussiaPicrite
DS1997-0236
1997
Kolhlstedt, D.L.Daines, M.J., Kolhlstedt, D.L.Influence of deformation on melt topology in peridotitesJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 102, No. 5, May 10, pp. 10257-72.MantleMelt, magma
DS1975-0784
1978
Koljonen, T.Koljonen, T., Rosenberg, R.Rare Earth Elements in Carbonatites and Related Rocks As Indications of Their Plate Tectonic Origin.Unknown., GlobalRare Earth Elements (ree), Carbonatite, Plate Tectonics
DS202008-1366
2020
Kolka, V.V.Artyushkov, E.V., Kolka, V.V., Chekhovich, P.A.The occurrence of lower viscosity layer in the crust of old cratons as a cause of the strongly differentiated character of postglacial uplift.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 492, pp. 351-355.Europe, Fennoscandia, Kola Peninsula, Karelia, Canadacraton

Abstract: Rapid glacio-isostatic rebound in Fennoscandia and Canada that is nonuniform in time and space indicates that there is a layer with strongly decreased viscosity at shallow crustal depths. The upper boundary of the layer is near the depth of 15 km, which corresponds to the maximum depth of earthquake hypocenters in the Precambrian cratons of the Kola Peninsula and Karelia. The position of the lower boundary is less distinct; however, most likely it is located near the base of the crust. The formation of such a layer in the Pliocene-Quaternary occurred due to infiltration of a large volume of mantle fluids into the crust. In many regions, this has led to retrograde metamorphism with rock expansion and a strong decrease in rocks viscosity.
DS2002-0677
2002
Koll, G.Hauff, P.L., Coulter, D., Koll, G., Peters, D.C., Peppin, W.A.An overview of hyper spectral remote sensing as applied to precious metals and diamond deposits.11th. Quadrennial Iagod Symposium And Geocongress 2002 Held Windhoek, Abstract p. 27.GlobalRemote sensing - hyperspectral
DS200612-1485
2006
Kollar, J.Vitos, L., Magyati-Kope, B., Ahuja, R., Kollar, J., Grimvall, G., Johansson, B.Phase transformations between garnet and perovskite phases in the Earth's mantle: a theoretical study.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 156, 1-2, pp. 108-116.MantleLower mantle, majorite, geophysics -seismic
DS1996-0473
1996
Koller, F.Frimmel, H.E., Hartnady, C.J.H., Koller, F.Geochemistry and tectonic setting of magmatic units in the Pan African Gariep belt, NamibiaChemical Geology, Vol. 130, No. 1-2, Aug. 7, pp. 101-138NamibiaGeochemistry, Gariep Belt
DS2002-0429
2002
Koller, F.Engler, A., Koller, F., Meisel, T., Quemeneur, J.Evolution of the Archean/Proterozoic crust in the southern Sao Francisco Craton nearJournal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 15, No. 6, pp. 709-23.Brazil, Minas GeraisTectonics - not specific to diamonds
DS201012-0399
2010
Koller, F.Koller, F., Palfi, A.G., Szabo, Cs., Niku-Paavola, V., Popp, F.Alkaline rocks in the Aris area, central Namibia, Africa.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 571.Africa, NamibiaAlkaline rocks, phonolite chemistry
DS201112-0360
2011
Kolmakov, Y.Gertner, I., Tishin, P., Vrublevskii, V., Sazonov, A., Zvyagina, E., Kolmakov, Y.Neoproterozoic alkaline igneous rocks, carbonatites and gold deposits of the Yenisei Ridge, central Siberia: evidence of mantle plume activity and late collision...Resource Geology, Vol. 61, 4, pp. 316-343.Russia, SiberiaTectonics - carbonatites
DS2002-1330
2002
Kolmogorov, Y.P.Reverdatto, V.V., Kolmogorov, Y.P., Parkhomenko, V.S., Selyatitsky, A.Y.Geochemistry of peridotites from the Kolchetav Massif, KazakhstanDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 386, 7, Sept-Oct.pp. 786-90.Russia, KazakhstanGeochemistry
DS200512-0992
2005
Kolmogorov, Y.P.Simonov, V.A., Kovyazin, S.V., Peive, A.A., Kolmogorov, Y.P.Geochemical characteristics of magmatic systems in the region of the Sierra Leone Fracture Zone: central Atlantic: evidence from melt inclusions.Geochemistry International, Vol. 43, 7, pp. 682-693.Africa, Sierra LeoneMagmatism, chemistry
DS200512-0993
2005
Kolmogorov, Yu.P.Simonov, V.A., Kovyazin, S.V., Peive, A.A., Kolmogorov, Yu.P.Geochemical characteristics of magmatic systems in the region of the Sierra Leone Fracture Zone, Central Atlantic: evidence from melt inclusions.Geochemistry International, Vol. 7, 5, pp. 682-Africa, Sierra LeoneMagmatism
DS1987-0362
1987
Koln, H.S.Koln, H.S.Landform development and laterites in northwestern AustraliaZeitsch fur Geomorphologie, Vol.64, June pp. 163-180AustraliaKimberley area, Geomorphology
DS201812-2785
2018
Koln, S.C.Bulanova, G.P., Speich, L. Smith, C.B., Gaillou, E., Koln, S.C., Wibberley, E., Chapman, J.G., Howell, D., Davy, A.T.Argyle deposit: The unique nature of Argyle fancy diamonds: internal structure, paragenesis, and reasons for color.Society of Economic Geology Geoscience and Exploration of the Argyle, Bunder, Diavik, and Murowa Diamond Deposits, Special Publication no. 20, pp. 169-190.Australia, western Australiadeposit - Argyle
DS1993-1301
1993
Kolobov, V.Yu.Reverdatto, V.V., Lepetukha, V.V., Kolobov, V.Yu.Contact effect of the Zerenda granites on the Berlyk suite of rocks in the Kokchetav anticlinorium.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 34, No. 12, pp. 117-124.RussiaMetasomatism
DS1983-0494
1983
Kolobova, S.E.Orlov, YU.A., Gik, L.D., Bobrov, B.A., Kolobova, S.E.Modelling of the Effect of a Kimberlite Pipe on a Seismic Wave Field.Soviet Geology And Geophysics, Vol. 24, No. 3, PP. 88-94.RussiaKimberlite, Geophysics
DS1997-0989
1997
KolobyaninRybalchenko, A.Y., Kolobyanin, Lukyanova, lLobkova ...A new type of native sources of diamond in the UralsDoklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 353, No. 2, Feb-Mar, pp. 223-6.Russia, UralsDiamond - genesis
DS1987-0596
1987
Kolodko, A.A.Prokopchuk, B.I., Levin, V.I., Kolodko, A.A.Detrital quartz from kimberlitic rocks. (Russian)Litol. Polezn. Iskop., (Russian), No. 3, pp. 141-144RussiaBlank
DS1991-0912
1991
Kolodko, A.A.Kolodko, A.A., Levin, V.I., Frantcesson, E.V., Kisel, S.I.Genetic types of kimberlite pipe craters of a new diamond bearing province of the USSR and some aspects of their developmentProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 516-517RussiaEuropean part, Pipes
DS1975-0307
1976
Kolomiytsev, A.I.Kolomiytsev, A.I., Yakubova, S.A.The Columnal Growth Mechanisms of Natural Cubic Diamond Crystals.Zap. Vses. Mineral. Obshch., No. 4, P. 72.RussiaCrystallography
DS1900-0046
1901
KolonKolonEdlesteine in SuedwestafrikaKolon. Zeits, Vol. 2, No. 23, PP. 356-357.Africa, NamibiaDiamonds
DS1900-0507
1907
KolonKolonBlaugrunduntersuchungen im Bezirk GibeonDeutsch. Kolonbl., Vol. 18, No. 13, PP. 629-630.Africa, NamibiaGeology, Kimberlite
DS1900-0734
1909
KolonKolonDer Blaugrund im Bezirk GibeonDeutsch. Kolonbl., Vol. 20, PP. 165166.Africa, NamibiaKimberlite
DS1995-2105
1995
KoloskovYogodzinski, G.M., Kay, R.W., Volynets, O.N., KoloskovMagnesian andesite in the western Aleutian Komandorsky region: Implications for slab melting - mantle wedge.Geological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 107, No. 5, pp. 509-519.Russia, AleutiansSubduction, Slab melt
DS1986-0719
1986
Koloskov, A.V.Seliverstov, V.A., Koloskov, A.V., Laputina, I.P.First dat a on the composition of minerals of deep seated inclusions in meymechite from Kamchatka #2Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 278, No. 1-6, April, pp. 123-126RussiaMineralogy, Meymechite
DS1986-0720
1986
Koloskov, A.V.Seliverstov, V.A., Koloskov, A.V., Laputina, I.P., et al.First dat a on the composition of minerals of deep seated inclusions in meymechite from Kamchatka #1Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 278, No. 10-6, pp. 127-130RussiaInclusions
DS1994-1568
1994
Koloskov, A.V.Seliverstov, V.A., Koloskov, A.V., Chubarov, V.M.Potassic alkaline ultrabasic rocks of the Valaginiski Range, easternKamchatka.Petrology, Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 170-185.Russia, KamchatkaLamproites
DS1998-0434
1998
Koloskov, A.V.Flerov, G.B., Koloskov, A.V., Moskaleva, S.V.Leucite and analcime in the Upper Cretaceous Paleogene potassiumbasaltoids.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 361A, No. 6, pp. 912-14.RussiaLeucite, Basaltoids
DS1999-0372
1999
Koloskov, A.V.Koloskov, A.V., Flerov, G.B., Seliverstov, DorendorfPotassic volcanics of central Kamchatka and the Late Cretaceous Paleogene Kuril Kamchatka alkaline Province.Petrology, Vol. 7, No. 5, pp. 527-RussiaAlkaline rocks
DS200612-0724
2005
Koloskov, A.V.Koloskov, A.V., Anosov, G.I.Features of the geological structure and Late Cenozoic volcanism of the East Asian margin: evidence for mantle rotational geodynamics.Problems of Sources of deep magmatism and plumes., pp. 267-281.MantleGeodynamics
DS1984-0646
1984
Koloskovm a, V.Seliverstov, V.A., Koloskovm a, V., LAPUTINA, I.p., et al.Ist Dat a on the Composition of Minerals of Deep Seated Inclusion in the Meimechites of Kamchatke.Doklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 278, No. 4, PP. 949-952.RussiaBlank
DS1984-0491
1984
Kolosnitsyna, T.I.Maslovskaya, M.N., Yegorov, K.N., Kolosnitsyna, T.I., Brandt, S.Strontium Isotope Distribution Rubidium Strontium Age and Rare Alkalies of Micas from Yakutian Kimberlites.Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 266, No. 1-6, MAY PP. 149-152.RussiaGeochronology, Mir, Udachnaya
DS201607-1295
2016
Kolotilina, T.Ernst, R.E., Hamilton, M.A., Soderlund, U., Hanes, J.A., Gladkochub, D.P., Okrugin, A.V., Kolotilina, T., Mekhonoshin, A.S., Bleeker, W., LeCheminant, A.N., Buchan, K.L., Chamberlain, K.R., Didenko, A.N.Long lived connection between southern Siberia and northern Laurentia in the Proterozoic.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 9, 6, pp. 464-469.Canada, RussiaProterozoic

Abstract: Precambrian supercontinents Nuna-Columbia (1.7 to 1.3 billion years ago) and Rodinia (1.1 to 0.7 billion years ago) have been proposed. However, the arrangements of crustal blocks within these supercontinents are poorly known. Huge, dominantly basaltic magmatic outpourings and intrusions, covering up to millions of square kilometres, termed Large Igneous Provinces, typically accompany (super) continent breakup, or attempted breakup and offer an important tool for reconstructing supercontinents. Here we focus on the Large Igneous Province record for Siberia and Laurentia, whose relative position in Nuna-Columbia and Rodinia reconstructions is highly controversial. We present precise geochronology—nine U -Pb and six Ar -Ar ages—on dolerite dykes and sills, along with existing dates from the literature, that constrain the timing of emplacement of Large Igneous Province magmatism in southern Siberia and northern Laurentia between 1,900 and 720 million years ago. We identify four robust age matches between the continents 1,870, 1,750, 1,350 and 720 million years ago, as well as several additional approximate age correlations that indicate southern Siberia and northern Laurentia were probably near neighbours for this 1.2-billion-year interval. Our reconstructions provide a framework for evaluating the shared geological, tectonic and metallogenic histories of these continental blocks.
DS200612-0652
2006
Koltashev, V.V.Kadik, A.A., Litvin, Y.A., Koltashev, V.V., Kryukova, E.B., Plotnichenko, V.G.Solubility of hydrogen and carbon in reduced magmas of the early Earth's mantle.Geochemistry International, Vol. 44, 1, pp. 33-47.MantleGeochemistry
DS2002-1003
2002
Kolume, F.N.Maslennikova, Y.V., Kolume, F.N., Possoukhova, T.V., Novgorodova, M.L.Diamonds and accompanying minerals from the Sierra Leone placers18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.148.Sierra LeoneDiamond - morphology, alluvials
DS200912-0593
2009
Kolume, F.N.Posukhova, T.V., Kolume, F.N.Diamonds from placers in western and central Africa: a problem of primary sources.Moscow University Geology Bulletin, Vol. 64, 3, pp. 177-186.Africa, Sierra Leone, Democratic Republic of CongoDeposit - Koidu, Chikapa
DS1990-1190
1990
Kolyago, Ye.K.Plyusnin, G.S., Kolyago, Ye.K., Pakholchenko, Yu.A., KalmychkovaRubidium-strontium age and genesis of the Kiya alkalic pluton, YeniseyRidgeDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 305, No. 2, Sept. pp. 207-210RussiaAlkalic pluton, Geochronology -rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr)
DS1991-1474
1991
Kolychev, Ye.A.Rundkvist, D.V., Khiltova, V.Ka., Kolychev, Ye.A., Vrevskiy, A.B.The evolutionary series of early Precambrian structures and theirmetallogenyInternational Geology Review, Vol. 33, No. 9, pp. 831-844RussiaMetallogeny, Precambrian greenstone belts
DS200512-0558
2005
Komabayahi, T.Komabayahi, T., Omori, S., Maruyama, S.Experimental and theoretical study of stability of dense hydrous magnesium silicates in the deep upper mantle.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 153, 4, Dec. 15, pp. 191-209.MantleUHP, peridotites, subduction, Geothermometry, water
DS200612-0725
2006
Komabayashi, T.Komabayashi, T.Water circulation in the Earth's mantle.International Mineralogical Association 19th. General Meeting, held Kobe, Japan July 23-28 2006, Abstract p. 132.MantleSubduction
DS200612-0726
2006
Komabayashi, T.Komabayashi, T., Omori, S.Internally consistent thermodynamic dat a set for dense hydrous magnesium silicates up to 35 GPa, 1600 degree C: implications for water circulation in deep mantle.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 156, 1-2, pp. 89-107.MantleGeothermometry
DS200712-0564
2006
Komabayashi, T.Komabayashi, T.Phase relations of hydrous peridotite: implications for water circulation in the Earth's mantle.American Geophysical Union, Geophysical Monograph, No. 168, pp. 29-44.MantleWater
DS200712-0565
2007
Komabayashi, T.Komabayashi, T.Phase relations of hydrous peridotite and water circulation in the Earth's mantle.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p.184.MantleWater
DS200712-0566
2007
Komabayashi, T.Komabayashi, T.Phase relations of hydrous peridotite and water circulation in the Earth's mantle.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p.184.MantleWater
DS200912-0396
2009
Komabayashi, T.Komabayashi, T.On the slab temperature in the deep lower mantle.GAC/MAC/AGU Meeting held May 23-27 Toronto, Abstract onlyMantleGeothermobarometry
DS200912-0397
2009
Komabayashi, T.Komabayashi, T., Maruyama, S., Rino, S.A speculation on the structure of the 'D' layer: the growth of anti-crust at the core mantle boundary through the subduction history of the Earth.Gondwana Research, Vol. 15, 3-4, pp. 342-353.MantleSubduction
DS201012-0400
2010
Komabayashi, T.Komabayashi, T., Fei, Y.Internally consistent thermodynamic database for iron to the Earth's core conditions.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 115, B3, BO3202.MantleGeothermometry
DS201312-0656
2013
Komabayashi, T.Noguchi, M., Komabayashi, T., Hirose, K., Ohishi, Y.High-temperature compression experiments of CaSiO3 perovskite to lowermost mantle conditions and its thermal equation of state.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 40, pp. 81-91.MantleGeothermometry
DS201601-0034
2015
Komabayashi, T.Nakajima, Y., Imada, S., Hirose, K., Komabayashi, T., Ozawa, H., Tateno, S., Tsutsui, S., Kuwayama, Y., Baron, A.Q.R.Carbon depleated outer core revealed by sound velocity measurements of liquid iron-carbon alloy.Nature Communications, 10.1038/ NCOMMS9942MantleCarbon

Abstract: The relative abundance of light elements in the Earth’s core has long been controversial. Recently, the presence of carbon in the core has been emphasized, because the density and sound velocities of the inner core may be consistent with solid Fe7C3. Here we report the longitudinal wave velocity of liquid Fe84C16 up to 70?GPa based on inelastic X-ray scattering measurements. We find the velocity to be substantially slower than that of solid iron and Fe3C and to be faster than that of liquid iron. The thermodynamic equation of state for liquid Fe84C16 is also obtained from the velocity data combined with previous density measurements at 1 bar. The longitudinal velocity of the outer core, about 4% faster than that of liquid iron, is consistent with the presence of 4-5 at.% carbon. However, that amount of carbon is too small to account for the outer core density deficit, suggesting that carbon cannot be a predominant light element in the core.
DS1989-0821
1989
Komar, P.D.Komar, P.D., Clemens, K.E., Zhenlin Li, Shyuer-Ming ShihThe effects of selective sorting on factor analyses of heavy mineralassemblagesJournal of Sedimentary Petrology, Vol. 59, No. 4, July pp. 590-596GlobalSampling, Heavy minerals
DS1995-1415
1995
Komarnitskii, G.M.Pakulnis, G.V., Komarnitskii, G.M.The Khanneshin uranium deposit at the carbonatite volcano margin #1Petrology, Vol. 37, No. 5, pp. 372-380.AfghanistanCarbonatite
DS1995-1416
1995
Komarnitskii, G.M.Pakulnis, G.V., Komarnitskii, G.M.The Khanneshin uranium deposit at the carbonatite volcano margin #2Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 37, No. 5, pp. 427-436.AfghanistanCarbonatite
DS200512-0625
2005
KomarovLevchenkov, O.A., Gaidamako, I.M., Levskii, L.K., Komarov, Yakovleva, Rizvanova, MakeevU Pb age of zircon from the Mir and 325 Let Yakutii pipes.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 400, 1, pp. 99-101.Russia, YakutiaGeochronology
DS1970-0546
1972
Komarov, A.N.Komarov, A.N., Zhitkov, A.S.Uranium Content in Mineral Phenocrysts and Deep Seated Xeonliths of the Yakutian Kimberlites.In Radioactive Elements In Rocks, Novosibirsk., PT. 2, PP. 125-126.RussiaBlank
DS1975-0785
1978
Komarov, A.N.Komarov, A.N., Ilupin, I.P.New Dat a on the Age of Kimberlites from Yakutia: Applications of Trace Dating Techniques.Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya)., Vol. 1978, No. 7, JULY, PP. 1004-1014.Russia, YakutiaGeochronology
DS1987-0107
1987
Komarov, A.N.Cherenkov, V.G., Komarov, A.N., Cherenko, A.F., Ilupin, I.P.On the age of Kharamaisky field kimberlites.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 296, No. 1, pp. 196-199RussiaGeochronology
DS1987-0363
1987
Komarov, A.N.Komarov, A.N.Areas for applying the track method of dating.(Russian)in: Isotopic methodsin geochronology.(Russian)Izd. Nauka, (Russian), pp. 84-95RussiaGeochronology, Kimberlite
DS1990-0869
1990
Komarov, A.N.Komarov, A.N., Ilupin, I.P.Fission track dating of the Siberian platform kimberlitesGeochemistry International, Vol. 27, No. 10, pp. 55-61East AfricaGeochronology, Kimberlites -zircon
DS1990-0870
1990
Komarov, A.N.Komarov, A.N., Ilupin, I.P.Geochronology of kimberlites of the Siberian platform track studies.(Russian)Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), No. 3, March pp. 365-372RussiaGeochronology, Kimberlites
DS1990-0871
1990
Komarov, A.N.Komarov, A.N., Ilupin, I.P.Geochronology of kimberlites of the Siberian platform track studies.(Russian)Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), No. 3, March pp. 365-372RussiaKimberlites, Geochronology
DS1990-0872
1990
Komarov, A.N.Komarov, A.N., Sharkov, Y.V., Levskii, L.K.Fission track age of kimberlites and associated rocks from explosive pipes of western Syria. (Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 315, No. 5, pp. 683-686SyriaGeochronology, Kimberlites and pipes
DS1950-0332
1957
Komarov, B.V.Kobets, N.V., Komarov, B.V.Some Problems of Methodology in Prospecting for Primary Diamond Methods by Aeromethods.Akad. Nauk Sssr Izv. Geol. Ser., PP. 80-86.Russia, YakutiaKimberlite, Geophysics, Airmag
DS1983-0202
1983
Komarov, F.F.Dudchik, Y.I., Komarov, F.F.The Influence of the Planar Potential Form on the Channeling Radiation Spectrum.Radiation Effects, Vol. 76, No. 3, PP. 61-65.GlobalExperimental Studies, Mineralogy
DS1996-0769
1996
Komarova, O.I.Komarova, O.I., Mirlin, Ye. G., Uglov, B.D.Tectonospheric asymmetry of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge within the Angola Brasil geotraverse zone.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 333, pp. 8-13.Angola, BrazilMorphostructure, Tectonics
DS202010-1852
2020
Komarovskikh, A.Komarovskikh, A., Rakhmanova, M., Yuryeva, O., Nadolinny, V.Infrared, photoluminescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance characteristic features of diamonds from Aikhal pipe, (Yakutia).Diamond & Related Materials, Vol. 109, 108045, 9p. PdfRussiadeposit - Aikhal

