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SDLRC - Scientific Articles all years by Author - F-Fn


The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation
The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation is compiled by Patricia Sheahan who publishes on a monthly basis a list of new scientific articles related to diamonds as well as media coverage and corporate announcementscalled the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service that is distributed as a free pdf to a list of followers. Pat has kindly agreed to allow her work to be made available as an online digital resource at Kaiser Research Online so that a broader community interested in diamonds and related geology can benefit. The references are for personal use information purposes only; when available a link is provided to an online location where the full article can be accessed or purchased directly. Reproduction of this compilation in part or in whole without permission from the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is strictly prohibited. Return to Diamond Resource Center
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Media/Corporate References by Name for all years
A B C D-Diam Diamonds Diamr+ E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Tips for Users
Posted/Published Reference CodesThe SDLRC provides 3 types of references identified in the reference code. DS for scientific article, DM for a media article, and DC for a corporate announcement. Consider DS0512-0001. The DS stands for "diamond scientific". 05 stands for 2005, the year the reference was posted. 12 represents the month the reference was posted. For all years prior to 2015 the default month is 12. -0001 is the reference's identifier and it does not mean anything. The number below the refence code, ie 2015, is the year the article was published. Note that the posted year may sometimes be later than the published year.
Sort OrderReferences are sorted by the "author" name and when the reference was posted to the compilation.
Most RecentIf the reference code is highlighted yellow, the reference was made available through the most recent monthly compilation of new literature. Use this to check out new references. When new references are posted, we make it our priority to track down an online link and obtain an abstract. With regard to older references, tracking down an abstract and an online link is a work in progress.
Link to external location of article: If the title has a link, it means we have found a location online where you can either retrieve the full article free, or purchase access to it. The Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is not a technical article procurement service; if you want a restricted article, you must deal directly with the vendor who controls the copyright to the article.
Searching this page for a specific term or authorIn your Firefox browser click Edit in the menu bar and then Find. In the Find box that shows up at the bottom of the web page enter your search term. Firefox will highlight all occurrences. This is particularly helpful when the author you are seeking was not the lead author by whom the compilation is sorted.
Sending or sharing a referenceThe left column (Posted/Published) has an embedded hyperlink for each reference. In Firefox, if you right click on it, you can obtain the link url for that reference's location within the page, which you can copy and paste into an email or any other document. You can also use the "share this link" option to tweet, facebook etc the link.
Author Index
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years - F-Fn
Posted/
Published
AuthorTitleSourceRegionKeywords
DS1989-1561
1989
Faas, A.V.Vistelius, A.B., Drubetzkoy, E.R., Faas, A.V.Statistical estimation of mineral age by K-Ar methodMathematical Geology, Vol. 21, No. 8, November pp. 905-920GlobalGeostatistics, Geochronology
DS1991-1807
1991
Faas, V.Vistelius, A.B., Faas, V.On the precision of age measurements by rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) isochrons in nontrivalcasesMathematical Geology, Vol. 23, No. 8, November pp. 999-1044GlobalGeostatistics, Geochronology
DS1989-1667
1989
Fabbri, A.G.Yatabe, S.M., Fabbri, A.G.Putting AI to work in geoscienceEpisodes, Vol. 12, No. 1, March pp. 10-17. Database # 17845GlobalComputer, Artificial Intelligence
DS1993-0255
1993
Fabbri, A.G.Chung, Chang-Jo, Fabbri, A.G.The representation of geoscience information for dat a integrationNonrenewable Resources, Vol. 2, No. 2, Summer pp. 122-139GlobalGIS, Fuzzy logic, Geostatistics
DS200812-0335
2008
Fabbri, A.G.Fabbri, A.G., Chung, C-J.On blind tests and spatial prediction models. ( Lac de Gras diamond deposits)Natural Resources Research, Vol. 17, 2, June pp. 107-118.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDiamond deposit - model
DS200712-0492
2006
Fabcong, M.Jianxin, Z., Jingsui, Y., Fabcong, M.,Yusheng, W., Huimin, Li., Cailai, W.U Pb isotopic studies of eclogites and their host gneisses in the Xitishan area of the North Qaidam mountains, western China: new evidence HP-UHP belt.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 28, 2-3, Nov. 15, pp. 143-150.ChinaUHP, Eclogites
DS2002-0443
2002
Fabian, S.Fabian, S.Exploring for diamonds in BrasilPdac Abstracts, 1/8p.BrazilNews item, Black Swan Resources
DS1983-0221
1983
Fabre, J.Fabre, J.Afrique de L'ouestPergamon Press, 426P.West AfricaTectonics, Structural Geology, Craton
DS201812-2823
2018
Fabregas, P.Jerram, D.A., Sharp, T.H., Torsvik, T.H., Poulson, R., Watton, T.H., Freitag, U., Halton, A., Sherlock, S.C., Malley, J.A.S., Finley, A., Roberge, J., Swart, R., Fabregas, P., Ferreira, C.H., Machado, V.Volcanic constraints on the unzipping of Africa from South America: insights from new geochronological controls alone the Angola margin.Tectonophysics, doi.org/10.1016/ j.tecto.2018.07.027 33p.Africa, Angola, South Americageochronology

Abstract: The breakup of Africa from South America is associated with the emplacement of the Paraná-Etendeka flood basalt province from around 134 Ma and the Tristan da Cunha plume. Yet many additional volcanic events occur that are younger than the main pulse of the Paraná-Etendeka and straddle the rift to drift phases of the main breakup. This contribution reports on new geochronological constraints from the Angolan part of the African Margin. Three coastal and one inland section have been sampled stretching across some 400 Km, with 39Ar/40Ar, U-Pb and Palaeontology used to provide age constraints. Ages from the new data range from ~100 to 81 Ma, with three main events (cr. 100, 91 and 82-81 Ma). Volcanic events are occurring within the Early to Late Cretaceous, along this part of the margin with a general younging towards Namibia. With the constraints of additional age information both onshore and offshore Angola, a clear younging trend at the early stages of rift to drift is recorded in the volcanic events that unzip from North to South. Similar age volcanic events are reported from the Brazilian side of the conjugate margin, and highlight the need to fully incorporate these relatively low volume volcanic pulses into the plate tectonic breakup models of the South Atlantic Margin.
DS2001-0121
2001
FabrettiBonatti, E., Brunelli, Fabretti, Ligi, Portara, SeylerSteady state creation of crust free lithosphere at cold spots in mid-ocean ridgesGeology, Vol. 29, No. 11, Nov. pp. 979-82.MantlePeridotites, flow
DS2003-0132
2003
Fabretti, P.Bonatti, E., Ligi, M., Brunelli, D., Cipriani, A., Fabretti, P., Ferrante, V., Gasperini, L.Mantle thermal pulses below the mid Atlantic Ridge and temporal variations in theNature, No. 6939, pp. 499-505.MantleGeothermometry
DS200412-0182
2003
Fabretti, P.Bonatti, E., Ligi, M., Brunelli, D., Cipriani, A., Fabretti, P., Ferrante, V., Gasperini, L., Ottolini, L.Mantle thermal pulses below the mid Atlantic Ridge and temporal variations in the formation of oceanic lithosphere.Nature, No. 6939, pp. 499-505.MantleGeothermometry
DS1991-0463
1991
Fabrichnaya, O.B.Fabrichnaya, O.B., et al.Constitution of the mantle: phase relations, petrological models, elasticity, mineralogyPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 69, No. 1-2, November pp. 37-100MantleModel, Petrology, geophysics
DS1984-0198
1984
Fabries, J.Conquere, F., Fabries, J.Chemical Disequilibrium and its Thermal Significance in Spinel Peridotites from the Lherz and Freychinede Ultramafic Bodies (ariege: French Pyrenees.)Proceedings of Third International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, PP. 319-331.GlobalMineral Chemistry
DS1987-0200
1987
Fabries, J.Fabries, J., Figueroa, O., Lorand, J.P.Petrology and thermal history of highly deformed mantle xenoliths from the Montferrier basanites, Langedoc, SouthernFrance: a comparison with ultramafiJournal of Petrologgy, Vol. 28, No. 5, October pp. 887-920FranceBasanite
DS1988-0486
1988
Fabries, J.Morimoto, N., Fabries, J., Ferguson, A.K., Ginzburg, I.V., et al.Nomenclature of pyroxenes. ... new classification and recommendations based on crystal chemistryMineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 39, pp. 55-76. Database # 17362GlobalRock classification, Mineralogy - pyroxenes
DS1990-0218
1990
Fabries, J.Bodinier, J.L., Vasseur, G., Vernieres, J., Dupuy, C., Fabries, J.Mechanisms of mantle metasomatism: geochemical evidence from the Lherzorogenic peridotiteJournal of Petrology, Vol. 31, No. 3, June pp. 597-628GermanyMantle Metasomatism, Geochemistry
DS2001-0311
2001
Fabries, J.Fabries, J., Lorand, J.P., Guiraud, M.Petrogenesis of the amphibole rich veins from the Lherz orogenic lherzolite massif: case study lithospheric...Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 140, No. 4, pp. 383-403.France, mantlePyroxenites, Petrology
DS1992-1323
1992
Fabro, C.Salviulo, G., Princivalle, F., Demarchi, G., Fabro, C.Effects of Ca-magnesium substitution in C2/c pyroxene structure on natural clinopy roxenes from spinel peridotite nodules (Pico Cabugi, Brasil).Phys. Chem. Minerals, Vol. 19, pp. 213-219.BrazilNodules, Peridotite
DS1994-1413
1994
Fabro, C.Princivalle, F., Salviulo, G., Fabro, C., Demarchi, G.Inter and intra crystalline temperature and pressure estimates on pyroxenes from northeast Brasil mantle xenoliths.Contr. Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 116, No. 1/2, pp. 1-6.BrazilXenoliths
DS201212-0339
2012
Facatino, M.Jelsma, H.,Krishnan, S.U., Perritt, S.,Kumar, M., Preston, R., Winter, F., Lemotlo, L., Costa, J., Van der Linde, G., Facatino, M., Posser, A., Wallace, C., Henning, A., Joy, S., Chinn, I., Armstrong, R., Phillips, D.Kimberlites from central Angola: a case stidy of exploration findings.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractAfrica, AngolaOverview of kimberlites
DS201412-0427
2013
Facatino, M.Jelsma, H., Krishnan, U., Perritt, S., Preston, R., Winter, F., Lemotlo, L., van der Linde, G., Armstrong, R., Phillips, D., Joy, S., Costa, J., Facatino, M., Posser, A., Kumar, M., Wallace, C., Chinn, I., Henning, A.Kimberlites from central Angola: a case study of exploration findings.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, pp. 173-190.Africa, AngolaExploration - kimberlites
DS200812-0149
2008
Facccena, C.Brun, J-P., Facccena, C.Exhumation of high pressure rocks driven by slab rollback.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 272, 1-2, July 30, pp. 1-7.MantleHP - slab
DS1999-0053
1999
Faccena, C.Becker, T.W., Faccena, C., Giardini, D.The development of slabs in the upper mantle: insights from numerical and laboratory experiments.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 104, No. 7, July 10, pp. 15207-26.MantleExperimental, Subduction
DS201707-1317
2017
Faccenda, M.Dal Zilio, L., Faccenda, M., Capitanio, F.The role of deep subduction in supercontinental breakup.Tectonophysics, in press availableMantlesubduction

Abstract: The breakup of continents and their subsequent drifting plays a crucial role in the Earth's periodic plate aggregation and dispersal cycles. While continental aggregation is considered the result of oceanic closure during subduction, what drives sustained divergence in the following stages remains poorly understood. In this study, thermo-mechanical numerical experiments illustrate the single contribution of subduction and coupled mantle flow to the rifting and drifting of continents. We quantify the drag exerted by subduction-induced mantle flow along the basal surface of continental plates, comparing models of lithospheric slab stagnation above the upper-lower mantle boundary with those where slabs penetrate into the lower mantle. When subduction is upper-mantle confined, divergent basal tractions localise at distances comparable to the effective upper mantle thickness (~ 500 km), causing the opening of a marginal basin. Instead, subduction of lithosphere in the lower mantle reorganises the flow into a much wider cell localising extensional stresses at greater distances from the trench (~ 3000 km). Sub-continental tractions are higher and more sustained over longer time periods in this case, and progressively increase as the slab sinks deeper. Although relatively low, basal-shear stresses when integrated over large plates, generate tension forces that may exceed the strength of the continental lithosphere, eventually leading to breakup and opening of a distal basin. The models illustrate the emergence of a similar mechanism, which results in the formation of back-arc basins above upper-mantle confined subduction, and scales to much larger distances for deeper subduction. Examples include the Atlantic Ocean formation and drifting of the South and North American plates during the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Farallon plate subduction.
DS201810-2393
2018
Faccenda, M.Zhou, Q., Hu, J., Liu, L., Chaparro, T., Stegman, D.R., Faccenda, M.Western U.S. seismic anisotropy revealing complex mantle dynamics.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 500, pp. 156-167.United Statesgeodynamics

Abstract: The origin of the complex pattern of SKS splitting over the western United States (U.S.) remains a long-lasting debate, where a model that simultaneously matches the various SKS features is still lacking. Here we present a series of quantitative geodynamic models with data assimilation that systematically evaluate the influence of different lithospheric and mantle structures on mantle flow and seismic anisotropy. These tests reveal a configuration of mantle deformation more complex than ever envisioned before. In particular, we find that both lithospheric thickness variations and toroidal flows around the Juan de Fuca slab modulate flow locally, but their co-existence enhances large-scale mantle deformation below the western U.S. The ancient Farallon slab below the east coast pulls the western U.S. upper mantle eastward, spanning the regionally extensive circular pattern of SKS splitting. The prominent E-W oriented anisotropy pattern within the Pacific Northwest reflects the existence of sustaining eastward intrusion of the hot Pacific oceanic mantle to beneath the continental interior, from within slab tears below Oregon to under the Snake River Plain and the Yellowstone caldera. This work provides an independent support to the formation of intra-plate volcanism due to intruding shallow hot mantle instead of a rising mantle plume.
DS201901-0024
2018
Faccenda, M.Dal Zilio, L., Faccenda, M., Capitanio, F.The role of deep subduction in supercontinent breakup.Tectonophysics, Vol. 746, pp. 312-324.Mantleplate tectonics

Abstract: The breakup of continents and their subsequent drifting plays a crucial role in the Earth's periodic plate aggregation and dispersal cycles. While continental aggregation is considered the result of oceanic closure during subduction, what drives sustained divergence in the following stages remains poorly understood. In this study, thermo-mechanical numerical experiments illustrate the single contribution of subduction and coupled mantle flow to the rifting and drifting of continents. We quantify the drag exerted by subduction-induced mantle flow along the basal surface of continental plates, comparing models of lithospheric slab stagnation above the upper-lower mantle boundary with those where slabs penetrate into the lower mantle. When subduction is upper-mantle confined, divergent basal tractions localise at distances comparable to the effective upper mantle thickness (~ 500 km), causing the opening of a marginal basin. Instead, subduction of lithosphere in the lower mantle reorganises the flow into a much wider cell localising extensional stresses at greater distances from the trench (~ 3000 km). Sub-continental tractions are higher and more sustained over longer time periods in this case, and progressively increase as the slab sinks deeper. Although relatively low, basal-shear stresses when integrated over large plates, generate tension forces that may exceed the strength of the continental lithosphere, eventually leading to breakup and opening of a distal basin. The models illustrate the emergence of a similar mechanism, which results in the formation of back-arc basins above upper-mantle confined subduction, and scales to much larger distances for deeper subduction. Examples include the Atlantic Ocean formation and drifting of the South and North American plates during the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Farallon plate subduction.
DS201904-0734
2019
Faccenda, M.Faccenda, M., Ferreira, A.M.G., Tisato, N., Lithgow-Bertelloni, C., Stixrude, L., Pennacchioni, G.Extrinsic elastic anisotropy in a compositionally heterogeneous Earth's mantle.Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, https://doi,org/ 10.1029/2018JB016482Mantleanistropy

Abstract: Several theoretical studies indicate that a substantial fraction of the measured seismic anisotropy could be interpreted as extrinsic anisotropy associated with compositional layering in rocks, reducing the significance of strain-induced intrinsic anisotropy. Here we quantify the potential contribution of grain-scale and rock-scale compositional anisotropy to the observations by (i) combining effective medium theories with realistic estimates of mineral isotropic elastic properties and (ii) measuring velocities of synthetic seismic waves propagating through modeled strain-induced microstructures. It is shown that for typical mantle and oceanic crust subsolidus compositions, rock-scale compositional layering does not generate any substantial extrinsic anisotropy (<1%) because of the limited contrast in isotropic elastic moduli among different rocks. Quasi-laminated structures observed in subducting slabs using P and S wave scattering are often invoked as a source of extrinsic anisotropy, but our calculations show that they only generate minor seismic anisotropy (<0.1-0.2% of Vp and Vs radial anisotropy). More generally, rock-scale compositional layering, when present, cannot be detected with seismic anisotropy studies but mainly with wave scattering. In contrast, when grain-scale layering is present, significant extrinsic anisotropy could exist in vertically limited levels of the mantle such as in a mid-ocean ridge basalt-rich lower transition zone or in the uppermost lower mantle where foliated basalts and pyrolites display up to 2-3% Vp and 3-6% Vs radial anisotropy. Thus, seismic anisotropy observed around the 660-km discontinuity could be possibly related to grain-scale shape-preferred orientation. Extrinsic anisotropy can form also in a compositionally homogeneous mantle, where velocity variations associated with major phase transitions can generate up to 1% of positive radial anisotropy.
DS201904-0735
2019
Faccenda, M.Ferreira, A.M.G., Faccenda, M., Sturgeon, W., Chang, S-J., Schardong, L.Ubiquitous lower mantle anisotropy beneath subduction zones.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 32, pp. 301-306.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: Seismic anisotropy provides key information to map the trajectories of mantle flow and understand the evolution of our planet. While the presence of anisotropy in the uppermost mantle is well established, the existence and nature of anisotropy in the transition zone and uppermost lower mantle are still debated. Here we use three-dimensional global seismic tomography images based on a large dataset that is sensitive to this region to show the ubiquitous presence of anisotropy in the lower mantle beneath subduction zones. Whereas above the 660?km seismic discontinuity slabs are associated with fast SV anomalies up to about 3%, in the lower mantle fast SH anomalies of about 2% persist near slabs down to about 1,000-1,200?km. These observations are consistent with 3D numerical models of deformation from subducting slabs and the associated lattice-preferred orientation of bridgmanite produced in the dislocation creep regime in areas subjected to high stresses. This study provides evidence that dislocation creep may be active in the Earth’s lower mantle, providing new constraints on the debated nature of deformation in this key, but inaccessible, component of the deep Earth.
DS202005-0773
2020
Faccenda, M.Yang, J., Faccenda, M.Intraplate volcanism originating from upwelling hydrous mantle transition zone.Nature, Vol. 579, 7797, pp. 1-4. pdfMantlewater, volcanism

Abstract: Most magmatism occurring on Earth is conventionally attributed to passive mantle upwelling at mid-ocean ridges, to slab devolatilization at subduction zones, or to mantle plumes. However, the widespread Cenozoic intraplate volcanism in northeast China1,2,3 and the young petit-spot volcanoes4,5,6,7 offshore of the Japan Trench cannot readily be associated with any of these mechanisms. In addition, the mantle beneath these types of volcanism is characterized by zones of anomalously low seismic velocity above and below the transition zone8,9,10,11,12 (a mantle level located at depths between 410 and 660 kilometres). A comprehensive interpretation of these phenomena is lacking. Here we show that most (or possibly all) of the intraplate and petit-spot volcanism and low-velocity zones around the Japanese subduction zone can be explained by the Cenozoic interaction of the subducting Pacific slab with a hydrous mantle transition zone. Numerical modelling indicates that 0.2 to 0.3 weight per cent of water dissolved in mantle minerals that are driven out from the transition zone in response to subduction and retreat of a tectonic plate is sufficient to reproduce the observations. This suggests that a critical amount of water may have accumulated in the transition zone around this subduction zone, as well as in others of the Tethyan tectonic belt13 that are characterized by intraplate or petit-spot volcanism and low-velocity zones in the underlying mantle.
DS202009-1614
2020
Faccenda, M.Brovarone, A.V., Butch, C.J., Ciappa, A., Cleaves, H.J., Elmaleh, A., Faccenda, M., Feineman, M., Hermann, J., Nestola, F., Cordone, A., Giovannelli., D.Let there be water: how hydration/dehydration reactions accompany key Earth and life processes.American Mineralogist, Vol. 105, pp. 1152-1160. pdfMantlecarbon

Abstract: Water plays a key role in shaping our planet and making life possible. Given the abundance of water on Earth's surface and in its interior, chemical reactions involving water, namely hydration and dehydration reactions, feature prominently in nature and are critical to the complex set of geochemical and biochemical reactions that make our planet unique. This paper highlights some fundamental aspects of hydration and dehydration reactions in the solid Earth, biology, and man-made materials, as well as their connections to carbon cycling on our planet.
DS2003-0096
2003
Faccenna, C.Bellashen, N., Faccenna, C., Funiciello, F., Daniel, J.M., Jolivet, L.Why did Arabia separate from Africa? Insights from 3-D laboratory experimentsEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 216, 3, pp. 365-81.AfricaTectonics, rifting
DS2003-1150
2003
Faccenna, C.Regard, V., Faccenna, C., Martinod, J., Bellier, O., Thomas, J-C.From subduction to collision: control of deep processes on the evolution of convergentJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B4. 10.1029/2002JB001943MantleSubduction, Tectonics
DS200412-0131
2003
Faccenna, C.Bellashen, N., Faccenna, C., Funiciello, F., Daniel, J.M., Jolivet, L.Why did Arabia separate from Africa? Insights from 3-D laboratory experiments.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 216, 3, pp. 365-81.AfricaTectonics, rifting
DS200412-0592
2004
Faccenna, C.Funicello, F., Faccenna, C., Giardini, D.Role of lateral mantle flow in the evolution of subduction systems: insights from laboratory experiments.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 157, 3, pp. 1393-1406.MantleSubduction
DS200412-1647
2003
Faccenna, C.Regard, V., Faccenna, C., Martinod, J., Bellier, O., Thomas, J-C.From subduction to collision: control of deep processes on the evolution of convergent plate boundary.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B4. 10.1029/2002 JB001943MantleSubduction Tectonics
DS200512-0075
2005
Faccenna, C.Bellahsen, N., Faccenna, C., Funiciello, F.Dynamics of subduction and plate motion laboratory experiments: insight into the plate tectonics behaviour of the Earth.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 110, B1, Jan. 6, B10401.MantleTectonics, subduction
DS200612-0419
2006
Faccenna, C.Funicello, F., Moroni, M., Piromallo, C., Faccenna, C., Cenedese, A., Bui, H.A.Mapping mantle flow during retreating subduction: laboratory models analyzed by feature tracking.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 111, B3, B3402 10.1029/2005 JB003792MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200812-0373
2008
Faccenna, C.Funiciello, F., Faccenna, C., Heuret, A., Lallemand, S., Di Guiseppe, E., Becker, T.W.Trench migration, net rotation and slab mantle decoupling.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 271, 1-4, pp. 233-240.MantleSubduction
DS200812-0628
2008
Faccenna, C.Lallemand, S., Heuret, A., Faccenna, C., Funiciello, F.Subduction dynamics as revealed by trench migration.Tectonics, Vol. 27, TC3014MantleSubduction
DS200912-0324
2009
Faccenna, C.Husson, L., Brun, J-P., Yamato, P., Faccenna, C.Episodic slab rollback fosters exhumation of HP-UHP rocks.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 179, 3, pp. 1291-1300.MantleUHP
DS201012-0190
2010
Faccenna, C.Faccenna, C., Becker, T.W., Lallemand, S., Lagabrielle, Y., Funiciello, F., Piromallo, C.Subduction triggered magmatic pulses: a new class of plumes?Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 299, 1-2, Oct. 15, pp. 54-68.MantleMagmatism
DS201012-0811
2010
Faccenna, C.Van Dinther, Y., Morra, G., Funiciello, F., Faccenna, C.Role of overriding plate in the subduction process: insights from numerical models.Tectonophysics, Vol. 484, pp. 74-86.MantleSubduction
DS201112-0087
2011
Faccenna, C.Bialas, R.W., Funiciello, F., Faccenna, C.Subduction and exhumation of continental crust: insights from laboratory models.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 184, 1, pp. 43-64.MantleSubduction
DS201312-0256
2013
Faccenna, C.Faccenna, C., Becker, T.W., Conrad, C.P., Husson, L.Mountain building and mantle dynamics.Tectonics, Vol. 32, 1, pp. 80-93.MantleGeodynamics
DS201312-0257
2013
Faccenna, C.Faccenna, C., Becker, T.W., Jolivet, L., Keskin, M.Mantle convection in the Middle East: reconciling Afar upwelling, Arabia indentation and Aegean trench rollback.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 375, pp. 254-269.Asia, ArabiaConvection
DS201412-0003
2014
Faccenna, C.Agard, P., Zuo, X., Funiciello, F., Bellahsen, N., Faccenna, C., Savva, D.Obduction: why, how and where. Clues from analog models.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 393, pp. 132-145.MantleSubduction
DS201804-0708
2018
Faccenna, C.Kiraly, A., Holt, A.F., Funiciello, F., Faccenna, C., Capitanio, F.A.Modeling slab-slab interactions: dynamics of outward dipping double sided subduction systems.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, 22p. PdfMantleplate tectonics