Abstract: The diversity of the defects in the collection (50 samples) of diamonds from the Aikhal pipe (Yakutia) has been studied with IR, PL, and EPR spectroscopy. The specific features of crystals have been established; the obtained information leads to the discussion about the diamond formation and growth conditions. One of the specific features observed is a high concentration of platelets. According to the platelet behavior, most of the crystals are regular suggesting the growth temperature to be 1100-1200 °C. The concentrations of A and B defects have been evaluated and the same temperature conditions have been obtained according to the Taylor diagram. Using the EPR spectroscopy, the C and N3V centers have been found in many crystals suggesting the aggregation of nitrogen during residence in the mantle at high temperatures. An interesting feature has been observed in the PL spectra. For most crystals, the spectrum with ZPL at 563.5 nm is very intensive. The structure of the observed defect is remaining unknown, the spectrum disappears as a result of annealing at 600 °C indicating the interstitial-vacancy annihilation mechanism.
DS202012-2224
2020
Komarovskikh, A.Komarovskikh, A., Rakmanova, M., Yuryeva, O., Nadolinny, V.Infrared, photoluminescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance characteristic features of diamonds from the Aikhal pipe ( Yakutia).Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 109, 108045, 9p. PdfRussiadeposit - Aikhal

Abstract: The diversity of the defects in the collection (50 samples) of diamonds from the Aikhal pipe (Yakutia) has been studied with IR, PL, and EPR spectroscopy. The specific features of crystals have been established; the obtained information leads to the discussion about the diamond formation and growth conditions. One of the specific features observed is a high concentration of platelets. According to the platelet behavior, most of the crystals are regular suggesting the growth temperature to be 1100-1200 °C. The concentrations of A and B defects have been evaluated and the same temperature conditions have been obtained according to the Taylor diagram. Using the EPR spectroscopy, the C and N3V centers have been found in many crystals suggesting the aggregation of nitrogen during residence in the mantle at high temperatures. An interesting feature has been observed in the PL spectra. For most crystals, the spectrum with ZPL at 563.5 nm is very intensive. The structure of the observed defect is remaining unknown, the spectrum disappears as a result of annealing at 600 °C indicating the interstitial-vacancy annihilation mechanism.
DS201603-0434
2015
Komarovskikh, A.Y.Yureva, O.P., Rakhmanova, M.I., Nadolinny, V.A., Zedgenizov, D.A., Shatsjy, V.S., Kagi, H., Komarovskikh, A.Y.The characteristic photoluminesence and EPR features of super deep diamonds ( Sao-Luis, Brazil).Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 42, 9, pp. 707-722.South America, BrazilDeposit - Sao-Luis

Abstract: Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were used for the first time to characterize properties of superdeep diamonds from the Săo-Luis alluvial deposits (Brazil). The infrared measurements showed the low nitrogen content (>50 of 87 diamonds from this locality were nitrogen free and belonged to type IIa) and simultaneously the extremely high level of nitrogen aggregation (pure type IaB being predominant), which indicates that diamonds under study might have formed under high pressure and temperature conditions. In most cases, PL features excited at various wavelengths (313, 473, and 532 nm) were indicative of different growth and post-growth processes during which PL centers could be formed via interaction between vacancies and nitrogen atoms. The overall presence of the 490.7 nm, H3, and H4 centers in the luminescence spectra attests to strong plastic deformations in these diamonds. The neutral vacancy known as the GR1 center has probably occurred in a number of crystals due to radiation damage in the post-growth period. The 558.5 nm PL center is found to be one of the most common defects in type IIa samples which is accompanied by the EPR center with g-factor of 2.00285. The 536 and 576 nm vibronic systems totally dominated the PL spectra of superdeep diamonds, while none of “normal” diamonds from the Mir pipe (Yakutia) with similar nitrogen characteristics showed the latter three PL centers.
DS201509-0440
2015
Komarovskikh, A.Yu.Yuryeva, O.P., Rakhmanova, M.I., Nadolinny, V.A., Zedgenizov, D.A., Shatsky, V.S., Kagi, H., Komarovskikh, A.Yu.The characteristic photoluminescence and EPR features of superdeep diamonds ( Sao Luis, Brazil).Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, In press available 16p.South America, Brazil, Mato GrossoDeposit - Juina area

Abstract: Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were used for the first time to characterize properties of superdeep diamonds from the Săo-Luis alluvial deposits (Brazil). The infrared measurements showed the low nitrogen content (>50 of 87 diamonds from this locality were nitrogen free and belonged to type IIa) and simultaneously the extremely high level of nitrogen aggregation (pure type IaB being predominant), which indicates that diamonds under study might have formed under high pressure and temperature conditions. In most cases, PL features excited at various wavelengths (313, 473, and 532 nm) were indicative of different growth and post-growth processes during which PL centers could be formed via interaction between vacancies and nitrogen atoms. The overall presence of the 490.7 nm, H3, and H4 centers in the luminescence spectra attests to strong plastic deformations in these diamonds. The neutral vacancy known as the GR1 center has probably occurred in a number of crystals due to radiation damage in the post-growth period. The 558.5 nm PL center is found to be one of the most common defects in type IIa samples which is accompanied by the EPR center with g-factor of 2.00285. The 536 and 576 nm vibronic systems totally dominated the PL spectra of superdeep diamonds, while none of "normal" diamonds from the Mir pipe (Yakutia) with similar nitrogen characteristics showed the latter three PL centers.
DS201511-1892
2015
Komarovskikh, A.Yu.Yuryeva, O.P., Rakhmanova, M.I., Nadolinny, V.A., Zedgenizov, D.A., Shatsky, V.S., Kagi, H., Komarovskikh, A.Yu.The characteristic photoluminescence and EPR features of superdeep diamonds ( Sao-Luis, Brazil).Physics and chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 42, 9, pp. 707-722.South America, BrazilSao-Luis alluvials

Abstract: Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were used for the first time to characterize properties of superdeep diamonds from the Săo-Luis alluvial deposits (Brazil). The infrared measurements showed the low nitrogen content (>50 of 87 diamonds from this locality were nitrogen free and belonged to type IIa) and simultaneously the extremely high level of nitrogen aggregation (pure type IaB being predominant), which indicates that diamonds under study might have formed under high pressure and temperature conditions. In most cases, PL features excited at various wavelengths (313, 473, and 532 nm) were indicative of different growth and post-growth processes during which PL centers could be formed via interaction between vacancies and nitrogen atoms. The overall presence of the 490.7 nm, H3, and H4 centers in the luminescence spectra attests to strong plastic deformations in these diamonds. The neutral vacancy known as the GR1 center has probably occurred in a number of crystals due to radiation damage in the post-growth period. The 558.5 nm PL center is found to be one of the most common defects in type IIa samples which is accompanied by the EPR center with g-factor of 2.00285. The 536 and 576 nm vibronic systems totally dominated the PL spectra of superdeep diamonds, while none of "normal" diamonds from the Mir pipe (Yakutia) with similar nitrogen characteristics showed the latter three PL centers.
DS201909-2086
2019
Komarovskikh, A.Yu.Shatsky, V.S., Nadolinny, V.A., Yuryeva, O.P., Rakhamanova, M.I., Komarovskikh, A.Yu.Features of the impurity composition of diamonds from placers of the northeastern Siberian craton.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 486, 2, pp. 644-646.Russia, Siberiadiamond morphology

Abstract: Diamond crystals from the Istok (25 crystals) and Mayat (49 crystals) placers were studied using the EPR, IR, and luminescence methods. The total content of impurity nitrogen in forms of A, B, and C (P1) centers ranges from 50 to 1200 ppm. According to the EPR spectroscopy, the presence of nitrogen C (P1), N3V and nitrogen-titanium OK1, N3, NU1 impurity centers was established in the investigated crystals. For 18 crystals from the Istok placer, the N3 nitrogen-titanium center was observed in the EPR spectra, but in the luminescence spectra there was no 440.3 nm system, which was previously attributed to the manifestation of the N3 defect. It is more likely that the nitrogen-titanium N3 EPR center corresponds to the electron-vibrational system 635.7 nm, which is observed in the luminescence spectra of these crystals. Crystals from the Istok placer contain the OK1, N3, and NU1 centers, but luminescence attributed to the oxygen-containing centers is absent in the region of 610-670 nm. For the Mayat placer crystals, the reverse situation was observed. The luminescence ascribed to the oxygen-containing centers was detected for 17 crystals, but there were no OK1, N3, and NU1 centers according to the EPR and luminescence. This result contradicts the arguments of a number of authors about the oxygen nature of these defects. For 5 crystals from the Mayat placer, the nickel impurity was registered. This indicates the presence of ultrabasic paragenesis diamond crystals in this placer.
DS202002-0211
2020
Komarovskikh, A.Yu.Nadolly, V.A., Shatsky, V.S., Yuryeva, O.P., Rakhmanova, M.I., Komarovskikh, A.Yu., Kalinin, A.A., Palyanov, Yu.N.Formation features of N3V centers in diamonds from the Kholomolokh placer in the Northeast Siberian craton.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 47, 4, 7p. PdfRussia, Siberiadeposit - Khololmolokh

Abstract: In recent years, despite significant progress in the development of new methods for the synthesis of diamond crystals and in their post-growth treatment, many questions remain unclear about the conditions for the formation and degradation of aggregate impurity nitrogen forms. Meanwhile, they are very important for understanding (evaluating) the origin, age, and post-growth conditions of natural diamonds. In the present work, an attempt was made to analyze the causes of the formation of high concentrations of N3V centers in natural IaB-type diamonds from the Kholomolokh placer (the Northeast Siberian craton). The possibility of decay of B centers during the plastic deformation of diamonds is analyzed and experiments on the high-temperature annealing of diamonds containing B centers are reported. The formation of N3V centers during the destruction of the B centers at high-pressure annealing of crystals has been established by experiment. It is assumed that, in the post-growth period, diamond crystals were exposed to tectono-thermal stages of raising the superplumes of the Earth's crust of the Siberian craton.
DS2002-1345
2002
Komatitsch, D.Ritsema, J., Rivera, L.A., Komatitsch, D., Tromp, J., Van Heijst, H.J.Effects of crust and mantle heterogeneity on PP/P and SS/S amplitude ratiosGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 29,10,May15,pp.72-MantleGeophysics
DS1960-0884
1967
Komatsu, H.Tolansky, S., Komatsu, H.Abundance of Type Ii DiamondsScience., Vol. 157, PP. 1173-1175.GlobalDiamond Genesis
DS201910-2311
2019
Komatsu, K.Zedgenizov, D., Kagi, H., Ohtani, E., Tsujimori, T., Komatsu, K.Inclusions of (Mg,Fe)Si03 in superdeep diamonds - former bridgmanite?Goldschmidt2019, 1p. AbstractMantlediamond inclusions

Abstract: Bridgmanite (Mg,Fe)SiO3, a high pressure silicate with a perovskite structure, is dominant material in the Lower Mantle and therefore is probably the most abundant mineral in the Earth. One single-phase and two composite inclusions of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 coexisting with jeffbenite ((Mg,Fe)3Al2Si3O12), and with jeffbenite and olivine ((Mg,Fe)2SiO4) have been analyzed to identify retrograde phases of former bridgmanite in diamonds from Juina (Brazil). XRD and Raman spectroscopy have revealed that (Mg,Fe)SiO3 inclusions are orthopyroxene at ambient conditions. XRD patterns of these inclusions indicate that they consist of polycrystals. This polycrystalline textures together with high lattice strain of host diamond around these inclusions observed from EBSD may be an evidence for the retrograde phase transition of former bridgmanite. Single-phase inclusions of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 in superdeep diamonds are suggested to represent a retrograde phase of bridgmanite and fully inherit its initial chemical composition, including a high Al and low Ni contents [1,2]. The composite inclusions of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 with jeffbenite and other silicate and oxide phases may be interpreted as exsolution products from originally homogeneous bridgmanite [3]. The bulk compositions of these inclusions are rich in Al, Ti, and Fe which are similar to bridgmanite produced in experiments on the MORB composition. However, the retrograde origin of composite inclusions due to decomposition of Al-rich bridgmanite may be doubtful because each of observed phases may represent single-phase inclusions, i.e. bridgmanite and high pressure garnet (majoritic garnet), with similar compositional features.
DS202007-1187
2020
Komatsu, K.Zedgenizov, D., Kagi, H., Ohtani, E., Tsujimori, T., Komatsu, K.Retrograde phases of former bridgemanite inclusions in superdeep diamonds.Lithos, in press available, 25p. PdfSouth America, Brazil, Africa, South Africa, Guinea, Canada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Sao Luis, Juina

Abstract: Bridgmanite (Mg,Fe)SiO3, a high pressure silicate with a perovskite structure, is dominant material in the lower mantle at the depths from 660 to 2700 km and therefore is probably the most abundant mineral in the Earth. Although synthetic analogues of this mineral have been well studied, no naturally occurring samples had ever been found in a rock on the planet’s surface except in some shocked meteorites. Due to its unstable nature under ambient conditions, this phase undergoes retrograde transformation to a pyroxene-type structure. The identification of the retrograde phase as ‘bridgmanite’ in so-called superdeep diamonds was based on the association with ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O and other high-pressure (supposedly lower-mantle) minerals predicted from theoretical models and HP-HT experiments. In this study pyroxene inclusions in diamond grains from Juina (Brazil), one single-phase (Sample SL-14) and two composite inclusions of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 coexisting with (Mg,Fe)3Al2Si3O12 (Sample SL-13), and with (Mg,Fe)3Al2Si3O12 and (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 (Sample SL-80) have been analyzed to identify retrograde phases of former bridgmanite. XRD and Raman spectroscopy have revealed that these are orthopyroxene (Opx). (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 and (Mg,Fe)3Al2Si3O12 in these inclusions are identified as olivine and jeffbenite (TAPP). These inclusions are associated with inclusions of (Mg,Fe)O (SL-14), CaSiO3 (SL-80) and composite inclusion of CaSiO3+CaTiO3 (SL-13). XRD patterns of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 inclusions indicate that they consist of polycrystals. This polycrystalline textures together with high lattice strain of host diamond around these inclusions observed from EBSD may be an evidence for the retrograde phase transition of former bridgmanite. Single-phase inclusions of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 in superdeep diamonds are suggested to represent a retrograde phase of bridgmanite and fully inherit its initial chemical composition, including a high Al and low Ni contents [Harte, Hudson, 2013; Kaminsky, 2017]. The composite inclusions of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 with jeffbenite and other silicate and oxide phases may be interpreted as exolusion products from originally homogeneous bridgmanite [Walter et al., 2011]. The bulk compositions of these composite inclusions are rich in Al, Ti, and Fe which are similar to Al-rich bridgmanite produced in experiments on the MORB composition. However, the retrograde origin of composite inclusions due to decomposition of Al-rich bridgmanite may be doubtful because each of observed phases may represent single-phase inclusions, i.e. bridgmanite and high pressure garnet (majoritic garnet), with similar compositional features.
DS202008-1460
2020
Komatsu, K.Zedgenizov, D., Kagi, H., Ohtaini, E., Tsujimori, T., Komatsu, K.Retrograde phases of former bridgemanite inclusions in superdeep diamonds.Lithos, Vol. 370-371, 105659 7p. PdfAfrica, South Africa, Guinea, Australia,South America, Brazil, Canada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Koffiefontein, Kankan, Lac de Gras, Juina, Machado, Orroroo

Abstract: (Mg,Fe)SiO3 bridgmanite is the dominant phase in the lower mantle; however no naturally occurring samples had ever been found in terrestrial samples as it undergoes retrograde transformation to a pyroxene-type structure. To identify retrograde phases of former bridgmanite single-phase and composite inclusions of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 in a series of superdeep diamonds have been examined with electron microscopy, electron microprobe, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Our study revealed that (Mg,Fe)SiO3 inclusions are represented by orthopyroxene. Orthopyroxenes in single-phase and composite inclusions inherit initial chemical composition of bridgmanites, including a high Al and low Ni contents. In composite inclusions they coexist with jeffbenite (ex-TAPP) and olivine. The bulk compositions of these composite inclusions are rich in Al, Ti, and Fe, which are similar but not fully resembling Al-rich bridgmanite produced in experiments on the MORB composition. The retrograde origin of composite inclusions due to decomposition of Al-rich bridgmanite may be doubtful because each of observed minerals may represent coexisting HP phases, i.e. bridgmanite or ringwoodite.
DS202001-0035
2019
Komatsu, N.Reina, G., Zhao, Li. Bianco, A., Komatsu, N.Chemical functionalization of nanodiamonds: opportunities and challenges ahead.Angewandte Chemie International edition, Vol. 58, 50, pp. 17918-17929.Globalnanodiamond

Abstract: Nanodiamond(ND)-based technologies are flourishing in a wide variety of fields spanning from electronics and optics to biomedicine. NDs are considered a family of nanomaterials with an sp3 carbon core and a variety of sizes, shapes, and surfaces. They show interesting physicochemical properties such as hardness, stiffness, and chemical stability. Additionally, they can undergo ad-hoc core and surface functionalization, which tailors them for the desired applications. Noteworthy, the properties of NDs and their surface chemistry are highly dependent on the synthetic method used to prepare them. In this Minireview, we describe the preparation of NDs from the materials-chemistry viewpoint. The different methodologies of synthesis, purification, and surface functionalization as well as biomedical applications are critically discussed. New synthetic approaches as well as limits and obstacles of NDs are presented and analyzed.
DS2003-0673
2003
KomazawaJoseph, E.J., Segawa, J., Kusumoto, S., Nakayama, E., Ishihara, T., KomazawaAirborne gravimetry - a new gravimeter system and test resultsExploration Geophysics, Vol. 34, 1-2, pp. 82-86.GlobalGeophysics - gravimetry not specific to diamonds
DS200412-0932
2003
Komazawa, M.Joseph, E.J., Segawa, J., Kusumoto, S., Nakayama, E., Ishihara, T., Komazawa, M., Sakuma, S.Airborne gravimetry - a new gravimeter system and test results.Exploration Geophysics, Vol. 34, 1-2, pp. 82-86.TechnologyGeophysics - gravimetry not specific to diamonds
DS2001-0480
2001
Kombayashi, T.Hirose, K., Kombayashi, T., Murakami, M., Funakoshi, K.In situ measurements of the majorite akimotoite perovskite phase transition boundaries in MgSiO3.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 28, No. 23, Dec. pp. 4351-4.MantlePerovskite
DS201312-0462
2013
Kombayashi, T.Kato, C., Hirose, K., Kombayashi, T., Ozawa, H., Ohisi, Y.NAL phase in K rich portions of the lower Mantle.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 40, 19, pp. 5085-5088.MantleAlkalic
DS1985-0354
1985
Komenko, V.M.Komenko, V.M., Platanov, A.N., Matsyukm, S.S.The optical sprectoscopy of chromium isomorphism in enstatite from plutonic paragenesisGeochemistry International, Vol. 21, No. 6, pp. 47-53Russia, YakutiaPetrology
DS1991-0913
1991
Komilova, V.P.Komilova, V.P.Composition of groundmass minerals from petrographically distinct types ofkimberlitesProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 521-522RussiaMineral chemistry, Monticellite, diopside
DS1998-0778
1998
Komilova, V.P.Komilova, V.P., Safronov, A.F., Phillipov, N. Zauzev.The garnet of diamond association in lamprophyres from the Anabar massif7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 458-9.Russia, Yakutia, AnabarDiamond inclusions, Lamprophyres
DS1984-0164
1984
Kominz, M.A.Bond, G.C., Nickeson, P.A., Kominz, M.A.Breakup of a supercontinent between 625 Ma and 555 Ma: new evidence And implications for continent histories.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 70, pp. 325-45.North America, ArgentinaTectonics, Rifting
DS1988-0069
1988
Kominz, M.A.Bond, G.C., Kominz, M.A.Evolution of thought on passive continental margins from The origin of geosynclinal theory ~ 1860 to the presentGeological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin, Vol. 100, No. 12, December pp. 1909-1933GlobalGeosyncline, Review-continental margins
DS1991-0914
1991
Kominz, M.A.Kominz, M.A., Bond, G.C.Unusually large subsidence and sea-level events during middle Paleozoictime: new evidence supporting mantle convection models for supercontinentassemblyGeology, Vol. 19, No. 1, pp. 56-60North AmericaMantle, Craton
DS2000-0397
2000
Komiya, T.Hayashi, M., Komiya, T., Mauyama, S.Archean regional metamorphism of the Isua Supracrustal Belt: implications for driving force for Archean plateInternational Geology Review, Vol. 42, No. 12, Dec. 1, pp. 1055-1115.Greenland, southern WestTectonics
DS2001-0461
2001
Komiya, T.Hayashi, M., Komiya, T., Nakamura, Y., Maruyama, S.Archean regional metamorphism Isua supracrustal belt: implications for a driving force for Archean plate..International Geology Review, Vol. 42, No. 12, Dec. pp. 1055-1115.Greenland, southwestTectonics, metamorphism
DS2001-1066
2001
Komiya, T.Shimizu, K., Komiya, T., Hirose, K., Shimizu, Maruyamachromium spinel an excellent micro container for retaining primitive melts - implications for a hydrous plume ...Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 189, No. 3-4, July 15, pp. 177-88.Zimbabwe, MantleKomatiites, Melting - Belingwe Greenstone belt
DS2002-0871
2002
Komiya, T.Komiya, T., Hayashi, M., Maryyama, S., Yurimoto, H.Intermediate P T type Archean metamorphism of the Isua supracrustal beltAmerican Journal of Science, Vol. 302, 9, pp. 806-26.GreenlandSubduction
DS2002-0872
2002
Komiya, T.Komiya, T., Maruyama, S., Hirata, T., Yurimoto, H.Petrology and geochemistry of MORB and OIB in the mid-Archean north pole regionInternational Geology Review, Vol. 44, No. 11, Nov. pp. 988-1016.Australia, westernMantle - geochronology
DS200412-0878
2004
Komiya, T.Isjikawa, A., Maruyama, S., Komiya, T.Layered lithospheric mantle beneath the Ontong Java Plateau: implications from xenoliths in alnoite, Malaita, Solomon Islands.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 45, 10, pp. 2011-2044.Indonesia, Solomon IslandsPeridotite, pyroxenites, xenoliths, geothermometry
DS200412-1030
2004
Komiya, T.Komiya, T.Material circulation model including chemical differentiation within the mantle and secular variation of temperature and composiPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 146, 1-2, pp. 333-367.MantleGeochronology - geochemistry
DS200412-1671
2004
Komiya, T.Rino, S., Komiya, T., Windley, B.F., Katayama, I., Motoki, A., Hirata, T.Major episodic increase of continental crust growth determined from zircon ages river sands: implications for mantle overturns iPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 146, 1-2, pp. 369-394.MantleGeochronology
DS200512-0559
2004
Komiya, T.Komiya, T.Material circulation model including chemical differentiation with the mantle and secular variation of temperature and composition of the mantle.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 146, 1-2, pp. 333-368.MantleGeochemistry
DS200612-0599
2006
Komiya, T.Horie, K., Komiya, T., Maruyama, S., Hirata, T., Hidaka, H., Windley, B.F.4.2 Ga zircon xenocryst in an Acasta gneiss from northwestern Canada: evidence for early continental crust.Geology, Vol.34, 4, April pp. 245-248.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology, spectrometry
DS200812-0547
2008
Komiya, T.Katayama, I., Komiya, T., Toriumi, M.Annealing time scale of the cratonic lithosphere of southern Africa inferred from the shape of inclusion minerals.International Geology Review, Vol. 50, 1, pp. 84-88.Africa, South AfricaCraton, inclusions
DS201012-0659
2010
Komiya, T.Santosh, M., Maruyama, S., Komiya, T., Yamamoto, S.Orogens in the evolving Earth: from surface continents to 'lost continents'.The evolving continents: understanding processes of continental growth, Geological Society of London, Vol. 338, pp. 77-106.MantleGeodynamics
DS201112-0506
2011
Komiya, T.Katayama, I., Michibayashi, K., Terao, R., Ando, J-I., Komiya, T.Water content of the mantle xenoliths from Kimberley and implications for explaining textural variations in cratonic roots.Geological Journal, Vol. 46, pp. 173-182.Africa, South AfricaSpectroscopy, microstructures
DS201212-0617
2012
Komiya, T.Sajeev, K., Windley, B.F., Hegner, E., Komiya, T.High temperature, high pressure granulites ( retrogressed eclogites) in the central region of the Lewisian NW Scotland: crustal scale subduction in the Neoarchean.Gondwana Research, in pressEurope, ScotlandEclogite
DS2001-1285
2001
KomminahoYliniemi, J., Tiira, T., Luosto, Komminaho, Giese, et al.EUROBRIDGE'95: deep seismic profiling within the East European CratonTectonophysics, Vol. 339, No. 1-2, pp. 153-75.EuropeGeophysics - seismics, Craton
DS200512-1219
2004
Komminaho, K.Yiniemi, J., Kozlovskaya, E., Hjelt, S-E., Komminaho, K., Ushakov, A.Structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath southern FIn land revealed by analysis of local events registered by the SVEKALAPKO seismic array.Tectonophysics, Vol. 394, 1-2, pp. 41-110.Europe, FinlandGeophysics - seismic, tomography
DS201501-0012
2014
Komminaho, K.Grad, M., Tiira, T., Olsson, S., Komminaho, K.Seismic lithosphere asthenosphere boundary beneath the Baltic Shield.GFF, Vol. 136, 4, pp. 581-598.Europe, Finland, Sweden, NorwayGeophysics - seismic

Abstract: The problem of the existence of the asthenosphere for old Precambrian cratons is still discussed. In order to study the seismic lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) beneath the Baltic Shield, we used records of nine local earthquakes with magnitudes ranging from 2.7 to 5.9. To model the LAB, original data were corrected for topography and Moho depth using a reference model with a 46-km-thick crust. For two northern events at Spitsbergen and Novaya Zemlya, we observe a low-velocity layer, 60-70-km-thick asthenosphere, and the LAB beneath Barents Sea was found at depth of c. 200 km. Sections for other events show continuous first arrivals of P-waves with no evidence for "shadow zone" in the whole range of registration, which could either be interpreted as the absence of the asthenosphere beneath the central part of the Baltic Shield, or that the LAB in this area occurs deeper (>200 km). The relatively thin low-velocity layer found beneath southern Sweden, 15 km below the Moho, could be interpreted as small-scale lithospheric heterogeneities, rather than asthenosphere. Differentiation of the lower lithosphere velocities beneath the Baltic Shield could be interpreted as regional heterogeneity or as anisotropy of the Baltic Shield lithosphere, with high velocities approximately in the east-west direction, and slow velocities approximately in the south-north direction.
DS202009-1671
2020
Komminaho, K.Tiira, T., Janik, T., Skrzynik, T., Komminaho, K., Heinonen, A., Veikkolainen, T., Vakeva, S., Korja, A.Full scale crustal interpretation of Kokkola-Kymi ( KOKKY) seismic profile, Fennoscandian shield.Pure and Applied Geophysics, Vol. 177, 8, pp. 3775-3795. pdfEurope, Finlandgeophysics - seismics

Abstract: The Kokkola-Kymi Deep Seismic Sounding profile crosses the Fennoscandian Shield in northwest-southeast (NW-SE) direction from Bothnian belt to Wiborg rapakivi batholith through Central Finland granitoid complex (CFGC). The 490-km refraction seismic line is perpendicular to the orogenic strike in Central Finland and entirely based on data from quarry blasts and road construction sites in years 2012 and 2013. The campaign resulted in 63 usable seismic record sections. The average perpendicular distance between these and the profile was 14 km. Tomographic velocity models were computed with JIVE3D program. The velocity fields of the tomographic models were used as starting points in the ray tracing modelling. Based on collected seismic sections a layer-cake model was prepared with the ray tracing package SEIS83. Along the profile, upper crust has an average thickness of 22 km average, and P-wave velocities (Vp) of 5.9-6.2 km/s near the surface, increasing downward to 6.25-6.40 km/s. The thickness of middle crust is 14 km below CFGC, 20 km in SE and 25 km in NW, but Vp ranges from 6.6 to 6.9 km/s in all parts. Lower crust has Vp values of 7.35-7.4 km/s and lithospheric mantle 8.2-8.25 km/s. Moho depth is 54 km in NW part, 63 km in the middle and 43 km in SW, yet a 55-km long section in the middle does not reveal an obvious Moho reflection. S-wave velocities vary from 3.4 km/s near the surface to 4.85 km/s in upper mantle, consistently with P-wave velocity variations. Results confirm the previously assumed high-velocity lower crust and depression of Moho in central Finland.
DS201412-0470
2013
Komnenic, A.Komnenic, A.Turns out the world's oldest diamonds are just polishing compound ( contamination Jack Hills region)Mining.com, Dec. 31, 1/2p.AustraliaZircon specimen contaminated
DS1987-0364
1987
Komogorova, L.G.Komogorova, L.G., Stadnik, E.V., Federov, V.I.Phytogeochemical investigations in contours of kimberlite bodies. (Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 297, No. 2, pp. 468-470RussiaBlank
DS1989-0822
1989
Komogorova, L.G.Komogorova, L.G., Stadnik, Ye.V., Federov, V.I.Phytogeochemical surveys within kimberlite bodiesDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 297, No. 1-6, pp. 184-185RussiaUdachanaya, Dalnyaya, Zarnitsa, biochemistry, kimberlite fields, Geochemistry -dispersion
DS200412-0590
2004
Komori, T.Fujino, K., sasaki, Y., Komori, T., Ogawa, H., Miyajima, N., Sata, N., Yagi, T.Approach to the mineralogy of the lower mantle by a combined method of a laser heated diamond anvil cell experiment and analyticPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 143-144, pp. 215-221.MantleMineralogy - experimental
DS1992-0885
1992
Komov, I.Komov, I.New exploration methods for blind ore and nonmetallic deposits. (mentionsdiamonds)Proceedings of the 29th International Geological Congress. Held Japan August 1992, Vol. 2, abstract p. 773RussiaDiamonds, Geophysics
DS1986-0452
1986
Komov, I.L.Komov, I.L.Geochemical methods of prospecting for deposits of non-metallic mineralresources.(Russian)Izd. Nauka Moscow Theoretical bases of geochemical methods of prospecting, pp. 157-171RussiaDiamond, Prospecting
DS1987-0365
1987
Komov, I.L.Komov, I.L., Lukashev, A.N., Koplus, A.V.Geochemical methods of prospecting for non-metallic minerals. DiamondVnu Science Press, pp. 9-31. plus refsGlobalGeochemistry, Prospecting methods
DS1991-0915
1991
Komov, I.L.Komov, I.L.Traditional and new types of diamond bearing rocks and methods for theirestimationProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 518-520RussiaImpactites, eclogites, lamproites, ultrabasites, basaltoids, Geothermometry
DS2000-0398
2000
KomyaHayashi, M., Komya, Nakamura, MaryamaArchean regional metamorphism of the Isua greenstone belt: implications driving force for plate tectonicsInternational Geology Review, Vol.42, 12, Dec. pp. 1055-1115.Greenland, southwestTectonics
DS200812-0961
2008
Kon, Y.Rio, S., Kon, Y., Sato, W., Maruyana, S., Santosh, M., Zhao, D.The Grenvillian and Pan African orogens: world's largest orogenies through geologic time, and their implications on the origin of superplume.Gondwana Research, Vol. 14, 1-2, August pp. 51-72.MantleOrogeny
DS201512-1935
2015
Kon, Y.Kon, Y., Araoka, D., Ejima, T., Hirata, T.Rapid and precise determination of major and trace elements in CCRMP and USGS geochemical reference samples using femtosecond laser ablation ICP-MS.Symposium on critical and strategic materials, British Columbia Geological Survey Paper 2015-3, held Nov. 13-14, pp. 245-250.TechnologyCarbonatite

Abstract: We measured 10 major (SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, total Fe2O3, MnO, MgO, CaO, Na2O, K2O, and P2O5) and 32 trace (Sc, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Hf, Pb, Th, and U) elements in 16 geochemical reference samples (AGV-1, AGV-2, BCR-1, BCR- 2, BHVO-2, BIR-1a, DNC-1a, G-2, GSP-1, GSP-2, MAG-1, QLO-1, RGM-1, RGM-2, SGR-1b, and STM-1) distributed by United States Geological Survey (USGS) and three reference rock samples (SY-2, SY-3, and MRG-1) provided by Canadian Certifi ed Reference Materials Project (CCRMP) using inductively coupled plasma -mass spectrometry coupled with the femtosecond laser ablation sample introduction technique (fsLA-ICP-MS). Before the elemental analysis, fused glassbeads were prepared from the mixture of sample powder and high-purity alkali fl ux with a mixing ratio of 1:10. The abundances of the major and trace elements were externally calibrated by using glass beads containing the major and trace elements prepared from 17 Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ) geochemical reference samples (JB-1, JB-1a, JB-2, JB-3, JA-1, JA-2, JA-3, JR-1, JR-2, JR-3, JP-1, JGb-1, JGb-2, JG-1a, JG- 2, JG-3, and JSy-1). Typical analysis repeatabilities for these geochemical reference samples were better than 3% for Al2O3 and Na2O; <5% for SiO2, TiO2, total Fe2O3, MnO, MgO, CaO, K2O, P2O5, Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr, Nb, Ba, Nd, and U; <8% for Sc, V, Cr, Co, Y, Cs, La, Ce, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Hf, Pb, and Th; <11% for Ni and Cu. These data clearly demonstrate that high analytical repeatability can be achieved by the fsLA-ICP-MS technique with glass beads made from 0.5 g larger samples.
DS201911-2507
2019
Kon, Y.Akam, C., Simandl, G.J., Lett, R., Paradis, S., Hoshino, M., Kon, Y., Araoka, D., Green, C., Kodama, S., Takagi, T., Chaudhry, M.Comparison of methods for the geochemical determination of rare earth elements: Rock Canyon Creek REE-F-Ba deposit case study, SE British Columbia, Canada.Geochemistry: Exploration, Environment, Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 414-430.Canada, British Columbiageochemistry

Abstract: Using Rock Canyon Creek REE-F-Ba deposit as an example, we demonstrate the need for verifying inherited geochemical data. Inherited La, Ce, Nd, and Sm data obtained by pressed pellet XRF, and La and Y data obtained by aqua regia digestion ICP-AES for 300 drill-core samples analysed in 2009 were compared to sample subsets reanalysed using lithium metaborate-tetraborate (LMB) fusion ICP-MS, Na2O2 fusion ICP-MS, and LMB fusion-XRF. We determine that LMB ICP-MS and Na2O2 ICP-MS accurately determined REE concentrations in SY-2 and SY-4, and provided precision within 10%. Fusion-XRF was precise for La and Nd at concentrations exceeding ten times the lower detection limit; however, accuracy was not established because REE concentrations in SY-4 were below the lower detection limit. Analysis of the sample subset revealed substantial discrepancies for Ce concentrations determined by pressed pellet XRF in comparison to other methods due to Ba interference. Samarium, present in lower concentrations than other REE compared, was underestimated by XRF methods relative to ICP-MS methods. This may be due to Sm concentrations approaching the lower detection limits of XRF methods, elemental interference, or inadequate background corrections. Aqua regia dissolution ICP-AES results, reporting for La and Y, are underestimated relative to other methods.
DS1960-0489
1964
Konala, R.K.R.Rao, P.S., Konala, R.K.R.Prospecting for Lead, Zinc and Diamond in Cuddapah and Kurnool Districts.India Geological Survey, UNPUBL. ReportIndia, Madhya PradeshProspecting
DS200812-0022
2008
Konamelan, A.N.Allialy, M.E., Djro, S.C., Yavouba, C., Konamelan, A.N., Pothin, K.B., Yao, D.B., Yobou, R.Comparative geochemistry of Seguela kimberlites, South Africa Group II kimberlites and other worldwide kimberlites.9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractAfrica, West Africa, Ivory CoastDeposit - Bobi, Toubabouko
DS1996-0633
1996
Konan, G.Hirdes, W., Davis, D.W., Ludtke, G., Konan, G.Two generations of Birimian (Paleoproterozoic) volcanic belts in northeast Coted'Ivoire: Birimian controversyPrcambrian Research, Vol. 80, pp. 173-191GlobalGeochronology, Birimian volcanics
DS200912-0398
2008
Konanova, N.V.Konanova, N.V.Prospects of bedrock diamond bearing capacity of the conjugation zone between the Sysolsky anticline and Kirovsk-Kazhimsk aulocogen north of Volga-Urals anteclise.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 423A, No. 9, pp. 1348-1351.Russia, UralsDiamond prospectivity
DS1997-0419
1997
Konda, B.Gladwin, D., Konda, B., Lauer, Camilucci, D.A comparative analysis of income based taxes on miningThe Canadian Mining and Metallurgical Bulletin (CIM Bulletin), Vol. 90, No. 1009, April pp. 33-35CanadaEconomics, Tax - mining
DS1996-0770
1996
Konda, B.W.Konda, B.W.Discussion paper proposed amendments to the Northwest Territories Mining Royalty regime in Canada Mining taxInsight Conference, Fundamentals Taxation, 35pNorthwest TerritoriesLegal -tax
DS202004-0504
2020
Kondakov, M.N.Chernykh, S.V., Chernykh, A.V., Tarelkin, S., Didenko, S. ,Kondakov, M.N., Shcherbachev, K.D., Trifonova, E.V., Drozdova, T.E., Troschiev, S.Y., Prikhodko, D.D., Glybin, Y.N., Chubenko, A.P., Britvich, G.I., Kiselev, D.A., Polushin, N.I., Rabinovich, O.IHPHT single crystal diamond type IIa characterization for particle detectors.Physicsa Status Solidi , doi:10.1002/pssa.201900888GlobalHPHT

Abstract: Various samples of multisectoral high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) single-crystal diamond plate (IIa type) (4?×?4?×?0.53?mm) are tested for particle detection applications. The samples are investigated by X-ray diffractometry, photoluminescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared, and visible/ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy. High crystalline perfection and low impurity concentration (in the {100} growth sector) are observed. To investigate detector parameters, circular 1.0 and 1.5?mm diameter Pt Schottky barrier contacts are created on {111} and {100} growth sectors. On the backside, a Pt contact (3.5?×?3.5?mm) is produced. The {100} growth sector is proved to be a high-quality detector: the full width at half maximum energy resolution is 0.94% for the 5.489?MeV 226Ra a-line at an operational bias of +500?V. Therefore, it is concluded that the HPHT material {100} growth sector is used for radiation detector production, whose quality is not worse than the chemical vapor deposition method or specially selected natural diamond detectors.
DS1970-0945
1974
Kondji, J.B.Kondji, J.B.Republique Centrafricaine... Activites Minieres En 1974Bangui-dir. Min., 2P.GlobalMining
DS2001-0783
2001
KondoMiyajima, N., Yagi, Hirose, Kondo, Fujino, MiuraPotential host phase of aluminum and potassium in the Earth's lower mantleAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 86, pp. 740-46.MantleAlkali earth elements
DS1983-0360
1983
Kondo, AHRENS.Kondo, AHRENS.Shock Compression in DiamondGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 10, pp. 281-284GlobalRef. Fleischer United States Geological Survey (usgs) Of 88-689.mineralogical Refs. 198, Diamond Morphology
DS1983-0361
1983
Kondo, K.Kondo, K., Ahrens, T.J.Shock Impression of Diamond CrystalGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 10, No. 4, PP. 181-184.GlobalGenesis, Formation
DS201610-1880
2016
Kondo, N.Kondo, N., Yoshino, T., Matsukage, K., Kogiso, T.Major element composition in an early enriched reservoir: constarints from 142 Nd/144 Nd isotope systematics in the earth Earth and high pressure melting experiments of a primitive peridotite,Progress in Earth and Planetary Science, Vol. 3, 25, Aug. 22MantleExperimental petrology