Abstract: Slab-slab interaction is a characteristic feature of tectonically complex areas. Outward dipping double-sided subduction is one of these complex cases, which has several examples on Earth, most notably the Molucca Sea and Adriatic Sea. This study focuses on developing a framework for linking plate kinematics and slab interactions in an outward dipping subduction geometry. We used analog and numerical models to better understand the underlying subduction dynamics. Compared to a single subduction model, double-sided subduction exhibits more time-dependent and vigorous toroidal flow cells that are elongated (i.e., not circular). Because both the Molucca and Adriatic Sea exhibit an asymmetric subduction configuration, we also examine the role that asymmetry plays in the dynamics of outward dipping double-sided subduction. We introduce asymmetry in two ways; with variable initial depths for the two slabs (geometric asymmetry), and with variable buoyancy within the subducting plate (mechanical asymmetry). Relative to the symmetric case, we probe how asymmetry affects the overall slab kinematics, whether asymmetric behavior intensifies or equilibrates as subduction proceeds. While initial geometric asymmetry disappears once the slabs are anchored to the 660 km discontinuity, the mechanical asymmetry can cause more permanent differences between the two subduction zones. In the most extreme case, the partly continental slab stops subducting due to the unequal slab pull force. The results show that the slab-slab interaction is most effective when the two trenches are closer than 10-8 cm in the laboratory, which is 600-480 km when scaled to the Earth.
DS201810-2367
2018
Faccenna, C.Pitard, P., Replumaz, A., Funiciello, F., Husson, L., Faccenna, C.Mantle kinematics driving collisional subduction: insights from analogue modeling.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 502, pp. 96-103.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: Since several decades, the processes allowing for the subduction of the continental lithosphere less dense than the mantle in a collision context have been widely explored, but models that are based upon the premise that slab pull is the prominent driver of plate tectonics fail. The India-Asia collision, where several episodes of continental subduction have been documented, constitute a case study for alternative views. One of these episodes occurred in the early collision time within the Asian plate where continental lithosphere not attached to any oceanic lithosphere subducted southward in front of the Indian lithosphere during its northward subduction that followed the oceanic subduction of the Tethys ocean. This process, known as collisional subduction, has a counter-intuitive behavior since the subduction is not driven by slab pull. It has been speculated that the mantle circulation can play an important role in triggering collisional subduction but a detailed, qualitative analysis of it is not available, yet. In this work we explore the southward subduction dynamics of the Asian lithosphere below Tibet by means of analogue experiments with the aim to highlight how the mantle circulation induces or responds to collisional subduction. We found that during the northward oceanic subduction (analogue of Tethys subduction) attached to the indenter (Indian analogue), the main component of slab motion is driven vertically by its negative buoyancy, while the trench rolls back. In the mantle the convective pattern consists in a pair of wide convective cells on both sides of the slab. But when the indenter starts to bend and plunge in the mantle, trench motion reverses. Its advance transmits the far field forces to two upper plates (Asian analogues). The more viscous frontal plate thickens, and the less viscous hinterland plate, which is attached to the back wall of the box, subducts. During this transition, a pair of sub-lithospheric convective cells is observed on both sides of the Asian analogue slab, driven by the shortening of the frontal plate. It favors the initiation of the backwall plate subduction. Such subduction is maintained during the entire collision by a wide cell with a mostly horizontal mantle flow below Tibet, passively advecting the Asian analogue slab. Experimental results suggest that once the tectonic far-field force related to the forward horizontal motion becomes dominant upon the buoyancy forces, trench advancing and the transmission of the tectonic force to the upper and backwall plates are promoted. This peculiar condition triggers the subduction of the backwall plate, despite it is light and buoyant.
DS200412-0348
2004
Faccini, B.Coltori, M., Beccaluva, L., Bonadiman, C., Faccini, B., Ntaflos, T., Siena, F.Amphibole genesis via metasomatic reaction with clinopyroxene in mantle xenoliths from Victoria Land, Antarctica. Mt. Melbourne,Lithos, Vol. 75, 1-2, July pp. 115-139.AntarcticaMetasomatism, trace element fingerprinting, glass
DS200712-0196
2007
Faccini, B.Coltorti, M., Bonadiman, C., Faccini, B., Gregoire, M., OReilly, S.Y., Powell, W.Amphiboles from supra subduction and intraplate lithospheric mantle.Lithos, Vol. 99, 1-2, pp. 68-84.MantleSubduction
DS200912-0063
2009
Faccini, B.Bonadiman, C., Yantao, H., Coltorti, M., Dallai, L., Faccini, B., Huang, YU., Xia, Q.Water content of pyroxenes in intraplate lithospheric mantle.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 21, 3, June pp. 637-647.MantleWater
DS201502-0044
2015
Facello, A.Bonetto, S., Facello, A., Ferrero, A-M., Umili, G.A tool for semi-automatic linear feature detection based on DTM.Computers & Geosciences, Vol. 75, pp. 1-12.TechnologyNot specific to diamonds
DS200912-0209
2009
Facer, J.Facer, J., Downes, H., Beard, A.In situ serpentinization and hydrous fluid metasomatism in spinel dunite xenoliths from the Bearpaw Mountains, Montana, USA.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 50, 8, pp. 1443-1475.United States, MontanaMetasomatism - not specific to diamonds
DS2001-0690
2001
Fachmann, S.Lisker, F., Fachmann, S.Phanerozoic history of the Mahanadi region, IndiaJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 106, No. 10, pp.22,027-50.IndiaTectonics
DS201312-0258
2013
Facts & FiguresFacts & FiguresFacts & Figures for 2012. Economy, activity, money, reserves, exploration, people, environment, world.Facts & Figures, 140p.CanadaSummary - economics
DS1988-0207
1988
Fadaie, K.Fadaie, K.Geophysical and isotopic constraints on the lithosphere of the east African rift systemPh.d. Thesis, Carleton University, East AfricaTectonics, Geochronology
DS201502-0118
2015
Fadel, I.van der Meijde, M., Fadel, I., Ditmar, P., Hamayun, M.Uncertainties in crustal thickness models for dat a sparse environments: a review for South America and Africa.Journal of Geodynamics, Vol. 84, 1, pp. 1-18.South America, AfricaGeophysics - seismics
DS201911-2552
2019
Fadel, I.Ortiz, K., Nyblade, A., Meijde, M., Paulssen, H., Kwadiba, M., Ntibinyane, O., Durheim, R., Fadel, I., Homman, K.Upper mantle P and S wave velocity structure of the Kalahari craton and surrounding Proterozoic terranes, southern Africa.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 46, 16, pp. 9509-9518.Africa, South Africageophysics - seismics

Abstract: P and S waves travel times from large, distant earthquakes recorded on seismic stations in Botswana and South Africa have been combined with existing data from the region to construct velocity models of the upper mantle beneath southern Africa. The models show a region of higher velocities beneath the Rehoboth Province and parts of the northern Okwa Terrane and the Magondi Belt, which can be attributed to thicker cratonic lithosphere, and a region of lower velocities beneath the Damara-Ghanzi-Chobe Belt and Okavango Rift, which can be attributed a region of thinner off-craton lithosphere. This finding suggests that the spatial extent of thick cratonic lithosphere in southern Africa is greater than previously known. In addition, within the cratonic lithosphere an area of lower velocities is imaged, revealing parts of the cratonic lithosphere that may have been modified by younger magmatic events.
DS202011-2067
2020
Fadel, I.White-Gaynor, A.L., Nyblade, A.A., Durrheim, R., Raveloson, R., van der Meijde, M., Fadel, I., Paulssen, H., Kwadiba, M., Ntibinyane, O., Titus, N., Sitali, M.Lithospheric boundaries and upper mantle structure beneath southern Africa imaged by P and S wave velocity models.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, 10.1029/GC008925 20p. PdfAfrica, South AfricaGeophysics, seismic

Abstract: We report new P and S wave velocity models of the upper mantle beneath southern Africa using data recorded on seismic stations spanning the entire subcontinent. Beneath most of the Damara Belt, including the Okavango Rift, our models show lower than average velocities (-0.8% Vp; -1.2% Vs) with an abrupt increase in velocities along the terrane's southern margin. We attribute the lower than average velocities to thinner lithosphere (~130 km thick) compared to thicker lithosphere (~200 km thick) immediately to the south under the Kalahari Craton. Beneath the Etendeka Flood Basalt Province, higher than average velocities (0.25% Vp; 0.75% Vs) indicate thicker and/or compositionally distinct lithosphere compared to other parts of the Damara Belt. In the Rehoboth Province, higher than average velocities (0.3% Vp; 0.5% Vs) suggest the presence of a microcraton, as do higher than average velocities (1.0% Vp; 1.5% Vs) under the Southern Irumide Belt. Lower than average velocities (-0.4% Vp; -0.7% Vs) beneath the Bushveld Complex and parts of the Mgondi and Okwa terranes are consistent with previous studies, which attributed them to compositionally modified lithosphere resulting from Precambrian magmatic events. There is little evidence for thermally modified upper mantle beneath any of these terranes which could provide a source of uplift for the Southern African Plateau. In contrast, beneath parts of the Irumide Belt in southern and central Zambia and the Mozambique Belt in central Mozambique, deep-seated low velocity anomalies (-0.7% Vp; -0.8% Vs) can be attributed to upper mantle extensions of the African superplume structure.
DS202007-1131
2020
Fadel. I.Chisenga, C., Van der Meijde, M., Yan, J., Fadel. I., Atekwana, E.A., Steffen, R., Ramotoroko, C.Gravity derived crustal thickness model of Botswana: its implication for the Mw 6.5 April 3, 2017, Botswana earthquake. Tectonophysics, Vol. 787, 228479 12p. PdfAfrica, Botswanageophysics - gravity

Abstract: Botswana experienced a Mw 6.5 earthquake on 3rd April 2017, the second largest earthquake event in Botswana's recorded history. This earthquake occurred within the Limpopo-Shashe Belt, ~350 km southeast of the seismically active Okavango Rift Zone. The region has no historical record of large magnitude earthquakes or active faults. The occurrence of this earthquake was unexpected and underscores our limited understanding of the crustal configuration of Botswana and highlight that neotectonic activity is not only confined to the Okavango Rift Zone. To address this knowledge gap, we applied a regularized inversion algorithm to the Bouguer gravity data to construct a high-resolution crustal thickness map of Botswana. The produced crustal thickness map shows a thinner crust (35-40 km) underlying the Okavango Rift Zone and sedimentary basins, whereas thicker crust (41-46 km) underlies the cratonic regions and orogenic belts. Our results also show localized zone of relatively thinner crust (~40 km), one of which is located along the edge of the Kaapvaal Craton within the MW 6.5 Botswana earthquake region. Based on our result, we propose a mechanism of the Botswana Earthquake that integrates crustal thickness information with elevated heat flow as the result of the thermal fluid from East African Rift System, and extensional forces predicted by the local stress regime. The epicentral region is therefore suggested to be a possible area of tectonic reactivation, which is caused by multiple factors that could lead to future intraplate earthquakes in this region.
DS200612-0385
2006
Fadil, A.Fadil, A., Vernant, P., McClusky, S., Reilinger, R., Gomez, F., Ben Sari, D., Mourabit, Feigl, BarazangiActive tectonics of the western Mediterranean: geodetic evidence for rollback of a delaminated subcontinental lithospheric slab beneath the Rif Mountains, Morocco.Geology, Vol. 34, 7, July pp. 529-532.Africa, MoroccoTectonics, continental dynamics
DS1975-0276
1976
Faerseth, R.B.Faerseth, R.B., Macintyre, R.M., Naterstad, J.Mesozoic Alkaline Dikes in the Sunnhordaland Region. Western Norway: Ages, Geochemistry and Regional Significance.Lithos, Vol. 9, PP. 331-345.Norway, ScandinaviaUltramafic And Related Rocks
DS1975-0739
1978
Faerseth, R.B.Faerseth, R.B.Mantle Derived Lherzolite Xenoliths and Megacrysts from Permo-triassic Dykes, Sunnhordland, Western Norway.Lithos, Vol. 11, PP. 23-35.Norway, ScandinaviaPetrogenesis
DS201708-1631
2017
Fagan, A.Fagan, A.Geochemistry and geothermobarometry of lherzolite and pyroxenite xenoliths from the CH-33, CH-52 & CH-58 Diamondiferous kimberlite pipes at Chidliak ( Baffin Island, Canada).11th. International Kimberlite Conference, PosterCanada, Nunavut, Baffin Islanddeposit - CH-33, CH-52, CH-58
DS201012-0191
2010
Fagan, A.J.Fagan, A.J., Luth, R.W.Growth of diamond in hydrous silicate melts.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 161, 2, pp. 229-236.MantleDiamond genesis
DS202002-0197
2019
Fagan, A.J.Krebs, M.Y., Pearson, D.G., Fagan, A.J., Bussweiler, Y., Sarkar, C.The application of trace elements and Sr-Pb isotopes to dating and tracing ruby formation: the Aappaluttoq deposit, SW Greenland.Chemical Geology, Vol. 523, pp. 42-58.Europe, Greenlandruby

Abstract: Trace element characteristics of rubies from the Aappaluttoq deposit, SW Greenland, were measured using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), laser ablation - inductively coupled plasma-time of flight-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-TOF-MS) and offline laser ablation followed by solution ICP-MS. LA-ICP-TOF-MS - applied to rubies for the first time - effectively maps trace element spatial variation in these gems. With the exception of a small number of elements that can substitute for Al3+ in the crystal structure (e.g., Ti, Fe, V, Cr, Mg), trace element mapping clearly demonstrates that most elements such as Th, U, Sr and Rb are hosted in mineral and fluid inclusions or are present along fractures. Primitive mantle normalized trace element patterns show characteristics that are broadly correlative to mineral inclusions within the analysed rubies. These minerals include rutile (enrichment of HFSE over LREE, high Ta/Nb and Hf/Zr ratios and low Th/U ratios), phlogopite (enrichment in Rb and Ba and positive Sr anomalies), and zircon (extreme enrichment in Zr-Hf, U and Th, HREE enrichment over LREE and positive Ce anomalies). The sample suite analysed here is derived from a bulk sample of ore composed of three different rock types (sapphirine-gedrite, leucogabbro and phlogopitite). Two different populations of ruby were identified at Aappaluttoq; these can be defined on the basis of their different V content within the corundum lattice. Therefore, V content may be able to geochemically define rubies from different host rocks within the same deposit. Using offline laser ablation followed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) we measured the radiogenic isotope compositions in ruby for the first time. A Pb-Pb isochron age of 2686 +300/-74?Ma, was defined for gem formation at Aappaluttoq. We believe that this is the first ever direct age determined on a ruby suite, independent of associated minerals, derived by bulk sampling sub-micron to micron sized inclusions in the corundum lattice. This age likely reflects the re-crystallization and re-setting of the ruby (and its U-Pb system) during the Neoarchean in SW Greenland, due to regional granulite to upper-amphibolite facies metamorphism.
DS1996-1548
1996
Fagan, R.Wilson, M.R., Kyser, T.K., Fagan, R.Sulfur isotope systematics and platinum group element behaviour in rare earth elements (REE)enriched metasomatic fluids: a studyGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 60, No. 11, June pp. 1933-1942.CaliforniaMantle xenoliths, Dish Hill
DS1991-0464
1991
Fagin, S.W.Fagin, S.W.Seismic modeling of geologic structures - applications to explorationproblemsSociety of Exploration Geophysicists, 250pGlobalBook -Table of contents, Modeling theory, case histories, Geophysics
DS201510-1792
2015
Fagny, A.M.Nkoudandou, O.F., Bardintzeff, J-M., Fagny, A.M.Sub-continental lithospheric mantle structure beneath the Adamawa plateau inferred from the petrology of ultramafic xenoliths from Ngaoundere, Cameroon, Central Africa. Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 111, pp. 26-40.Africa, CameroonLherzolite, Harzburgite, Olivine websterite

Abstract: Ultramafic xenoliths (lherzolite, harzburgite and olivine websterite) have been discovered in basanites close to Ngaoundéré in Adamawa plateau. Xenoliths exhibit protogranular texture (lherzolite and olivine websterite) or porphyroclastic texture (harzburgite). They are composed of olivine Fo89-90, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and spinel. According to geothermometers, lherzolites have been equilibrated at 880-1060 °C; equilibrium temperatures of harzburgite are rather higher (880-1160 °C), while those of olivine websterite are bracketed between 820 and 1010 °C. The corresponding pressures are 1.8-1.9 GPa, 0.8-1.0 GPa and 1.9-2.5 GPa, respectively, which suggests that xenoliths have been sampled respectively at depths of 59-63 km, 26-33 km and 63-83 km. Texture and chemical compositional variations of xenoliths with temperature, pressure and depth on regional scale may be ascribed to the complex history undergone by the sub-continental mantle beneath the Adamawa plateau during its evolution. This may involve a limited asthenosphere uprise, concomitantly with plastic deformation and partial melting due to adiabatic decompression processes. Chemical compositional heterogeneities are also proposed in the sub-continental lithospheric mantle under the Adamawa plateau, as previously suggested for the whole Cameroon Volcanic Line.
DS201412-0234
2014
Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink, J.Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink, J.How many lakes are there on Earth?Geophysical Research Letters, 10.1002/2014GL060641GlobalJust for interest
DS201501-0007
2014
Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink, J.Fahrenkamp-Uppenbrink, J.What drives Earth's thermodynamic engine?Science, Vol. 346, 6214, pp. 1184-1185.MantleAthenosphere, magmatism
DS1984-0268
1984
Fahrig, W.F.Fahrig, W.F., Christie, Eeade, TellaPaleomagnetism of the Tulemalu Dikes, Northwest TerritoriesCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 21, pp. 544-53.Northwest TerritoriesGeophysics - Magnetics
DS1986-0229
1986
Fahrig, W.F.Fahrig, W.F., Christie, K.W., et al.The tectonic significance of some basic dike swarms in the Canadian Superior Province with special reference to geochemistry and paleomagnetism of Mistassini swarmCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 23, pp. 238-53.QuebecTectonics, Dike swarms
DS1986-0230
1986
Fahrig, W.F.Fahrig, W.F., Christie, K.W., Chown, E.H., Janes, D., Machado, N.The tectonic significance of some basic dyke swarms in the Canadian Superior province with special reference to The geochemistry and paleomagnetism of thCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 23, No. 2, February pp. 238-253Ontario, QuebecTectonics, Dyke
DS1986-0231
1986
Fahrig, W.F.Fahrig, W.F., West, I.D.Diabase dyke swarms of the Canadian shieldGeological Survey of Canada, Map No. 1627A, 1: 4, 873, 900 scaleCanadaReview, Dyke
DS1987-0201
1987
Fahy, S.Fahy, S., Louie, S.G., Cohen, M.L.Theoretical total energy study of the transformation of graphite into hexagonal diamondPhys. Rev. B. Condensed matter, Vol. 35, No. 14, pp. 7623-7626GlobalMineralogy
DS1997-0328
1997
Faill, R.T.Faill, R.T.A geologic history of the north central Appalachians, Part 1. Orogenesis from the Mesoproterozoic -Taconic.American Journal of Science, Vol. 297, No. 6, June pp. 551-619AppalachiaOrogeny, Proterozoic
DS1998-0408
1998
Faill, R.T.Faill, R.T.A geologic history of the north central Appalachians, Part 3. the AlleghanyOrogenyAmerican Journal of Sci, Vol. 298, No. 2, Feb. pp. 131-180AppalachiaOrogeny, Tectonics
DS1860-0747
1892
Failyer, G.H.Failyer, G.H., Bailey, E.H.A Revised List of Kansas MineralsKansas Acad. Science Transactions, Vol. 13, PP. 27-29.United States, KansasDiamond Occurrence
DS1981-0153
1981
Fainshtein, G. Kh.Fainshtein, G. Kh.Basic Features in the Structure of the Diamond-bearing Sedimentary Formations in the Upper Paleozoic on the East Side Of the Tunguska Synclise.Soviet Geology And Geophysics, Vol. 22, No. 5, PP. 42-47.RussiaKimberlite
DS1986-0101
1986
Fainshtein, G.Kh.Brakfogel, F.F., Belov, E.N., Fainshtein, G.Kh., et al.Geology of the upper Paleozoic diamond bearing formations of TunguskaTransactions of the Institute of Institute Geologiya i Geofizika Akademii Nauk, Vol. 646, pp. 93-122RussiaBlank
DS1986-0232
1986
Fainshtein, G.Kh.Fainshtein, G.Kh., Kazanskii, Yu.P.Geology of the upper Paleozoic diamond bearing formations ofTunguskasyneclise. Cyclicity of sedimentation processes and correlation ofprofiles.(Russian)Transactions of the Institute of Institute Geologiya i Geofizika Akademii Nauk, Vol. 646 pp. 140-159RussiaBlank
DS1985-0767
1985
Faintsyen, G.KH.Zinchuk, N.N., Kotelnikov, D.D., Boris, E.I., Faintsyen, G.KH.Ancient Weathered Crusts and Prospecting for Diamond DepositsBook Review in Soviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 26, No. 8, pp. 119-121RussiaBlank
DS1960-0340
1963
Fairbairn, H.W.Fairbairn, H.W., Faure, G., Pinson, W.H., Hurley, P.M., Powell.Initial Ratio of Strontium 87 to Strontium 86 Whole Rock Age and Discordant Biotite in the Montregian Igneous Province Quebec.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 68, PP. 6515-6522.Canada, QuebecBlank
DS1960-0729
1966
Fairbairn, H.W.Powell, J.L., Hurley, P.M., Fairbairn, H.W.The Strontium Isotopic Composition and Origin of CarbonatiteInterscience Publishing, PP. 365-378.United States, Gulf Coast, Arkansas, Hot Spring County, Canada, QuebecGeochronology, Spitzkop, Oka, Magnet Cove
DS1970-0308
1971
Fairbairn, H.W.Hurley, P.M., Leo, G.W., White, R.W., Fairbairn, H.W.Liberian Age Province ( About 2700ma) and Adjacent Provinces in Liberia and Sierra Leone.Geological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 82, PP. 3483-3490.Sierra Leone, Liberia, West AfricaGeochronology
DS1970-0309
1971
Fairbairn, H.W.Hurley, P.M., Leo, G.W., White, R.W., Fairbairn, H.W.Liberian Age Province ( About 2, 700 M.y.) and Adjacent Provinces in Liberia and Sierra Leone.Geological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 82, PP. 3483-3490.West Africa, Liberia, Sierra Leone, GuineaStructure, Tectonics
DS1975-0111
1975
Fairbairn, H.W.Hurley, P.M., Fairbairn, H.W., Gaudette, H.E.Progress Report on Early Archean Rocks in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guyana and Their General Stratigraphic Setting.In: The Early History of The Earth, Windley, B.f. Editor, Jo, PP. 511-524. 619P.Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guiana, West Africa, South AmericaGeology
DS1950-0468
1959
Fairbairn, P.E.Fairbairn, P.E.Canada as a Field for Diamond ExplorationCast/ste Internal Report., SEPT. 18TH. 24P. (UNPUBL.)CanadaProspecting
DS1960-0661
1966
Fairbairn, P.E.Fairbairn, P.E., Robertson, R.H.S.Stages in the Tropical Weathering of KimberliteClay Minerals, Vol. 6, PP. 351-370.South AfricaGeomorphology
DS1975-0740
1978
Fairbairn, W.C.Fairbairn, W.C.Diamond Digging in West Africa, Lesotho and South AmericaSmall Scale Mining of The World, Conference Held Juriaco Mex, PP. 678-707.West Africa, Lesotho, South America, Sierra Leone, Sewa, LiberiaDiamond Mining Recovery, Kimberlite Pipes
DS1983-0222
1983
Fairbairn, W.C.Fairbairn, W.C.Mining and Marketing of Diamonds and Some Precious StonesAgid Guide To Mineral Resource Development., PP. 357-376.South Africa, South AmericaHistory, Mining Methods
DS1970-0908
1974
Fairbanks, E.E.Fairbanks, E.E.The Unsolved Genesis of DiamondsEarth Science., Vol. 27, No. 1, PP. 11-13.GlobalDiamonds, Genesis, Kimberlite
DS1997-0329
1997
Fairbridge, R.W.Fairbridge, R.W.Encyclopedia of European and Asian regional geology #2Chapman Hall, 896p. approx. $ 320.00 United StatesEurope, Albania, ArmeniaBook - Table of contents, Regional geology -European countries, Asian countries
DS1997-0814
1997
Fairbridge, R.W.Moores, E.M., Fairbridge, R.W.Encyclopedia of European and Asian regional geology #1Chapman and Hall, 800p. $ 500.00Europe, AsiaCountry - profile geology, Book - ad, Book - table of contents, Reference - encyclopedia
DS200712-0301
2007
Fairchild, I.J.Fairchild, I.J., Kennedy, M.J.Neoproterozoic glaciation in the Earth system.Journal of Geological Society of London, Vol. 164, 5, pp. 895-922.Geomorphology
DS2000-0442
2000
Fairchild, T.R.James, D.T., Dunning, G.R., Fairchild, T.R.Proterozoic microfossils from subsurface siliclastic rocks of the Sao Francico Craton, south central Brasil.Precambrian Research, Vol. 103, No. 1-2, Sept.pp. 31-54.Brazil, south centralCraton - Sao Francisco
DS1975-0503
1977
Fairhead, J.D.Fairhead, J.D., Reeves, C.V.Teleseimic Delay Times, Bouguer Anomalies and Inferred Thickness of the African Lithosphere.Earth Plan. Sci. Letters, Vol. 36, No. 1, PP. 63-76.Botswana, South AfricaGeophysics
DS1975-1014
1979
Fairhead, J.D.Fairhead, J.D.A Gravity Link between Domally Uplifted Cainozoic Volcanic Centres of north Africa and its Similarity to the East African Rift System Anomaly.Earth Planet. Sci. Letters, Vol. 42, PP. 109-113.Africa, East AfricaGeotectonics, East African Rift, Bouguer Anomaly Map, Geophysics
DS1981-0101
1981
Fairhead, J.D.Briden, J.C., Whitcombe, D.N., Stuart, G.W., Fairhead, J.D.Depth of Geological Contact Across the West African Craton Margin.Nature., Vol. 292, JULY 9TH., PP. 123-128.West Africa, Senegal, GuineaTectonics
DS1988-0208
1988
Fairhead, J.D.Fairhead, J.D.Mesozoic plate tectonic reconstructions of the central SouthAtlanticOcean: the role of the West and Central African rift systemsTectonophysics, Vol. 155, No. 1-4, Dec. 1, pp. 181-192West AfricaTectonics, Rift systems
DS1988-0209
1988
Fairhead, J.D.Fairhead, J.D., Okereke, C.S.Depths to major density contrasts beneath the West African rift system in Nigeria and Cameroon based on the spectral analysis of gravity dataJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 7, No. 5-6, pp. 769-778Nigeria, Cameroon, West AfricaTectonics, Rift systems
DS1991-0465
1991
Fairhead, J.D.Fairhead, J.D., Okereke, C.S., Nnange, J.M.Crustal structure of the Mamfe basin, West Africa, based on gravity @SOURCE[ TectonophysicsTectonophysics, Vol. 186, pp. 351-358West Africa, Nigeria, Benue TroughGeophysics -gravity, Tectonics
DS1995-2040
1995
Fairhead, J.D.Watts, A.B., Lamb, S.H., Fairhead, J.D.Lithospheric flexing and bending of the central AndesEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 134 No. 1-2, Aug 15, pp. 9-22AndesTectonics
DS1996-0608
1996
Fairhead, J.D.Hartley, R., Watts, A.B., Fairhead, J.D.Isostasy of AfricaEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 137, No. 1-4, Jan. 1, pp. 1-18AfricaGeomorphology, Isostasy
DS1996-0609
1996
Fairhead, J.D.Hartley, R., Watts, A.B., Fairhead, J.D.Isostasy of AfricaEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 137, No. 1/4, Jan. 1, pp. 1-18.AfricaIsostasy, Lithosphere
DS1998-1543
1998
Fairhead, J.D.Vidotti, R.M., Ebinger, C.J., Fairhead, J.D.Gravity signature of the western Parana basin, BrasilEarth and Plan. Sci. Lett, Vol. 159, pp. 117-32BrazilGeophysics - gravity, Bouguer, Flood basalts
DS2000-0711
2000
Fairhead, J.D.Nnange, J.M., Ngako, V., Fairhead, J.D., Ebinger, C.J.Depths to density discontinuities beneath the Adamawa Plateau region, from spectral analyses of gravity data.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 30, No. 4, May pp. 887-901.Central AfricaGeophysics - gravity, Remte sensing
DS2000-0712
2000
Fairhead, J.D.Nnange, J.M., Ngako, V., Fairhead, J.D., Ebinger, C.J.Depths to density discontinuities beneath the Adamawa Plateau region: from spectral analysis - gravity data.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 30, No. 4, May pp. 887-901.Central AfricaGeophysics - seismics, gravity, Discontinuity
DS2003-0391
2003
Fairhead, J.D.Fairhead, J.D., Maus, S.CHAMP satellite and terrestrial magnetic dat a help define the tectonic model for SouthLeading Edge, Vol. 22, 8, pp. 779-83.South AmericaGeophysics
DS200412-0531
2003
Fairhead, J.D.Fairhead, J.D., Maus, S.CHAMP satellite and terrestrial magnetic dat a help define the tectonic model for South America and resolve the lingering problemLeading Edge, Vol. 22, 8, pp. 779-83.South AmericaGeophysics
DS2002-0444
2002
Faithful, J.W.Faithful, J.W.The Ben Hope 'diamond' re-examined18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.123.ScotlandPetrology
DS201510-1811
2015
Faithful, J.W.Vandenberg, J.A., Herrell, M., Faithful, J.W., Snow, A.M., Lacrampe, J., Bieber, C., Dayyani, S., Chisholm, V.Multiple modeling approach for the aquatic effects assessment of a proposed northern diamond mine development. Gahcho KueMine Water and the Environment, in press available, 19p.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Gahcho Kue

Abstract: Eight water models were used to assess potential aquatic environmental effects of the proposed Gahcho Kué diamond mine on groundwater and surface water flow and quality in the Northwest Territories, Canada. This sequence of models was required to cover different spatial and temporal domains, as well as specific physico-chemical processes that could not be simulated by a single model. Where their domains overlapped, the models were interlinked. Feedback mechanisms amongst models were addressed through iterative simulations of linked models. The models were used to test and refine mitigation plans, and in the development of aquatic component monitoring programs. Key findings generated by each model are presented here as testable hypotheses that can be evaluated after the mine is operational. This paper therefore offers a record of assumptions and predictions that can be used as a basis for post-validation.
DS201609-1754
2016
Faithful, J.W.Vandenberg, J.A., Herrell, M., Faithful, J.W., Snow, A.M., Lacrampe, J., Bieber, C., Dayyani, S., Chisholm, V.Multiple modeling approach for the aquatic effects assessment of a proposed northern diamond mine development.Mine Water and the Environment, Vol. 35, pp. 350-368.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Gahcho Kue

Abstract: Eight water models were used to assess potential aquatic environmental effects of the proposed Gahcho Kué diamond mine on groundwater and surface water flow and quality in the Northwest Territories, Canada. This sequence of models was required to cover different spatial and temporal domains, as well as specific physico-chemical processes that could not be simulated by a single model. Where their domains overlapped, the models were interlinked. Feedback mechanisms amongst models were addressed through iterative simulations of linked models. The models were used to test and refine mitigation plans, and in the development of aquatic component monitoring programs. Key findings generated by each model are presented here as testable hypotheses that can be evaluated after the mine is operational. This paper therefore offers a record of assumptions and predictions that can be used as a basis for post-validation.
DS201603-0422
2015
Faithfull, J.Starkey, R.E., Faithfull, J.The history and occurrence of "Buxton Diamonds".Journal of the Russell Society, Vol. 18, pp. 24-45.Europe, United KingdomHistory

Abstract: The presence of quartz crystals in t he soils around Buxton has been known for centuries, and at one time theses so-called 'Buxton Diamonds' were, from published sources, apparently realtively abundant, and well-knwn to both visitors and to commentators. However, few specimens survive in museum collections, and there is considerable confusion in published accounts as to what exactly constitutes a 'Buxton Diamond'. No satisfactory description or explanation of their origin r occurrence has hitherto been published. Attractive specimens of quartz and amethyst are known from various occurrences in the Peak District, associated with igneous rocks, but these are not true 'Buxton Diamonds' . This paper presents the history of 'Buxton Diamonds', and confirms the occurrence of these, sometime highly attractive, crystals of quartz in the limestone of Diamond Hill and the surrounding area.
DS201412-0235
2014
Faithfull, J.W.Faithfull, J.W., Hughes, J., Upton, B.J.G., Ellam, R.M., Ntaflos, T.An aillikite dyke from Sutherland, Scotland.Volcanic and Magmatic Studies Group meeting, Poster Held Jan. 6-8. See minsoc websiteEurope, ScotlandAillikite
DS201809-2039
2018
Faithfull, J.W.Hutchison, M.T., Faithfull, J.W., Barfod, D.N., Hughes, J.W., Upton, B.G.J.The mantle of Scotland viewed through the Glen Gollaidh aillikite.Mineralogy and Petrology, doi.org/10.1007/ s00710-018-0610-y 18p.Europe, Scotlandaillikite

Abstract: The Glen Gollaidh aillikite dyke (58.36741°N 4.69751°W), N.W. Scotland, occurs within the Neoproterozoic sedimentary rocks of the Moine Supergroup ~4 km east of the Moine Thrust. Phlogopite 40Ar/36Ar measurements give a late Devonian maximum emplacement age of 360.3?±?4.9 (2s) Ma. This age occurs in a quiet period of Scottish magmatic history c. 30 Ma after the closure of the Iapetus and before the start of intra-plate alkali magmatism which affected southern Scotland for ~60 My from c. 350 Ma. Abundant chromites and Cr-diopsides and a few unaltered olivines, reflecting a mantle provenance, were recovered from heavy mineral concentrates. The North Atlantic Craton, exposed in Lewisian gneisses west of the Moine thrust, is therefore inferred to extend east at depth under Glen Gollaidh, presenting an opportunity to investigate the thickness and composition of the cratonic margin in the Devonian. The aillikite was found to be barren of diamond and no picro-ilmenites or garnets were definitively identified. However, mineral chemistry suggests that a proportion of Glen Gollaidh xenocrysts crystallised in equilibrium with garnet. Most spinels are Mg, Al chromites, with some Mg chromite present. All fall within the garnet peridotite field based on Ti and Cr but with insufficient Cr2O3 (up to 47.2 wt%) to be consistent with the diamond stability field. Amongst Cr-diopsides 30% of grains have Cr and Al contents consistent with derivation from garnet peridotite. The majority of clinopyroxenes also show a marked depletion in heavy compared to light rare-earth elements, again consistent with equilibration with garnet. The opx-cpx solvus thermometer demonstrates that average Cr-diopside compositions require at least 37 kbar to give a temperature (979 °C) lying even on a relatively warm 40 mWm-2 geotherm (Hasterok and Chapman Earth Planet Sc Lett 307:59-70, 2011). Large variations in the chemistry of mantle minerals reflect a complex history of metasomatism akin to constituents of alkali igneous rocks elsewhere in the Hebridean and Northern Highlands Terranes. Fertilised mantle provided the conditions for generation of aillikite melts, probably triggered by break-off of the advancing Avalonia slab. The cratonic root underlying the Glen Gollaidh aillikite during the late Devonian was apparently too thin to lie within the diamond stability field, consistent with xenoliths from alkali basalts further south. Nonetheless, sufficient geophysical and mineral chemical evidence supports Glen Gollaidh aillikite sitting close to the edge of diamond-prospective mantle therefore suggesting diamond potential a short distance to the west within the Lewisian and what is now East Greenland.
DS1998-0409
1998
Faiziev, A.R.Faiziev, A.R.A generalized model for magmatic and carbonatite related fluoriteformation, with the eastern Pamirs eg.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 358, No. 1, pp. 16-18.GlobalCarbonatite
DS200712-0654
2007
Faiziev, A.R.Lutkov, V.S., Faiziev, A.R.The South Tien Shan belt of Diamondiferous alkaline basic rocks.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 413, 2, pp. 192-194.Asia, ChinaAlkalic
DS1986-0233
1986
Faizullin, R.M.Faizullin, R.M., Sadykov, I.S., Marchenko, E.Ya.A geologic and technological model of the carbonatite type of apatite oredepositsSoviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 27, No. 11, pp. 24-31RussiaCarbonatite, Apatite
DS201112-0964
2011
Fajber, R.Simandl, G.J., Fajber, R., Dunn, C.E.Biogeochemical footprint of the Ta and Nb bearing carbonatite Blue River area, British Columbia, Canada.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1877.Canada, British ColumbiaCarbonatite
DS201112-0965
2011
Fajber, R.Simandl, G.J., Fajber, R., Dunn, C.E., Ulry, B., Dahrouge, J.Biogeochemical exploration vectors in search of carbonatite, Blue River British Columbia.British Columbia Geological Survey, BCGS GeoFile, 2011-05.Canada, British ColumbiaCarbonatite
DS201412-0832
2014
Fajber, R.Simandl, G.J., Paradis, S., Stone, R.S., Fajber, R., Kressall, R.D., Grattan, K., Crozier, J., Simandl, L.J.Applicablity of handheld X-ray fluroescence spectrometry in the exploration and development of carbonatite related niobium deposits: a case study of the Aley carbonatite, British Columbia, Canada.Geochemistry: Exploration, Environment, Analysis, Vol. 14, 3, pp. 211-221.Canada, British ColumbiaCarbonatite
DS201512-1917
2015
Fajber, R.Fajber, R., Simandl, G.J., Luck, P., Neetz, M.Biogeochemical methods to explore for carbonatites and related mineral deposits: an orientation survey, Blue River area, British Columbia, Canada.Symposium on critical and strategic materials, British Columbia Geological Survey Paper 2015-3, held Nov. 13-14, pp. 241-244.Canada, British ColumbiaCarbonatite

Abstract: Carbonatites host economic deposits of niobium (Nb), rare earth elements (REE), phosphate, baddeleyite (natural zirconia), vermiculite, and fl uorspar, and historically, supplied copper, uranium, carbonate (for cement industries) and sodalite (Pell, 1994 and Simandl, this volume). The Upper Fir carbonatite is in southeastern British Columbia, approximately 200 km north of Kamloops (Fig. 1). It is one ofmany known carbonatite occurrences in the British Columbia alkaline province, which follows the Rocky Mountain Trench and extends from the southeastern tip of British Columbia to its northern boundaries with the Yukon and Northwest Territories (Pell, 1994). The Upper Fir is a strongly deformed carbonatite with an indicated mineral resource of 48.4 million tonnes at 197 ppm of Ta2O5 and 1,610 ppm of Nb2O5, and an inferred resource of 5.4 million tonnes at 191 ppm of Ta2O5 and 1760 ppm of Nb2O5 (Kulla et al. 2013). The Nb, Ta, and vermiculite mineralization is described by Simandl et al. (2002, 2010), Chong, et al, (2012), and Chudy (2014). In this document we present the results of an orientation survey designed to determine the biogechemical signature of a typical carbonatite in the Canadian Cordillera. This survey suggests that needles and twigs of White Spruce (Picea glauca) and Subalpine Fir (Abies lasio carpa) are suitable sampling media to explore for carbonatites and carbonatite-related rare earth elements (REE), niobium (Nb), and tantalum (Ta) deposits.
DS200712-0302
2007
Falcao, E.H.L.Falcao, E.H.L., Wudl, F.Carbon allotropes; beyond graphite and diamond.Journal of Chemical Technology Biotechnology, John Wiley & Sons, Vol. 82, 6, pp. 524-531.TechnologyCarbon
DS201012-0192
2010
Falck, H.Falck, H., Gochnauer, K., Irwin, D.2010 Northwest Territories mineral exploration overview.Northwest Territories Geoscience Office, Nov. 28, 21p.Canada, Northwest Territoriesdiamonds pp. 8-10.
DS201112-0708
2011
Falck, H.Mumford, T.R., Cousens, B.L., Falck, H., Cairns, S.Blachford Lake intrusive suite; insight from carbonatites and other alkaline intrusive suites of the southern Slave Craton.Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts for 2011, Poster abstract p. 112.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesCarbonatite
DS201912-2778
2019
Falck, H.Falck, H., Elliott, B., Cairns, S., Powell, L.NWT mineral exploration and mining overview 2019.Yellowknife Forum NWTgeoscience.ca, abstract volume p. 27.Canada, Northwest Territorieseconomics

Abstract: In spite of a poor year for sales of rough diamonds globally, diamond mining continues to provide a foundation for the NWT economy. Gahcho Kué mine, which has been operating slightly ahead of plan, announced the discovery of the diamondiferous Wilson kimberlite within the current mine plan area. Consistently high forecasts for zinc demand have encouraged both the rejuvenation of Pine Point by Osisko Metals Inc. and NorZinc Ltd.’s ongoing efforts to bring Prairie Creek into production. Gold prices have been buoyed by safe-haven sentiment after concerns over economic growth, tariffs and trade wars with China. Advanced projects have benefited with an improving investment climate encouraging on-going exploration by Nighthawk Gold Corp. and TerraX Minerals Inc. However, many smaller projects were suspended as the companies were not able to raise sufficient funds on in the investment market. This was particularly true for the commodities targeting green energy and battery technologies. Most of the projects focusing on lithium, cobalt and vanadium started the year strongly but were dormant by the summer. A notable exception was the reactivation of Avalon’s Nechalacho project with an infusion of resources from Cheetah Resources of Australia. One of the indicators of exploration activity – claims staked vs. lapsed – continued an upward trend that began in 2017. In 2018, a total of 268 claims covering 184,985 hectares were added and 70 claims covering 58, 876 hectares were released. In the first three quarters of 2019, 120 claims covering 45,000 Ha were added but a nearly equivalent area 55,000 Ha in 85 claims and leases were cancelled. There are also 37 active Prospecting Permits this year. New staking included large areas in the Mackenzie Mountains, the additional ground at Pine Point, re-staking of claims in the Lac de Gras region and expansion of claims in the Yellowknife area. In 2019-2020, the Government of Northwest Territories invested nearly $1 million in grassroots mineral exploration through the Mining Incentive Program. This funding was dispersed to 19 exploration projects comprising twelve prospectors and seven companies. The Mineral Resources Act has passed the legislature marking the NWT’s first-ever stand-alone Act governing mining in the territory.
DS200712-0466
2007
Falde, D.Isaak, D.G., Gwanmesia, G.D., Falde, D., Davis, M.G., Triplett, R.S., Wang, L.The elastic properties of b-Mg2SiO4 from 295 to 660K and implications on the composition of Earth's upper mantle.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 162, 1-2, pp. 22-31.ChinaPerovskite
DS200712-0467
2007
Falde, D.Isaak, D.G., Gwanmesia, G.D., Falde, D., Davis, M.G., Triplett, R.S., Wang, L.The elastic properties of b-Mg2SiO4 from 295 to 660K and implications on the composition of Earth's upper mantle.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 162, 1-2, pp. 22-31.ChinaPerovskite
DS201112-0940
2011
Faleev, V.A.Sharapov, V.N., Mazurov, M.P., Tomilenko, A.A., Faleev, V.A.Mass transfer in garnet ultramafic xenoliths subject to partial melting under hot reduced gas flows.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 52, pp. 165-177.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Udachnaya Vostochnaya
DS200612-0170
2006
Faleide, Jl.Breivik, A.J., Mjelde, R., Faleide, Jl., Murai, Y.Rates of continental breakup magmatism and seafloor spreading in the Norway Basin Iceland plume interaction.Journal of Geophysical Research,, Vol. 111, B7, B7102,Europe, Iceland, NorwayMagmatism
DS201804-0748
2018
Faleiros, F.M.Teixeira, W., Hamilton, M.A., Girardi, A.V., Faleiros, F.M.U Pb baddeleyite ages of key dyke swarms in the Amazonian craton ( Carajas/Rio Maria and Rio Apa areas): tectonic implications for events at 1880, 1110 Ma, 535 Ma and 200 Ma.Precambrian Research, in press available 19p.South Americacraton - Amazonian

Abstract: U-Pb baddeleyite ages for key mafic dykes of the Amazonian Craton reveal four significant intraplate episodes that allow connections with global igneous activity through time and supercontinent cycles. The oldest dykes (Carajás-Rio Maria region) are diabases with ages of 1880.2 ± 1.5 Ma and 1884.6 ± 1.6 Ma, respectively, corresponding with the Tucumã swarm which crops out to the west and is age-equivalent. The magmatic activity has a genetic link with the ca. 1.88 Ga Uatumã Silicic Large Igneous Province (SLIP), characterized by felsic plutonic-volcanic rocks. There is an age correlation with LIP events (ca. 1880 Ma) in the Superior, Slave, Indian and other cratons. This magmatism could be derived from significant perturbations of the upper mantle during the partial assembly of Columbia. Gabbronorite of the Rio Perdido Suite (Rio Apa Terrane) crystallized at 1110.7 ± 1.4 Ma, and is identical to that of the Rincón del Tigre-Huanchaca LIP event of the Amazonian Craton. This event was synchronous with the initiation of Keweenawan magmatism of central Laurentia (Midcontinent Rift) and also with coeval units in the Kalahari, Congo and India cratons. The two youngest U-Pb dates (535 and 200 Ma) occur in the Carajás region. Diabase of the Paraupebas swarm yields an age of 535.1 ± 1.1 Ma, which may be correlative with the giant Piranhas swarm located ca. 900 km apart to the west. The Paraupebas swarm is correlative with post-collisional plutonism within the Araguaia marginal belt. Therefore, the Cambrian dykes may reflect reactivation of cooled lithosphere, due to crustal extension/transtension active along the craton’s margin during assembly of West Gondwana. This magmatism is also contemporaneous with the 539-530 Ma Wichita LIP of southern Laurentia. The youngest studied Carajás region dyke was emplaced at ca. 200 Ma, corresponding with 40Ar/39Ar ages for the Periquito dykes west of Carajás and with most K-Ar ages of the giant Cassiporé swarm, located north of the study area. The newly dated ca. 200 Ma dyke fits well into the known, brief span of ages for the CAMP Large Igneous Province event, around the present central and northern Atlantic Ocean.
DS202005-0763
2020
Faleiros, F.M.Teixeira, W., Cordani, U.G., Faleiros, F.M., Sato, K., Maurer, V.C., Ruiz, A.S., Azevedo, E.J.P.The Rio Apa Terrane reviewed: U-Pb zircon geochronology and provenance studies provide paleotectonic links with a growing Proterozoic Amazonia.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 202, 103089 35p. PdfSouth America, Brazilcraton

Abstract: New and compiled data of zircon U-Pb ages and geochemical-isotopic constraints provide new insights into the orogenic evolution of the Rio Apa Terrane (RAT) and its close affinity with the Amazonia throughout the Proterozoic. Two terranes with distinct evolutionary histories built the RAT. The Porto Murtinho (2070-1940 Ma) and Amoguijá (1870-1820 Ma) magmatic arcs generated the Western Terrane which is mainly composed of short-lived crustal components. Granitoid rocks (1870 Ma) in the distal Corumbá Window indicate that the RAT is much larger in extent. The Caracol accretionary arc (1800-1740 Ma) and the associated Alto Tererê back-arc basin formed away from the Amoguijá belt, being roughly coeval with the adjoining Baía das Garças suite (1776 Ma) and Paso Bravo granitoid rocks (1774-1752 Ma). These tectonic units constitute the Eastern Terrane, whilst the NdHf isotopic constraints indicate derivation from a predominantly juvenile magma source with the minor input of crustal-derived contaminants. The youngest detrital zircon grains from the Alto Tererê samples gave 1740-1790 Ma ages and unimodal age spectra were mainly present. The basin infill was, therefore, most likely concomitant with the exhumation of the Caracol belt. Alto Tererê provenance study also included detritus from passive to active margin settings. The RAT underwent regional cooling between 1.35 and 1.27 Ga, documented mainly by 40Ar39Ar and KAr ages. This age pattern matches a collisional episode that formed the accretionary margin of Amazonia, suggesting that the RAT was a close neighbor at Ectasian times. The geodynamic interplay between them lasted until 1.1 Ga ago, highlighted by some shared-components of a LIP event.
DS202010-1871
2020
Faleiros, F.M.Rebeiro, B.V., Cawood, P.A., Faleiros, F.M., Mulder, J.A., Martin, E., Finch, M.A., Raveggi, M., Teixeira, W., Cordani, U.G., Pavan, M.A long lived active margin revealed by zircon U-Pb-Hf data from the Rio Apa terrane (Brazil): new insights into the Paleoproterozoic evolution of the Amazonian craton.Precambrian Research, 57p. PdfSouth America, Brazilcraton

Abstract: We present the first regional in-situ zircon U-Pb-Hf isotopic data from metaigneous and metasedimentary rocks from the Paleo- to Mesoproterozoic Rio Apa Terrane (RAT), a crustal fragment outcropping in the central-western Brazil and north-eastern Paraguay. These new ages and Hf isotopic data delineate three magmatic events, which record the construction of the temporally and isotopically distinct Western and Eastern Terranes of the RAT. The Western Terrane comprises the 2100-1940 Ma Porto Murtinho Complex and the 1900-1840 Ma Amoguijá Belt, which both define a crustal reworking array in eHfT-time space evolving from a precursor source with Hf TDM age of ca. 2700 Ma. The 1800-1720 Ma Caracol Belt constitutes the Eastern Terrane and yields suprachondritic eHfT signatures up to +7.1, indicating significant juvenile input. The metasedimentary Amolar Group and Rio Naitaca Formation in the Western Terrane have maximum depositional ages of 1850-1800 Ma and subchondritic eHfT signatures down to -5.7, similar to the underlying basement of the Amoguijá Belt. In the Eastern Terrane, the Alto Tererê Formation has a maximum depositional age of 1750 Ma and mostly suprachondritic eHfT signatures, similar to magmatic rocks of the underlying Caracol Belt. Together, the new igneous and detrital zircon age and Hf isotopic data record a temporal and spatial transition from 2100 to 1840 Ma crustal reworking in the west to more juvenile magmatism at 1800-1720 Ma in the east. This transition is interpreted to reflect convergent margin magmatism associated with periods of subduction zone advance and retreat in an accretionary orogenic setting. Comparison of the eHfT-time signature of the RAT with the Amazonian Craton suggest penecontemporaneous development, with the Western and Eastern Terranes of the RAT being correlative with the Ventuari-Tapajós and Rio Negro-Juruena Province of the Amazonian Craton, respectively. Our new data also reveal that the eHfT signatures of the RAT are distinct from the Maz terrane, which refutes the MARA Block hypothesis.
DS1991-1090
1991
Falk, R.W.McCallum, M.E., Huntly, P.M., Falk, R.W., Otter, M.L.Morphological, resorption and etch feature trends of diamonds From kimberlites within the Colorado Wyoming State Line District, USAProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 261-263Colorado, WyomingDiamond morphology, Diamond inclusions
DS1994-1133
1994
Falk, R.W.McCallum, M.E, Huntley, P.M., Falk, R.W., Otter, M.L.Morphological resorption and etch feature trends of diamonds From kimberlite populations Colorado-Wyoming State Line.Proceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, pp. 32-50.Colorado, Wyoming, United StatesDiamond morphology, Deposit -Sloan
DS2000-0279
2000
Falkowski, P.Falkowski, P., Scholes, R.J., Steffen, W.Climate change: the Global Carbon cycle: a test of our knowledge of Earth as a systemScience, Vol. 290, No. 5490, Oct. 13, pp.291-306.GlobalCarbon cycle
DS1960-0143
1961
Falk-Ronne, A.Falk-Ronne, A.Djaevelens DiamanterCopenhagen: Gyldendal, 166P.GlobalKimberlite, Kimberley
DS200812-0121
2008
Fall, A.Bodnar, R.J., Azbej, T., Becker, S., Cannatelli, C., Fall, A., Hole, J., Severs, M.The whole Earth geohydrologic cycle.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A91.MantleWater
DS201905-1038
2019
Fall, A.Guzmics, T., Berkesi, M., Bodnar, R.J., Fall, A., Bali, E., Milke, R., Vetlenyi, E., Szabo, C.Natrocarbonatites: a hidden product of three phase immiscibility. ( Oldoinyo Lengai)Geology, https://doi.org/ 10.1130/G46125.1 Africa, Tanzaniacarbonatite