Abstract: The Accessible Silicate Earth (ASE) has a higher 142Nd/144Nd ratio than most chondrites. Thus, if the Earth is assumed to have formed from these chondrites, a complement low-142Nd/144Nd reservoir is needed. Such a low-142Nd/144Nd reservoir is believed to have been derived from a melt in the early Earth and is called the Early Enriched Reservoir (EER). Although the major element composition of the EER is crucial for estimating its chemical and physical properties (e.g., density) and is also essential for understanding the origin and fate of the EER, which are both major factors that determine the present composition of the Earth, it has not yet been robustly established. In order to determine the major element composition of the EER, we estimated the age and pressure-temperature conditions to form the EER that would best explain its Nd isotopic characteristics, based on Sm-Nd partitioning and its dependence on pressure, temperature, and melting phase relations. Our estimate indicates that the EER formed within 33.5 Myr of Solar System formation and at near-solidus temperatures and shallow upper-mantle pressures. We then performed high-pressure melting experiments on primitive peridotite to determine the major element composition of the EER at estimated temperature at 7 GPa and calculated the density of the EER. The result of our experiments indicates that the near-solidus melt is iron-rich komatiite. The estimated density of the near-solidus melt is lower than that of the primitive peridotite, suggesting that the EER melt would have ascended in the mantle to form an early crust. Given that high mantle potential temperatures are assumed to have existed in the Hadean, it follows that the EER melt was generated at high pressure and, therefore, its composition would have been picritic to komatiitic. As the formation age of the EER estimated in our study precedes the last giant, lunar-forming impact, the picritic to komatiitic crust (EER) would most likely have been ejected from the Earth by the last giant impact or preceding impacts. Thus, the EER has been lost, leaving the Earth more depleted than its original composition.
DS1998-0779
1998
Kondo, T.Kondo, T., Yagi, T.Phase transition of pyrope garnet under lower mantle conditionsAmerican Geophysical Union (AGU) Geo. Mon., No. 101, pp.MantleGarnet - pyrope
DS2001-0848
2001
Kondo, T.Ohtani, E., Litasov, K., Suzuki, A., Kondo, T.Stability field of new hydrous mantle phase with implications for water transport into the deep mantle.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 28, No. 20, Oct. 15, pp. 3991-4.MantleMineral chemistry
DS2001-1142
2001
Kondo, T.Suzuki, A., Ohtani, E., Kondo, T., et al.Neutron diffraction study of hydrous phase G: hydrogen in the lower mantle hydrous silicate phase G.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 28, No. 20, Oct. 15, pp. 3987-90.MantleMineral chemistry
DS2002-0798
2002
Kondo, T.Kabo, T., Ohtani, E., Kondo, T., Kato, T., Toma, M., Hosoya, T., Sano, A.Metastable garnet in oceanic crust at the top of the lower mantleNature, No. 6917, Dec. 19, pp. 803-5.MantleGarnet mineralogy
DS2003-0823
2003
Kondo, T.Litasov, K., Ohtani, E., Langenhorst, F., Yurimoto, H., Kubo, T., Kondo, T.Water solubility in Mg perovskites and water storage capacity in the lower mantleEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 211, 1-2, June 15, pp. 189-203.MantleWater storage
DS2003-0824
2003
Kondo, T.Litasov, K., Ohtani, E., Langenhorst, F., Yurimoto, H., Kubo, T., Kondo, T.Water solubility in Mg perovskites and water storage capacity in the lower mantleEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 211, 1-2, pp. 189-203.MantleBlank
DS200412-1144
2003
Kondo, T.Litasov, K., Ohtani, E., Langenhorst, F., Yurimoto, H., Kubo, T., Kondo, T.Water solubility in Mg perovskites and water storage capacity in the lower mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 211, 1-2, June 15, pp. 189-203.MantleWater storage
DS200612-0585
2006
Kondo, T.Hirao, N., Kondo, T., Ohtani, E., Kikegawa, T.Post hollandite phase in KAlSi308 as a possible host mineral of potassium in the Earth's lower mantle.International Mineralogical Association 19th. General Meeting, held Kobe, Japan July 23-28 2006, Abstract p. 130.MantleMineralogy
DS200612-1205
2006
Kondo, T.Sakai, T., Kondo, T., Ohtain, E., Terasaki, H., Endo, N., Kuba, T., Suzuki, T., Kikegawa, T.Interaction between iron and post perovskite at core mantle boundary and core signature in plume source region.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 33, 15, August 16, L15317MantleGeophysics - seismics, boundary
DS200612-1206
2006
Kondo, T.Sakai, T., Kondo, T., Ohtani, E., Terasaki, H., Miyahara, Yoo, Endo, Kuba, Suzuki, KikegawaWetting property at the core mantle boundary and core signature in plume source region.International Mineralogical Association 19th. General Meeting, held Kobe, Japan July 23-28 2006, Abstract p. 129.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200812-0471
2008
Kondo, T.Hirao, N., Ohtani, E., Kondo, T., Sakari, T., Kikegawa, T.Hollandite II phase in KAiSi3O8 as a potential host mineral of potassium in the Earth's lower mantle.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors., Vol. 166, 1-2, pp. 97-104.MantlePotassium
DS201012-0014
2009
Kondo, T.Asanuma, H., Ohtani, E., Sakai, T., Terasaki, H., Kamada, S., Kondo, T., Kikegawa, T.Melting of iron silicon alloy up to the core mantle boundary pressure: implications to the thermal structure of the Earth's core.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 37, 6, pp. 353-359.MantleMelting
DS201412-0646
2014
Kondo, T.Ohta, K., Fujino, K., Kuwayama, Y., Kondo, T., Shimizu, K., Ohishi, Y.Highly conductive iron rich (Mg, Fe) O magnesiowustite and its stability in the Earth's lower mantle.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 119, no. 6, pp. 4656-4665.MantleMineralogy
DS201511-1840
2015
Kondo, T.Harada, Y., Hishinuma, R., Terashima, C., Uetsuka, H., Nakata, K., Kondo, T., Yuasa, M., Fujishima, A.Rapid growth of diamond and its morphology by in-liquid plasma CVD.Diamond and Related Materials, in press available, 16p.TechnologySynthetics

Abstract: Diamond synthesis and its morphology by in-liquid plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method are investigated in this study. Diamond films were grown on Si substrates from mixed alcohol solution. Very high growth rate of 170 µm/h was achieved by this method. Microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond films were formed in different conditions. In the case of microcrystalline film, the shapes of diamond grains depend on the location in the film. All morphological differences in this study can be explained by the same mechanism of conventional gas phase CVD method. It means diamond morphology by in-liquid plasma CVD method can be controlled by process parameters as well as gas phase CVD method.
DS1987-0353
1987
Kondoh, S.Kitamura, M., Kondoh, S., et al.Planar OH bearing effects in mantle olivineNature, Vol. 328, No. 6126, July 9, pp. 143-145ArizonaBuell Park
DS200512-0100
2004
KondrashovBogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Golubeva, Zinchuk, Ilupin, Rotman, Levsky, Ovchinnikova, KondrashovVariations in chemical and isotopic compositions of the Yakutian kimberlites and their causes.Geochemistry International, Vol. 42, 9, pp. 799-821.Russia, Siberia, YakutiaGeochemistry
DS1998-0780
1998
Kondrashov, I.A.Kondrashov, I.A., Pervov, Sharkov et al.Layering in the southern Sakun high pressureotassium alkaline massif, AldanShield.Petrology, Vol. 6, No. 3, June, pp. 237-251.Russia, SiberiaGeochronology, Alkaline rocks
DS200612-0727
2006
Kondrashov, I.A.Kononova, V.A., Nosova, A.A., Pervov, V.A., Kondrashov, I.A.Compositional variations in kimberlites of the East European platform as a manifestation of sublithospheric geodynamic processes.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 409A, no. 6, July-August, pp. 952-957.Russia, Baltic ShieldGeodynamics
DS200712-0086
2007
Kondrashov, I.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Nosova, A.A., Kondrashov, I.A.Kimberlites and lamproites of east European platform: petrology and geochemistry.Petrology, Vol. 15, 4, pp.EuropeLamproite
DS200712-0087
2007
Kondrashov, I.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Nosova, A.A., Kondrashov, I.A.Kimberlites and lamproites of east European platform: petrology and geochemistry.Petrology, Vol. 15, 4, pp.EuropeLamproite
DS200812-0122
2008
Kondrashov, I.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Dubinina, E.O., Nosova, A.A., Kondrashov, I.A.Nature of carbonates from kimberlites of the Zimnii Bereg field, Arkangelsk: evidence from Rb Sr C and O isotope data.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 421,1, pp. 807-811.Russia, Kola Peninsula, ArchangelDeposit - Zimnii Bereg
DS200912-0399
2009
Kondrashov, I.A.Kononova, V.A., Kargin, A.V., Nosova, A.A., Kondrashov, I.A., Bogatikov, O.A.Geochemical comparison of kimberlites from the Siberian and East European platforms: problems of genesis and spatial zoning.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 428, 1, pp. 1156-1161.Russia, EuropeKimberlite genesis
DS201112-0535
2011
Kondrashov, I.A.Kononova, V.A., Bogatikov, O.A., Kondrashov, I.A.Kimberlites and lamproites: criteria for similarity and differences.Petrology, Vol. 19, 1, pp. 34-54.MantleGeodynamics - genesis
DS201601-0025
2015
Kondrashov, I.A.Kargin, A.V., Babarina, I.I., Bogatikov, O.A., Yutkina, E.V., Kondrashov, I.A.Paleproterozoic Kimozero kimberlite ( Karelian Craton): geological setting and geochemical typing.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 465, 1, pp. 1135-1138.RussiaDeposit - Kimozero

Abstract: Geological and structural mapping of Paleoproterozoic Kimozero kimberlite with account for lithological facies and geochemical specialization provides evidence for the multiphase structure of the kimberlite pipe, which underwent fragmentation as a result of shear–faulting deformations. Two geochemical types of kimberlite (magnesium and carbonate) are distinguished.
DS201705-0863
2017
Kondrashov, I.A.Nosova, A.A., Dubinina, E.O., Sazonova, L.V., Vargin, A.V., lebedeva, N.M., Khvostikov, V.A., Burmii, Zh.P., Kondrashov, I.A., Tretyachenko, V.V.Geochemistry and oxygen isotopic composition of olivine in kimberlites from the Arkhangelsk Province: contribution of mantle metasomatism.Petrology, Vol. 25, 2, pp. 150-180.Russia, Archangel, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Grib, Pionerskaya

Abstract: The paper presents data on the composition of olivine macrocrysts from two Devonian kimberlite pipes in the Arkhangelsk diamond province: the Grib pipe (whose kimberlite belongs to type I) and Pionerskaya pipe (whose kimberlite is of type II, i.e., orangeite). The dominant olivine macrocrysts in kimberlites from the two pipes significantly differ in geochemical and isotopic parameters. Olivine macrocrysts in kimberlite from the Grib pipe are dominated by magnesian (Mg# = 0.92-0.93), Ti-poor (Ti < 70 ppm) olivine possessing low Ti/Na (0.05-0.23), Zr/Nb (0.28-0.80), and Zn/Cu (3-20) ratios and low Li concentrations (1.2-2.0 ppm), and the oxygen isotopic composition of this olivine d18O = 5.64‰ is higher than that of olivine in mantle peridotites (d18O = 5.18 ± 0.28‰). Olivine macrocrysts in kimberlite from the Pionerskaya pipe are dominated by varieties with broadly varying Mg# = 0.90-0.93, high Ti concentrations (100-300 ppm), high ratios Ti/Na (0.90-2.39), Zr/Nb (0.31-1.96), and Zn/Cu (12-56), elevated Li concentrations (1.9-3.4 ppm), and oxygen isotopic composition d18O = 5.34‰ corresponding to that of olivine in mantle peridotites. The geochemical and isotopic traits of low-Ti olivine macrocrysts from the Grib pipe are interpreted as evidence that the olivine interacted with carbonate-rich melts/fluids. This conclusion is consistent with the geochemical parameters of model melt in equilibrium with the low-Ti olivine that are similar to those of deep carbonatite melts. Our calculations indicate that the variations in the d18O of the olivine relative the “mantle range” (toward both higher and lower values) can be fairly significant: from 4 to 7‰ depending on the composition of the carbonate fluid. These variations were formed at interaction with carbonate fluid, whose d18O values do not extend outside the range typical of mantle carbonates. The geochemical parameters of high-Ti olivine macrocrysts from the Grib pipe suggest that their origin was controlled by the silicate (water-silicate) component. This olivine is characterized by a zoned Ti distribution, with the configuration of this distribution between the cores of the crystals and their outer zones showing that the zoning of the cores and outer zones is independent and was produced during two episodes of reaction interaction between the olivine and melt/fluid. The younger episode (when the outer zone was formed) likely involved interaction with kimberlite melt. The transformation of the composition of the cores during the older episode may have been of metasomatic nature, as follows from the fact that the composition varies from grain to grain. The metasomatic episode most likely occurred shortly before the kimberlite melt was emplaced and was related to the partial melting of pyroxenite source material.
DS201811-2554
2018
Kondrashov, I.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Dokuchaev, A.Ya., Kargin, E.V., Yutkina, E.V., Kondrashov, I.A.Paleoproterozic kimberlites of the Lake Kimozero area, Karelian craton: ore mineralization in kimberlites and fault zones.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 482, 1, pp. 1130-1133.Russiadeposit - Lake Kimozero

Abstract: Syngenetic and epigenetic ore mineralization was studied in Paleoproterozoic metakimberlites in the area of Kimozero Lake. In the Kimozero structure, redeposited ore mineralization is constrained to fracture and shear zones and consists of Fe-vaesite, Fe-Co-polydymite, millerite, Ni-pyrrhotite, pentlandite, chalcopyrite, Zn-bearing copper, galena, and Ni-pyrite. The composition of this mineralization is analogous to that of syngenetic mineralization in pyroclastic and coherent kimberlite, and its likely source was the kimberlite itself.
DS202010-1848
2020
Kondrashov, I.A.Kargin, A.V., Nosova, A.A., Babarina, I.I., Dokuchaev, A.Ya., Kondrashov, I.A.Paleproterozoic kimberlites of Kimozero: petrographic facies recstruction of kimberlite pipe overcoming tectonic and metamorphic modification.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 493, 1, pp. 522-525.Russiadeposit - Kimozero

Abstract: Based on a detailed petrographic investigation and geological observations of the Paleoproterozoic Kimozero kimberlite (Karelia, Russia), we present a new model of kimberlite pipe with multiphase and mono-crater structure. We recognised volcanoclastic and coherent kimberlite series that filled the inner and outer zones of the kimberlite crater. The multiphase structure, emplacement style, petrography and reconstructed size of the Kimozero kimberlite correspond to Phanerozoic kimberlite pipes.
DS200712-0267
2007
Kondratov, L.S.Dorijnamjaa, D., Kondratov, L.S., Voinkov, D.M., Amarsaikhan, Ts.Specific gas composition of the absorbed form in impatites of the diamond bearing Mongolian astropipes.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A231.Asia, MongoliaAgit Khangay, Khuree Mandal Tsenkher, Bayan Khuree
DS201709-1980
2011
Kondratov, L.S.Dorjnamjaa, D., Voinkov, D.M., Kondratov, L.S., Selenge, D., Altanshagai, G., Enkhbatar, B.Concerning diamond and gold bearing astropipes of Mongolia.International Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Vol. 1, pp. 98-104.Asia, Mongoliaastropipes, impact craters

Abstract: In this paper we present summation of eighteen year’s investigation of the all gold and diamond-bearing astropipes of Mongolia. Four astropipe structures are exemplified by the Agit Khangay (10 km in diameter, 470 38' N; 960 05' E), Khuree Mandal (D=11 km; 460 28' N; 980 25' E), Bayan Khuree (D=1 km; 440 06' N; 1090 36' E), and Tsenkher (D=7 km; 980 21' N; 430 36' E) astropipes of Mongolia. Detailed geological and gas-geochemical investigation of the astropipe structures show that diamond genesis is an expression of collision of the lithospheric mantle with the explosion process initiated in an impact collapse meteor crater. The term "astropipes" (Dorjnamjaa et al., 2010, 2011) is a neologism and new scientific discovery in Earth science and these structures are unique in certain aspects. The Mongolian astropipes are genuine "meteorite crater" structures but they also contain kimberlite diamonds and gold. Suevite-like rocks from the astropipes contain such minerals, as olivine, coesite, moissanite (0,6 mm), stishovite, coesite, kamacite,tektite, khamaravaevite (mineral of meteorite titanic carbon), graphite-2H, khondrite, picroilmenite, pyrope, phlogopite, khangaite (tektite glass, 1,0-3,0 mm in size), etc. Most panned samples and hand specimens contain fine diamonds with octahedrol habit (0, 2-2,19 mm, 6,4 mg or 0,034-0,1 carat) and gold (0,1-5 g/t). Of special interest is the large amount of the black magnetic balls (0,05-5,0 mm) are characterized by high content of Ti, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mn, Mg, Cd, Ga, Cl, Al, Si, K. Meanwhile, shatter cones (size approx. 1.0 m) which are known from many meteorite craters on the Earth as being typical of impact craters were first described by us Khuree Mandal and Tsenkher astropipe structures. All the described meteorite craters posses reliable topographic, geological, mineralogical, geochemical, and aerospace mapping data, also some geophysical and petrological features (especially shock metamorphism) have been found, all of which indicate that these structures are a proven new type of gold-diamond-bearing impact structure, termed here "astropipes". The essence of the phenomenon is mantle manifestation and plume of a combined nuclear-magma-palingenesis interaction.
DS201905-1027
2019
Kondrin, M.V.Ekimov, E.A., Kondrin, M.V., Krivobok, V.S., Khomich, A.A., Vlasov, I.I., Khmelnitskiy, R.A.Effect of Si, Ge and Sn dopant elements on structure and photoluminescence of nano- and microdiamonds synthesized from organic compounds.Diamond & Related Materials, Vol. 93, pp. 75-83.Globalluminescence

Abstract: HPHT synthesis of diamonds from hydrocarbons attracts great attention due to the opportunity to obtain luminescent nano- and microcrystals of high structure perfection. Systematic investigation of diamond synthesized from the mixture of hetero-hydrocarbons containing dopant elements Si or Ge (C24H20Si and C24H20Ge) with a pure hydrocarbon - adamantane (C10H16) at 8?GPa was performed. The photoluminescence of SiV- and GeV- centers in produced diamonds was found to be saturated when Si and Ge contents in precursors exceed some threshold values. The presence of SiC or Ge as second phases in diamond samples with saturated luminescence indicates that ultimate concentrations of the dopants were reached in diamond. It is shown that SiC inclusions can be captured by growing crystals and be a source of local stresses up to 2?GPa in diamond matrix. No formation of Ge-related inclusions in diamonds was detected, which makes Ge more promising as a dopant in the synthesis method. Surprisingly, the synthesis of diamonds from the C24H20Sn hetero-hydrocarbon was ineffective for SnV- formation: only fluorescence of N-and Si-related color centers was detected at room temperature. As an example of great potential for the synthesis method, mass synthesis of 50-nm diamonds with GeV- centers was realized at 9.4?GPa. Single GeV- production in individual nanodiamond was demonstrated.
DS201707-1353
2017
Kondrorashov, I.A.Nosova, A., Tretyachenko, V.V., Sazonova, L.V., Kargin, A.V., Lebedeva, N.M., Khovostikov, V.A., Burmii, Zh.P., Kondrorashov, I.A., Tretyachenko, V.V.Geochemistry and oxygen isotopic composition of olivine in kimberlites from the Arkhangelsk province: contribution of mantle metasomatism.Petrology, Vol. 25, 2, pp. 150-180.Russia, Archangel, Kola Peninsuladeposit - Grib, Pionerskaya