Abstract: Earth’s only active natrocarbonatite volcanism, occurring at Oldoinyo Lengai (OL), Tanzania, suggests that natrocarbonatite melts are formed through a unique geological process. In the East African Rift, the extinct Kerimasi (KER) volcano is a neighbor of OL and also contains nephelinites hosting melt and fluid inclusions that preserve the igneous processes associated with formation of natrocarbonatite melts. Here, we present evidence for the presence of coexisting nephelinite melt, fluorine-rich carbonate melt, and alkali carbonate fluid. The compositions of these phases differ from the composition of OL natrocarbonatites; therefore, it is unlikely that natrocarbonatites formed directly from one of these phases. Instead, mixing of the outgassing alkali carbonate fluid and the fluorine-rich carbonate melt can yield natrocarbonatite compositions at temperatures close to subsolidus temperatures of nephelinite (<630-650 °C). Moreover, the high halogen content (6-16 wt%) in the carbonate melt precludes saturation of calcite (i.e., formation of calciocarbonatite) and maintains the carbonate melt in the liquid state with 28-41 wt% CaO at temperatures =600 °C. Our study suggests that alkali carbonate fluids and melts could have commonly formed in the geological past, but it is unlikely they precipitated calcite that facilitates fossilization. Instead, alkali carbonates likely precipitated that were not preserved in the fossil nephelinite rocks. Thus, alkali carbonate fluids and melts have been so far overlooked in the geological record because of the lack of previous detailed inclusion studies.
DS201906-1298
2019
Fall, A.Guzmics, T., Berkesi, M, Bodnar, R.J., Fall, A., Bali, E., Milke, R., Vetlenyi, E., Szabo, C.Natrocarbonatites: a hidden product of three phase immiscibility.Geology, Vol. 47, 6, pp. 527-530.Africa, Tanzaniadeposit - Oldoinyo Lengai

Abstract: Earth’s only active natrocarbonatite volcanism, occurring at Oldoinyo Lengai (OL), Tanzania, suggests that natrocarbonatite melts are formed through a unique geological process. In the East African Rift, the extinct Kerimasi (KER) volcano is a neighbor of OL and also contains nephelinites hosting melt and fluid inclusions that preserve the igneous processes associated with formation of natrocarbonatite melts. Here, we present evidence for the presence of coexisting nephelinite melt, fluorine-rich carbonate melt, and alkali carbonate fluid. The compositions of these phases differ from the composition of OL natrocarbonatites; therefore, it is unlikely that natrocarbonatites formed directly from one of these phases. Instead, mixing of the outgassing alkali carbonate fluid and the fluorine-rich carbonate melt can yield natrocarbonatite compositions at temperatures close to subsolidus temperatures of nephelinite (<630-650 °C). Moreover, the high halogen content (6-16 wt%) in the carbonate melt precludes saturation of calcite (i.e., formation of calciocarbonatite) and maintains the carbonate melt in the liquid state with 28-41 wt% CaO at temperatures =600 °C. Our study suggests that alkali carbonate fluids and melts could have commonly formed in the geological past, but it is unlikely they precipitated calcite that facilitates fossilization. Instead, alkali carbonates likely precipitated that were not preserved in the fossil nephelinite rocks. Thus, alkali carbonate fluids and melts have been so far overlooked in the geological record because of the lack of previous detailed inclusion studies.
DS2003-0487
2003
Fall, C.J.Goss, J.P., Coomer, B.J., Jones, R., Fall, C.J., Briddon, P.R., Oberg, S.Extended defects in diamond: the interstitial plateletPhysical Review, Vol. 67, 16, 15p.GlobalBlank
DS200412-0700
2003
Fall, C.J.Goss, J.P., Coomer, B.J., Jones, R., Fall, C.J., Briddon, P.R., Oberg, S.Extended defects in diamond: the interstitial platelet.Physical Review Letters, Vol. 67, 16, 15p.TechnologyDiamond - morphology
DS200512-0281
2005
Fallara, F.Faure, S., Fallara, F., Godey, S.3D architecture of the North American lithosphere by seismic tomography: implications for regional diamond exploration.Quebec Exploration Conference, 1p. abstractCanada, QuebecTomography
DS200712-0995
2007
Fallick, A.Skelton, A., Vuorinen, J.H., Arghe, F., Fallick, A.Fluid rock interaction at a carbonatite gneiss contact, Alno Sweden.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 154, 1, pp.75-90.Europe, SwedenCarbonatite
DS1988-0285
1988
Fallick, A.E.Halliday, A.N., Dickin, A.P., Fallick, A.E., Fitton, J.G.Mantle dynamics: a neodynium, strontium, lead and oxygen isotopic study Of the Cameroon line volcanicchainJournal of Petrology, Vol. 29, No. 1, pp. 181-211GlobalMantle, Geochronology
DS1994-1915
1994
Fallick, A.E.Wilding, M.C., Harte, B., Fallick, A.E., Harris, J.W.Inclusion chemistry, carbon isotopes and nitrogen distribution in Diamonds from the Bultfontein mine.Proceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, pp. 116-126.South AfricaMineral chemistry, Deposit -Bultfontein
DS1997-0761
1997
Fallick, A.E.Melezhik, V.A., Fallick, A.E., Clark, T.Two billion year old isotopically heavy carbon: evidence from the LabradorTrough, Canada.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 34, pp. 271-85.Quebec, Labrador, UngavaGeochronology, Labrador Trough
DS1997-0876
1997
Fallick, A.E.Onuonga, I.O., Fallick, A.E., Bowden, P.The recognition of meteoric hydrothermal and supergene processes in volcanic carbonatites, Nyanza Rift...Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 25, No. 1, July pp. 103-114.KenyaCarbonatite, Geochronology
DS201012-0346
2010
Fallick, A.E.Kasemann, S.A., Prave, A.R., Fallick, A.E., Hawkesworth, C.J., Hoffmann, K-H.Neoproterozoic ice ages, boron isotopes, and ocean acidification: implications for a snowball Earth.Geology, Vol. 38, 9, pp. 775-778.MantleSnowball Earth
DS201505-0235
2015
Fallick, A.E.Giuliani, G.,Pivin, M., Fallick, A.E., Ohnenstetter, D., Song, Y., Demaiffe, D.Geochemical and oxygen isotope signatures of mantle corundum megacrysts from the Mbuji-Mayi kimberlite, Democratic Republic of Congo and the Changle alkali basalt, China.Comptes Rendus Geoscience, Vol. 347, 1, pp. 24-34.Africa, Democratic Republic of Congo, ChinaDeposit - Mbuji-Mayi
DS201709-1984
2017
Fallick, A.E.Feneyrol, J., Giuliani, G., Demaiffe, D., Ohenstetter, D., Fallick, A.E., Dubessy, J., Martelet, J-E., Rakotondrazafy, A.F.M., Omito, E., Ichangi, D., Nyamai, C., Wamunyu, W.Age and origin of the tsavorite and tanzanite mineralozing fluids in the Neoproterozoic Mozambique metamorphic belt.The Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 55, pp. 763-786.Africa, Kenya, Tanzania, Madagascartanzanite

Abstract: The genetic model previously proposed for tsavorite- (and tanzanite-) bearing mineralization hosted in the Neoproterozoic Metamorphic Mozambique Belt (stretching from Kenya through Tanzania to Madagascar) is refined on the basis of new Sm-Nd age determinations and detailed Sr-O-S isotope and fluid-inclusion studies. The deposits are hosted within meta-sedimentary series composed of quartzites, graphitic gneisses, calc-silicate rocks intercalated with meta-evaporites, and marbles. Tsavorite occurs either in nodules (also called “boudins”) oriented parallel to the metamorphic foliation in all of the deposits in the metamorphic belt or in quartz veins and lenses located at the hinges of anticlinal folds (Lelatema fold belt and Ruangwa deposits, Tanzania). Gem tanzanite occurs in pockets and lenses in the Lelatema fold belt of northern Tanzania. The Sm-Nd isotopic data for tsavorites and tanzanites hosted in quartz veins and lenses from Merelani demonstrate that they formed at 600 Ma, during the retrograde metamorphic episode associated with the East African Orogeny. The tsavorites hosted in nodules do not provide reliable ages: their sedimentary protoliths had heterogeneous compositions and their Sm-Nd system was not completely rehomogenized, even at the local scale, by the fluid-absent metamorphic recrystallization. The initial 87Sr/86Sr isotopic ratios of calcite from marble and tanzanites from Merelani fit with the strontium isotopic composition of Neoproterozoic marine carbonates. Seawater sediment deposition in the Mozambique Ocean took place around 720 Ma. The quartz-zoisite O-isotopic thermometer indicates a temperature of formation for zoisite between 385 and 448 °C. The sulfur isotopic composition of pyrite (between –7.8 and –1.3‰ V-CDT) associated with tsavorite in the Lelatema fold belt deposits suggests the contribution of reduced marine sulfate. The sulfur in pyrite in the marbles was likely derived from bacterial sulfate reduction which produced H2S. Fluid inclusion data from tsavorite and tanzanite samples from the Merelani mine indicate the presence of a dominant H2S-S8±(CH4)±(N2)±(H2O)-bearing fluid. In the deposits in Kenya and Madagascar, the replacement of sulfate by tsavorite in the nodules and the boron isotopic composition of tourmaline associated with tsavorite are strong arguments in favor of the participation of evaporites in garnet formation.
DS201811-2573
2015
Fallick, A.E.Giuliani, G., Branquet, Y., Fallick, A.E., Groat, L.A., Marshall, D.Emerald deposits around the world, their similarities and differences.InColor, December pp. 56-69.Globalemeralds
DS1995-1393
1995
Fallick, A.F.Onuong, I.O., Bowden, P., Fallick, A.F.Carbon, oxygen and sulphur isotope investigations at Buru and Kuge volcanic carbonatite centres, Nyanza RiftGeological Society Africa 10th. Conference Oct. Nairobi, p. 124-5. Abstract.KenyaGeochronology, carbonatite, Deposit -Buru, Kuge
DS1997-0330
1997
Fallon, G.N.Fallon, G.N., Andrews, P., Bartrop, S.B.Drillhole electromagnetic surveying in the mine environmentExploration Geophysics, Bulletin of Australian, Vol. 27, No. 2-3, Sept. pp. 67-76AustraliaGeophysics - electromagnetic, Drillhole, mining
DS1997-0331
1997
Fallon, G.N.Fallon, G.N., Collins, S., Bishop, J.R.DHEM and spurious responsesExploration Geophysics, Bulletin of Australian, Vol. 27, No. 2-3, Sept. pp. 171-174GlobalGeophysics - DHEM.
DS1989-1088
1989
Fallon, P.J.Nam, T.L., Fallon, P.J., Keddy, R.J., Vanrijn, H.J.Detection of nuclear radiation by scintillation-counting using syntheticdiamondAppl. Rad. Is, Vol. 40, No. 8, pp. 657-661GlobalDiamond synthesis
DS200612-0061
2006
Fallon, S.J.Auzende, A.L., Badro, J., Weber, P., Fallon, S.J., Ryerson, F.J.Element partitioning at ultra high pressure: new insights on bulk lower mantle geochemistry.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 25, abstract only.MantleUHP
DS200612-0062
2006
Fallon, S.J.Auzende, A.L., Badro, J., Weber, P., Fallon, S.J., Ryerson, F.J.Element partitioning at ultra high pressure: new insights on bulk lower mantle geochemistry.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, 1, p. 25, abstract only.MantleUHP
DS200712-0045
2007
Fallon, S.J.Badro, J., Ryerson, F.J., Webe, P.K., Ricolleau, A., Fallon, S.J., Hutcheon, I.D.Chemical imaging with NanSIMS: a window into deep Earth geochemistry.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 262, 3-4, Oct. 30, pp. 543-551.MantleGeochemistry
DS200812-0069
2008
Fallon, S.J.Auzende, A-L., Badro, J., Ryerson, F.J., Weber, P.K., Fallon, S.J., Addad, A., Siebert, J., Fiquet, G.Element partitioning between magnesium silicate perovskite and ferropericlase: new insights into bulk lower mantle geochemistry.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 269, 1-2, May 15, pp. 164-174.MantleGeochemistry
DS2001-0312
2001
Fallon, T.J.Fallon, T.J., Danyushevsky, L.V., Green, D.M.Peridotite melting at 1 GPA: reversal experiments on partial melt compositions produced by peridotite basaltJournal Petrology, Vol. 42, No. 12, pp. 2363-85.MantleExperiments - sandwich, Melting
DS200712-0303
2007
Fallon, T.J.Fallon, T.J., Danyushevsky, L.V., Ariskin, A., Green, D.H., Ford, C.E.The application of olivine geothermometry to infer crystallization temperatures of parental liquids; implications for the temperature of MORB magmas.Chemical Geology, Vol. 241, 3-4, pp. 207-233.MantleGeothermometry
DS1993-0427
1993
Falloon, T.Falloon, T.Get out your arc umbrellasNature, Vol. 365, No. 6444, September 23, p. 298GlobalMantle, Arc tectonics
DS1986-0301
1986
Falloon, T.J.Green, D.H., Falloon, T.J., Brey, G.P., Nickel, K.G.Peridotite melting to GPa and genesis of primary mantle derived magmasProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 181-183GlobalMantle
DS1989-0307
1989
Falloon, T.J.Crawford, A.J., Falloon, T.J., Green, D.H.Classification, petrogenesis and tectonic setting of boninitesIn: Boninites, Editor A.J. Crawford, Unwin and Hyman, pp. 2-49GlobalBoninites, Classification
DS1989-0415
1989
Falloon, T.J.Falloon, T.J., Green, D.H.The solidus of carbonated, fertile peridotiteEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 94, No. 3/4 September pp. 364-370HawaiiPyrolite/peridotite, Experimental petrogenesis
DS1990-0462
1990
Falloon, T.J.Falloon, T.J., Green, D.H.Solidus of carbonated fertile peridotite under fluid-saturatedconditionsGeology, Vol. 18, No. 3, March pp. 193-288GlobalGeochemistry, Peridotite
DS1991-1682
1991
Falloon, T.J.Sweeney, R.J., Falloon, T.J., Green, D.H., Tatsumi, Y.The mantle origin of Karoo picritesEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 107, No. 2, November pp. 256-271South AfricaPicrites, Mantle
DS1994-1731
1994
Falloon, T.J.Sweeney, R.J., Falloon, T.J., Green, D.H.Experimental constraints on the possible mantle originCarbonatite volcanism, Ed. Bell, K., Keller, J., pp. 191-208.TanzaniaDeposit -Oldoinyo Lengai
DS1997-0332
1997
Falloon, T.J.Falloon, T.J., Green, D.H., O'Neill, H., Hibberson, W.Experimental tests of low degree peridotite partial melt compositions:implications for the nature ....Earth and Plan. Sci. Letters, Vol. 152, No. 1-4, pp. 149-162.GlobalPetrology - experimental, Andesitic melts, lherzolites
DS1997-1282
1997
Falloon, T.J.Yaxley, G.M., Kamenets, V., Green, D.H., Falloon, T.J.Classes in mantle xenoliths from Western Victoria Australia, and their relevance to mantle processes.Earth Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 148, No. 3-4, May pp. 433-446.AustraliaXenoliths, Mantle
DS1999-0202
1999
Falloon, T.J.Falloon, T.J., Green, D.H., Faul, U.H.Peridotitic melting at 1 and 1.5 GPa: an experimental evaluation of techniques using diamond aggregates...Journal of Petrology, Vol. 40, No. 9, Sept. pp. 1343-76.GlobalPetrology - experimental, Melting - near solidus melts, mineral mixes
DS2001-0407
2001
Falloon, T.J.Green, D.H., Falloon, T.J., Eggins, S.M., Yaxley, G.M.Primary magmas and mantle temperaturesEuropean Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 13, No. 3, pp. 437-51.MantleMagmatism, Melting, subduction, slabs, hotspots
DS2002-0350
2002
Falloon, T.J.Danyushevsky, L.V., Sokolov, S., Falloon, T.J.Melt inclusions in olivine phenocrysts: using diffusive re-equilibration to determine theJournal of Petrology, Vol. 43, 9, Sept.pp. 1651-72.GlobalOlivine rocks
DS200512-0363
2005
Falloon, T.J.Green, D.H., Falloon, T.J.Primary magmas at mid-ocean ridges, 'hotspots' and other intraplate settings: constraints on mantle potential temperatures.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, pp. 217-248. ( total book 861p. $ 144.00)MantleGeothermometry
DS201412-0312
2014
Falloon, T.J.Green, D.H., Hibberson, W.O., Rosenthal, A., Kovasc, I., Yaxley, G.M., Falloon, T.J., Brink, F.Experimental study of the influence of water on melting and phase assemblages in the upper mantle.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 55, 10, pp. 2067-2096.MantleMelting
DS201611-2112
2015
Falloon, T.J.Green, D.H., Falloon, T.J.Mantle-derived magmas: intraplate, hot spots and mid-ocean ridges.Science Bulletin, Vol. 60, 22, pp. 1873-1900.MantleHotspots

Abstract: Primary or parental magmas act as probes to infer eruption and source temperatures for both mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and ‘hot-spot’ magmas (tholeiitic picrites). The experimental petrogenetic constraints (‘inverse’ experiments) argue for no significant temperature differences between them. However, there are differences in major, minor and trace elements which characterise geochemical, not thermal, anomalies beneath ‘hot-spots’. We suggest that diapiric upwelling from interfaces (redox contrasts) between old subducted slab and normal MOR basalt source mantle is the major reason for the observed characteristics of island chain or ‘hot-spot’ volcanism. Intraplate basalts also include widely distributed volcanic centres containing lherzolite xenoliths, i.e. mantle-derived magmas. Inverse experiments on olivine basalt, alkali olivine basalt, olivine basanite, olivine nephelinite, olivine melilitite and olivine leucitite (lamproite) determined liquidus phases as a function of pressure, initially under anhydrous and CO2-absent conditions. Under C- and H-absent conditions, only tholeiites to alkali olivine basalts had Ol + Opx ± Cpx as high-pressure liquidus phases. Addition of H2O accessed olivine basanites at 2.5-3 GPa, ~1,200 °C, but both CO2 and H2O were necessary to obtain saturation with Ol, Opx, Cpx and Ga at 2.5-3.5 GPa for olivine nephelinite and olivine melilitite. The forward and inverse experimental studies are combined to formulate a petrogenetic grid for intraplate, ‘hot-spot’ and MOR magmatism within the plate tectonics paradigm. The asthenosphere is geochemically zoned by slow upward migration of incipient melt. The solidus and phase stabilities of lherzolite with very small water contents (<3,000 ppm) determine the thin plate behaviour of the oceanic lithosphere and thus the Earth’s convection in the form of plate tectonics. There is no evidence from the parental magmas of MOR and ‘hot-spots’ to support the ‘deep mantle thermal plume’ hypothesis. The preferred alternative is the presence of old subducted slabs, relatively buoyant and oxidised with respect to MORB source mantle and suspended or upwelling in or below the lower asthenosphere (and thus detached from overlying plate movement).
DS2000-0280
2000
Fallows, S.J.Fallows, S.J., Spence, G.D., Rogers, G.C.Upper crustal velcocity structure of the southwestern Canadian Cordillera from explosion recordings -seismicPure and Applied Geophys., Vol. 158, No. 9, Sept. pp. 1315-36.British Columbia, CordilleraGeophysics - seismics
DS1997-0333
1997
Falls, R.Falls, R.Developing projects from feasibility and finance to construction andoperationsMiga Conference Held June 3-5, Denver, 22pAngola, Zambia, Zaire, TanzaniaMining, Project services
DS1986-0234
1986
Falls, R.E.Falls, R.E.Diamonds - a year of recoveryEngineering and Mining Journal, Vol. 187, No. 6, June p. 71GlobalNews item, Economics
DS1985-0180
1985
Falls, R.E.R.Falls, R.E.R.Diamonds: Gradual Industry RecoveryEngineering and Mining Journal, Vol. 186, No. 3, MARCH PP. 129-130.South Africa, Southwest Africa, Namibia, Lesotho, BotswanaProduction
DS201603-0375
2015
Falls, S.Falls, S.Clarity, cut and culture: the many meanings of diamonds. University Press, 224p. $ 22.00 paperback bookTechnologyHistory

Abstract: Images of diamonds appear everywhere in American culture. And everyone who has a diamond has a story to tell about it. Our stories about diamonds not only reveal what we do with these tiny stones, but also suggest how we create value, meaning, and identity through our interactions with material culture in general. Things become meaningful through our interactions with them, but how do people go about making meaning? What can we learn from an ethnography about the production of identity, creation of kinship, and use of diamonds in understanding selves and social relationships? By what means do people positioned within a globalized political-economy and a compelling universe of advertising interact locally with these tiny polished rocks? This book draws on 12 months of fieldwork with diamond consumers in New York City as well as an analysis of the iconic De Beers campaign that promised romance, status, and glamour to anyone who bought a diamond to show that this thematic pool is just one resource among many that diamond owners draw upon to engage with their own stones. The volume highlights the important roles that memory, context, and circumstance also play in shaping how people interpret and then use objects in making personal worlds. It shows that besides operating as subjects in an ad-burdened universe, consumers are highly creative, idiosyncratic, and theatrical agents.
DS201709-1983
2014
Falls, S.Falls, S.Clarity, cut and culture: the many meanings of diamond.University Press, 216p.Technologybook review