Abstract: The paper presents data on the composition of olivine macrocrysts from two Devonian kimberlite pipes in the Arkhangelsk diamond province: the Grib pipe (whose kimberlite belongs to type I) and Pionerskaya pipe (whose kimberlite is of type II, i.e., orangeite). The dominant olivine macrocrysts in kimberlites from the two pipes significantly differ in geochemical and isotopic parameters. Olivine macrocrysts in kimberlite from the Grib pipe are dominated by magnesian (Mg# = 0.92–0.93), Ti-poor (Ti < 70 ppm) olivine possessing low Ti/Na (0.05–0.23), Zr/Nb (0.28–0.80), and Zn/Cu (3–20) ratios and low Li concentrations (1.2–2.0 ppm), and the oxygen isotopic composition of this olivine d18O = 5.64‰ is higher than that of olivine in mantle peridotites (d18O = 5.18 ± 0.28‰). Olivine macrocrysts in kimberlite from the Pionerskaya pipe are dominated by varieties with broadly varying Mg# = 0.90–0.93, high Ti concentrations (100–300 ppm), high ratios Ti/Na (0.90–2.39), Zr/Nb (0.31–1.96), and Zn/Cu (12–56), elevated Li concentrations (1.9–3.4 ppm), and oxygen isotopic composition d18O = 5.34‰ corresponding to that of olivine in mantle peridotites. The geochemical and isotopic traits of low-Ti olivine macrocrysts from the Grib pipe are interpreted as evidence that the olivine interacted with carbonate-rich melts/fluids. This conclusion is consistent with the geochemical parameters of model melt in equilibrium with the low-Ti olivine that are similar to those of deep carbonatite melts. Our calculations indicate that the variations in the d18O of the olivine relative the “mantle range” (toward both higher and lower values) can be fairly significant: from 4 to 7‰ depending on the composition of the carbonate fluid. These variations were formed at interaction with carbonate fluid, whose d18O values do not extend outside the range typical of mantle carbonates. The geochemical parameters of high-Ti olivine macrocrysts from the Grib pipe suggest that their origin was controlled by the silicate (water–silicate) component. This olivine is characterized by a zoned Ti distribution, with the configuration of this distribution between the cores of the crystals and their outer zones showing that the zoning of the cores and outer zones is independent and was produced during two episodes of reaction interaction between the olivine and melt/fluid. The younger episode (when the outer zone was formed) likely involved interaction with kimberlite melt. The transformation of the composition of the cores during the older episode may have been of metasomatic nature, as follows from the fact that the composition varies from grain to grain. The metasomatic episode most likely occurred shortly before the kimberlite melt was emplaced and was related to the partial melting of pyroxenite source material.
DS201610-1851
2010
Kone, F.Chirico, P.G., Barthelemy, F., Kone, F.Alluvial diamond resource potential and production capacity assessment of Mali.U.S. Geological Survey, Report 2010-5044, 23p.Africa, MaliAlluvials, resources

Abstract: South Africa, and attended by representatives of the diamond industry and leaders of African governments to develop a certification process intended to assure that rough, exported diamonds were free of conflictual concerns. This meeting was supported later in 2000 by the United Nations in a resolution adopted by the General Assembly. By 2002, the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) was ratified and signed by diamond-producing and diamond-importing countries. Over 70 countries were included as members of the KPCS at the end of 2007. To prevent trade in "conflict diamonds" while protecting legitimate trade, the KPCS requires that each country set up an internal system of controls to prevent conflict diamonds from entering any imported or exported shipments of rough diamonds. Every diamond or diamond shipment must be accompanied by a Kimberley Process (KP) certificate and be contained in tamper-proof packaging. The objective of this study was (1) to assess the naturally occurring endowment of diamonds in Mali (potential resources) based on geological evidence, previous studies, and recent field data and (2) to assess the diamond-production capacity and measure the intensity of mining activity. Several possible methods can be used to estimate the potential diamond resource. However, because there is generally a lack of sufficient and consistent data recording all diamond mining in Mali and because time to conduct fieldwork and accessibility to the diamond mining areas are limited, four different methodologies were used: the cylindrical calculation of the primary kimberlitic deposits, the surface area methodology, the volume and grade approach, and the content per kilometer approach. Approximately 700,000 carats are estimated to be in the alluvial deposits of the Kenieba region, with 540,000 carats calculated to lie within the concentration grade deposits. Additionally, 580,000 carats are estimated to have been released from the primary kimberlites in the region. Therefore, the total estimated diamond resources in the Kenieba region are thought to be nearly 1,300,000 carats. The Bougouni zones are estimated to have 1,000,000 carats with more than half, 630,000 carats, contained in concentrated deposits. When combined, the Kenieba and Bougouni regions of Mali are estimated to be host to 2,300,000 carats of diamonds.
DS201602-0230
2016
Konecny, P.Petrik, I., Janak, M., Froitzheim, N., Georgiev, N., Yoshida, K., Sasinkova, V., Konecny, P., Milovska, S.Triassic to Early Jurassic (c.200 Ma) UHP metamorphism in the Central Rhodopes: evidence from U-Pb-Th dating of monazite in diamond bearing gneiss from Chelelpare, Bulgaria.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, in press available, 44p.Europe, BulgariaGneiss - diamonds

Abstract: Evidence for ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism (UHPM) in the Rhodope Metamorphic Complex comes from occurrence of diamond in pelitic gneisses, variably overprinted by granulite facies metamorphism, known from several areas of the Rhodopes. However, tectonic setting and timing of UHPM are not interpreted unanimously. Linking age to metamorphic stage is a prerequisite for reconstruction of these processes. Here we use monazite in diamond-bearing gneiss from Chepelare (Bulgaria) to date the diamond-forming UHPM event in the Central Rhodopes. The diamond-bearing gneiss comes from a strongly deformed, lithologically heterogeneous zone (Chepelare Mélange) sandwiched between two migmatized orthogneiss units, known as Arda-I and Arda-II. Diamond, identified by Raman micro-spectroscopy, shows the characteristic band mostly centred between 1332 and 1330 cm-1. The microdiamond occurs as single grains or polyphase diamond + carbonate inclusions, rarely with CO2. Thermodynamic modelling shows that garnet was stable at UHP conditions of 3.5-4.6 GPa and 700-800 °C, in the stability field of diamond, and was re-equilibrated at granulite facies/partial melting conditions of 0.8-1.2 GPa and 750-800 °C. The texture of monazite shows older central parts and extensive younger domains which formed due to metasomatic replacement in solid residue and/or overgrowth in melt domains. The monazite core compositions, with distinctly lower Y, Th and U contents, suggest its formation in equilibrium with garnet. The U-Th-Pb dating of monazite using electron microprobe analysis yielded a c. 200 Ma age for the older cores with low Th, Y, U and high La/Nd ratio, and a c. 160 Ma age for the dominant younger monazite enriched in Th, Y, U and HREE. The older age of around 200 Ma is interpreted as the timing of UHPM whereas the younger age of around 160 Ma as granulite facies/partial melting overprint. Our results suggest that UHPM occurred in Late Triassic to Early Jurassic time, in the framework of collision and subduction of continental crust after the closure of Palaeotethys.
DS201604-0621
2016
Konecny, P.Petrik, I., Janak, M., Froitzheim, N., Georgiev, N., Yoshida, K., Sasinkova, V., Konecny, P., Milovska, S.Triassic to Early Jurassic ( c. 200Ma) UHP metamorphism in the Central Rhodopes: evidence from U-Pb dating of monazite in diamond bearing gneiss from Chepelare ( Bulgaria).Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 34, 3, pp. 265-291.Europe, BulgariaUHP diamond bearing gneiss
DS201606-1105
2016
Konecny, P.Petrik, I., Janak, M., Froitzheim, N., Georgiev, N., Yoshida, K., Sasinkova, V., Konecny, P., Milovska, S.Triassic to Early Jurassic ( c. 200Ma) UHP metamorphism in the central Rhodopes: evidence from U-Pb-Th dating of monazite in diamond bearing gneiss from Chepelare Bulgaria.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 34, 3, pp. 265-291.Europe, BulgariaDiamonds in gneiss
DS1985-0576
1985
Konenko, V.F.Ryabov, V.V., Konenko, V.F., Khmelnikova, O.S.Rock Forming Minerals of Picritic Basalts of the Norilsk RegionSoviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 26, No. 4, pp. 77-84RussiaPicrite
DS1994-1709
1994
Kones, R.K.Street, G.J., Bulletinock, S.J., Kones, R.K.Airborne geophysics in diamond and gemstone explorationPreprint from Snowden Mining Forum held May 18, Perth, 8p. 6 figuresLesotho, Russia, Siberia, Northwest Territories, BotswanaGeophysics -aeromagnetics, Case histories -Australia
DS1995-0532
1995
KonevFeoktistov, G.D., Vladimirov, B.M., Egorov, K.N., KonevKimberlite and lamproite comparative petrogeochemistryProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 152-54.Russia, SiberiaLamproite, Petrology
DS1996-0454
1996
Konev, A.Feoktistov, G.D., Vladimirov, B.M., Egorov, K.N., Konev, A.Petrochemical comparison of kimberlites and some lamproites of the Siberian Platform and Australia.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 37, No. 10, pp. 26-33.Russia, Siberia, AustraliaLamproites, Petrology
DS1988-0369
1988
Konev, A.A.Konev, A.A., Bekman, I.K., Vorobiev, E.I., Piskunova, L.F.Leucitic lamproites of the Molbo River.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 299, No. 3, pp. 707-710RussiaBlank
DS1990-0873
1990
Konev, A.A.Konev, A.A., Vorobjev, E.I., Malyshonok, Yu.V., PiskyuNew dat a on the mineralogy of carbonatitesInternational Mineralogical Association Meeting Held June, 1990 Beijing China, Vol. 2, extended abstract p. 701-702RussiaCarbonatite, Classification -Sr Ba
DS1993-0838
1993
Konev, A.A.Konev, A.A., Feoktistov, G.D.Petrochemical features of the Aldan lamproitesRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 34, No. 6, pp. 78-83.Russia, YakutiaLamproite, Mineral chemistry, petrochemistry
DS1995-1426
1995
Konev, A.A.Panina, L.I., Konev, A.A.Genetic features of the Molbo River lamproites, West AldanGeochemistry International, Vol. 32, No. 11, Nov. 1, pp. 49-59.Russia, Aldan shieldLamproites, Deposit -Molbo River
DS1999-0774
1999
Konev, A.A.Vorobev, E.I., Konev, A.A.Evolution of carbonate substrate of carbonatitesRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 40, No. 8, pp. 1208-16.RussiaCarbonatite
DS1999-0775
1999
Konev, A.A.Vorobev, E.I., Koval, P.V., Konev, A.A., Suvorova, L.F.Geochemistry of calcite from carbonatite like rocks and leucogranites of Taryn Massif ( Alden Shield).Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 40, No. 5, pp. 712-21.Russia, Aldan ShieldCarbonatite
DS200712-0876
2007
Konev, A.A.Rasskazov, S.V., Ilyasova, A.M., Konev, A.A., Yasnygina, Maslovskaya, Feflov, Demonterova, SaraninaGeochemical evidence of the Zadoi alkaline ultramafic Massif, Cis Sayan area southern Siberia.Geochemistry International, Vol. 45, 1, pp. 1-14.Russia, SiberiaAlkalic
DS1991-0916
1991
Koneva, A.A.Koneva, A.A., Ushchapovskaya, Z.F.Harkerite and buntfolteinite* from the skarns of Tazheran alkaline intrusion (southwestern Baikal region).spelling misinterpreted intranslation?Soviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 32, No. 3, pp. 74-77Russia, Lake BaikalAlkaline rocks, Mineralogy
DS1998-0980
1998
KongMcKinlay, F.T., Scott Smith, B.H., De Gasperis, KongGeology of the recently discovered Hardy Lake kimberlites, northwest Territories7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 564-6.Northwest TerritoriesXenocrysts, palynology, Deposit - Hardy Lake
DS1988-0156
1988
Kong, H.S.Davis, R.F., Sitar, Z., Williams, B.E., Kong, H.S., Kim, H.J. et.Critical evaluation of the status of the areas for future research regarding the wide band GAP semi-conductors diamond, gallium nitride and silicon carbideMaterial Sci. Eng. B. Solid State Adv. Technol, Vol. B1, No. 1, Aug. pp. 77-104GlobalDiamond synthesis
DS201312-0966
2013
Kong, J.Wescott, P., Nichols, K., Stachel, T., Muehlenbachs, K., Kong, J.Infrared spectroscopy and carbon isotopic analyses of Victor mine diamonds.2013 Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts, p. 82-83.Canada, OntarioDeposit - Victor
DS201705-0870
2017
Kong, J.Pearson, G., Krebs, M., Stachel. T., Woodland, S., Chinn, I., Kong, J.Trace elements in gem-quality diamonds: origin and evolution of diamond-forming fluid inclusions.European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2017, Vienna April 23-28, 1p. 19281 AbstractTechnologyDiamond inclusions
DS201709-2043
2017
Kong, J.Pimenta Martins, L.G., Matos, M.J.S., Paschoal, A.R., Freire, P.T.C., Andrade, N.F., Aguiar, A.L., Kong, J., Neves, B.R.A., de Oliveira, A.B., Mazzoni, M.S.C., Souza Filhio, A.G., Cancad, L.G.Raman evidence for pressure induced formation of diamondene.Nature Communications, Vol. 8, 9p.Technologydiamondene

Abstract: Despite the advanced stage of diamond thin-film technology, with applications ranging from superconductivity to biosensing, the realization of a stable and atomically thick two-dimensional diamond material, named here as diamondene, is still forthcoming. Adding to the outstanding properties of its bulk and thin-film counterparts, diamondene is predicted to be a ferromagnetic semiconductor with spin polarized bands. Here, we provide spectroscopic evidence for the formation of diamondene by performing Raman spectroscopy of double-layer graphene under high pressure. The results are explained in terms of a breakdown in the Kohn anomaly associated with the finite size of the remaining graphene sites surrounded by the diamondene matrix. Ab initio calculations and molecular dynamics simulations are employed to clarify the mechanism of diamondene formation, which requires two or more layers of graphene subjected to high pressures in the presence of specific chemical groups such as hydroxyl groups or hydrogens.
DS201805-0934
2018
Kong, J.Aulbach, S., Creaser, R.A., Stachel, T., Kong, J.Diamond ages from Victor ( Superior craton): intra-mantle cycling of volatiles ( C.N.S) during supercontinent reorganisation.Earth Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 490, pp. 77-87.Canada, Ontariodeposit - Victor

Abstract: The central Superior Craton hosts both the diamondiferous 1.1 Ga Kyle Lake and Jurassic Attawapiskat kimberlites. A major thermal event related to the Midcontinent Rift at ca. 1.1 Ga induced an elevated geothermal gradient that largely destroyed an older generation of diamonds, raising the question of when, and how, the diamond inventory beneath Attawapiskat was formed. We determined Re-Os isotope systematics of sulphides included in diamonds from Victor by isotope dilution negative thermal ionisation mass spectrometry in order to obtain insights into the age and nature of the diamond source in the context of regional tectonothermal evolution. Regression of the peridotitic inclusion data (n = 14 of 16) yields a 718 ± 49 Ma age, with an initial 187Os/188Os ratio of 0.1177 ± 0.0016, i.e. depleted at the time of formation (?Os -3.7 ± 1.3). Consequently, Re depletion model ages calculated for these samples are systematically overestimated. Given that reported 187Os/188Os in olivine from Attawapiskat xenoliths varies strongly (0.1012-0.1821), the low and nearly identical initial Os of sulphide inclusions combined with their high 187Re/188Os (median 0.34) suggest metasomatic formation from a mixed source. This was likely facilitated by percolation of amounts of melt sufficient to homogenise Os, (re)crystallise sulphide and (co)precipitate diamond; that is, the sulphide inclusions and their diamond host are synchronous if not syngenetic. The ~720 Ma age corresponds to rifting beyond the northern craton margin during Rodinia break-up. This suggests mobilisation of volatiles (C, N, S) and Os due to attendant mantle stretching and metasomatism by initially oxidising and S-undersaturated melts, which ultimately produced lherzolitic diamonds with high N contents compared to older Kyle Lake diamonds. Thus, some rift-influenced settings are prospective with respect to diamond formation. They are also important sites of hidden, intra-lithospheric volatile redistribution that can be revealed by diamond studies. Later emplacement of the Attawapiskat kimberlites, linking the carbon cycle to the surface, was associated with renewed disturbance during passage of the Great Meteor Hotspot. Lherzolitic diamond formation from oxidising small-volume melts may be the expression of an early and deep stage of the lithospheric conditioning required for the successful eruption of kimberlites, which complements the late and shallow emplacement of volatile-rich metasomes after upward displacement of a redox freezing front.
DS201812-2786
2018
Kong, J.Bulbuc, K.M., Galarneau, M., Stachel, T., Stern, R.A., Kong, J., Chinn, I.Contrasting growth conditions for sulphide-and garnet-included diamonds from the Victor mine ( Ontario).2018 Yellowknife Geoscience Forum , p. 97-98. abstractCanada, Ontario, Attawapiskatdeposit - Victor

Abstract: The Victor Diamond Mine, located in the Attawapiskat kimberlite field (Superior Craton), is known for its exceptional diamond quality. Here we study the chemical environment of formation of Victor diamonds. We imaged eight sulphide-included diamond plates from Victor using cathodoluminescence (CL). Then, along core-rim transects, we measured nitrogen content and aggregation state utilizing Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and the stable isotope compositions of carbon (d13C) and nitrogen (d15N), using a multi-collector ion microprobe (MC-SIMS). We compare the internal growth features and chemical characteristics of these sulphide inclusion-bearing diamonds with similar data on garnet inclusion-bearing diamonds from Victor (BSc thesis Galarneau). Using this information, possible fractionation processes during diamond precipitation are considered and inferences on the speciation of the diamond forming fluid(s) are explored. Sulphide inclusion-bearing diamonds show much greater overall complexity in their internal growth features than garnet inclusion-bearing diamonds. Two of the sulphide-included samples have cores that represent an older generation of diamond growth. Compared to garnet inclusion-bearing diamonds, the sulphide-included diamonds show very little intra-sample variation in both carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition; the inter-sample variations in carbon isotopic composition, however, are higher than in garnet included diamonds. For sulphide-included diamonds, d13C ranges from -3.4 to -17.5 and d15N ranges from -0.2 to -9.2. Garnet inclusion-bearing diamonds showed d13C values ranging from -4.6 to -6.0 and d15N ranging from -2.8 to -10.8. The observation of some 13C depleted samples indicates that, unlike the lherzolitic garnet inclusion-bearing diamonds, the sulphide inclusion-bearing diamonds are likely both peridotitic and eclogitic in origin. The total range in N content across sulphide inclusion-bearing diamonds was 2 to 981 at ppm, similar to the garnet-included samples with a range of 5 to 944 at ppm. The very limited variations in carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures across growth layers indicate that sulphide-included Victor diamonds grew at comparatively high fluid:rock ratios. This is contrasted by the garnet inclusion-bearing diamonds that commonly show the effects of Rayleigh fractionation and hence grew under fluid-limited conditions.
DS201812-2831
2018
Kong, J.Krebs, M.Y., Pearson, D.G., Stachel, T., Laiginhas, F., Woodland, S., Chinn, I., Kong, J.A common parentage - Low abundance trace element data of gem diamonds reveals similar fluids to fibrous diamonds. ( silicate/sulphide)Lithos, doi.org/10.1016/ jlithos.2018.11.025 49p.Canada, Ontario, Attawapiskat, Africa, South Africadeposit - Victor, Finsch, Newlands

Abstract: Quantitative trace element data from high-purity gem diamonds from the Victor Mine, Ontario, Canada as well as near-gem diamonds from peridotite and eclogite xenoliths from the Finsch and Newlands mines, South Africa, acquired using an off-line laser ablation method show that we see the same spectrum of fluids in both high-purity gem and near-gem diamonds that was previously documented in fibrous diamonds. “Planed” and “ribbed” trace element patterns characterize not only the high-density fluid (HDF) inclusions in fibrous diamonds but also in gem diamonds. Two diamonds from two Finsch harzburgite xenoliths show trace element patterns similar to those of saline fluids, documenting the involvement of saline fluids in the precipitation of gem diamonds, further strengthening the link between the parental fluids of both gem and fibrous diamonds. Differences in trace element characteristics are evident between Victor diamonds containing silicate inclusions compared with Victor diamonds containing sulphide inclusions. The sulphide-bearing diamonds show lower levels of inter-element fractionation and more widely varying siderophile element concentrations - indicating that the silicate and sulphide-bearing diamonds likely formed by gradations of the same processes, via melt-rock reaction or from a subtly different fluid source. The shallow negative LREEN-HREEN slopes displayed by the Victor diamonds establish a signature indicative of original derivation of the diamond forming agent during major melting (~10% melt). Consequently, this signature must have been passed on to HDFs separating from such silicate melts.
DS201902-0288
2019
Kong, J.Krebs, M.Y., Pearson, D.G., Stachel, T., Laiginhas, F., Woodland, S., Chinn, I., Kong, J.A common parentage low abundance trace element data of gem diamonds reveals similar fluids to fibrous diamonds.Lithos, Vol. 324, 1, pp. 356-370.Canada, Ontario, Africa, South Africadeposit - Victor, Finsch, Newlands

Abstract: Quantitative trace element data from high-purity gem diamonds from the Victor Mine, Ontario, Canada as well as near-gem diamonds from peridotite and eclogite xenoliths from the Finsch and Newlands mines, South Africa, acquired using an off-line laser ablation method show that we see the same spectrum of fluids in both high-purity gem and near-gem diamonds that was previously documented in fibrous diamonds. "Planed" and "ribbed" trace element patterns characterize not only the high-density fluid (HDF) inclusions in fibrous diamonds but also in gem diamonds. Two diamonds from two Finsch harzburgite xenoliths show trace element patterns similar to those of saline fluids, documenting the involvement of saline fluids in the precipitation of gem diamonds, further strengthening the link between the parental fluids of both gem and fibrous diamonds. Differences in trace element characteristics are evident between Victor diamonds containing silicate inclusions compared with Victor diamonds containing sulphide inclusions. The sulphide-bearing diamonds show lower levels of inter-element fractionation and more widely varying siderophile element concentrations - indicating that the silicate and sulphide-bearing diamonds likely formed by gradations of the same processes, via melt-rock reaction or from a subtly different fluid source. The shallow negative LREEN-HREEN slopes displayed by the Victor diamonds establish a signature indicative of original derivation of the diamond forming agent during major melting (~10% melt). Consequently, this signature must have been passed on to HDFs separating from such silicate melts.
DS1998-0781
1998
Kong, J.M.Kong, J.M., Boucher, D.R., Scott Smith, B.H.Exploration and geology of the Attawapiskat kimberlites, James Bay Northern Ontario.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 446-8.OntarioGeology - exploration history, textures, geochronology, Deposit - Attawapiskat
DS2002-0476
2002
Kong, J.M.Fowler, J.A., Grutter, H.S., Kong, J.M., Wood, B.D.Diamond exploration in Northern Ontario with reference to the Victor kimberlite, near Attawapiskat.Exploration and Mining Geology, Vol. 10, 1-2, pp. 67-75.OntarioExploration - time lines for mining sequence, Evaluation, program
DS201112-0897
2011
Kong, J.M.Sader, J.A., Hattori, K.H., Kong, J.M., Hamilton, S.M., Brauneder, K.Geochemical responses in peat groundwater over Attawapiskat kimberlites, James Bay Lowlands, Canada and their application to diamond exploration.Geochemistry, Exploration, Environment, Analysis:, Vol. 11, pp. 193-210.Canada, Ontario, James Bay LowlandsGeochemistry
DS201810-2304
2018
Kong, W.Cheng, Z., Zhang, Z., Aibai, A., Kong, W., Holtz, F.The role of magmatic and post-magmatic hydrothermal processes on rare earth element mineralization: a study of the Bachu carbonatites from the Tarim Large Igneous Province, NW China.Lithos, Vol. 314-315, pp. 71-87.Chinacarbonatite

Abstract: The contribution of magmatic and hydrothermal processes to rare earth element (REE) mineralization of carbonatites remains an area of considerable interest. With the aim of better understanding REE mineralization mechanisms, we conducted a detailed study on the petrology, mineralogy and C-O isotopes of the Bachu carbonatites, NW China. The Bachu carbonatites are composed predominantly of magnesiocarbonatite with minor calciocarbonatite. The two types of carbonatite have primarily holocrystalline textures dominated by dolomite and calcite, respectively. Monazite-(Ce) and bastnäsite-(Ce), the major REE minerals, occur as euhedral grains and interstitial phases in the carbonatites. Melt inclusions in the dolomite partially rehomogenize at temperatures above 800?°C, and those in apatite have homogenization temperatures (Th) ranging from 645 to 785?°C. Oxygen isotope ratios of the calciocarbonatite intrusions (d18OV-SMOW?=?6.4‰ to 8.3‰), similar to the magnesiocarbonatites, indicate the parental magma is mantle-derived, and that they may derive from a more evolved stage of carbonatite fractionation. The magnesiocarbonatites are slightly enriched in LREE whereas calciocarbonatites have higher HREE concentrations. Both dolomite and calcite have low total REE (TREE) contents ranging from 112 to 436?ppm and 88 to 336?ppm, respectively, much lower than the bulk rock composition of the carbonatites (371 to 36,965?ppm). Hence, the fractional crystallization of carbonates is expected to elevate REE concentrations in the residual magma. Rocks from the Bachu deposit with the highest TREE concentration (up to 20?wt%) occur as small size (2?mm to 3 cm) red rare earth-rich veins (RRV) with barite + celestine + fluorapatite + monazite-(Ce) associations. These rocks are interpreted to have a hydrothermal origin, confirmed by the fluid inclusions in barite with Th in the range 198-267?°C. Hydrothermal processes may also explain the existence of interstitial textures in the carbonatites with similar mineral assemblages. The C-O isotopic compositions of the RRV (d13CV-PDB?=?-3.6 to -4.3‰, d18OV-SMOW?=?7.6 to 9.8‰) are consistent with an origin resulting from fluid exsolution at the end of the high temperature fractionation trend. A two-stage model involving fractional crystallization and hydrothermal fluids is proposed for the mineralization of the Bachu REE deposit.
DS1997-0613
1997
Kongolo, J.G.N.Kongolo, J.G.N.Presentation by the Minister of MinesMiga Conference Held Denver June 3-5, 7pGlobalMining
DS2003-0663
2003
Konig, M.Jokat, W., Boebel, T., Konig, M., Meyer, U.Timing and geometry of early Gondwana breakupJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B9, Sept. 16, 10.1029/2002JB001802RodiniaTectonics
DS200412-0922
2003
Konig, M.Jokat, W., Boebel, T., Konig, M., Meyer, U.Timing and geometry of early Gondwana breakup.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B9, Sept. 16, 10.1029/2002 JB001802Gondwana, RodiniaTectonics
DS200812-0307
2008
Konig, M.Eagles, G., Konig, M.A model of plate kinematics in Gondwana breakup.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 173, 2, pp. 703-717.MantleTectonics
DS201012-0401
2009
Konig, S.Konig, S., Munker, C., Schuth, S., Luguet, A., Hoffmann, J.E., Kuduon, J.Boninites as windows into trace element mobility in subduction zones.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 74, 2, pp. 684-704.MantleSubduction
DS201112-0534
2011
Konig, S.Konig, S., Munker, C., Hohl, S., Paulick, H., Barth, A.R., Lagos, M., Pfander, J., Buchl, A.The Earth's tungsten budget during mantle melting and crust formation.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 78, 8, pp. 2119-2136.MantleMelting - not specific to diamonds
DS201312-0496
2014
Konig, S.Konig, S., Lorand, J-P., Luguet, A., Pearson, D.G.A non primitive origin of near-chondritic S-Se-Te ratios in mantle peridotites; implications for the Earth's late accretionary history.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 385, pp. 110-121.MantlePeridotite
DS201508-0356
2015
Konig, S.Harvey, J., Konig, S., Luguet, A.The effects of melt depletion and metasomatism on highly siderophile and strongly chalcophile elements: S-Se-Te-Re-PGE systematics of peridotite xenoliths from Kilbourne Hole, New Mexico.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 166, pp. 210-233.United States, New Mexico, Colorado PlateauPeridotite, xenoliths
DS201508-0367
2015
Konig, S.Luguet, A., Behrens, M., Pearson, D.G., Konig, S., Herwartz, D.Significance of the whole rock Re-Os ages in cryptically and modally metasomatized cratonic peridotites: constraints from HSE-Se-Te systematics.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 164, pp. 441-463.Africa, BotswanaDeposit - Letlhakane
DS1989-0048
1989
Konikov, A.Z.Avchenko, O.V, Gabov, N.F., Kozyreva, A.Z., Konikov, A.Z., TravinEclogites of North Muiskaya Block- the composition and genesis.(Russian)Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. Geol., (Russian), No. 5, pp. 68-82RussiaEclogites
DS1989-0049
1989
Konikov, A.Z. Travin.Avchenko, O.V., Gabov, N.F., Kozyreva, I.V., Konikov, A.Z. Travin.Composition and origin of eclogites of the North Muya blockInternational Geology Review, Vol. 31, No. 8, August pp. 792-805RussiaEclogites, North Muya
DS2000-0513
2000
Konikov, E.G.Konikov, E.G.Distribution of sulphides and norites in the Elan intrusive body Voronezh Crystalline Massif .. boniniteRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 41,9,pp.1214-24.RussiaMagmas - boninite
DS200412-1328
2004
KonilovMints, M.V., Berzin, R.G., Suleimanov,A.K., Zamozhnyana, N.G., Stupak, Konilov, Zlobin, KaulinaThe deep structure of Early Precambrian Crust of the Karelian Craton, southeastern Fennoscandian shield: results of investigatioGeotectonics, Vol. 38, 2, pp. 87-102.Europe, Fennoscandia, Kola PeninsulaGeophysics - seismics
DS200512-0728
2004
KonilovMints, M.V., Berzin, R.G., Andryushchenko, Y.N., Zamozhnyaya, N.G., Zlobin, Konilov, Stupak, SuleimanovThe deep structure of the Karelian Craton along Geotraverse 1-EB.Geotectonics, Vol. 38, 5, pp. 329-342.RussiaGeophysics - seismics
DS1991-0500
1991
Konilov, A.N.Fonarev, V.I., Graphchikov, A.A., Konilov, A.N.A consistent system of geothermometers for metamorphic complexesInternational Geology Review, Vol. 33, No. 8, August pp. 743-783RussiaGeothermometry, Metamorphic complexes
DS200512-1151
2004
Konilov, A.N.Volodichev, O.I.,Slabunov, A.I., Bibikova, E.V., Konilov, A.N., Kuzenko, T.I.Archean eclogites in the Belomorian mobile belt, Baltic Shield.Petrology, Vol. 12, 6, pp. 540-560.Russia, Baltic ShieldEclogite
DS201012-0499
2010
Konilov, A.N.Mints, M.V., Belousova, E.A., Konilov, A.N., Natapov, Shchipansky, Griffin, O'Reilly, Dokukina, KaulinaMesoarchean subduction processes: 2.87 Ga eclogites from the Kola Peninsula, Russia.Geology, Vol. 38, 8, pp. 739-742.Russia, Kola PeninsulaBelomorian
DS201012-0500
2010
Konilov, A.N.Mints, M.V., Konilov, A.N., Dokukina, Kaulina, Belousova, Natapov, Griffin, O'ReillyThe Belomorian eclogite province: unique evidence of Meso-Neoarchean subduction and collisionsDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 434, 2, pp. 1311-1316.RussiaEclogite
DS201612-2294
2016
Konilov, A.N.Dokukina, K.A., Mints, M.V., Konilov, A.N.Mesoarchean Gridino mafic dykes swarm of the Belomorian eclogite province of the Fennoscandian shield ( Russia). Acta Geologica Sinica, Vol. 90, July abstract p. 8.Russia, Kola PeninsulaDykes
DS200812-0584
2008
Konish, H.Konish, H., Xu, H., Spicuzza, M.,Valley, J.W.Polycrystalline diamond inclusions in Jack Hills zircon: carbonado?Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A489.AustraliaDiamond inclusions
DS201802-0274
2017
Konkin, V.D.Ustinov, V.N., Golubev, Yu.K., Zagainy, A.K., Kukui, I.M., Mikoev, I.L., Lobkova, L.P., Antonov, S.A., Konkin, V.D.Analysis of the African province diamond prospects in relation to the Russia mineral base development abroad. *** IN RUSOtechestvennaya Geologiya ***IN RUS, No. 6, pp. 52-66. pdfAfricadiamond - arenas
DS1985-0355
1985
Konnerupmadsen, J.Konnerupmadsen, J.Composition of Gases in the Earth's Upper MantleMaterial Fys. Med., *Lang?, Vol 41, No. 1-14, pp. 399-429GlobalGenesis, Mantle
DS1986-0369
1986
Konnerup-Madsen, J.Holm, P.M., Konnerup-Madsen, J.Characteristics of mafic potassium-rich rocks from central Italian lamproite and their petrogenesis. *DAN.In: 17th. Nordic Geol. Meeting, abstracts, Noriska Geologmotet, p. 55. abstractItalyLamproite
DS200812-0874
2008
Konnerup-Madsen, J.Pedersen, S., Andersen, T., Konnerup-Madsen, J., Griffin, W.L.Recurrent mesoproterozoic continental magmatism in south central Norway.International Journal of Earth Sciences, In press availableEurope, NorwayMagmatism
DS2000-0514
2000
Konnikov, E.G.Konnikov, E.G.Distribution of trace elements in sulphides and norites of Elan intrusive body and genesis of boninite magmas.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol.41,9,pp.1214-24.RussiaLayered intrusions, Deposit - Elan, Voronezh Crystalline Massif
DS1991-0138
1991
Konnonova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Konnonova, V.A.Lamproites. (Russian) languageIzd. Nauka, Moscow Publication, (Russian), 294pRussiaBook -Lamproites, Petrology
DS1996-1066
1996
Konnonova, Y.A.Parasdanyan, K.S., Konnonova, Y.A., Bogatikov, O.A.Sources of heterogenous magmatism of the Arkanglesk diamondiferousprovince.Petrology, Vol. 4, No. 5, Sept-Oct., pp. 460-479.Russia, ArkangelskMagmatism
DS201012-0312
2010
KonoIrifune, T., Nishiyama, Tange, Kono, Shinmel, Kinoshita, Negishi, Kato, Higo, FunakoshiPhase transitions, densities and sound velocities of mantle and slab materials down to the upper part of the lower mantle.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 142.MantleSubduction
DS2003-1347
2003
Kono, K.Suga, T., Takeda, Y., Kono, K., Kishimoto, N., Bandouroko, V.V., Lee, C.G.Radiation effects in diamond induced by negative gold ionsNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B., Vol. 206, pp. 947-51.GlobalDiamond - radiation
DS200412-1947
2003
Kono, K.Suga, T., Takeda, Y., Kono, K., Kishimoto, N., Bandouroko, V.V., Lee, C.G.Radiation effects in diamond induced by negative gold ions.Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B., Vol. 206, pp. 947-51.TechnologyDiamond - radiation
DS1970-0946
1974
Kono, M.Kono, M. , Akimoto, S.Magnetic Properties of KimberliteRock Magnetism And Paleogeophysics, Vol. 2, PP. 2-4.GlobalKimberlite, Geophysics
DS1995-0991
1995
Kono, M.Kono, M.Geomagnetic superchrons and paleointensities: implications to coreprocesses.Eos, Vol. 76, No. 46, Nov. 7. p.F171. Abstract.MantleGeophysics -magnetics, Paleomagnetics
DS1995-1869
1995
Kono, M.Tanaka, H., Kono, M., Uchimura, H.Some global features of palaeointensity in geological timeGeophys. Journal of International, Vol. 120, pp. 97-102GlobalVolcanics, Paleointensity database
DS2003-1455
2003
Kono, S.Watanabe, A., Deguchi, A., Kitabatake, M., Kono, S.Field emission from diamond particles studied by scanning field emmision microscopyUltramicroscopy, Vol. 95, pp. 145-51.GlobalTechniques
DS200812-0503
2008
Kono, Y.Irifune, T., Higo, Y., Inoue, T., Kono, Y., Ohfuji, H., Funakoshi, K.Sound velocities of majorite garnet and the composition of the mantle transition zone.Nature, Vol. 451, 7180, pp. 814-817.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS201709-2059
2017
Kono, Y.Stagno, V., Kono, Y., Greaux, S., Kebukawa, Y., Stopponi, V., Scarlato, P., Lustrino, M., Irifune, T.From carbon in meteorites to carbonatite rocks on Earth.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Globalcarbonatite

Abstract: The composition of the early Earth’s atmosphere is believed to result from significant magma outgassing during the Archaean eon. It has been widely debated whether the oxygen fugacity (fo2) of the Earth’s mantle has remained constant over the last ~3.8 Ga to levels where volatiles were mostly in their mobile form [1,2], or whether the mantle has experienced a gradual increase of its redox state [3]. Both hypotheses raise fundamental questions on the effect of composition of the early Earth’s accreting material, the origin and availability of primordial carbon in Earth’s interior, and the migration rate of CO2-rich magmas. In addition, the occurrence in nature of carbonatites (or silicate-carbonatitic rocks), diamonds and carbides indicate a dominant control of the mantle redox state on the volatile speciation over time and, maybe, on mechanisms of their formation, reaction and migration through the silicate mantle. A recent model has been developed that combines both experimental results on the fo2 of preserved carbonaceous chondrites at high pressure and thermodynamic predictions of the the temporal variation of the mantle redox state, with the CO2-bearing magmas that could form in the early asthenospheric mantle. Since any variation in melt composition is expected to cause significant changes in the physical properties (e.g., viscosity and density), the migration rate of these magmas has been determined using recent in situ viscosity data on CO2-rich melts with the falling sphere technique. Our results allow determining the composition of CO2- bearing magmas as function of the increasing mantle redox state over time, and the mechanisms and rate for exchange of carbon between mantle reservoirs.
DS201812-2888
2018
Kono, Y.Stagno, V., Stopponi, V., Kono, Y., Manning, C.E., Irifune, T.Experimenal determination of the viscosity of Na2CO3 melt between 1.7 and 4.6 Gpa at 1200-1700 C: implications for the rheology of carbonatite magmas in the Earth's upper mantle.Chemical Geology, Vol. 501, pp. 19-25.Mantlecarbonatite

Abstract: Knowledge of the rheology of molten materials at high pressure and temperature is required to understand magma mobility and ascent rate at conditions of the Earth's interior. We determined the viscosity of nominally anhydrous sodium carbonate (Na2CO3), an analogue and ubiquitous component of natural carbonatitic magmas, by the in situ “falling sphere” technique at 1.7, 2.4 and 4.6?GPa, at 1200 to 1700?°C, using the Paris-Edinburgh press. We find that the viscosity of liquid Na2CO3 is between 0.0028?±?0.0001?Pa•s and 0.0073?±?0.0001?Pa•s in the investigated pressure-temperature range. Combination of our results with those from recent experimental studies indicate a negligible dependence on pressure from 1?atm to 4.6?GPa, and a small compositional dependence between molten alkali metal-bearing and alkaline earth metal-bearing carbonates. Based on our results, the viscosity of Na2CO3 is consistent with available viscosity data of both molten calcite (determined at high pressure and temperature) and Na2CO3 at ambient pressure. Molten Na2CO3 is a valid experimental analogue for study of the rheology of natural and/or synthetic near-solidus carbonatitic melts. Estimated values of the mobility and ascent velocity of carbonatitic melts at upper conditions are between 70 and 300?g?cm-3•Pa-1•s-1 and 330-1450?m•year-1, respectively, when using recently proposed densities for carbonatitic melts. The relatively slow migration rate allows magma-rock interaction over time causing seismic anomalies and chemical redox exchange.
DS201910-2281
2019
Kono, Y.Liu, J., Dorfman, S.M., Lv, M., Li, J., Xhu, F., Kono, Y.Loss of immiscible nitrogen from metallic melt explains Earth's missing nitrogen.Geochemical Perspectives Letters, Vol. 11, pp. 18-22.Mantlenitrogen

Abstract: Nitrogen and carbon are essential elements for life, and their relative abundances in planetary bodies are important for understanding planetary evolution and habitability. The high C/N ratio in the bulk silicate Earth (BSE) relative to chondrites has been difficult to explain through partitioning during core formation and outgassing from molten silicate. Here we propose a new model that may have released nitrogen from the metallic cores of accreting bodies during impacts with the early Earth. Experimental observations of melting in the Fe-N-C system via synchrotron X-ray radiography of samples in a Paris-Edinburgh press reveal that above the liquidus, iron-rich melt and nitrogen-rich liquid coexist at pressures up to at least 6 GPa. The combined effects of N-rich supercritical fluid lost to Earth’s atmosphere and/or space as well as N-depleted alloy equilibrating with the magma ocean on its way to the core would increase the BSE C/N ratio to match current estimates.
DS202004-0534
2020
Kono, Y.Stagno, V., Stopponi, V., Kono, Y., D'Arco, A., Lupi, S., Romano, C., Poe, B.T., Foustoukos, D.J., Scarlato, P., Manning, C.E.The viscosity and atomic structure of volatile bearing melililititic melts at high pressure and temperature and the transport of deep carbon.Minerals MDPI, Vol. 10, 267 doi: 10.23390/min10030267 14p. PdfMantleMelililite, carbon