Abstract: Images of diamonds appear everywhere in American culture. And everyone who has a diamond has a story to tell about it. Our stories about diamonds not only reveal what we do with these tiny stones, but also suggest how we create value, meaning, and identity through our interactions with material culture in general. Things become meaningful through our interactions with them, but how do people go about making meaning? What can we learn from an ethnography about the production of identity, creation of kinship, and use of diamonds in understanding selves and social relationships? By what means do people positioned within a globalized political-economy and a compelling universe of advertising interact locally with these tiny polished rocks? This book draws on 12 months of fieldwork with diamond consumers in New York City as well as an analysis of the iconic De Beers campaign that promised romance, status, and glamour to anyone who bought a diamond to show that this thematic pool is just one resource among many that diamond owners draw upon to engage with their own stones. The volume highlights the important roles that memory, context, and circumstance also play in shaping how people interpret and then use objects in making personal worlds. It shows that besides operating as subjects in an ad-burdened universe, consumers are highly creative, idiosyncratic, and theatrical agents.
DS1989-1014
1989
Falster, A.U.Meurer, W.P., Falster, A.U., Simmons, W.B., Hanson, S.L., Rog, A.M.Trace mineralogy of the Magnet Cove carbonatite, ArkansawSixteenth Rochester Mineralogical Symposium, Rocks and Minerals, held April, Vol. 64, No. 6, December p. 473. Summary onlyArkansasCarbonatite, Magnet Cove
DS1997-0548
1997
Falter, M.Jacobs, J., Falter, M., Jessberger, E.K.40 Ar-39 Ar thermochronological constraints on the structural evolution of the Mesoproterozoic Natal...Precambrian Research, Vol. 86, No. 1/2, Dec. 15, pp. 71-92GlobalMetamorphic province, Argon, Tectonics, structure
DS2001-0313
2001
Falus, G.Falus, G., Szabo, C., Vaselli, O.Mantle upwelling within the Panoonian Basin: evidence from xenolith lithology and mineral chemistry.Terra Nova, Vol. 12, No. 6, Dec. pp. 295-302.Austria, RomaniaPeridotite xenoliths
DS200412-0532
2004
Falus, G.Falus, G., Druru, M.R., Van Roermund, H.L.M., Szabo, C.Magmatism related localized deformation in the mantle: a case study.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 146, no. 4, pp. 493-505.MantleMagmatism
DS1982-0201
1982
Falzone, STACEY.Falzone, STACEY.Thermal Expansion. (diamond)Phys. Chem. Miner, Vol. 8, pp. 212-217GlobalRef. Fleischer United States Geological Survey (usgs) Of 88-689.mineralogical Refs. 198, Diamond Morphology
DS200612-0386
2005
Famin, V.Famin, V., Herbert, R., Philippot, P., Jolivet, L.Ion probe and fluid inclusions evidence for co-seismic fluid infiltration in a crustal detachment.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 150, 3, pp. 354-367.MantleGeochronology
DS2001-0694
2001
FanLiu, J., Ye, K., Maruyama, Cong, FanMineral inclusions in zircon from gneisses in the ultrahigh pressure zone of the Dabie Mountains.Journal of Geology, Vol. 109, pp. 523-35.Chinaultra high pressure (UHP), geochronology, Dabie Shan area
DS200612-1116
2006
FanQicheng, Fan, Sui Jianli, Ping Xu, Li Ni, Sun Qian, Wang TuanhuaSi and alkali rich melt inclusions in minerals of mantle peridotites from eastern China: implications for lithospheric evolution.Science China Earth Sciences, Vol. 49, 1, pp. 43-49.ChinaPeridotite, tectonics, melting
DS201902-0334
2019
Fan, D.Xu, J., Zhang, D., Fan, D., Dera, P.K., Shi, F., Zhou, W.Thermoeleastic properties of eclogitic garnets and omphacites: implications for deep subduction of oceanic crust and density anomalies in the upper mantle.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 46, 1, pp. 179-188.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: Eclogite mainly consists of pyrope-almandine-grossular garnet and sodium-rich pyroxene (omphacite) and is a key component of the Earth's upper mantle and oceanic crust. It plays an important role in the mantle convection. The lack of thermoelastic parameters of eclogitic garnets and omphacites hampers accurate modeling of eclogite density at deep-Earth pressure-temperature conditions. In this study, we obtained the thermoelastic parameters of natural eclogitic garnets and omphacites and then modeled the densities of high-Fe and low-Fe eclogites in the subducted oceanic crust and the normal upper mantle. In the upper mantle, eclogite enhances the slab subduction into the transition zone; however, the presence of the metastable low-Fe eclogite would promote the slab stagnation within the upper range of the transition zone. Additionally, eclogite can explain positive density anomalies at depths of 100-200 km of the upper mantle of Asia identified by seismic observations.
DS1996-0441
1996
Fan, G.Fan, G., Wallace, T.C., Chase, C.G.Gravity anomaly and flexural model: constraints on the structure beneath the Peruvian AndesTectonophysics, Vol. 255, No. 1-2, April 20, pp. 99-110Andes, PeruTectonics, Geophysics -gravity
DS1993-0429
1993
Fan, G.W.Fan, G.W., Wallace, T., Beck, S.Flexure of the Brazilian shield and possible implications for the deepstructure.American Geophysical Union, EOS, supplement Abstract Volume, October, Vol. 74, No. 43, October 26, abstract p. 548.BrazilTectonics, Structure
DS201112-1100
2011
Fan, H.Wang, K., Fan, H., Yang, K., Hu, F., Ma, Y.Bayan Obo carbonatites: texture evidence from polyphase intrusive and extrusive carbonatites.Acta Geologica Sinica, Vol. 84, 6, pp. 1365-1376.Asia, ChinaCarbonatite
DS201711-2537
2017
Fan, H.Zhu, R., Zhang, H., Zhu, G., Meng, H., Fan, H., Yang, J., Wu, F., Zhang, Z.Craton destruction and related resources.International Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 106, 7, pp. 2233-2257.Chinacraton

Abstract: Craton destruction is a dynamic event that plays an important role in Earth’s evolution. Based on comprehensive observations of many studies on the North China Craton (NCC) and correlations with the evolution histories of other cratons around the world, craton destruction has be defined as a geological process that results in the total loss of craton stability due to changes in the physical and chemical properties of the involved craton. The mechanisms responsible for craton destruction would be as the follows: (1) oceanic plate subduction; (2) rollback and retreat of a subducting oceanic plate; (3) stagnation and dehydration of a subducting plate in the mantle transition zone; (4) melting of the mantle above the mantle transition zone caused by dehydration of a stagnant slab; (5) non-steady flow in the upper mantle induced by melting, and/or (6) changes in the nature of the lithospheric mantle and consequent craton destruction caused by non-steady flow. Oceanic plate subduction itself does not result in craton destruction. For the NCC, it is documented that westward subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate should have initiated at the transition from the Middle-to-Late Jurassic, and resulted in the change of tectonic regime of eastern China. We propose that subduction, rollback and retreat of oceanic plates and dehydration of stagnant slabs are the main dynamic factors responsible for both craton destruction and concentration of mineral deposits, such as gold, in the overriding continental plate. Based on global distribution of gold deposits, we suggest that convergent plate margins are the most important setting for large gold concentrations. Therefore, decratonic gold deposits appear to occur preferentially in regions with oceanic subduction and overlying continental lithospheric destruction/modification/growth.
DS200412-0533
2004
Fan, H-R.Fan, H-R., Xie, Yi-H., Wang, K-Y., Tao, K-J.REE daughter minerals trapped in fluid inclusions in the Giant Bayan Obo REE Nb Fe deposit, inner Mongolia, China.International Geology Review, Vol. 46, 8, pp. 638-645.China, MongoliaCarbonatite
DS201112-0567
2011
Fan, H-R.Lan, T-G., Fan, H-R., Santosh, M., Hu, F-F., Yang, Y-H, Liu, Y.Geochemistry and Sr Nd Pb Hf isotopes of the Mesozoic Dadian alkaline intrusive complex in the Sulu orogenic belt, eastern China: implications for crust mantle interaction.Chemical Geology, Vol. 285, 1-4, pp. 97-114.ChinaAlkalic
DS201112-1133
2011
Fan, H-R.Yang, K-F, Fan, H-R., Santosh, M., Hu, F-F., Wang, K-Y.Mesoproterozoic carbonatitic magmatism in the Bayan Obo deposit, Inner Mongolia, North China: constraints for the mechanism of super accumulation of rare earth elements.Ore Geology Reviews, in press available 10p.ChinaCarbonatite, REE
DS201112-1134
2011
Fan, H-R.Yang, K-F., Fan, H-R., Santosh, M., Hu, F-F., Wang, K-Y.Mesoproterozoic mafic and carbonatitic dykes from the northern margin of the North Chin a craton: implications for the fin al breakup of Columbia supercontinent.Tectonophysics, Vol. 498, pp. 1-10.ChinaCarbonatite, Bayan Obo
DS201412-0236
2014
Fan, H-R.Fan, H-R., Hu, F-F., Yang, K-F., Pirajno, F., Liu, X., Wang, K-Y.Integrated U-Pb and Sm-Nd geochronology for a REE rich carbonatite dyke at the giant Bayan Obo REE deposit, northern China.Lithos, in press availableChinaDeposit - Bayan Obo
DS201412-0237
2014
Fan, H-R.Fan, H-R., Hu, F-F., Pirajno, F., Liu, X., Wang, K-Y.Integrated U Pb and Sm-Nd geochronology for a REE rich carbonatite dyke at the giant Bayan Obo REE deposit, northern China.Ore Geology Reviews, in press availableChinaDeposit - Bayan Obo
DS201412-0238
2014
Fan, H-R.Fan, H-R., Hu, F-F., Yang, K-F., Pirajno, F., Liu, X., Wang, K-Y.Integrated U Pb and Sm Nd geochronology of a REE rich carbonatite dyke at the gaint Bayan Obo REE deposit, northern China.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 63, pp. 510-519.ChinaCarbonatite
DS201511-1827
2015
Fan, H-R.Cai, Y-C., Fan, H-R., Santsh, M., Hu, F-F., Yang, K-F, Hu, Z.Subduction related metasomatism of the lithospheric mantle beneath the southeastern North Chin a Craton: evidence from mafic to intermediate dykes in the northern Sulu orogen.Tectonophysics, Vol. 659, pp. 137-151.ChinaSulu orogen - dykes

Abstract: The widespread mafic to intermediate dykes in the northern Sulu orogen provide important constrains on mantle source characteristics and geodynamic setting. Here we present LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb ages which indicate that the dykes were emplaced during Early Cretaceous (~ 113-108 Ma). The rocks show SiO2 in the range of 46.2 to 59.5 wt.% and alkalic and shoshonitic affinity with high concentrations of MgO (up to 7.6 wt.%), Cr (up to 422 ppm) and Ni (up to 307 ppm). They are enriched in light rare earth elements LREE (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm and Eu) and large ion lithophile elements (LILE, Rb, Sr, Ba, U and Th) and show strong depletion in high field strength elements (HFSE, Nb, Ta, Ti and P). The dykes possess uniformly high (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.70824-0.70983), low eNd(t) (- 14.0 to - 17.4) and (206Pb/204Pb)i (16.66-17.02) and negative eHf(t) (- 23.5 to - 13.7). Our results suggest that the source magma did not undergo any significant crustal contamination during ascent. The systematic variation trends between MgO and major and trace elements suggest fractionation of olivine and clinopyroxene. The highly enriched mantle source for these rocks might have involved melts derived from the subducted lower crust of Yangtze Craton that metasomatized the ancient lithospheric mantle of the North China Craton.
DS201912-2835
2019
Fan, H-R.Yang, Y-H., Wu, F-Y., Qiu-Li, L., Rojas-Agramonte, Y., Yang, J-H., Yang, L., Ma, Q., Xie, L-W., Huang, C., Fan, H-R., Zhao, Z-F., Xu, C.In situ U-Th-Pb dating and Sr-Nd isotope analysis of bastnasite by LA-(MC)-ICP-MS.Geostandards and Geoanalltical Research, Vol. 43, 3, pp. 543-565.China, Europe, Sweden, Asia, Mongolia, United States, Africa, Malawi, MadagascarREE

Abstract: Bastnäsite is the end member of a large group of carbonate-fluoride minerals with the common formula (REE) CO3F•CaCO3. This group is generally widespread and, despite never occurring in large quantities, represents the major economic light rare earth element (LREE) mineral in deposits related to carbonatite and alkaline intrusions. Since bastnäsite is easily altered and commonly contains inclusions of earlier-crystallised minerals, in situ analysis is considered the most suitable method to measure its U-Th-Pb and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions. Electron probe microanalysis and laser ablation (multi-collector) inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry of forty-six bastnäsite samples from LREE deposits in China, Pakistan, Sweden, Mongolia, USA, Malawi and Madagascar indicate that this mineral typically has high Th and LREE and moderate U and Sr contents. Analysis of an in-house bastnäsite reference material (K-9) demonstrated that precise and accurate U-Th-Pb ages could be obtained after common Pb correction. Moreover, the Th-Pb age with its high precision is preferable to the U-Pb age because most bastnäsites have relatively high Th rather than U contents. These results will have significant implications for understanding the genesis of endogenous ore deposits and formation processes related to metallogenic geochronology research.
DS202002-0203
2020
Fan, H-R.Liu, S., Fan, H-R., Groves, D.I., Yang, K-F, Yang, Z-F., Wang, Q-W.Multiphase carbonatite related magmatic and metasomatic processes in the genesis of the ore-hosting dolomite in the giant Bayan Obo REE-Nb-Fe deposit.Lithos, in press available, 96p. PdfChinacarbonatite

Abstract: The origin of dolomite that hosts the Bayan Obo REE-Nb-Fe deposit (57.4 % REE2O3, 2.16 % Nb2O5, and >1500 % iron oxides) has been controversial for decades, but it is integral to understanding of the genesis of this giant deposit. In this study, based on the textures and in situ major and trace element composition of its carbonates, the dolomite was proved to be initially generated from magnesio-ferro-carbonatite melts. It subsequently experienced magmatic-hydrothermal alteration and recrystallization in a low strain environment, caused by calcio-carbonatitic fluids, with formation of finer-grained dolomite, interstitial calcite and increasing amounts of associated fluorocarbonates. Available stable isotope analyses indicate that the recrystallized ore-hosting dolomite has higher d13C and d18O ratios compared to its igneous coarse-grained precursor. Rayleigh fractionation during the recrystallization process, rather than crustal contamination, played a major role in the highly-variable stable isotope composition of carbonates in the dolomite. Low-T alteration increased variability with apparently random increases in d18O within carbonates. The REE, Ba and Sr were added simultaneously with the elevated (La/Yb)cn from magnesio-ferro-carbonatite melts to calcio-carbonatitic fluids, and to carbonatite-derived aqueous fluids, through which extensive fluorine metasomatism and alkali alteration overlapped the recrystallization of the ore-hosting dolomite. Therefore, the multi-stage REE mineralization at Bayan Obo is closely related to metasomatism by calcio-carbonatitic fluids of previously-emplaced intrusive magnesio-ferro-carbonatite bodies during late evolution of the Bayan Obo carbonatite complex. Then, the ore-hosting dolomitic carbonatite was subjected to compressive tectonics during a Paleozoic subduction event, and suffered intense, largely brittle, deformation, which partially obscured the earlier recrystallization process. The complex, multi-stage evolution of the ore-hosting dolomite is responsible for the uniqueness, high grade and giant size of the Bayan Obo deposit, the world's largest single REE resource with million tonnes of REE oxides.
DS202010-1857
2020
Fan, H-R.Liu, S., Ding, L., Fan, H-R., Yang, K-F., Tang, Y-W. She, H-D, Hao, M-z.Hydrothermal genesis of Nb mineralization in the giant Bayan Obo REE-Nb-Fe deposit ( China): implicated by petrography and geochemistry of Nb-bearing minerals.Precambrian Research, Vol. 348, 105864 24p. PdfChinadeposit - Bayan Obo

Abstract: The Bayan Obo REE-Nb-Fe deposit, which reserves the current largest REE resources globally, also hosts over 70% of China’s Nb resources. Unlike many world-class carbonatite-related Nb deposits (e.g. Morro dos Seis Lagos and Araxá, Brazil) with igneous or secondary origin, Nb was mainly stored in Nb-bearing minerals (aeschynite, ilmenorutile, baotite, fergusonite etc.) of hydrothermal origin at Bayan Obo, supported by evidence from petrography, element and isotopic geochemistry. Although igneous fersmite and columbite were occasionally discovered in local carbonatite dykes, the Mesoproterozoic and Paleozoic hydrothermal metasomatism occurred in the ore-hosting dolomite, related to carbonatite intrusion and the closure of Paleo-Asian Ocean respectively, has played a more significant role during the ultimate Nb enrichment. REE, however, was significantly enriched during both the carbonatite-related magmatic and hydrothermal processes. Consequently, there was differentiated mineralization between REE and Nb in the carbonatite dykes and the ores. Niobium mineralization at Bayan Obo is rather limited in Mesoproterozoic carbonatite, whereas more extensive in the metasomatized ore-hosting dolomite, and generally postdating the REE mineralization at the same stage. According to mineral geochemistry, Bayan Obo aeschynite was classified into 3 groups: aeschynite-(Nd) with convex REE patterns (Group 1); aeschynite-(Ce) (Group 2) and nioboaeschynite (Group 3) with nearly flat REE patterns. Aeschynite (Group 1), ilmenorutile and fergusonite precipitated from Paleozoic hydrothermal fluids with advanced fractionation of Ce-rich REE minerals. The Mesoproterozoic hydrothermal Nb mineralization, represented by aeschynite (Group 3) and baotite, occurred postdating REE mineralization at same stage. Besides, fersmite and aeschynite (Group 2) precipitated from the Mesoproterozoic REE-unfractionated melt and hydrothermal fluids, respectively. All above Nb-bearing minerals exhibit extreme Nb-Ta fractionation as a primary geochemical characteristic of mantle-derived carbonatite. The forming age of the aeschynite megacrysts (Group 1) has not been accurately determined. However, the potential age was constrained to ~430 Ma or alternatively ~270-280 Ma subjected to subduction and granite activity, respectively. These aeschynite crystals inherited REEs from multiphase former REE mineralization, with an intermediate apparent Sm-Nd isochron age between the Mesoproterozoic and the Paleozoic REE mineralization events.
DS202012-2254
2020
Fan, H-R.Wang, Z-Y., Fan, H-R., Zhou, L., Yang, K-F., She, H-D.Carbonatite-related REE deposits: an overview.MDPI Minerals, Vol. 10, 965 doi:103390/min10110965, 26p. PdfChinacarbonatite, REE

Abstract: The rare earth elements (REEs) have unique and diverse properties that make them function as an “industrial vitamin” and thus, many countries consider them as strategically important resources. China, responsible for more than 60% of the world’s REE production, is one of the REE-rich countries in the world. Most REE (especially light rare earth elements (LREE)) deposits are closely related to carbonatite in China. Such a type of deposit may also contain appreciable amounts of industrially critical metals, such as Nb, Th and Sc. According to the genesis, the carbonatite-related REE deposits can be divided into three types: primary magmatic type, hydrothermal type and carbonatite weathering-crust type. This paper provides an overview of the carbonatite-related endogenetic REE deposits, i.e., primary magmatic type and hydrothermal type. The carbonatite-related endogenetic REE deposits are mainly distributed in continental margin depression or rift belts, e.g., Bayan Obo REE-Nb-Fe deposit, and orogenic belts on the margin of craton such as the Miaoya Nb-REE deposit. The genesis of carbonatite-related endogenetic REE deposits is still debated. It is generally believed that the carbonatite magma is originated from the low-degree partial melting of the mantle. During the evolution process, the carbonatite rocks or dykes rich in REE were formed through the immiscibility of carbonate-silicate magma and fractional crystallization of carbonate minerals from carbonatite magma. The ore-forming elements are mainly sourced from primitive mantle, with possible contribution of crustal materials that carry a large amount of REE. In the magmatic-hydrothermal system, REEs migrate in the form of complexes, and precipitate corresponding to changes of temperature, pressure, pH and composition of the fluids. A simple magmatic evolution process cannot ensure massive enrichment of REE to economic values. Fractional crystallization of carbonate minerals and immiscibility of melts and hydrothermal fluids in the hydrothermal evolution stage play an important role in upgrading the REE mineralization. Future work of experimental petrology will be fundamental to understand the partitioning behaviors of REE in magmatic-hydrothermal system through simulation of the metallogenic geological environment. Applying "comparative metallogeny" methods to investigate both REE fertile and barren carbonatites will enhance the understanding of factors controlling the fertility.
DS1997-0334
1997
Fan, J.Fan, J., Kerrich, R.Geochemical characteristics of aluminum depleted, undepleted komatiites \heavy rare earth elements (HREE) enriched low Ti tholeiitesGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 61, No. 22, Nov. pp. 4723-44OntarioGeochemistry, Komatiites
DS1998-0894
1998
Fan, J.Louden, K.E., Fan, J.Crustal structures of Grenville, Makkovik and southern Nain provinces along the Lithoprobe ESCOOT transect.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 35, No. 5, May pp. 583-601.Labrador, GreenlandGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics
DS202003-0365
2019
Fan, J.Tang, S., Liu, H., Yan, S., Xu, X., Wu, W., Fan, J., Liu, J., Hu, C., Tu, L.A high sensitivity MEMS gravimeter with a large dynamic range. ( not specific to diamonds)Nature.com Microsystems & Nanoengineering, Vol. 5, doi:org/10.1038/ s41378-019-0089-7Globalgeophysics - gravity

Abstract: Precise measurement of variations in the local gravitational acceleration is valuable for natural hazard forecasting, prospecting, and geophysical studies. Common issues of the present gravimetry technologies include their high cost, high mass, and large volume, which can potentially be solved by micro-electromechanical-system (MEMS) technology. However, the reported MEMS gravimeter does not have a high sensitivity and a large dynamic range comparable with those of the present commercial gravimeters, lowering its practicability and ruling out worldwide deployment. In this paper, we introduce a more practical MEMS gravimeter that has a higher sensitivity of 8?µGal/vHz and a larger dynamic range of 8000 mGal by using an advanced suspension design and a customized optical displacement transducer. The proposed MEMS gravimeter has performed the co-site earth tides measurement with a commercial superconducting gravimeter GWR iGrav with the results showing a correlation coefficient of 0.91.
DS201909-2111
2019
Fan, M.S.Zhu, R.Z., Ni, P., Ding, J.Y., Wang, G.G., Fan, M.S., Li, S.N.Metasomatic processes in the lithospheric mantle beneath the No. 30 kimberlite ( Wafangdian region, North China craton).canminportal.org, Vol. 57, pp. 499-517.Chinadeposit - No. 30

Abstract: This paper presents the first major and trace element compositions of mantle-derived garnet xenocrysts from the diamondiferous No. 30 kimberlite pipe in the Wafangdian region, and these are used to constrain the nature and evolution of mantle metasomatism beneath the North China Craton (NCC). The major element data were acquired using an electron probe micro-analyzer and the trace element data were obtained using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Based on Ni-in-garnet thermometry, equilibrium temperatures of 1107-1365 °C were estimated for peridotitic garnets xenocrysts from the No. 30 kimberlite, with an average temperature of 1258 °C, and pressures calculated to be between 5.0 and 7.4 GPa. In a CaO versus Cr2O3 diagram, 52% of the garnets fall in the lherzolite field and 28% in the harzburgite field; a few of the garnets are eclogitic. Based on rare earth element patterns, the lherzolitic garnets are further divided into three groups. The compositional variations in garnet xenocrysts reflect two stages of metasomatism: early carbonatite melt/fluid metasomatism and late kimberlite metasomatism. The carbonatite melt/fluids are effective at introducing Sr and the light rare earth elements, but ineffective at transporting much Zr, Ti, Y, or heavy rare earth elements. The kimberlite metasomatic agent is highly effective at element transport, introducing, e.g., Ti, Zr, Y, and the rare earth elements. Combined with compositional data for garnet inclusions in diamonds and megacrysts from the Mengyin and Wafangdian kimberlites, we suggest that these signatures reflect a two-stage evolution of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath the NCC: (1) early-stage carbonatite melt/fluid metasomatism resulting in metasomatic modification of the SCLM and likely associated with diamond crystallization; (2) late-stage kimberlite metasomatism related to the eruption of the 465 Ma kimberlite.
DS201312-0806
2012
Fan, N.J.Shen, A.H., Bassett, W.A., Skalwold, E.A., Fan, N.J., Tao, Y.Precision measurement of interfacet angles on faceted gems using a goniometer.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 48, spring pp. 32-38.TechnologyDiamond reference cut stones
DS1989-0416
1989
Fan, Q.Fan, Q., Hooper, P.R.The mineral chemistry of ultramafic xenoliths of Eastern China:implications for Upper mantle composition and the paleogeothermsJournal of Petrology, Vol. 30, No. 5, October pp. 1117-1158ChinaMantle, Xenoliths -mineral chemis
DS2003-0641
2003
Fan, Q.Jahn, B., Fan, Q., Yang, J.J., Henin, O.Petrogenesis of the Maowu pyroxenite eclogite body from the UHP metamorphicLithos, Vol. 70, 3-4, pp. 243-67.ChinaUHP, geochronology
DS200412-0898
2003
Fan, Q.Jahn, B., Fan, Q., Yang, J.J., Henin, O.Petrogenesis of the Maowu pyroxenite eclogite body from the UHP metamorphic terrane of Dabie Shan: chemical and isotopic constraLithos, Vol. 70, 3-4, pp. 243-67.ChinaUHP, geochronology
DS200812-0336
2008
Fan, Q.Fan,Q., Sui, J., Li, N., Sun, Q.Silica rich melt inclusions in upper mantle peridotite: implications for subcontinental lithospheric evolution of eastern China.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A253.ChinaGeochemistry
DS201112-0314
2011
Fan, Q.Fan, Q., Sui, J., Du, X., Zhao, Y.Genesis of carbonatite from Hannuoba and Yangyuan north China.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.827.ChinaMantle evolution
DS2003-0521
2003
Fan, W.Guo, F., Fan, W., Wang, F., Lin, G.Geochemistry of late Mesozoic mafic magmatism in west Shandong Province, easternGeochemical Journal, Vol. 37, pp. 63-77.ChinaBlank
DS200412-0746
2003
Fan, W.Guo, F., Fan, W., Wang, F., Lin, G.Geochemistry of late Mesozoic mafic magmatism in west Shandong Province, eastern China: characterizing the lost lithospheric manGeochemical Journal, Vol. 37, pp. 63-77.ChinaUHP, xenoliths
DS200412-0747
2004
Fan, W.Guo, F., Fan, W., Wang, Y., Li, C.When did the Emeishan mantle plume activity start? Geochronological and geochemical evidence from ultramafic mafic dykes in soutInternational Geology Review, Vol. 46, 3, pp. 226-234.ChinaPlume, geochronology
DS200412-0748
2004
Fan, W.Guo, F., Fan, W., Wang, Y., Zhang, M.Origin of early Cretaceous calc-alkaline lamprophyres from the Sulu Orogen in eastern China: implications for enrichment processLithos, Vol. 78, 3, Nov. pp. 291-305.ChinaGeochemistry, geochronology, mantle metasomatism, subdu
DS200512-0378
2005
Fan, W.Gui, F., Fan, W., Wang, Y.Petrogenesis and tectonic implications of Early Cretaceous high K calc alkaline volcanic rocks in the Laiyang Basin of the Sulu Belt, eastern China.The Island Arc, Vol. 14, 2, June pp. 69-90.ChinaUHP
DS200512-1168
2005
Fan, W.Wang, Y., Fan, W., Peng, T., Zhang, H., Gou, F.Nature of the Mesozoic lithospheric mantle and tectonic decoupling beneath the Dabie Orogen, central China. Evidence from 40Ar 39Ar geochronology, Sr/Nd, PbChemical Geology, Vol. 220, 3-4, pp. 165-189.Asia, ChinaGeochronology - early Cretaceous mafic igneous rocks
DS200612-0512
2006
Fan, W.Guo, F., Fan, W., Li, C.Geochemistry of late Mesozoic adakites from the Sulu belt, China: magma genesis and implications for crustal recycling beneath continental collisional orogens.Geological Magazine, Vol. 143, 1, pp. 1-13.ChinaCrust, Geochemistry REE, eclogite
DS200612-0818
2005
Fan, W.Lin, G., Zhang, Y., Guo, F., Wang, Y., Fan, W.Numerical modeling of lithosphere evolution in the North Chin a craton; thermal versus tectonic thinning.Journal of Geodynamics, Vol. 40, 1, pp. 92-103.ChinaTectonics
DS201112-0590
2011
Fan, W.Li, C., Guo, F., Fan, W.Lower crustal melting via magma underplating: elemental Sr Nd Pb isotopic constraints from late Mesozoic intermediate felsic volcanic rocks in NE Chin a block.Island Arc, in press available,ChinaGeochemistry, alkaline - shoshonites
DS201612-2302
2016
Fan, W.Huangfu, P., Wang, Y., Cawood, P.A., Li, Z-H., Fan, W., Gerya, T.V.Thermo-mechanical controls of flat subduction: insight from numerical modeling.Gondwana Research, Vol. 40, pp. 170-183.MantleSubduction