Abstract: Understanding the viscosity of mantle-derived magmas is needed to model their migration mechanisms and ascent rate from the source rock to the surface. High pressure-temperature experimental data are now available on the viscosity of synthetic melts, pure carbonatitic to carbonate-silicate compositions, anhydrous basalts, dacites and rhyolites. However, the viscosity of volatile-bearing melilititic melts, among the most plausible carriers of deep carbon, has not been investigated. In this study, we experimentally determined the viscosity of synthetic liquids with ~31 and ~39 wt% SiO2, 1.60 and 1.42 wt% CO2 and 5.7 and 1 wt% H2O, respectively, at pressures from 1 to 4.7 GPa and temperatures between 1265 and 1755 °C, using the falling-sphere technique combined with in situ X-ray radiography. Our results show viscosities between 0.1044 and 2.1221 Pa•s, with a clear dependence on temperature and SiO2 content. The atomic structure of both melt compositions was also determined at high pressure and temperature, using in situ multi-angle energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction supported by ex situ microFTIR and microRaman spectroscopic measurements. Our results yield evidence that the T-T and T-O (T = Si,Al) interatomic distances of ultrabasic melts are higher than those for basaltic melts known from similar recent studies. Based on our experimental data, melilititic melts are expected to migrate at a rate ~from 2 to 57 km•yr-1 in the present-day or the Archaean mantle, respectively.
DS200612-0025
2006
Konokova, N.N.Andreeva, I.A., Kovalenko, V.I., Konokova, N.N.Natrocarbonatitic melts of the Bolshaya Tagna massif, the eastern Sayan region.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 408, 4, pp. 542-546.RussiaCarbonatite
DS200612-0139
2005
Konoleva, N.G.Bivin, V.A., Treloar, P.J., Konoleva, N.G., Ikorsky, S.V.A review of the occurrence, form and origin of C bearing species in the Khibiny alkaline igneous complex, Kola Peninsula, NW Russia.Lithos, Vol. 85, 1-4, Nov-Dec. pp. 93-112.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS201112-0987
2011
Konomkova, N.N.Sorokhtina, N.V., Asavin, A.M., Konomkova, N.N., Senin, V.Composition of K bearing sulfide associations in carbonatites of the Guli massif of the Polar Siberia.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.144-146.Russia, SiberiaGuli
DS201112-0988
2011
Konomkova, N.N.Sorokhtina, N.V., Asavin, A.M., Konomkova, N.N., Senin, V.Composition of K bearing sulfide associations in carbonatites of the Guli massif of the Polar Siberia.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.144-146.Russia, SiberiaGuli
DS1998-0030
1998
KononkovaAndreeva, I.A., Naumov, V.B., Kovalenko, V., KononkovaThe chemical composition of melt inclusions in sphene from theralites Of the Mushugai Khudak carbonatite...Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 361, No. 5, pp. 708-12.GlobalCarbonatite - genesis
DS1998-0031
1998
KononkovaAndreeva, I.A., Naumov, V.B., Kovalenko, V.I., KononkovaFluoride sulfate and chloride sulfate salt melts of carbonatite bearing complex Mushugai Khudak.Petrology, Vol. 6, No. 3, June, pp. 274-83.GlobalCarbonatite, Deposit - Mushugai Khudak
DS1998-1381
1998
KononkovaSolovova, I.P., Ryabchikov, I.D., Kogarko, KononkovaInclusions in minerals of the Palaborwa carbonatite complex, South AfricaGeochemistry International, Vol. 36, No. 5, pp. 377-388.South AfricaCarbonatite, Deposit - Palabora
DS1985-0635
1985
Kononkova, N.N.Sobolev, A.V., Sobolev, N.V., Smit, K.B., Kononkova, N.N.New dat a on the petrology of olivine lamproites of Western australia From the results of the investigation of magmatic inclusions in olivines.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 284, No. 1, pp. 196-201AustraliaLamproite, Inclusions
DS1987-0694
1987
Kononkova, N.N.Sobolev, A.V., Sobolev, N.V., Smith, C.B., Kononkova, N.N.New dat a on the petrology of the olivine lamproites of Western Australia revealed by the study of magmatic inclusions inolivineDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 284, No. 5, Publishing July 1987, pp. 106-110AustraliaLamproite, Petrology
DS1990-0620
1990
Kononkova, N.N.Gurenko, A.A., Sobolev, A.V., Kononkova, N.N.New petrologic dat a on ugandites from the East African Rift, as revealed by study of magmatic inclusions in mineralsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 305, No. 2, Sept. pp. 130-134UgandaPetrology, Ugandites
DS1990-0621
1990
Kononkova, N.N.Gurenko, A.A., Sobolev, A.V., Kononkova, N.N., Shcherbovskiy, Ye.Ya.Olivine from the ultrabasic and basic rocks of the East African rift system differentiated seriesGeochemistry International, Vol. 27, No. 10, pp. 117-123East AfricaPetrology, Ultrabasics -olivine -analyses
DS1990-0622
1990
Kononkova, N.N.Gurenko, A.A., Sobolev, A.V., Kononkova, N.N., Shcherbovsky, E.Y.Olivine of ultramafic and mafic rocks of the main differentiated seriesof the East African rift system (Russian)No. 3, March pp. 429-436, East AfricaGlobalPetrology
DS1992-0333
1992
Kononkova, N.N.Danyushevskiy, L.V., Sobolev, A.V., Kononkova, N.N.Methods of studying melt inclusions in minerals during investigations on water bearing primitive mantle melts (Tonga Trench boninites)Geochemistry International, Vol. 29, No. 7, pp. 48-61GlobalBoninites
DS1992-1444
1992
Kononkova, N.N.Sobolev, A.V., Kamenskiy, V.S., Kononkova, N.N.New dat a on Siberian meymechite petrologyGeochemistry International, Vol. 29, No. 3, pp. 10-20Russia, SiberiaPetrology, Meymechite
DS1993-0595
1993
Kononkova, N.N.Gurenko, A.A., Kononkova, N.N.Zoning of minerals as an indicator of the redox conditions of their crystallization ( as illustrated by high-potassium magma of the East AfricanRift)Doklady Academy of Sciences USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 318, No. 1-6, March 1992 Publishing date pp. 162-169Africa, East AfricaTectonics, Alkaline rocks
DS1994-0678
1994
Kononkova, N.N.Gurenko, A.A., Sobolev, A.V., Kononkova, N.N.The East African rift as indicated by magma inclusions in the mineralsDoklady Academy of Sciences Acad. Science USSR, Vol. 323, No. 2, June pp. 94-100.KenyaTectonics, Petrology
DS1999-0013
1999
Kononkova, N.N.Andreeva, I.A., Numov, V.B., Kononkova, N.N.The magma composition and genesis of theralite from the Mushugai Khuduk carbonatite bearing complex....Geochemistry International, Vol. 37, No. 8, Aug. pp. 735-49.GlobalCarbonatite
DS200412-0039
2004
Kononkova, N.N.Andreeva, I.A., Kovalenko, V.I., Kononkova, N.N.Chemical composition of magma ( melt inclusions) of melilite bearing nephelinite from the Belaya Zima carbonatite complex, easteDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 394, 1, Jan-Feb. pp. 116-119.RussiaMelilitite
DS200412-0040
2004
Kononkova, N.N.Andreeva, I.A., Kovalenko, V.I., Naumov, V.B., Kononkova, N.N.Composition and formation conditions of silicate and salt magmas forming the garnet syenite porphyries (Sviatonossites) of the cGeochemistry International, Vol. 42, 6, pp. 497-512.Asia, MongoliaCarbonatite, Mushagi-Khudak Complex
DS200512-1024
2003
Kononkova, N.N.Solova, I.P., Girnis, A.V., Rass, I.T., Keller, J., Kononkova, N.N.Different styles of evolution of CO2 rich alkaline magmas: the role of melt composition in carbonate silicate liquid immiscibility. ( Mahlberg)Periodico di Mineralogia, (in english), Vol. LXX11, 1. April, pp. 87-93.Europe, GermanyMagmatism
DS200612-1334
2005
Kononkova, N.N.Solovova, I.P., Girnis, A.V., Kogarko, L.N., Kononkova, N.N., Stoppa, F., Rosaatelli, G.Compositions of magma and carbonate silicate liquid immiscibility in the Vulture alkaline igneous complex, Italy.Lithos, Vol. 85, 1-4, Nov-Dec. pp. 113-128.Europe, ItalyCarbonatite
DS201012-0740
2009
Kononkova, N.N.Solovova, I.P., Girnis, A.V., Ryabchikov, I.D., Kononkova, N.N.Mechanisms of formation of barium rich phlogopite and strontium rich apatite during the final stages of alkaline magma evolution.Geochemistry International, Vol. 47, 6, June, pp. 578-591.MantleMagmatism
DS201112-0727
2010
Kononkova, N.N.Naumov, V.B., Tolstykh, M.L., Grib, E.N., Leonov, V.L., Kononkova, N.N.Chemical composition, volatile components, and trace elements in melts of the Karymskii volcanic centre, Kamchatka and Golovnin a volcano, Kunashir Island....Vladykin, N.V., Deep Seated Magmatism: its sources and plumes, pp. 104-127.RussiaMineral inclusions
DS201112-0984
2011
Kononkova, N.N.Solovova, I.P., Girnis, A.V., Kogarko, L.N., Kononkova, N.N.Compositions of magmas and carbonate silicate liquid immiscibility in the Vulture alkaline igneous complex, Italy.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., pp. 150-170.Europe, ItalyCarbonatite
DS201112-0989
2011
Kononkova, N.N.Sorokhtina, N.V., Asavin, A.M., Kononkova, N.N.Composition of K bearing sulfide associations in carbonatites of the Guli Massif of the Polar Siberia.Peralk-Carb 2011, workshop held Tubingen Germany June 16-18, PosterRussia, SiberiaCarbonatite
DS201312-0493
2013
Kononkova, N.N.Kogarko, L.N., Sorokhtina, N.V., Kononkova, N.N., Klimovich, I.V.Uranium and thorium in carbonatitic minerals from the Guli Massif, Polar Siberia.Geochemistry International, Vol. 51, 10, pp. 767-776.RussiaCarbonatite
DS201312-0868
2012
Kononkova, N.N.Solovova, I.P., Girnis, A.V., Kononkova, N.N.Relationships of carbonate and K rich basaltoid magmas: insight from melt and fluid inclusions.Vladykin, N.V. ed. Deep seated magmatism, its sources and plumes, Russian Academy of Sciences, pp. 164-203.MantleMetasomatism
DS201801-0067
2017
Kononkova, N.N.Sorokhtina, N.V., Belyatsky, B.V., Kononkova, N.N., Rodionov, N.V., Lepkhina, E.N., Antonov, A.V., Sergeev, S.A.Pyrochlore group minerals from Paleozoic carbonatite massifs of the Kola Peninsula: composition and evolution.Carbonatite-alkaline rocks and associated mineral deposits , Dec. 8-11, abstract p. 20-21.Russia, Kola Peninsulacarbonatites

Abstract: Chemical composition and evolution of pyrochlore-group minerals (Nb?Ta?Ti) from the early phoscorites and calcite carbonatites, and late rare-earth dolomite carbonatites from Seblyavr and Vuorijarvi Paleozoic massifs have been studied. There are two trends in pyrochlore composition evolution: the change of U, Ti, and Ta enriched varieties by calcium high-Nb, and the change of early calcium varieties by barium-strontium pyrochlores. The substitutions are described by the typical reactions: 2Ti4+ + U4+ ? 2Nb5+ + Ca2+; Ta5+ ? Nb5+; U4+ + v (vacancy) ? 2Ca2+. The Ca ranges in pyrochlores are explained by isomorphic occupation of the cation position A with Ba, Sr, and REE, the total concentration of which increases as the carbonatite melt evolved and reaches a maximum in rare-earth dolomite carbonatites. The formation of barium pyrochlore is mainly due to successive crystallization from the Ba and Sr enriched melt (oscillatory zoning crystals), or with the secondary replacement of grain margins of the calcium pyrochlore, as an additional mechanism of formation. High enrichments in LREE2O3 (up to 6 wt.%) are identified. The fluorine content in pyrochlore group minerals varies widely. A high concentration (up to 8 wt.%) is found in central and marginal zones of crystals from calcite carbonatites, while it decreases in the pyrochlore from dolomite carbonatites. Fluorine in the crystal lattice has sufficient stability during cation-exchange processes and it is not lost in the case of developing of late carbonatites over the earlier ones. In the late mineral populations the relics enriched by this component are observed. There is a positive correlation of fluorine with sodium. The marginal and fractured zones of pyrochlore crystals from all rock types are represented by phases with a cation deficiency in position A and an increased Si. The evolution of mineral composition depends on the alkaline-ultramafic melt crystallization differentiation, enrichment of the late melts by alkalis and alkaline earth metals at the high fluorine activity. It is determined that the fluorine sharply increases from the early pyroxenites to the carbonatite rocks of the massif. The foscorites and carbonatites of the early stages of crystallization are the most enriched in fluorine, while the late dolomite carbonatites are depleted by this component and enriched in chlorine and water. The fluorine saturation of the early stages of carbonatite melting leads to the formation of fluorapatite and pyrochlore minerals which are the main mineralsconcentrators of fluorine. Pyrochlore group minerals from the Paleozoic carbonatite complexes of the Kola Peninsula are characterized by decreasing Pb, Th and U, and Th/U ratios in the transition from the early foscorites to later calcite carbonatites and hydrothermal dolomite carbonatites. The pyrochlore age varies within the 420-320 m.y. interval (U-Pb SHRIMPII data), while the rocks of the earliest magmatic stages has an individual grain age of 423 ± 15 Ma, but pyrochlore ages for calcite and dolomite carbonatites are younger: 351 ± 8.0 Ma and 324 ± 6.1 Ma, respectively. Such a dispersion of the age data is apparently associated with a disturbed Th/U ratio due to high ability for cation-exchange processes of pyrochlore crystalline matrix including secondary transformations. The research was done within the framework of the scientific program of Russian Academy of Sciences and state contract K41.2014.014 with Sevzapnedra.
DS202001-0041
2019
Kononkova, N.N.Sorokhtina, N.V., Kogarko, L.N., Zaitsev, V.A., Kononkova, N.N., Asavin, A.M.Sulfide mineralization in the carbonatites and phoscorites of the Guli Massif, Polar Siberia, and their noble metal potential.Geochemistry International, Vol. 57, 11, pp. 1125-1146.Russia, Siberiacarbonatite

Abstract: We report the first combined investigation (neutron activation, X-ray fluorescence, and electron microprobe analysis) of mineral forms of Au and Ag and noble metal distribution in the sulfide-bearing phoscorites and carbonatites of the Guli alkaline ultrabasic massif (Polar Siberia) and magnetite and sulfide separates from these rocks. The highest noble metal contents were observed in the sulfide separates from the carbonatites: up to 2.93 Pt, 61.6 Au, and 3.61 ppm Ag. Pyrrhotite, djerfisherite, chalcopyrite, and pyrite are the most abundant sulfides and the main hosts for Au and Ag. The latest assemblage of chalcopyrite, Ag-rich djerfisherite, lenaite, sternbergite, and native silver shows significant Ag concentrations. The wide occurrence of K sulfides and presence of multiphase inclusions in pyrrhotite consisting of rasvumite, K?Na–Ca carbonate, carbocernaite, strontianite, galena, chalcopyrite, sternbergite, lenaite, and native silver suggest that the sulfides were formed at high activities of K, Na, Sr, LREE, F, Cl, and S. Chlorine shows high complex-forming capacity to Ag and could be an agent of noble metal transport in the carbonatites. Crystallization of the early djerfisherite–pyrrhotite assemblages of the phoscorites and carbonatites began at a temperature not lower than 500°C and continued up to the formation of late Ag-bearing sulfides at temperatures not higher than 150°C. The carbonatite-series rocks could be enriched in Au and Ag during late low-temperature stages and serve as a source for Au placers.
DS202007-1121
2020
Kononkova, N.N.Abramov, S.S., Rass, I.T., Kononkova, N.N.Fenites of the Miaskite carbonatite complex in the Vishnevye Mountains, southern Urals, Russia: origin of the metasomatic zoning and thermodynamic simulations of the processes.Petrology, Vol. 28, 3, pp. 298-323. pdfRussia, Uralscarbonatite

Abstract: Mineral zoning in fenites around miaskite intrusions of the Vishnevye Mountains complex can be interpreted as a magmatic-replacement zonal metasomatic aureole (in D.S. Korzhinskii’s understanding): the metasomatic transformations of the fenitized gneisses under the effect of deep alkaline fluid eventually resulted in the derivation of nepheline syenite eutectic melt. Based on the P-T-fO2 parameters calculated from the composition of minerals coexisting in the successive zones, isobaric-isothermal fO2-aSiO2 and µNa2O-µAl2O3 sections were constructed with the Perplex program package to model how the fenites interacted with H2O-CO2 fluid (in the Na-K-Al-Si-Ca-Ti-Fe-Mg-O-H-C system). The results indicate that the fluid-rock interaction mechanisms are different in the outer (fenite) and inner (migmatite) parts of the zonal aureole. Its outer portion was dominated by desilication of rocks, which led, first, to quartz disappearance from these rocks and then to an increase in the Al# of the coexisting minerals (biotite and clinopyroxene). In the inner part of the aureole, fenite transformations into biotite-feldspathic metasomatic rocks and nepheline migmatite were triggered by an increase in the Na and Al activities in the system alkaline H2O-CO2 fluid-rock. As a consequence, the metasomatites were progressively enriched in Al2O3 and alkalis, and these transformations led to the development of biotite in equilibrium with K-Na feldspar and calcite at the sacrifice of pyroxene. The further introduction of alkalis led to the melting of the biotite-feldspathic metasomatites and the origin of nepheline migmatites. The simulated model sequence of metasomatic zones that developed when the gneiss was fenitized and geochemical features of the successive zones (differences in the LILE and REE concentrations in the rocks and minerals of the fenitization aureole and the Sm-Nd isotope systematics of the rocks of the alkaline complex) indicate that the source of the fluid responsible for the origin of zonal fenite-miaskite complexes may have been carbonatite, a derivative of mantle magmas, whereas the miaskites were produced by metasomatic transformations of gneisses and subsequent melting under the effect of fluid derived from carbonatite magmas.
DS202010-1824
2020
Kononkova, N.N.Abramov, S.S., Rass, I.T., Kononkova, N.N.Fenites of the Miasite-carbonatite complex in the Vishevye Mountains, southern Urals, Russia: origin of the metasomatic zoning and thermodynamic simulations of the processes.Petrology, Vol. 28, 3, pp. 263-286.Russia, Uralscarbonatite

Abstract: Mineral zoning in fenites around miaskite intrusions of the Vishnevye Mountains complex can be interpreted as a magmatic-replacement zonal metasomatic aureole (in D.S. Korzhinskii’s understanding): the metasomatic transformations of the fenitized gneisses under the effect of deep alkaline fluid eventually resulted in the derivation of nepheline syenite eutectic melt. Based on the P-T-fO2 parameters calculated from the composition of minerals coexisting in the successive zones, isobaric-isothermal fO2-aSiO2 and µNa2O-µAl2O3 sections were constructed with the Perplex program package to model how the fenites interacted with H2O-CO2 fluid (in the Na-K-Al-Si-Ca-Ti-Fe-Mg-O-H-C system). The results indicate that the fluid-rock interaction mechanisms are different in the outer (fenite) and inner (migmatite) parts of the zonal aureole. Its outer portion was dominated by desilication of rocks, which led, first, to quartz disappearance from these rocks and then to an increase in the Al# of the coexisting minerals (biotite and clinopyroxene). In the inner part of the aureole, fenite transformations into biotite-feldspathic metasomatic rocks and nepheline migmatite were triggered by an increase in the Na and Al activities in the system alkaline H2O-CO2 fluid-rock. As a consequence, the metasomatites were progressively enriched in Al2O3 and alkalis, and these transformations led to the development of biotite in equilibrium with K-Na feldspar and calcite at the sacrifice of pyroxene. The further introduction of alkalis led to the melting of the biotite-feldspathic metasomatites and the origin of nepheline migmatites. The simulated model sequence of metasomatic zones that developed when the gneiss was fenitized and geochemical features of the successive zones (differences in the LILE and REE concentrations in the rocks and minerals of the fenitization aureole and the Sm-Nd isotope systematics of the rocks of the alkaline complex) indicate that the source of the fluid responsible for the origin of zonal fenite-miaskite complexes may have been carbonatite, a derivative of mantle magmas, whereas the miaskites were produced by metasomatic transformations of gneisses and subsequent melting under the effect of fluid derived from carbonatite magmas.
DS201603-0363
2016
Kononov, A.M.Alexeev, S.V., Alexeeva, L.P., Kononov, A.M.Trace elements and rare earth elements in ground ice in kimberlites and sedimentary rocks of western Yakutia.Cold Regions Science and Technology, Vol. 123, pp. 140-148.RussiaGeomorphology

Abstract: The paper presents unique results of studying the composition of the ground ice (major components, trace elements, and rare earth elements — REEs) encountered at a depth of 200-250 m in sedimentary and magmatic rocks in the Western Yakutia diamond-bearing regions. In addition to those established earlier, three new geochemical types of ground ice have been defined: (i) sulfate-hydrocarbonate, (ii) chloride-hydrocarbonate, and (iii) sulfate-chloride types with mixed cation composition. The ground ice geochemical features are caused by evolutionary processes of interaction in the water-rock system during permafrost formation. The enclosed rocks were the source for the addition of sulfate and chlorine ions, as well as trace elements, to the ground waters of the active water exchange zone that had existed before freezing. The distribution pattern of REEs in ground ice has a special form distinct from that of sedimentary rocks, kimberlites, and ocean waters, but similar to the REE pattern in local river waters. This REE pattern features the positive europium (Eu) anomaly and approximate equality of light and heavy REEs. The obtained results essentially expand the insight into ice-formation processes in sedimentary and magmatic rocks.
DS201612-2273
2016
Kononov, A.M.Alexeev, S.V., Alexeeva, L.P., Kononov, A.M.Trace elements and rare earth elements in ground ice in kimberlites and sedimentary rocks of western Yakutia.Cold Regions Science and Technology, Vol. 123, pp. 140-148.Russia, YakutiaGeomorphology

Abstract: The paper presents unique results of studying the composition of the ground ice (major components, trace elements, and rare earth elements - REEs) encountered at a depth of 200-250 m in sedimentary and magmatic rocks in the Western Yakutia diamond-bearing regions. In addition to those established earlier, three new geochemical types of ground ice have been defined: (i) sulfate-hydrocarbonate, (ii) chloride-hydrocarbonate, and (iii) sulfate-chloride types with mixed cation composition. The ground ice geochemical features are caused by evolutionary processes of interaction in the water-rock system during permafrost formation. The enclosed rocks were the source for the addition of sulfate and chlorine ions, as well as trace elements, to the ground waters of the active water exchange zone that had existed before freezing. The distribution pattern of REEs in ground ice has a special form distinct from that of sedimentary rocks, kimberlites, and ocean waters, but similar to the REE pattern in local river waters. This REE pattern features the positive europium (Eu) anomaly and approximate equality of light and heavy REEs. The obtained results essentially expand the insight into ice-formation processes in sedimentary and magmatic rocks.
DS1999-0444
1999
Kononov, O.V.Marfunin, A.S., Kononov, O.V., Shelementiev, Y.B.Diamond mineralogy, physics, Gemology and world market: state of the artMoscow University of Geol. Bulletin., Vol. 53, No. 5, pp. 53-66.RussiaDiamond geology - overview
DS200812-0338
2008
Kononov, O.V.Fang, L., Kononov, O.V., Marfunin, A.S., Taraevich, A.V., Tarasavich, B.N.Development of a technique for IR spectroscopic determination of nitrogen content and aggregation degree in diamond crystals.Moscow University Geology Bulletin, Vol. 63, 4, pp. 281-284.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200912-0060
2009
KononovaBogatikov, O.A., Sharkov, E.V., Bogina, Kononova, Nosova, Samsonov, ChistyakovWithin plate (intracontinental) and postorogenic magmatism of the East European Craton as reflection of the evolution of continental lithosphere.Petrology, Vol. 17, 3, May pp. 207-226.RussiaMagmatism
DS1991-0137
1991
Kononova, K.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Garanin, V.K., Kononova, K.A., Kudrjavtseva, G.P.Ore minerals from the lamproite ground massProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 484-485Russia, Australia, SpainOxide mineral chemistry, Diamond evaluation
DS201412-0443
2014
Kononova, V.Kargin, A., Nosova, A., Larionova, Yu., Kononova, V., Borisovsky, S., Kovalchuk, E., Griboedova, I.Mesoproterozoic orangeites ( Kimberlites II) of west Karelia: mineralogy, geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotope composition.Petrology, Vol. 22, 2, pp. 151-183.RussiaOrangeites
DS1985-0356
1985
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Yashina, R.M.Geochemical criteria for differentiating between rare metallic carbonatites and barren carbonatite like rocksIndian Mineralogist, Sukheswala Volume, pp. 136-150IndiaCarbonatite
DS1985-0357
1985
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Yashina, R.M.Geochemical criteria for differentiation between rare metallic carbonatites and barren carbonatite like rocksIndian Minerals, Special Volume, Sukhneswala, pp. 136-150IndiaCarbonatite, Geochemistry
DS1987-0063
1987
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Makhotkin, I.L., Eremeev, N.V.Rare earth and elements as indicators of the origin of lamproites of central Aldan (USSR).(Russian)Vulkanol. Seismol., (Russian), No. 1, pp. 15-29RussiaLamproites, Rare earths
DS1987-0108
1987
Kononova, V.A.Chernyshev, I.V., Kononova, V.A., Kramm, W., Grauert, B.Isotopic geochronology of Ural alkaline rocks based ion zircon uranium leaddata.(Russian)Geochemiya, (Russian), No. 3, pp. 323-338GlobalBlank
DS1988-0065
1988
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Makhotkin, I.L.Lamproites. (Russian)Ultrabasic rocks, Magmaticheskiye Gornyye Porody, Izd. Nauka, Moscow, Vol. 5, pp. 217-229RussiaLamproites, Geochemistry
DS1988-0066
1988
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Yeremeyev, N.V., Makhotkin, I.L., Kononova, V.A.Lamproites of the Aldan and central AsiaDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 290, No. 1-6, March pp. 154-157RussiaLamproite, Analyses
DS1988-0774
1988
Kononova, V.A.Yeremeyev, N.V., Kononova, V.A., Makhotsin, I.L., et al.Native metals in lamproites of central AldanDokl. Acad. Sciences USSR Earth Science Section, Vol. 303, No. 6, pp. 167-171RussiaLamproites, Native metals
DS1989-0133
1989
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Makhotkin, I.L., Kononova, V.A.Lamproites: composition and petrogenetic questions. (Russian)Moscow, Nayka, Monograph, (Russian), pp. 92-100RussiaLamproites, Petrology
DS1989-0134
1989
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Makhotkin, I.L., Kononova, V.A.Lamproites, composition and aspects of petrogenesis.(Russian)Kristal. Kora V Prostranstve i vrement: magmatizm Dokl. Sov. Geol, pp. 92-100. Chem abstracts E1310:082300M CA 153003RussiaLamproites, Genesis
DS1989-0135
1989
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Makhotkin, I.P., Kononova, V.A.Lamproites, composition and petrogenetic questions.(Russian)in: Crystalline crust in space and time; magmatism, (Russian), Izd. Nauka, Moscow, pp. 91-100RussiaLamproites, Petrology
DS1989-0408
1989
Kononova, V.A.Eremeyev, N.V., Kononova, V.A., Makhotkin, I.L., Dmitrieva, M.T.Native metals in lamproites of central Aldan.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 303, No. 6, pp. 1464-1467RussiaLamproite, Base metals
DS1990-0874
1990
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Makhotkin, I.L., Malov, Y.V., Bogatikov, O.A.Lamproites and petrochemical series of potassium rocks.(Russian)Izves. Akad. Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Ser, Geol. No. 11, November pp. 55-65RussiaLamproites, Petrochemistry
DS1991-0917
1991
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Sveshnikova, Ye.V., Drynkin, V.I., Gurevich, A.V.Potassic and potassic sodic series of volcanics in the Cenozoic ofYugoslaviaInternational Geology Review, Vol. 33, No. 8, August pp. 793-806YugoslaviaNephelinite, Shoshonite
DS1991-0918
1991
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Sveshnikova, Ye.V., Drynkin, V.I., Gurevich, A.V.Potassic and potassic-sodic series of volcanics in the Cenozoic ofYugoslaviaInternational Geology Review, Vol. 33, No. 8, August pp. 793-806YugoslaviaPotassic rocks, Cenozoic
DS1993-0849
1993
Kononova, V.A.Kramm, U., Kogarko, L.N., Kononova, V.A., Vartiainen, H.The Kola alkaline province of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) and Finland: precise rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) agesLithos, Vol. 30, No. 1, April pp. 33-44Russia, Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), FinlandAlkaline rocks, Geochronology
DS1993-1800
1993
Kononova, V.A.Yeremeyv, N.V., Zhuravlev, .Z., Kononova, V.A., Pervov, V.A., Kramm, U.Source and age of the potassic rocks in the Ryabinov intrusion, centralAldan.Geochemistry International, Vol. 30, No. 6, pp. 105-112.Russia, AldanAlkaline rocks
DS1994-0175
1994
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., et al.Petrogenesis of Mesosoic potassic magmatism of the Central Aldan: a isotopic and geodynamic modelInternational Geology Review, Vol. 36, No. 7, July pp. 629-644Russia, AldanMagmatism, Geochronology
DS1994-0176
1994
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Pervov, V.A., ZhguralevPetrogenesis of Mesozoic potassic magmatism of the central Aldan: a isotopic and geodynamic model.International Geology Review, Vol. 36, No. 7, July pp. 629-644.Russia, AldanAlkalic rocks, Geochronology
DS1995-0984
1995
Kononova, V.A.Kogarko, L.N., Kononova, V.A., Orlova, M.P., Woolley, A.R.Alkaline rocks and carbonatites of the world: Part Two former USSR. ...Sakhalin, Primorye, AnadyrChapman and Hall, pp. 1-240.GlobalEast Sayan, Kuznetsk Minusinsk, East Tuva, Baikal, Aldan, Sette Daban, Chukotka, Kamchatka, Omolon
DS1995-0985
1995
Kononova, V.A.Kogarko, L.N., Kononova, V.A., Orlova, M.P., Woolley, A.R.Alkaline rocks and carbonatites of the world: Part Two former USSRChapman and Hall, pp. 1-240.Russia, Kola, Karelia, Kanin-Timan, UkraineCaucasus, Armenia, Azerbaian, Georgia, Urals, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kirgystan, Tadzikistan
DS1995-0992
1995
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Bogatikov, O.A., Pervov, V.A., YeremeyevCentral Asian potassic magmatic rocks: geochemistry and formationconditions.Geochemistry International, Vol. 32, No. 2, pp. 23-42.Russia, AsiaAlkaline rocks, Geochemistry
DS1996-1006
1996
Kononova, V.A.Mues-Schumacher, U., Keller, J., Kononova, V.A., SuddabyMineral chemistry and geochronology of the potassic alkaline ultramafic Inagli Complex, Aldan Shield.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 60, No. 402, Oct. pp. 711-730.Russia, Siberia, AldanAlkaline rocks, Ignali Complex
DS1997-0614
1997
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A.Pseudoleucite and the origin of the highly potassic rocks of the southern Sakun Massif, Aldan Shield.Petrology, Vol. 5, No. 2, March-April pp. 167-182.Russia, Aldan ShieldAlkaline rocks, Sakun Massif
DS1997-0903
1997
Kononova, V.A.Perov, V.A., Kononova, V.A., et al.Potassic magmatism of the Aldan shield: an indicator of the multistage evolution of lithospheric mantle.Petrology, Vol. 5, No. 5, Sept-Oct. pp. 415-430.Russia, SiberiaMagmatism, Mantle
DS1999-0079
1999
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Pervov, ParsadanyanUltramafic Diamondiferous rocks, Russian platform and geodynamicsStanley, SGA Fifth Biennial Symposium, pp. 1301-4.RussiaMelilitite, lamproite, lamprophyre, picrite
DS2000-0515
2000
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Pervov, Bogatikov, Parsadanyan et al.Potassic mafic rocks with megacrysts from northwestern Ladoga Lake area: diversity of mantle sources potassicGeochemistry International, Vol. 38, No.S1, pp. S39-58.Russia, Karelia, FennoscandiaTectonics, geochronology, alkaline, Shonkinite, minette
DS2000-0516
2000
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Pervov, V.A., Ilupin, I.P.Geochemical and mineralogical correlation of kimberlites from Timan and Zimnii Bereg.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 372, No. 4, May-June pp. 724-7.RussiaGeochemistry, Deposit - Timan, Zimnii
DS2000-0517
2000
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Pervov, V.A., Parsdanyan, K.S.Strontium-neodymium isotope age and geochemistry of megacryst bearing lamprophyres of Ladoga region: evidence lithospheric..Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 370, No. 1, Jan-Feb pp.157-9.RussiaGeochronology, Lamprophyres
DS2001-0117
2001
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Pervov, ZhuravlevSources, geodynamic setting of formation and diamond bearing potential of kimberlites from northern marginPetrology, Vol. 9, No. 3, pp. 191-203.RussiaPlate - Sr neodymium isotopic and ICP MS, Geochronology, geochemistry
DS2002-0873
2002
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Kurat, Embey-Isztin, Pervov, KoeberlGeochemistry of metasomatised spinel peridotite xenoliths from the Darigana Plateau, southeast MongoliaMineralogy and Petrology, Vol.75,1-2,pp. 1-21.MongoliaXenoliths
DS2002-0874
2002
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Kurat, G., Embey Isztin, A., Pervov ...Geochemistry of metasomatised spinel peridotite xenoliths from the Dariganga PlateauMineralogy and Petrology, Vol.75,1-2,pp.1-22., Vol.75,1-2,pp.1-22.Mongolia, southeastXenoliths
DS2002-0875
2002
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Kurat, G., Embey Isztin, A., Pervov ...Geochemistry of metasomatised spinel peridotite xenoliths from the Dariganga PlateauMineralogy and Petrology, Vol.75,1-2,pp.1-22., Vol.75,1-2,pp.1-22.Mongolia, southeastXenoliths
DS2002-0876
2002
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Levsky, L.K., Pervov, V.A., Ovchinnikova, G.V., BogatikovPb Sr Nd isotopic systematics of mantle sources of potassic ultramafic and mafic rocksPetrology, Vol. 10, 5, pp. 433-47.RussiaAlkaline rocks, Geochronology
DS2002-0877
2002
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Levsky, L.K., Pervov, V.A., Ovchinnikova, G.V., BogatikovPb Sr Nd isotopic systematics of mantle sources of potassic ultramafic and mafic rocks in the north and east European platform.Petrology, Vol. 10, 5, pp. 433-47.Russia, UralsGeochronology, Alkaline rocks
DS2002-0878
2002
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Levsky, L.K., Pervov, V.A., Ovchinnikova, G.V., Bogatikov, A.Pb Sr Nd isotopic systematics of mantle sources of potassic ultramafic and mafic rocksPetrology, Vol. 10, 5, pp. 433-47.Russia, Europe, Kola PeninsulaGeochronology
DS2002-1250
2002
Kononova, V.A.Pervov, V.A., Kononova, V.A., Ilupin, I.P., Simakov, S.K.PT parameters of formation of rocks included as xenoliths in kimberlites of middle Timan.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 386, 7, Sept-Oct.pp. 867-9.Russia, TimanGeochronology
DS2003-1538
2003
Kononova, V.A.Yutkina, E.V., Kononova, V.A., Kozar, N.A., Lnyazkov, A.P.Sr Nd and geochemical compositions of kimberlite from the eastern Azov region, theirDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 391, 5, pp. 751-54.RussiaGeochemistry, geochronology
DS200412-2192
2004
Kononova, V.A.Yutkina, E.V., Kononova, V.A., Bogatikov, O.A., Knyazkov, A.P., Kozar, N.A., Ovchinnikova, G.V., Levsky, L.K.Kimberlites of eastern Priazove ( Ukraine) and geochemical characteristics of their sources.Petrology, Vol. 12, 2, pp. 134-148.Europe, UkraineDevonian age, Arkangelsk, Terskii Bereg, Novolaspinakay
DS200412-2193
2003
Kononova, V.A.Yutkina, E.V., Kononova, V.A., Kozar, N.A., Lnyazkov, A.P.Sr Nd and geochemical compositions of kimberlite from the eastern Azov region, their age and nature of the lithospheric source.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 391, 5, pp. 751-54.RussiaGeochemistry, geochronology
DS200512-0100
2004
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Golubeva, Zinchuk, Ilupin, Rotman, Levsky, Ovchinnikova, KondrashovVariations in chemical and isotopic compositions of the Yakutian kimberlites and their causes.Geochemistry International, Vol. 42, 9, pp. 799-821.Russia, Siberia, YakutiaGeochemistry
DS200512-0560
2005
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Golubeva, Y.Y., Bogatikov, O.A., Nosova, Levsky, OvchinnikovaGeochemical diversity of Yakutian kimberlites: origin and diamond potential (ICP-MS dat a and Sr, Nd and Pb isotropy).Petrology, Vol. 13, 3, pp. 205-228.RussiaMineral chemistry
DS200512-1227
2005
Kononova, V.A.Yutkina, E.V., Kononova, V.A., Tsymbal, S.N., Levskii, L.K., Kiryanov, N.N.Isotopic geochemical specialization of mantle source of kimberlites from the Kirovograd complex, Ukrainian shield.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 402, 4, pp. 551-555.Russia, UkraineGeochronology
DS200612-0727
2006
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Nosova, A.A., Pervov, V.A., Kondrashov, I.A.Compositional variations in kimberlites of the East European platform as a manifestation of sublithospheric geodynamic processes.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 409A, no. 6, July-August, pp. 952-957.Russia, Baltic ShieldGeodynamics
DS200712-0086
2007
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Nosova, A.A., Kondrashov, I.A.Kimberlites and lamproites of east European platform: petrology and geochemistry.Petrology, Vol. 15, 4, pp.EuropeLamproite
DS200712-0087
2007
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Nosova, A.A., Kondrashov, I.A.Kimberlites and lamproites of east European platform: petrology and geochemistry.Petrology, Vol. 15, 4, pp.EuropeLamproite
DS200712-0368
2006
Kononova, V.A.Golubeva, Yu.Yu., Pervov, V.A., Kononova, V.A.Petrogenesis of autoliths from kimberlitic breccias in the V. Grib pipe, Arkangelsk district.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 411, no. 8, pp. 1257-1262.Russia, Kola Peninsula, ArchangelDeposit - Grib
DS200812-0122
2008
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Dubinina, E.O., Nosova, A.A., Kondrashov, I.A.Nature of carbonates from kimberlites of the Zimnii Bereg field, Arkangelsk: evidence from Rb Sr C and O isotope data.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 421,1, pp. 807-811.Russia, Kola Peninsula, ArchangelDeposit - Zimnii Bereg
DS200812-0585
2007
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Golubeva, Y.Y., Bogatikov, O.A., Kargin, A.V.Diamond resource potential of kimberlites from the Zimny Bereg field, Arkangelsk oblast.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 49, 6, pp. 421-441.Russia, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Zimny Bereg
DS200912-0059
2009
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Nusova, A.A., Kargin, A.V.Polygenetic sources of kimberlites, magma composition and diamond potential exemplified by the East European and Siberian cratons.Petrology, Vol. 17, 6, pp. 605-625.Russia, YakutiaChemistry
DS200912-0399
2009
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Kargin, A.V., Nosova, A.A., Kondrashov, I.A., Bogatikov, O.A.Geochemical comparison of kimberlites from the Siberian and East European platforms: problems of genesis and spatial zoning.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 428, 1, pp. 1156-1161.Russia, EuropeKimberlite genesis
DS201012-0063
2010
Kononova, V.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Nosova, A.A., Kargin, A.V.Polygenetic sources of kimberlites, magma composition, and diamond potential exemplified by the East European and Sibnerian cratons.Petrology, Vol. 17, 6, pp. 606-625.RussiaKimberlite genesis
DS201112-0502
2011
Kononova, V.A.Kargin, A.V., Golubeva, Yu.Yu., Kononova, V.A.Kimberlites of the Daldyn-Alakit region (Yakutia): spatial distribution of the rocks with different chemical characteristics.Petrology, Vol. 19, 5, pp. 496-520.Russia, YakutiaGroup 1 kimberlites
DS201112-0503
2011
Kononova, V.A.Kargin, A.V., Golubeva, Yu.Yu., Kononova, V.A.Kimberlites of the Daldyn Alakit region ( Yakutia): spatial distribution of the rocks with different chemical characteristics.Petrology, Vol. 19, 5, pp. 496-520.RussiaPetrochemical data
DS201112-0535
2011
Kononova, V.A.Kononova, V.A., Bogatikov, O.A., Kondrashov, I.A.Kimberlites and lamproites: criteria for similarity and differences.Petrology, Vol. 19, 1, pp. 34-54.MantleGeodynamics - genesis
DS201212-0348
2011
Kononova, V.A.Kargin, A.V., Golubeva, Yu.Yu., Kononova, V.A.Kimberlites of the Daldyn Alakit region, Yakutia: spatial distribution of the rocks with different chemical characteristics.Petrology, Vol. 19, 5, pp. 496-520.RussiaDeposit - Daldyn-Alakit
DS200812-0123
2008
Kononova, V.A.A.A.Bogatikov, O.A.A.A., Larchenko, V.A.A.A., Kononova, V.A.A.A., Nosova, A.A.A.A., Minchenko, G.A.V.A.New kimberlite bodies in the Zimnii Bereg field, Archangelsk district: petrography and prognostic estimates.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 418, 1, pp. 68-72.Russia, Archangel, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Zimnii Bereg
DS1998-1124
1998
KononvaParsadanyan, K.S., Pervov, V.A., Bogatikov, KononvaGeochemical features of high magnesium alkaline rocks and their correlation with geological evolution - structureMineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 1137-8.Russia, Baltic ShieldAlkaline rocks, Geochemistry