Abstract: Numerical experiments are used to investigate the thermo-mechanical controls for inducing flat subduction and why flat subduction is rare relative to normal/steep subduction. Our modeling results demonstrate that flat subduction is an end-member of a steady state subduction geometry and is characterized by a curved slab with a nearly-horizontal slab section. Intermediate cases between normal/steep and flat subduction appear to be transient in origin and evolve toward one of the stable end-members. Physical parameters inducing flat subduction can be classified into four categories: buoyancy of the subducting oceanic lithosphere (e.g., slab age, oceanic crustal thickness), viscous coupling between the overriding and downgoing plates (e.g., initial subduction angle), external kinematic conditions, and rheological properties of the subduction zone. On the basis of parameter sensitivity tests and the main characteristics of present-day flat subduction zones, positive buoyancy from either the young slab or the thickened oceanic crust is considered as the primary controlling parameter. Our results show that the possibility of flat subduction is directly proportional to oceanic crustal thickness and inversely proportional to the slab age. Furthermore, oceanic crust must be thicker than 8 km to induce flat subduction, when the slab is older than 30 Ma with an initial subduction angle of = 20° and without absolute trenchward motion of the overriding plate. The lower the initial subduction angle or the thicker the overriding continental lithosphere, the more likelihood for flat subduction. The initial subduction angle is more influential for the development of flat subduction than the overriding lithospheric thickness, and a thick overriding lithosphere induces flat subduction only under the condition of an initial subduction angle of = 25°, with a slab age of = 30 Ma and without absolute trenchward motion of the overriding plate. However, when the initial subduction angle is increased to > 25°, no flat subduction is predicted. All the parameters are evaluated within the constraints of a mechanical framework in which the slab geometry is regarded as a result of a balance between the gravitational and hydrodynamic torques. Any factor that can sufficiently reduce gravitational torque or increase hydrodynamic torque will exert a strong effect on flat subduction development. Our results are consistent with the observations of modern flat subduction zones on Earth.
DS1996-0442
1996
Fan, W.M.Fan, W.M., Menzies, M.A.Lithospheric thinning and accretion in Mesozoic- Cenozoic eastern China:isotopic study mantle xenolithsInternational Geological Congress 30th Session Beijing, Abstracts, Vol. 1, p. 122.ChinaXenoliths
DS2000-0281
2000
Fan, W.M.Fan, W.M., Zhang, H.F., Menzies, M.A.On and off the North Chin a Craton: where is the Archean keel?Journal of Petrology, Vol. 41, No. 7, July pp. 933-50.ChinaCraton - keel, Tectonics, mobile belts
DS2001-0430
2001
Fan, W.M.Guo, F., Fan, W.M., Wang, Y.J., Lin, G.Late Mesozoic mafic intrusive complexes in North Chin a Block; constraints on the nature of subcontinental..Physics and Chemistry of the Earth Pt. A. Solid Earth, Vol. 26, No. 9-10, pp. 759-71.ChinaLithospheric mantle, Magmatism
DS2003-1545
2003
Fan, W.M.Zhang, H.F., Sun, M., Zhou, X.H., Zjou, M.F., Fan, W.M., Zheng, J.P.Secular evolution of the lithosphere beneath the eastern North Chin a Craton: evidenceGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 67, 22, pp. 4373-87.ChinaGeochronology, eclogites
DS200412-2203
2003
Fan, W.M.Zhang, H.F., Sun, M., Zhou, X.H., Zjou, M.F., Fan, W.M., Zheng, J.P.Secular evolution of the lithosphere beneath the eastern North Chin a Craton: evidence from Mesozoic basalts and high Mg andesiteGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 67, 22, pp. 4373-87.ChinaGeochronology, eclogites
DS2002-1775
2002
Fan, W-M.Zhang, H.F., Sun, M., Zhou, X-H., Fan, W-M., Zhai, M-G.Mesozoic lithosphere destruction beneath the North Chin a Craton:Contribution to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 143, 5, pp.ChinaTectonics - subduction
DS200412-0534
2004
Fan, W-M.Fan, W-M., Guo, F., Wang, Y-J, Zhang, M.Late Mesozoic volcanism in the northern Huaiyang tectono-magmatic belt: partial melts from lithospheric mantle with subducted coChemical Geology, Vol. 209, 1-2, pp. 27-48.ChinaUHP, Dabie Orogen, subduction
DS200612-0815
2006
Fan, W-M.Liang, X-Q, Fan, W-M., Wang, Y-J., Xian, H.Early Mesozoic post collisional shoshonitic lamprophyres along the western margin of the South Chin a orogen; geochemical characteristics and tectonicInternational Geology Review, Vol. 48, 4, pp. 311-328.ChinaGeochemistry - shoshonites
DS201802-0268
2018
Fan, W-m.Sun, W-d., Hawkesworth, C.J., Yao, C., Zhang, C-C., Huang, R.f., Liu, X., Sun, X-L, Ireland, T., Song, M-s., Ling, M-x., Ding, X., Zhang, Z-f., Fan, W-m., Wu, Z-q.Carbonated mantle domains at the base of the Earth's transition zone.Chemical Geology, Vol. 478, pp. 69-75.Mantlecarbonatite

Abstract: The oxygen fugacity of the upper mantle is 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than that of the lower mantle and this has been attributed to Fe2 + disproportionating into Fe3 + plus Fe0 at pressures > 24 GPa. The upper mantle might therefore have been expected to have evolved to more oxidizing compositions through geological time, but it appears that the oxygen fugacity of the upper mantle has remained constant for the last 3.5 billion years. Thus, it indicates that the mantle has been actively buffered from the accumulation of Fe3 +, and that this is linked to oxidation of diamond to carbonate coupled with reduction of Fe3 + to Fe2 +. When subducted plates penetrate into the lower mantle, compensational upwelling transports bridgmanite into the transition zone, where it breaks down to ringwoodite and majorite, releasing the ferric iron. The system returns to equilibrium through oxidation of diamond. Early in Earth history, diamond may have been enriched at the base of the transition zone in the Magma Ocean, because it is denser than peridotite melts at depths shallower than 660 km, and it is more buoyant below. Ongoing oxidation of diamond forms carbonate, leading to relatively high carbonate concentrations in the source of ocean island basalts.
DS201412-1000
2014
Fan, Z.F.Yang, J-J., Fan, Z.F., Yu, C., Yan, R.Coseismic formation of eclogite facies cataclastic dykes at Yangkou in the Chinese Sulu UHP metamorphic belt.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 32, 9, pp. 937-960.ChinaUHP
DS1993-0428
1993
Fan ChungFan Chung, Sternberg, S.Mathematics and the Buckyball.The elaborate symmetries of this soccer ball shaped molecule allow many of its properties to be calculated from firstprinciplesAmerican Scientist, Vol. 81, January-February pp. 56-70GlobalGeochemistry, Carbon
DS1984-0269
1984
Fan liangmingFan liangming, Yang Yong Fu, Wen LuUltra violet photographs and spectral characteristics of mixed type diamonds in a kimberlite tube inChina. *CHIActa Petrologica Mineralogica Et Analytica *CHI, Vol. 3, No. 4, (12) pp. 339-345ChinaDiamond Morphology
DS1992-0954
1992
Fan QichengLiu Ruoxin, Fan QichengThe mantle fluid inclusions -new evidence of partial melting and chemical In homogeneity of mantleInternational Symposium Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks Deep seated xenoliths China and its, Abstracts pp. 77-80ChinaGeochemistry, Mantle
DS1992-1050
1992
Fan WeimingMenzies, M.A., Fan Weiming, Baker, J., Thirlwall, M.F., Ming ZhangThe lower lithosphere of eastern China: on craton/ off craton isotopic provinciality or recent recycling?International Symposium Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks Deep seated xenoliths China and its, Abstracts pp. 85-88ChinaCraton, Geochronology
DS1992-1051
1992
Fan WeimingMenzies, M.A., Fan Weiming, Ming ZhangDepleted and enriched lithosphere beneath eastern China: evidence from Quaternary alkaline volcanic rocks and their xenolithsEos Transactions, Vol. 73, No. 14, April 7, supplement abstracts p. 324ChinaAlkaline rocks, Xenoliths
DS202012-2209
2020
Fanara, S.Buono, G., Fanara, S., Macedonio, G., Palladino, D.M., Petrosino, P., Sottili, G., Pappalardo, L.Dynamics of degassing in evolved alkaline magmas: petrological, experimental and theoretical insights.Earth-Science Reviews, Vol. 211, 103402, 23p. PdfMantlealkaline

Abstract: In the last few decades, advanced monitoring networks have been extended to the main active volcanoes, providing warnings for variations in volcano dynamics. However, one of the main tasks of modern volcanology is the correct interpretation of surface-monitored signals in terms of magma transfer through the Earth's crust. In this frame, it is crucial to investigate decompression-induced magma degassing as it controls magma ascent towards the surface and, in case of eruption, the eruptive style and the atmospheric dispersal of tephra and gases. Understanding the degassing behaviour is particularly intriguing in the case of poorly explored evolved alkaline magmas. In fact, these melts frequently feed hazardous, highly explosive volcanoes (e.g., Campi Flegrei, Somma-Vesuvius, Colli Albani, Tambora, Azores and Canary Islands), despite their low viscosity that usually promotes effusive and/or weakly explosive eruptions. Decompression experiments, together with numerical models, are powerful tools to examine magma degassing behaviour and constrain field observations from natural eruptive products and monitoring signals. These approaches have been recently applied to evolved alkaline melts, yet numerous open questions remain. To cast new light on the degassing dynamics of evolved alkaline magmas, in this study we present new results from decompression experiments, as well as a critical review of previous experimental works. We achieved a comprehensive dataset of key petrological parameters (i.e., 3D textural data for bubbles and microlites using X-ray computed microtomography, glass volatile contents and nanolite occurrence) from experimental samples obtained through high temperature-high pressure isothermal decompression experiments on trachytic alkaline melts at super-liquidus temperature. We explored systematically a range of final pressures (from 200 to 25 MPa), decompression rates (from 0.01 to 1 MPa s-1), and volatile (H2O and CO2) contents. On these grounds, we integrated coherently literature data from decompression experiments on evolved alkaline (trachytic and phonolitic) melts under various conditions, with the aim to fully constrain the degassing mechanisms and timescales in these magmas. Finally, we simulated numerically the experimental conditions to evaluate strengths and weaknesses in decrypting degassing behaviour from field observations. Our results highlight that bubble formation in evolved alkaline melts is primarily controlled by the initial volatile (H2O and CO2) content during magma storage. In these melts, bubble nucleation needs low supersaturation pressures (= 50-112 MPa for homogeneous nucleation, = 13-25 MPa for heterogeneous nucleation), resulting in high bubble number density (~ 1012-1016 m-3), efficient volatile exsolution and thus in severe rheological changes. Moreover, the bubble number density is amplified in CO2-rich melts (mole fraction XCO2 = 0.5), in which continuous bubble nucleation predominates on growth. These conditions typically lead to highly explosive eruptions. However, moving towards slower decompression rates (= 10-1 MPa s-1) and H2O-rich melts, permeable outgassing and inertial fragmentation occur, promoting weakly explosive eruptions. Finally, our findings suggest that the exhaustion of CO2 at deep levels, and the consequent transition to a H2O-dominated degassing, can crucially enhance magma vesiculation and ascent. In a hazard perspective, these constraints allow to postulate that time-depth variations of unrest signals could be significantly weaker/shorter (e.g., minor gas emissions and short-term seismicity) during major eruptions than in small-scale events.
DS200612-0643
2006
Fancomg, M.Jianxin, Z., Fancomg, M.Lawsonite bearing eclogites in the north Qilian and north Altyn Tagh: evidence for cold subduction of oceanic crust.Chinese Science Bulletin, Vol. 51, 10, May pp. 1238-1244.ChinaEclogite
DS1975-0591
1977
Fandry, C.B.Ogden, P.R.JR., Gunter, W.D., Fandry, C.B.A New Occurrence of Madupite: Leucite Hills, WyomingGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 9, No. 6, P. 754, (abstract.).GlobalLeucite Hills, Leucite, Rocky Mountains
DS1989-0365
1989
FangDonahoe, J.L., Green, N.L., Fang, Jen-HoAn expert system for idenification of minerals in thin sectionJournal of Geology Education, Vol. 37, No. 1, pp. 4-6. Database # 17586GlobalGIS - Mineralogy, Computer- Expert system
DS2001-0073
2001
FangBai, W., Yang, J., Fang, Yan, ZhangExplosion of ultrahigh pressure minerals in the mantleActa Geologica Sinica, Vol. 22, No. 5, pp. 385-90.MantleUHP
DS2003-1555
2003
Fang, A.M.Zhao, Z.Y., Fang, A.M., Yu, L.J.High to ultrahigh pressure ductile shear zones in the Sulu UHP metamorphic belt, China:Terra Nova, Vol. 15, pp. 322-29.ChinaUHP, subduction
DS200412-2220
2003
Fang, A.M.Zhao, Z.Y., Fang, A.M., Yu, L.J.High to ultrahigh pressure ductile shear zones in the Sulu UHP metamorphic belt, China: implications for continental subductionTerra Nova, Vol. 15, pp. 322-29.ChinaUHP, subduction
DS200512-1257
2005
Fang, A.M.Zhao, Z.Y., Wei, C.J., Fang, A.M.Plastic flow of coesite eclogite in a deep continent subduction regime: microstructures, deformation mechanisms and rheologic implications.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 237, 1-2, Aug, 30, pp. 209-222.Asia, ChinaUHP, Sulu
DS200812-0337
2008
Fang, C.Fang, C., Ahuja, R.Local structure and electronic spin transition of Fe bearing MgSiO3 perovskite under conditions of the Earth's lower mantle.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors., Vol. 166, 1-2, pp. 77-82.MantleMineral chemistry
DS201802-0225
2018
Fang, C.Chen, N., Ma, H., Chen, L., Yan, B., Fang, C., Liu, X., Li, Y., Guo, L., Chen, L., Jia, X.Effects of S on the synthesis of type 1b diamond under high pressure and high temperature.International Journal of Refractory Metals & Hard Materials, Vol. 71, pp. 141-146.Technologysynthetic diamonds
DS1990-0463
1990
Fang, J.H.Fang, J.H., Chen, H.C.Uncertainties are better handled by fuzzy arithmeticAmerican Association Petrol. Geologists Bulletin, Vol. 74, No. 8, August pp. 1228-1233GlobalGeostatistics, Fuzzy Logic
DS1997-0335
1997
Fang, J.H.Fang, J.H.Fuzzy logic and geology... brief overview for laymanGeotimes, Vol. 42, No. 10, October pp. 23-26GlobalGeostatistics, Fuzzy Logic
DS200812-0338
2008
Fang, L.Fang, L., Kononov, O.V., Marfunin, A.S., Taraevich, A.V., Tarasavich, B.N.Development of a technique for IR spectroscopic determination of nitrogen content and aggregation degree in diamond crystals.Moscow University Geology Bulletin, Vol. 63, 4, pp. 281-284.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201312-0259
2013
Fang, L.Fang, L.Morphology and spectral characteristics of octahedral diamond crystals from Yubilenaya diamond pipe, Yakutia.Journal of Superhard Materials, Vol. 35, 4, pp. 214-219.RussiaDeposit - Jubulenaya
DS201502-0110
2014
Fang, N.Sun, J., Zhu, X., Chen, Y., Fang, N., Li, S.Is the Bayan Obo ore deposit a micrite mound? A comparison with the Sailinhudong micrite mound.International Geology Review, Vol. 56, 14, pp. 1720-1731.ChinaCarbonatite
DS200612-0071
2006
Fang, Q.Bai, W., Ren, Y., Yang, J., Fang, Q., Yan, B.The native iron and wustite assemblage: records of oxygen element from the mantle.Acta Geologica Sinica , Vol. 27, 1, pp. 43-50.MantleMineral chemistry
DS201112-0871
2004
Fang, Q-S.Robinson, P.T., Bai, W-J., Malpas, J., Yang, J-S., Zhou, M-F., Fang, Q-S., Hu, X-F., Cameron, StaudigelUltra high pressure minerals in the Loubasa ophiolite, Tibet and their tectonic implications.Aspects of the Tectonic evolution of China, Editors Fletcher, Ali, Aitchison, Geological Society Of America, Spec. Pub.226, pp.247-71China, TibetUHP
DS2002-0445
2002
Fang, W.Fang, W., Hu, Su, Xio, Ji, JiangOn emplacment ages of lamproite in Zhenyuan County, Guizhon Province, ChinaChina Sciences Bulletin, Vol.47, 10,pp. 874-80.China, GuizhonGeochronology, Lamproites
DS1981-0154
1981
Fang qingsongFang qingsong, Bai WangiThe Discovery of Alpine Type Diamond Bearing Ultrabasic Intrusions in Xizang (tibet).Geological Review., Vol. 27, No. 5, PP. 455-457.ChinaGeology
DS1996-0443
1996
Fang Tao, et al.Fang Tao, et al.Carbon and oxygen isotopic characteristics of rare earth elements (REE) fluorcarbonate mineral sand their genetic implicationsChinese Journal of Geochemistry, ENG., Vol. 15, No. 1, pp. 82-86.China, MongoliaCarbonatite, Deposit -Bayan Obo
DS201912-2790
2019
Fanget, B.Jacq, K., Giguet-Covex, C., Sabatier, P., Perrette, Y., Fanget, B., Coquin, D., Debret, M., Arnaud, F.High resolution grain size distribution of sediment core with hyperspectral imaging. ( not specific to diamond)Sedimentary Geology, Vol. 393-394, pdfGlobalhyperspectral

Abstract: The study of sediment cores allows for the reconstruction of past climate and environment through physical-chemical analysis. Nevertheless, this interpretation suffers from many drawbacks that can be overcome with the newest technologies. Hyperspectral imaging is one of these and allows a fast, high resolution, and non-destructive analysis of sediment cores. In this study, we use visible and near-infrared hyperspectral imaging to predict particle size fractions and distribution (PSD) at a resolution of 200?µm on a previously well-studied sediment core taken from Lake Bourget (Western Alps, France). These predictions agree with previous studies on this core. Then, the PSD was used to estimate sedimentary deposit sources using the PSD unmixing algorithm AnalySize. It permitted estimation of the contribution of five sources (micrite, small and large bio-induced calcite crystals, diatom frustules, detrital particles), which had previously been characterized. The spatial dimension allowed for laminae to be discretized and counted, in agreement with the age-depth model previously established. We then evaluated the particle size and spectral signatures of each of these annual laminae, hence characterizing their physico-chemical composition. These high-resolution data also allowed for estimation of the accumulation rate (cm/year) of each of the main sources in the laminated unit and inferring the trophic status and the presence of instantaneous events of the lake.
DS1930-0105
1932
Fannin, N.Fannin, N.The Fannin Years. a Pioneer's Story of the Diamond Fields And the Zulu War.Durban: Robinson And Co., 53P.South AfricaKimberley, History, Biography
DS1998-1238
1998
FanningRiley, T.R., Pankhurst, Leat, Storey, FanningTime relationships of pre-breakup Gondwana magmatismJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, 1A, p. 160. AbstractGondwanaMagmatism
DS1998-1427
1998
FanningSutherland, F.L., Hoskin, P.W.O., Fanning, CoenraadsModels of corundum origin from alkali basaltic terrains: an appraisalContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 133, pp. 356-72.Australia, AsiaMagma, petrology, mineralogy, CorunduM.
DS1984-0382
1984
Fanning, C.M.Jaques, A.L., Webb, A.W., Fanning, C.M., Black, C.P., Pidgeon, R.The Age of the Diamond Bearing Pipes and Associated LeuciteB.m.r. Journal of Aust. Geol. Geophys., Vol. 9, PP.Australia, Western AustraliaGeochronology, Related Rocks
DS1986-0644
1986
Fanning, C.M.Pidgeon, R.T., Smith, C.B., Fanning, C.M.The ages of kimberlite and lamproite emplacement in Western AustraliaProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 136-138AustraliaLamproite, Geochronology
DS1989-1214
1989
Fanning, C.M.Pidgeon, R.T., Smith, C.B., Fanning, C.M.Kimberlite and lamproite emplacement ages in western AustraliaGeological Society of Australia Inc. Blackwell Scientific Publishing, Special, No. 14, Vol. 1, pp. 369-381AustraliaTectonics, Age emplacement
DS1998-1180
1998
Fanning, C.M.Potrel, A., Peucat, J.J., Fanning, C.M.Archean crustal evolution of the West African Craton: example of the Amsagaarea (Reguibat Rise).Precamb. Res., Vol. 90, No. 3-4, July 1, pp. 107-118.West AfricaCraton, crustal growth, recycling, subduction, Geochronology
DS2001-0120
2001
Fanning, C.M.Boger, S.D., Wilson, C.J.L., Fanning, C.M.Early Proterozoic tectonism within the East Antarctic Craton : final suture between East and West GondwanaGeology, Vol. 29, No. 5, May, pp. 463-6.GlobalTectonics, Rodinia
DS2001-0396
2001
Fanning, C.M.Goodge, J.W., Fanning, C.M., Bennett, V.C.uranium-lead (U-Pb) evidence of1,7 Ga crustal tectonism during Nimrod Orogeny in the Transantarctic Mountains...Precambrian Research, Vol. 112, No. 3-4, Dec. 10, pp.261-88.AntarcticaProterozoic plate reconstructions, Tectonics
DS2001-1141
2001
Fanning, C.M.Sutherland, F.L., Fanning, C.M.Gem bearing basaltic volcanism, Barrington New South Wales: Cenozoic revolution based on basalt K Ar agesAustralian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 48, No. 2, Apr. pp. 221-38.Australia, New South WalesGeochronology - fission track and uranium-lead (U-Pb) isotope dating, volcanism - basalt
DS2002-0276
2002
Fanning, C.M.Chardon, D., Peucat, J.J., Jayananda, M., Choukroune, P., Fanning, C.M.Archean granite greenstone tectonics at Kolar South India: interplay of diapirism andTectonics, Vol. 21, 3, 7-1.IndiaMagmatism - not specific to diamonds
DS2003-0634
2003
Fanning, C.M.Jacobs, J., Bauer, W., Fanning, C.M.New age constraints for Grenville age metamorphism in western central Dronning MaudInternational Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 92, No. 3, July pp. 301-315.Antarctica, RodiniaGeochronology, Orogeny, Laurentia
DS200412-0892
2003
Fanning, C.M.Jacobs, J., Bauer, W., Fanning, C.M.New age constraints for Grenville age metamorphism in western central Dronning Maud Land ( east Antarctica) and implications forInternational Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 92, no. 3, July pp. 301-315.Antarctica, RodiniaGeochronology Orogeny, Laurentia
DS200512-0634
2004
Fanning, C.M.Liati, A., Franz, L., Gebauer, D., Fanning, C.M.The timing of mantle and crustal events in South Namibia, as defined by SHRIMP dating of zircon domains from a garnet peridotite xenolith of the Gideon Kimberlite province.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 39, 3-5, pp. 147-157.Africa, NamibiaGeochronology
DS200512-0635
2004
Fanning, C.M.Liati, A., Franz, L., Gebauer, D., Fanning, C.M.The timing of mantle and crustal events in South Namibia as defined by SHRIMP dating of zircon domains from a garnet peridotite xenolith of the Gibeon kimberlite province.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 39, 3-5, June pp. 147-157.Africa, NamibiaGeochronology, Pipe Hanaus 1, crustal events
DS200612-1025
2006
Fanning, C.M.Pankhurst, R.J., Rapela, C.W., Fanning, C.M., Marquez, M.Gondwanide continental collision and origin of Patagonia.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 76, 3-4, June pp. 235-257.South AmericaTectonics
DS200612-1398
2005
Fanning, C.M.Swain, G., Woodhouse, A., Hand, M., Barovich, K., Schwarz, M., Fanning, C.M.Provenance and tectonic development of the late Archean Gawler Craton, Australia: U Pb zircon, geochemical and Sm Nd isotopic implications.Precambrian Research, Vol. 141, 3-4, pp. 106-136.AustraliaGeochronology
DS200712-0872
2007
Fanning, C.M.Rapela, C.W., Pankhurst, R.J., Casquet, C., Fanning, C.M., Baldor Casado, E.G., Galindo, C., DahlquistThe Rio de la Plat a craton and the assembly of SW Gondwana.Earth Science Reviews, In press availableSouth America, BrazilTectonics
DS200712-0873
2007
Fanning, C.M.Rapela, C.W., Pankhurts, R.J., Casquet, C., Fanning, C.M., Baldo, E.G., Gonzalez-Casado, J.M., Galindo, C., Dahlquist, J.The Rio de la Plate craton and the assembly of SW Gondwana.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 83, 1-2, pp. 49-82.South America, BrazilCraton, tectonics
DS201412-0058
2014
Fanning, C.M.Boger, S.D., Hirdes, W., Ferreira, C.A.M., Jenett, T., Dallwig, R., Fanning, C.M.The 580-520 Ma Gondwana suture of Madagascar and its continuation into Antarctica and Africa.Gondwana Research, in press available 14p.Africa, MadagascarShield - Arabian Nubian
DS201509-0385
2015
Fanning, C.M.Boger, S.D., Hirdes, W., Ferreira, C.A.M., Jenett, T., Dallwig, R., Fanning, C.M.The 580-520 Ma Gondwana suture of Madagascar and its continuation into Antarctica and Africa.Gondwana Research, Vol. 28, pp. 1048-1060.Africa, MadagascarTectonics

Abstract: U-Pb age data from southwest Madagascar provide a compelling case that the pre-Gondwana Indian plate was stitched with the arc terranes of the Arabian Nubian Shield along a suture that closed between 580 Ma and 520 Ma. The key observations supportive of this interpretation are: (1) metamorphism dated to 630-600 Ma is manifested only on the west side of the suture in rocks that have affinities with the oceanic and island arc terranes of the Arabian Nubian Shield, or which represent continental rocks welded to these terranes prior to the amalgamation of Gondwana, and (2) orogenesis at 580-520 Ma is manifest in rocks on both sides of the suture, an observation taken to mark the timing of collision and to reflect spatial continuity across the suture. In southwest Madagascar the distribution of metamorphic ages places the suture along the Beraketa high-strain zone, the tectonic boundary between the Androyen and Anosyen domains. Similar age relationships allow for the extrapolation of this tectonic boundary into both East Antarctica and Africa.
DS201905-1017
2019
Fanning, C.M.Boger, S.D., Maas, R., Pastuhov, M., Macey, P.H., Hirdes, W., Schulte, B., Fanning, C.M., Ferreira, C.A.M., Jenett, T., Dallwig, R.The tectonic domains of southern and western Madagascar.Precambrian Research, Vol. 327, pp. 144-175.Africa, Madagascarplate tectonics

Abstract: Southern and western Madagascar is comprised of five tectonic provinces that, from northeast to southwest, are defined by the: (i) Ikalamavony, (ii) Anosyen, (iii) Androyen, (iv) Graphite and (v) Vohibory Domains. The Ikalamavony, Graphite and Vohibory Domains all have intermediate and felsic igneous protoliths of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite-granite composition, with positive eNd, and low Sr and Pb isotopic ratios. All three domains are interpreted to be the products of intra-oceanic island arc magmatism. The protoliths of the Ikalamavony and Graphite Domains formed repectively between c. 1080-980?Ma and 1000-920?Ma, whereas those of the Vohibory Domain are younger and date to between c. 670-630?Ma. Different post-formation geologic histories tie the Vohibory-Graphite and Ikalamavony Domains to opposite sides of the pre-Gondwana Mozambique Ocean. By contrast, the Androyen and Anosyen Domains record long crustal histories. Intermediate to felsic igneous protoliths in the Androyen Domain are of Palaeoproterozoic age (c. 2200-1800?Ma), of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite-granite composition, and show negative eNd, moderate to high 87Sr/86Sr and variable Pb isotopic compositions. The felsic igneous protoliths of the Anosyen Domain are of granitic composition and, when compared to felsic gneisses of the Androyen Domain, show consistently lower Sr/Y and markedly higher Sr and Pb isotope ratios. Like the Vohibory and Graphite Domains, the Androyen Domain can be linked to the western side of the Mozambique Ocean, while the Anosyen Domain shares magmatic and detrital zircon commonalities with the Ikalamavony Domain. It is consequently linked to the opposing eastern side of this ocean. The first common event observed in all domains dates to c. 580-520?Ma and marks the closure of the Mozambique Ocean. The trace of this suture lies along the boundary between the Androyen and Anosyen Domains and is defined by the Beraketa high-strain zone.
DS200512-1163
2005
Fanning, M.Wallis, S., Tsuboi, M., Suzuki, K., Fanning, M., Jiang, L., Tanaka, T.Role of partial melting in the evolution of the Sulu (eastern China) ultrahigh pressure terrane.Geology, Vol. 33, 2, pp. 129-132.ChinaUHP
DS201612-2299
2016
Fantsuzova, V.I.Fantsuzova, V.I., Danilov, K.B.The structure of the Lomonsov volcanic pipe in the Arkangelsk diamond province from anomalies of the microseismic field.Journal of Volcanology and Seismology, Vol. 10, 5, pp. 339-346.Russia, Kola Peninsula, ArchangelDeposit- Lomonsov

Abstract: This paper presents results from a study of the Lomonosov volcanic pipe as derived from anomalies of the microseismic field. Microseismic sounding revealed that this volcanic pipe is a cone-shaped body with a small gradient of microseismic intensity motion (2 to 5 dB). Discontinuities generally show greater contrasts compared with the variations of microseismic motion in the pipe body. Comparison of the results of this microseismic sounding with other geological and geophysical data showed that the intensities of the micro-seismic field along lines that traversed the pipe reflect realistic structures of a kimberlite pipe and the host rocks. The method of microseismic sounding was used to reconstruct the deeper structure of the volcanic pipe and the host rocks down to depths greater than 2 km. We estimated the velocity contrast and the errors involved in the identification of vertical boundaries of the pipe. The volcanic pipe has a shape that is consistent with a nearly vertical source situated at a depth of a few hundred meters. This is hypothesized to be a typical occurrence for other diamond-bearing pipes as well.
DS201904-0772
2017
Faraco, M.Reis, N.J., Nadeau, S., Fraga, L.M., Menezes Betiollo, L., Telma Lins, Faraco, M., Reece, J., Lachhman, D., Ault, R.Stratigraphy of the Roraima Supergroup along the Brazil-Guyana border in the Guiana shield, northern Amazonian craton - results of the Brazil Guyana geology and geodiversity mapping project.Brazilian Journal of Geology, Vol. 41, 1, pp. 43-57.South America, Brazil, GuyanaGuiana shield

Abstract: The Geological and Geodiversity Mapping binational program along the Brazil-Guyana border zone allowed reviewing and integrating the stratigraphy and nomenclature of the Roraima Supergroup along the Pakaraima Sedimentary Block present in northeastern Brazil and western Guyana. The area mapped corresponds to a buffer zone of approximately 25 km in width on both sides of the border, of a region extending along the Maú-Ireng River between Mount Roraima (the triple-border region) and Mutum Village in Brazil and Monkey Mountain in Guyana. The south border of the Roraima basin is overlain exclusively by effusive and volcaniclastic rocks of the Surumu Group of Brazil and its correlated equivalent the Burro-Burro Group of Guyana.
DS201810-2371
2018
Faraco, M.T.L.Reis, N.J., Nadeau, S., Fraga, L.M., Betiollo, L.M., Faraco, M.T.L., Reece, J., Lachhman, D., Ault, R.Stratigraphy of the Roraima Supergroup along the Brazil-Guyana border in the Guiana shield, northern Amazonian craton- results of the Brazil-Guyana geology and geodiversity mapping project.Brazilian Journal of Geology, Vol. 47, 1, pp. 43-57.South America, Brazil, Guyanacraton

Abstract: The Geological and Geodiversity Mapping binational program along the Brazil-Guyana border zone allowed reviewing and in- tegrating the stratigraphy and nomenclature of the Roraima Supergroup along the Pakaraima Sedimentary Block present in northeastern Brazil and western Guyana. The area mapped corresponds to a buffer zone of approximately 25 km in width on both sides of the border, of a region extending along the Maú-Ireng River between Mount Roraima (the tri- ple-border region) and Mutum Village in Brazil and Monkey Mountain in Guyana. The south border of the Roraima basin is overlain exclusively by effusive and volcaniclastic rocks of the Surumu Group of Brazil and its correlated equivalent the Burro-Burro Group of Guyana.
DS201812-2833
2016
Faraco, T.Kroonenberg, S.B., de Roever, E.W.F., Fraga, L.M., Faraco, T., Lafon, J-M., Cordani, U., Wong, T.E.Paleoproterzoic evolution of the Guiana Shield in Suriname: a revised model.Netherlands Journal of Geolsciences, Vol. 95, 4, pp. 491-522.South America, SurinameGuiana shield

Abstract: The Proterozoic basement of Suriname consists of a greenstone-tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite belt in the northeast of the country, two high-grade belts in the northwest and southwest, respectively, and a large granitoid-felsic volcanic terrain in the central part of the country, punctuated by numerous gabbroic intrusions. The basement is overlain by the subhorizontal Proterozoic Roraima sandstone formation and transected by two Proterozoic and one Jurassic dolerite dyke swarms. Late Proterozoic mylonitisation affected large parts of the basement. Almost 50 new U-Pb and Pb-Pb zircon ages and geochemical data have been obtained in Suriname, and much new data are also available from the neighbouring countries. This has led to a considerable revision of the geological evolution of the basement. The main orogenic event is the Trans-Amazonian Orogeny, resulting from southwards subduction and later collision between the Guiana Shield and the West African Craton. The first phase, between 2.18 and 2.09 Ga, shows ocean floor magmatism, volcanic arc development, sedimentation, metamorphism, anatexis and plutonism in the Marowijne Greenstone Belt and the adjacent older granites and gneisses. The second phase encompasses the evolution of the Bakhuis Granulite Belt and Coeroeni Gneiss Belt through rift-type basin formation, volcanism, sedimentation and, between 2.07 and 2.05 Ga, high-grade metamorphism. The third phase, between 1.99 and 1.95 Ga, is characterised by renewed high-grade metamorphism in the Bakhuis and Coeroeni belts along an anticlockwise cooling path, and ignimbritic volcanism and extensive and varied intrusive magmatism in the western half of the country. An alternative scenario is also discussed, implying an origin of the Coeroeni Gneiss Belt as an active continental margin, recording northwards subduction and finally collision between a magmatic arc in the south and an older northern continent. The Grenvillian collision between Laurentia and Amazonia around 1.2-1.0 Ga caused widespread mylonitisation and mica age resetting in the basement.
DS1998-0410
1998
Faragher, T.Faragher, T., Ryziuk, B.Metallic and industrial mineral assessment report on the exploration work Hinton area.Alberta Geological Survey, MIN 19980006AlbertaExploration - assessment, New Claymore Resources Ltd.
DS1999-0203
1999
Faragher, T.Faragher, T., Ryziuk, B.Diamond exploration of the Cadotte River Creek area propertiesAlberta Geological Survey, MIN 199900020AlbertaExploration - assessment, New Claymore Resources Ltd.
DS1999-0204
1999
Faragher, T.Faragher, T., Ryziuk, B.Diamond exploration of the Figaro propertyAlberta Geological Survey, MIN 199900021AlbertaExploration - assessment, New Claymore Resources Ltd.
DS1999-0205
1999
Faragher, T.Faragher, T., Ryziuk, B.Diamond exploration of the Falher propertyAlberta Geological Survey, MIN 199900023AlbertaExploration - assessment, New Claymore Resources Ltd.
DS1999-0206
1999
Faragher, T.Faragher, T., Ryziuk, B.Diamond exploration of the Golden Block propertyAlberta Geological Survey, MIN 199900024AlbertaExploration - assessment, New Claymore Resources Ltd.
DS200512-0276
2004
Farah, D.Farah, D.Blood from stones: the secret financial network of terror.Broadwaybooks.com, New York, $24.95Book review: Gems & Gemology 40,3, Fall p.270. Conflict
DS201812-2808
2018
Farahbakhsh, E.Farahbakhsh, E., Chandra, R., Olierook, H.K.H., Scalzo, R., Clark, C., Reddy, S.M., Muller, R.D.Computer vision based framework for extracting geological lineaments from optical remote sensing data.researchgate.com, arXiv:1810.02320v1 17p. Oct 4.Globallineaments

Abstract: The extraction of geological lineaments from digital satellite data is a fundamental application in remote sensing. The location of geological lineaments such as faults and dykes are of interest for a range of applications, particularly because of their association with hydrothermal mineralization. Although a wide range of applications have utilized computer vision techniques, a standard workflow for application of these techniques to mineral exploration is lacking. We present a framework for extracting geological lineaments using computer vision techniques which is a combination of edge detection and line extraction algorithms for extracting geological lineaments using optical remote sensing data. It features ancillary computer vision techniques for reducing data dimensionality, removing noise and enhancing the expression of lineaments. We test the proposed framework on Landsat 8 data of a mineral-rich portion of the Gascoyne Province in Western Australia using different dimension reduction techniques and convolutional filters. To validate the results, the extracted lineaments are compared to our manual photointerpretation and geologically mapped structures by the Geological Survey of Western Australia (GSWA). The results show that the best correlation between our extracted geological lineaments and the GSWA geological lineament map is achieved by applying a minimum noise fraction transformation and a Laplacian filter. Application of a directional filter instead shows a stronger correlation with the output of our manual photointerpretation and known sites of hydrothermal mineralization. Hence, our framework using either filter can be used for mineral prospectivity mapping in other regions where faults are exposed and observable in optical remote sensing data.
DS201905-1028
2018
Farahbakhsh, E.Farahbakhsh, E., Chandra, R., Olierook, H.K.H., Scalzo, R., Clark, C., Reddy, S.M., Muller, R.D.Computer vision based framework for extracting geological lineaments from optical remote sensing data.arXiv.1810,02320vl, researchgate 17p.Australialineaments
DS1998-0984
1998
FarberMcNulty, B.A., Farber, Wallace, Lopez, PalaciosRole of plate kinematics and plate slip vector partitioning in continental magmatic arcs: evidenceGeology, Vol. 26, No. 9, Sept. pp. 827-30PeruCordillera Blanca, Tectonics
DS1992-0449
1992
Fardy, J.J.Fardy, J.J., Farrar, Y.J.Trace element analysis of Argyle diamonds using instrumentalneutron-activation analysisJournal of Rad. Nucl. L., Vol. 164, No. 5, March 24, pp. 337-345. # HT631AustraliaDiamonds, Thermometry -trace element analysis
DS200612-0387
2005
Fareduddin, Pant.N.V.Fareduddin, Pant.N.V., Neogi, S.Petrologic evolution of the Kodomali kimberlite, Mainpur kimberlite field, Chhattisgarh, central India.Geological Society of India, Bangalore November Meeting Group Discussion on Kimberlites and Related Rocks India, Abstract p. 100-101.India, Bastar CratonKimberlite - Kodomali
DS200412-1624
2004
FareeduddinRao, M.S., Fareeduddin, Godhavari, K.S., Chander, S., Sisodia, C.P.Carbonaceous metaexhalite of shungitic affinity in Paleoproterozoic Aravelli Supergroup, Dugocha area, Rajasthan.Journal Geological Society of India, Vol. 63, 5, pp. 522-532IndiaCarbon, graphite
DS200512-0277
2005
FareeduddinFareeduddinProposed group discussion on kimberlites and related rocks of India. To be held November 2005.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 65, pp. 252-253.IndiaCraton
DS200612-0388
2006
FareeduddinFareeduddin, Pant, N.C., Neogi, S.Petrology of the Kodomali diatreme, Mainput area, Chhattisgarh, central India: implications for a Paleozoic orangeite field.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 68, 1, pp. 19-34.IndiaDeposit - Kodomali
DS200612-1352
2005
FareeduddinSrikantappa, C., Fareeduddin, Malathi, M.N.Olivine hosted melt inclusions and serpentine hosted aqueous fluids in diamond bearing kimberlites from Wajakarur, Andhra Pradesh, India.Geological Society of India, Bangalore November Meeting Group Discussion on Kimberlites and Related Rocks India, Abstract p. 75-76.India, Andhra Pradesh, Dharwar CratonDiamond inclusions
DS200712-0358
2007
FareeduddinGhosh, S., Fareeduddin, Viswanathan, S.Chondritic features in a Diamondiferous rock, Majhgawan, Central India.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 69, 4, p. 863 ( 1p.)IndiaPetrography
DS200812-1009
2008
FareeduddinSawkar, R.H., FareeduddinTraining in diamond exploration. Course organized by Geological Society of India , Rio Tinto India et al. Leaders Mitchell and Coopersmith. Brief overview.Journal of Geological Society of India, Vol. 71, April pp. 453=458.IndiaBrief - review of training course held Jan 2008
DS200812-1010
2008
FareeduddinSawkar, R.H., FareeduddinTraining in diamond exploration.Journal of Geological Society of India, Vol. 71, 4, pp. 453-458.IndiaTechnology
DS200912-0210
2008
FareeduddinFareeduddin, Sawkar, R.H.Ninth International Kimberlite Conference - brief overview.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 72, 6, pp. 837-840.IndiaBrief overview
DS200912-0506
2009
FareeduddinMitchell, R.H., FareeduddinMineralogy of the peralkaline lamproites from the Raniganj Coalfield, India.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 73, 3, June pp. 457-477.IndiaDykes, genetic classification
DS201212-0143
2012
FareeduddinDas, J.N., Korkoppa, M.M., Fareeduddin, Shivana, S., Srivastava, J.K., Gera, N.L.Tuffisitic kimberlite from eastern Dharwar craton, Undraldoddi area, Raichur District, Karnataka, India10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractIndia, KarnatakaDeposit - Undraldoddi area
DS201212-0194
2012
FareeduddinFareeduddin, Mitchell, R.H.Diamonds and their source rocks in India.Geological Society of India Bangalore, 434p.IndiaKimberlites, lamproites, lamprophyres, alluvials
DS201212-0349
2012
FareeduddinKaur, G., Korkoppa, M., FareeduddinPetrology of P-13 and P-5 kimberlite from Lattavaram kimberlite cluster, Wajrakarur kimberlite field, Andhra Pradesh, India.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractIndia, Andhra PradeshDeposit - Wajrakarur field
DS201312-0185
2013
FareeduddinDas, J.N., Korakoppa, M.M., FareeduddinTuffisitic kimberlite from Eastern Dharwar craton, Undraldoddi area, Raichur District, Karnataka, India.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, Special Issue of the Journal of the Geological Society of India,, Vol. 2, pp. 109-128.India, KarnatakaDeposit - Undraldoddi
DS201312-0463
2013
FareeduddinKaur, G., Korakoppa, M.M., FareeduddinPetrology of P-5 and P-13 kimberlites from Lattavaram kimberlite cluster, Wajrakarur kimberlite field, Andhra Pradesh, India: reclassification as lamproites.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 1, Special Issue of the Journal of the Geological Society of India,, Vol. 1, pp. 183-194.India, Andhra PradeshDeposit - Lattavaram
DS201412-0165
2013
FareeduddinDas, J.N., Korakoppa, M.M., Fareeduddin, Shivana, S., Srivastava, J.K., Gera, N.L.Tuffisitic kimberlite from eastern Dharwar craton, Undraldoddi area, Raichur district, Karnataka India.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, pp. 109-128.India, KarnatakaDeposit - Raichur district
DS202009-1627
2020
FareeduddinFareeduddin, Pant, N.C., Gupta, S., Chakraborty, P., Sensarma, S., Jain, A.K., Prasad, G.V.R., Srivastava, P., Rajan, S., Tiwari, V.M.The geodynamic evolution of the Indian subcontinent - an introduction.Episodes, Vol. 43, 1, pp. 8p.Indiacarbonatites
DS1995-0519
1995
Fareeduddin, I.R.Fareeduddin, I.R., Kirmani, B.L., et al.Lamprophyre dykes in the South Delhi fold belt near Pipela District SirobiRajasthan.Journal of Geological Society India, Vol. 46, No. 3, Sept. pp. 255-262.IndiaLamprophyres, Dikes
DS202005-0730
2020
Fareeduddin.Fareeduddin., Pant, N.C., Gupta, S., Chakraborty, P., Sensarma, S., Jain, A.K., Prasad, G.V.R., Srivastava, P., Rjan, S., Tiwari, V.M.The geodynamic evolution of the Indian subcontinent - an introduction.Episodes ( IUGS), Vol. 43, 1, pp. 1-18.Indiacarbonatite
DS200912-0211
2009
Farges, F.Farges, F., Sucher, S., Horovitz, H., Fourcault, J-M.The French Blue and the Hope' new dat a from the discovery of a historical lead cast.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 45, 1, Spring pp. 4-19.TechnologyDiamonds notable
DS201012-0193
2010
Farges, F.Farges, F.The rediscovery of the French Blue diamond.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, AbstractTechnologyDiamonds notable
DS201212-0195
2012
Farges, F.Farges, F., Vinson, J., Rehr, J.R., Post, J.E.Spectroscopy of B doped diamonds: experiment vs. theory. Hope, Tavernier Blue, French Blueemc2012 @ uni-frankfurt.de, 1p. AbstractTechnologyDiamond - colour
DS201412-0705
2014
Farges, F.Post, J.E., Farges, F.The Hope diamonds: rare gem, historic jewel.Rocks and Minerals, Jan.-Feb. pp. 16-26.TechnologyDiamonds notable - Hope
DS201802-0259
2017
Farina Dolsa, S.Presser, J.L.B., Alonso, R.N., Farina Dolsa, S., Larroza, F.A., Rocca, M.C.L., Hornes, K., Baller, L.Impact metamorphism evidence of Negla and Yasuka Renda large impact crater. ***PORT only abstract in eng Boletin Museum History Natural Paraguay ***IN PORT, Vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 69-82. pdfSouth America, Paraguayimpact craters
DS201702-0234
2016
Farina-Dolsa, S.Presser, J.L.B., Farina-Dolsa, S., Larroza-Cristaldo, F.A., Rocca, M., Alonso, R.N., Acededo, R.D., Cabral-Antunez, N.D., Baller, L., Zarza-Lima, P.R., Sekatcheff, J.M.Modeled mega impact structures in Paraguay: II the eastern region. **PortBoletin del Museo Nacional de Historia Narural del Paraguay, Vol. 20, 2, pp. 205-213. pdf available in * PortSouth America, ParaguayImpact Crater

Abstract: We report here the discovery and study of several new modeled large impact craters in Eastern Paraguay, South America. They were studied by geophysical information (gravimetry, magnetism), field geology and also by microscopic petrography. Clear evidences of shock metamorphic effects were found (e.g., diaplectic glasses, PF, PDF in quartz and feldspar) at 4 of the modeled craters: 1) Negla: diameter:~80-81 km., 2) Yasuka Renda D:~96 km., 3) Tapyta, D: ~80 km. and 4) San Miguel, D: 130-136 km. 5) Curuguaty, D: ~110 km. was detected and studied only by geophysical information. Target-rocks range goes from the crystalline Archaic basement to Permian sediments. The modeled craters were in some cases cut by tholeiitic/alkaline rocks of Mesozoic age and partially covered by lavas of the basaltic Mesozoic flows (Negla, Yasuka Renda, Tapyta and Curuguaty). One of them was covered in part by sediments of Grupo Caacupé (age: Silurian/Devonian). Some of these modeled craters show gold, diamonds, uranium and REE mineral deposits associated. All new modeled large impact craters are partially to markedly eroded.
DS1860-0463
1885
Farini, G.A.Farini, G.A.Die KalahariBerlin: Verh. Ges Erdk., Vol. 12, PP. 445-461.Africa, South Africa, BotswanaTravelogue
DS1860-0502
1886
Farini, G.A.Farini, G.A.Huit Mois Au KalahariTour Du Monde., Vol. 52, No. 1351, Nov. 27TH. PP. 321-352; No. 1352 Dec. 4THAfrica, BotswanaTravelogue
DS1860-0503
1886
Farini, G.A.Farini, G.A.A Recent Journey in the KalahariRoy. Geogr. Soc. (London) Proceedings, Vol. 86, PP. 437-453.Africa, South Africa, BotswanaTravelogue
DS1860-0504
1886
Farini, G.A.Farini, G.A.Through the Kalahari Desert. a Narrative of a Journey with Gun and Camera and Note-book, to Lake N'gami and Back.London: Sampson And Low, Reprinted Cape Town: Struik 1973., 475P.Africa, South Africa, BotswanaTravelogue, Geography
DS201602-0205
2015
Farla, R.Girard, J., Amulele, G., Farla, R., Mohiuddin, A., Karato, S-i.Shear deformation of bridgmanite and magnesiowustite aggregates at lower mantle conditions.Science, Vol. 351, 6269, pp. 144-147.MantleRheology

Abstract: Rheological properties of the lower mantle have strong influence on the dynamics and evolution of Earth. By using the improved methods of quantitative deformation experiments at high pressures and temperatures, we deformed a mixture of bridgmanite and magnesiowüstite under the shallow lower mantle conditions. We conducted experiments up to about 100% strain at a strain rate of about 3 × 10(-5) second(-1). We found that bridgmanite is substantially stronger than magnesiowüstite and that magnesiowüstite largely accommodates the strain. Our results suggest that strain weakening and resultant shear localization likely occur in the lower mantle. This would explain the preservation of long-lived geochemical reservoirs and the lack of seismic anisotropy in the majority of the lower mantle except the boundary layers.
DS201911-2534
2019
Farla, R.Ishi, T., Huang, R., Myhill, R., Fei, H., Koemets, I., Liu, Z., Maeda, F., Yuan, L., Wang, L., Druzhbin, D., Yamamoto, T., Bhat, S., Farla, R., Kawazoe, T., Tsujino, N., Kulik, E., Higo, Y., Tange, H., Katsura, T.Sharp 660 km discontinuity controlled by extremely narrow binary post-spinel transition.Nature Geosciences, Vol. 12, pp. 869-872.Mantlediscontinuity

Abstract: The Earth’s mantle is characterized by a sharp seismic discontinuity at a depth of 660?km that can provide insights into deep mantle processes. The discontinuity occurs over only 2?km—or a pressure difference of 0.1?GPa—and is thought to result from the post-spinel transition, that is, the decomposition of the mineral ringwoodite to bridgmanite plus ferropericlase. Existing high-pressure, high-temperature experiments have lacked the pressure control required to test whether such sharpness is the result of isochemical phase relations or chemically distinct upper and lower mantle domains. Here, we obtain the isothermal pressure interval of the Mg-Fe binary post-spinel transition by applying advanced multi-anvil techniques with in situ X-ray diffraction with the help of Mg-Fe partition experiments. It is demonstrated that the interval at mantle compositions and temperatures is only 0.01?GPa, corresponding to 250?m. This interval is indistinguishable from zero at seismic frequencies. These results can explain the discontinuity sharpness and provide new support for whole-mantle convection in a chemically homogeneous mantle. The present work suggests that distribution of adiabatic vertical flows between the upper and lower mantles can be mapped on the basis of discontinuity sharpness.
DS202004-0538
2020
Farley, E.M.R.Taylor, R.N., Favila-Harris, P., Branney, M.J., Farley, E.M.R., Gernon, T.M., Palmer, M.R.Dynamics of chemically pulsing mantle plume.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 537, 116182 14p. PdfMantlehotspot

Abstract: Upwelling plumes from the deep mantle have an impact on the Earth's surface for tens to hundreds of millions of years. During the lifetime of a mantle plume, periodic fluctuations in its composition and temperature have the potential to generate changes in the nature and volume of surface volcanism. We constrain the spatial and temporal scale of compositional changes in a plume using high-resolution Pb isotopes, which identify chemical pulses emerging from the Canary Islands hotspot over the last ~15 million years (Myr). Surface volcanism spanning ~ 400 km along the island chain changes composition systematically and synchronously, representing a replenishment of the plume head by a distinct mantle flavour on timescales of 3-5 Myr. These low-frequency compositional changes are also recorded by individual volcanoes, and comprise a sequence of closely-spaced isotopic trajectories. Each trajectory is maintained for ~1 Myr and is preceded and followed by ~0.3 Myr transitions to magmas with distinct isotope ratios. Relatively sharp transitions between periods of sustained isotopic stability require discrete yet coherent heterogeneities rising at speeds of ~100-200 km Myr-1 and extending for ~150 km vertically in the conduit. The long-term synchronous changes require larger scale isotopic domains extending ~600 km vertically through in the plume stem. These observations demonstrate that plumes can chemically “pulse” over short and long-timescales reflecting the characteristics and recycling history of the deep mantle.
DS200612-1601
2006
Farley, K.Zhao, Z., Gautheron, C., Farley, K., Zhang, H., Yu, X., Mo, X.Subcontinental lithospheric mantle origin of the Cenozoic kamafugite in western Qinling, China: evidence from helium isotopes in mantle derived xenoliths.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 16 abstract only.ChinaKamafugite, geochronology
DS1993-0430
1993
Farley, K.A.Farley, K.A.Is primordial helium really extraterrestrial?Science, Vol. 261, July 9, pp. 166-167MantleGeochronology, helium
DS1995-0520
1995
Farley, K.A.Farley, K.A.Rapid cycling of subducted sediments into the Samoan mantle plumeGeology, Vol. 23, No. 6, June pp. 531-534.GlobalHarzburgite xenoliths, Carbonatite, Metasomatism
DS2002-0422
2002
Farley, K.A.Ehlers, C., Farley, K.A.Apatite ( U-Th) He thermochronometry: methods and applications to problems in tectonic and surface processes.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 206, 1-2, pp. 1-14.GlobalTectonics, Geothermometry
DS1999-0207
1999
Farling, M.S.Farling, M.S.Structural geology of the Banshee triangle zone; a structural interpretation of seismic, Alberta.American Association Pet. Geol., Annual Meeting, p. A39-40. abstract.AlbertaGeophysics - seismics
DS2000-0931
2000
FarmerStevens, L.M., Williams, M.L., Bowring, S.A., FarmerPetrology of lower crustal xenoliths across the Cheyenne Belt Implications for evolution and seismics..Geological Society of America (GSA) Abstracts, Vol. 32, No. 7, p.A-386.Wyoming, New MexicoXenoliths, Geophysics - seismic imaging of the lower crust
DS1996-0069
1996
Farmer, G.Ball, T.H., Farmer, G.Isotopic study of the Richeau Hills: implications for accretionary tectonics at southern margin of Archean..Geological Society of America, Abstracts, Vol. 28, No. 7, p. A-315.WyomingTectonics, Geochronology
DS1989-1346
1989
Farmer, G.L.Scambos, T.A., Farmer, G.L.lead isotopic compositions of alkalic igneous rocks from central MontanaEos, Vol. 70, No. 15, April 11, p. 503. (abstract.)MontanaMissouri Breaks Diatreme, Rocky Boys, Winnett sill, Diatremes
DS1991-0063
1991
Farmer, G.L.Ball, T.T., Farmer, G.L.Identification of 2.0 to 2.4 Ga neodymium model age crustal material of the Cheyenne belt, southeast Wyoming: implications Prot. accretionary tectonics s margin Of the Wyoming craGeology, Vol. 19, No. 4, April pp. 360-363WyomingGeochronology, Tectonics
DS1991-0064
1991
Farmer, G.L.Ball, T.T., Farmer, G.L.Identification of 2.0 to 2.4 Ga neodymium model age crustal material in the Cheyenne belt, southeastern Wyoming: implications for Proterozoic accretionary tectonics athe soGeology, Vol. 19, No. 4, April pp. 360-363WyomingTectonics, Geochronology
DS1991-0466
1991
Farmer, G.L.Farmer, G.L., Ball, T.T.Origin of Tdm (neodymium)=2.0-2.2 Ga crust in southern Wyoming: mechanical mixing of Proterozoic and Archean crustal materialEos, Spring Meeting Program And Abstracts, Vol. 72, No. 17, April 23, p. 296WyomingGeochronology, Crust
DS1995-1985
1995
Farmer, G.L.Verplanck, P.L., Farmer, G.L., Snee, L.W.Isotopic evidence on the origin of compositional layering in an epizonal magma bodyEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 136, No. 1-2, Nov. 1, pp. 31-42GlobalLayered intrusions, Geochronology
DS2000-0282
2000
Farmer, G.L.Farmer, G.L., Letser, A.C., Bowring, S., Matzel, J.Composition of the lower continental crust beneath the Cheyenne Belt S. WyoGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstracts, Vol. 32, No. 7, p.A-386.Wyoming, ColoradoGeochronology - isotopic evidence, Xenoliths - mafic
DS2000-0612
2000
Farmer, G.L.Manley, C.R., Glazner, A.F., Farmer, G.L.Timing of volcanism in the Sierra Nevada of California: evidence for Pliocene delamination of batholithic rootGeology, Vol. 28, No. 9, Sept. pp. 811-14.CaliforniaTectonics, Magmatism - alkaline
DS2002-0339
2002
Farmer, G.L.Crowley, J.L., Mazel, J.P., Bowring, S.A., Williams, M.L., Farmer, G.L.Paleoproterozoic to mesoproterozoic evolution of southwestern North America: the view from the lower crust.Geological Society of America Annual Meeting Oct. 27-30, Abstract p. 253.Wyoming, New MexicoDeformation, xenoliths
DS2002-0446
2002
Farmer, G.L.Farmer, G.L.Contrasting lower crustal evolution across an Archean Proterozoic suture: physical, chemical and geochronologic studies of lower crustal xenoliths in southern WyomingGeological Society of America Annual Meeting Oct. 27-30, Abstract p. 252.Wyoming, ColoradoGeochronology
DS2003-0610
2003
Farmer, G.L.Humphreys, E., Hessler, E., Ducker, K., Farmer, G.L., Erlsev, E., Atwater, T.How Laramide age hydration of North America lithosphere by the Farallon slabInternational Geology Review, Vol. 45, 7, July pp. 575-595.Colorado, WyomingTectonics
DS2003-0611
2003
Farmer, G.L.Humphreys, E., Hessler, E., Dueker, K., Farmer, G.L., Erslev, E., Atwater, T.How Laramide age hydration of North American lithosphere by the Farallon SlabInternational Geology Review, Vol. 45, 7, July pp. 575-95.Wyoming, ColoradoSubduction
DS200412-0858
2003
Farmer, G.L.Humphreys, E., Hessler, E., Dueker, K., Farmer, G.L., Erslev, E., Atwater, T.How Laramide age hydration of North American lithosphere by the Farallon Slab controlled subsequent activity in the Western UnitInternational Geology Review, Vol. 45, 7, July pp. 575-95.United States, WyomingSubduction
DS200512-0278
2005
Farmer, G.L.Farmer, G.L., Bowring, S.A., Willams, M.L., Christensen, N.I., Matzel, J.P., Stevens, L.Contrasting lower crustal evolution across an Archean Proterozoic suture: physical, chemical and geochronologic studies of lower crustal xenoliths in southern Wyoming and northern Colorado.American Geophysical Union, Geophysical Monograph, No. 154, pp. 139-162.United States,Wyoming, Colorado PlateauGeophysics - seismics, tectonics
DS200612-1500
2006
Farmer, G.L.Walker, J.D., Bowers, T.D., Black, R.A., Glazner, A.F., Farmer, G.L., Carlson, R.W.A geochemical database for western North American volcanic and intrusive rocks. NAVDATIn: Sinha, A.K. Geoinformatics: data to knowledge, GSA Special Paper, 397, 397, pp.61-72United StatesGeochemistry - data
DS200712-0304
2005
Farmer, G.L.Farmer, G.L., Bowring, S.A., Williams, M.I., Christiensen, N.I., Matzel, J., Stevens, I.Contrasting lower crustal evolution across an Archean Proterozoic suture, physical, chemical and geochronologic studies of lower crustal xenoliths....Keller & Karlstrom: The Rocky Mountain Region, American Geophysical Union, No. 154, pp. 139-162.United States, Wyoming, Colorado PlateauGeochronology
DS201312-0083
2013
Farmer, G.L.Blessington, M., Kettler, R., Verplanck, P., Farmer, G.L.Niobium mineralization in a magnetite rich carbonatite, Elk Creek Nebraska, USA.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractUnited States, NebraskaCarbonatite
DS201412-0947
2014
Farmer, G.L.Verplank, P.L., Kettler, R.M., Blessington, M.J., Lowers, H.A., Koenig, A.E., Farmer, G.L.Rare earth element and niobium enrichments in the Elk Creek carbonatite, USA.30th. International Conference on Ore Potential of alkaline, kimberlite and carbonatite magmatism. Sept. 29-, http://alkaline2014.comUnited States, NebraskaCarbonatite
DS201512-1982
2015
Farmer, G.L.Verplanck, P.L., Farmer, G.L., Mariano, A.N.Nd and Sr isotopic composition of rare earth element mineralized carbonatites.Symposium on critical and strategic materials, British Columbia Geological Survey Paper 2015-3, held Nov. 13-14, pp. 65-74.GlobalCarbonatite

Abstract: For nearly 50 years, carbonatites have been the primary sources of niobium and rare earth elements (REEs), particularly the light REEs including La, Ce, Pr, and Nd. In addition, carbonatites may be enriched in other critical elements and have the potential to be future sources. Currently, only fi ve of the more than 500 known carbonatites in the world are being mined for REEs: Bayan Obo (Inner Mongolia, China); Maoniuping (Sichuan, China); Dalucao (or Daluxiang, Sichuan, China); and Mountain Pass (California, USA), and the carbonatite-derived laterite at Mount Weld (Australia). To achieve ore-grade REE enrichment, initial carbonatitic magmas require an adequate endowment of REEs and need to evolve in ways for these elements to concentrate in REE-bearing mineral phases. Radiogenic isotope studies of carbonatites clearly point to a mantle origin, but a wide range in isotopic compositions has led to contrasting views about the specifi c mantle reservoir(s) that sourced carbonatites. In this study we use the neodymium and strontium isotopic compositions of a suite of mineralized carbonatites to establish the nature of the source magmas. We examine samples that span a wide range in age (~23 Ma to 1385 Ma), Nd concentrations (3720 to 32,900 ppm), and Sr concentrations (2290 to 167,900 ppm). Our Nd and Sr isotopic data include multiple samples from Mountain Pass (USA; eNd i = -3.1 to -5.4, Sri = 0.70512 to 0.70594), Elk Creek (USA; ~eNd i = 1.7, Sri = 0.7035), and Maoniuping (China; eNd i = -4.1 and -4.2, Sri = 0.70627 and 0.70645), and one sample each from Bear Lodge (USA; eNd i = 0.1, Sri = 0.70441), Kangankunde (Malawi; eNd i = 3.3, Sri = 0.70310), Adiounedj (Mali; eNd i = -0.1, Sri = 0.70558), and Mushgai Khudag (Mongolia; eNd i = -1.3, Sri = 0.70636). Isotopic data from two producing carbonatite REE deposits (Mountain Pass and Maoniuping) have broadly similar isotopic compositions (eNd i = -3.1 to -5.4 and Sri = 0.7051 to 0.7065), and these compositions point to a carbonated source in the lithospheric mantle. Mineralized but unmined carbonatites have higher Nd initial isotopic compositions (eNd i = -1.3 to 3.3) and a wider range in Sr isotopic compositions (Sri = 0.70310 to 0.70637), but these data are consistent with a lithospheric mantle reservoir.
DS1982-0559
1982
Farmer, H.Serpa, L., Brown, L., Setzer, T., Farmer, H., Oliver, J., Kaufman.Rift Structure from Cocorp Surveys in the MidcontinentEarthquake Notes, Vol. 54, No. 1, PP. 45-46.GlobalMid-continent
DS1984-0650
1984
Farmer, H.Serpa, L., Setzer, T., Farmer, H., Brown, L., Oliver, J., Kaufman.Structure of the Southern Keweenawan Rift from Cocorp SurveyTectonics, Vol. 3, No. 3, JUNE PP. 367-384.United States, KansasMid-continent
DS1984-0651
1984
Farmer, H.Serpa, L., Setzer, T., Farmer, H., Peddy, C., Brown, L., Oliver, J.Cocorp Profiling Across the Midcontinent Gravity HighGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 16, No. 2, FEBRUARY P. 113. (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent
DS201911-2522
2018
Farmer, P.Frankfurter, R., Kardas-Nelson, M., Benton, A., Barrie, M.B., Dibba, Y., Farmer, P., Richardson, E.T.Indirect rule redux: the political economy of diamond mining and its relation to the Ebola outbreak in Kono district, Sierra Leone.Review of African Political Economy, Vol. 45, no. 158, pp. 522-540.Africa, Sierra Leonehistory

Abstract: This article explores the relationship between the 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak and the political economy of diamond mining in Kono District, Sierra Leone. The authors argue that foreign companies have recycled colonial strategies of indirect rule to facilitate the illicit flow of resources out of Sierra Leone. Drawing on field research conducted during the outbreak and in its aftermath, they show how this ‘indirect rule redux’ undermines democratic governance and the development of revenue-generation institutions. Finally, they consider the linkages between indirect rule and the Ebola outbreak, vis-à-vis the consequences of the region’s intentionally underdeveloped health care infrastructure and the scaffolding of outbreak containment onto the paramount chieftaincy system.
DS1986-0235
1986
Farn, A.E.Farn, A.E.The very sphinx of diamondsJournal of Gemology, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 166-167GlobalNotable diamond, Sancy
DS1997-0336
1997
Farnetani, C.G.Farnetani, C.G.Excess temperature of mantle plumes: the role of chemical stratification across 'D'Geophys. Research Letters, Vol. 24, No. 13, July 1, pp. 1583-86MantlePlumes, Geochemistry
DS2002-0447
2002
Farnetani, C.G.Farnetani, C.G., Legras, B., Tackley, P.J.Mixing and deformations in mantle plumesEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.196, 1-2, Feb.28, pp. 1-15.MantlePLumes - review
DS2003-0392
2003
Farnetani, C.G.Farnetani, C.G., Samuel, H.Lagrangian structures and stirring in the Earth's mantleEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 206, No. 3-4, pp. 335-48.MantleTectonics
DS2003-1209
2003
Farnetani, C.G.Samuel, H., Farnetani, C.G.Thermochemical convection and helium concentrations in mantle plumesEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 207, 1-4, pp. 39-56.MantleMineral chemistry
DS2003-1210
2003
Farnetani, C.G.Samuel, H., Farnetani, C.G.Thermochemical convection and helium concentrations in mantle plumesEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 207, 1-4, Feb. 28, pp. 39-56.MantleThermometry, Convection
DS200512-0279
2005
Farnetani, C.G.Farnetani, C.G., Samuel, H.Beyond the thermal plume paradigm.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 32, no. 7, L07311 doi:10.1029/2005 GL022360MantleGeothermometry
DS200612-1213
2005
Farnetani, C.G.Samuel, H., Farnetani, C.G., Andrault, D.Heterogeneous lowermost mantle: compositional constraints and seismological observables.American Geophysical Union, Geophysical Monograph, Ed. Van der Hilst, Earth's Deep Mantle, structure ...., No. 160, pp. 101-116.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200712-0305
2007
Farnetani, C.G.Farnetani, C.G., Hofmann, A.W.Dynamics and internal structure of a mantle plume conduit.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A268.MantleHotspots
DS200812-0339
2008
Farnetani, C.G.Farnetani, C.G., Hofmann, A.W.Length scales of isotope heterogeneities: from D' to a mantle plume conduit.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A257.MantlePlume
DS200912-0212
2009
Farnetani, C.G.Farnetani, C.G., Hofmann, A.W.Dynamics and internal structure of a lower mantle plume conduit.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 282, 1-4, pp. 314-322.MantleGeodynamics
DS1960-0846
1967
Farnham, P.R.Johnson, S.H., Farnham, P.R.Refraction Seismic Surveys on the Mid-continent Gravity Anomaly in Minnesota and Wisconsin.Institute LAKE SUPERIOR GEOLOGY, 13TH. MEETING HELD EAST LANSING, P. 24, (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent, Geophysics
DS1970-0151
1970
Farnham, P.R.Mooney, H.M., Craddock, C.E., Farnham, P.R., Johnson, S.H., Vol.Refraction Seismic Investigations of the Northern Mid-continent Gravity High.Journal of GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, Vol. 75, No. 26, PP. 5056-5086.GlobalMid Continent
DS1970-0152
1970
Farnham, P.R.Mooney, H.M., Farnham, P.R., et al.Seismic Studies Over the Midcontinent Gravity High in Minnesota and Northwestern Wisconsin.Minnesota Geological Survey Report Invest., No. 11, 191P.GlobalMid-continent, Geophysics
DS201908-1806
2019
Farooq, S.H.Ramiz, M.M., Mondal, M,E.A., Farooq, S.H.Geochemistry of ultramafic-mafic rocks of the Madawara ultramafic complex in the southern part of the Bundelkhand craton, Central Indian Shield: implications for mantle sources and geodynamic setting.Geological Journal, Vol. 54, 4, pp. 2185-2207.Indiacraton

Abstract: Detailed field, petrography and whole-rock geochemical study was carried out in order to constrain the mantle sources and geodynamic setting of the Madawara Ultramafic Complex (MUC) of the Bundelkhand Craton. Studies reveal that there are two types of ultramafic rocks: (a) high-Mg ultrabasic/basic rocks and (b) undeformed ultramafic-mafic plutonic rocks. The high-Mg ultrabasic/basic rocks have undergone severe low-grade (greenschist) metamorphism and are characterized by stringer and veinlet structures of talc-tremolite-actinolite schists with alternate layers of serpentinites showing comparatively higher SiO2 (46.1-49.4 wt%), lower MgO (24.6-26.2 wt%), and higher Al2O3 (4.58-7.06 wt%) and CaO (2.72-6.77 wt%) compared to the undeformed ultramafic rocks. The undeformed ultramafic rocks (mainly harzburgite, lherzolite, and olivine websterite) are characterized by globular structures and have lower SiO2 (40-44.1 wt%), higher MgO (30.4-38 wt%) and lower Al2O3 (1.84-4.03 wt%) and CaO (0.16-3.14 wt%). The undeformed mafic rocks (mainly gabbro) occur as small pockets within the undeformed ultramafic rocks as well as independent outcrops. Limited variation in Nb/Th against Nb/Yb along with negative Nb-Ti anomalies of all the rock types in the multi-element diagram reveals the significant role of the metasomatized mantle in their genesis. All the rocks show enrichment in light rare earth element and large-ion lithophile elements compared to heavy rare earth elements and high-field strength elements. The geochemical characteristics coupled with Ce/Yb versus Ce variation of the rocks of MUC point towards two different sources for their genesis. The high-Mg ultrabasic/basic rocks are derived from partial melting of metasomatized mantle at shallow depth, while the undeformed ultramafic rocks were formed as a result of asthenospheric upwelling from a greater depth that induced the melting in the overlying lithosphere. Gabbro rocks represent the last and most evolved phase of the complex. Geochemical signatures suggest that the rocks of MUC were formed in a continental arc setting.
DS200912-0099
2009
Farquar, J.Cartigny, P., Farquar, J., Thomassot, E., Harris, J.W., Wing, B., Masterson, A., McKeegan, K., Stachel, T.A mantle origin for Paleoarchean peridotite diamonds from the PAnd a kimberlite, Slave Province: evidence from 13C, 15N and 34,34S stable isotope systematics.Lithos, In press - available 38p.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Panda
DS1989-1413
1989
Farquar, R.M.Smith, P.E., Farquar, R.M.Direct dating of Phanerozoic sediments by the 238U- 206 lead methodNature, Vol. 341, No. 6242, October 12, pp. 518-520GlobalGeochronology, Phanerozoic
DS1991-0467
1991
Farquhar, J.Farquhar, J., Chacko, T.Isotopic evidence for involvement of CO2 bearing magmas in granuliteformationNature, Vol. 354, No, 6348, Nov. 7, pp. 60-63GlobalGranulite, metamorphism, Geochronology
DS2002-0448
2002
Farquhar, J.Farquhar, J., Wing, B.A., McKeegan, K.D., Harris, J.W.Observation of mass independent sulphur isotope composition for sulphide inclusions from e type diamonds, Orapa kimberlite pipe.Eos, American Geophysical Union, Spring Abstract Volume, Vol.83,19, 1p.BotswanaGeochronology, diamond inclusions
DS2002-0449
2002
Farquhar, J.Farquhar, J., Wing, B.A., McKeegan, K.D., Harris, J.W.Mass independent sulfur of inclusions in diamond and sulfur recycling on early EarthScience, Vol. 299, 5602, Dec. 20, pp.MantleDiamond inclusions, Sulphur
DS201312-0117
2013
Farquhar, J.Cabral, R.A., Jackson, M.A., Rose-Kaga, E.F., Koga, K.T., Whitehouse, MJ., Antonelli, M.A., Farquhar, J., Day, J.M.D., Hauri, E.H.Anomalous sulphur isotopes in plume lavas reveal deep mantle storage of Archean crust.Nature, Vol. 496, April 25, pp. 490-493.Mantle, Cook IslandsSubduction
DS201412-0220
2014
Farquhar, J.Eiler, J.M., Berquist, B., Bourg, I., Cartigny, P., Farquhar, J., Gagnon, A., Guo, W., Halevy, I., Hofman, A., larson, T.E., Levin, N., Schauble, E.A., Stolper, D.Frontiers of stable isotope geoscience.Chemical Geology, Vol. 372, pp. 119-143.TechnologyReview of isotopes
DS201709-2025
2017
Farquhar, J.Magalhaes, N., Magna, T., Rapprich, V., Kratky, O., Farquhar, J.Sulfur isotope systematics in carbonatites from Sevattur and Samalpatti, S India.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Indiacarbonatites, Sevattur, Samalpatti

Abstract: We report preliminary data for sulfur isotopes from two spatially related Neoproterozoic carbonatite complexes in Tamil Nadu, S India, with the aim of getting further insights into their magmatic and/or post-emplacement histories [1]. The major sulfide phase in these rocks is pyrite, with minor chalcopyrite, whereas sulfate occurs as barite. A bimodal distribution of G34Ssulfide is found for Samalpatti (13.5 to 14.0‰), and Sevattur (-2.1 to 1.4‰) carbonatites. A significantly larger range of G34Ssulfide values is found for the associated Samalpatti silicate rocks (-5.2 to 7.4‰) relative to Sevattur pyroxenites and gabbros (-1.1 to 2.1‰). High G34Ssulfide values for Samalpatti carbonatites are unsual [2,3] but could reflect hydrothermal post-emplacement modification [1] of S isotopes. The low G34Ssulfide values for Sevattur may represent a mantle source signature. The G34Ssulfate is uniformly positive for both complexes, with most data falling in a narrow range (5.7 to 7.8‰) and one datum for a pyroxenite yielding more positive G34Ssulfate = 13.3‰. Data for '33S varies outside of analytical uncertainty (-0.07 to 0.04‰), indicating contribution from a source with a surface-derrived component. The small range of '33S values does not allow us to determine whether these sources contain S fractionated by biogeochemical (mass-dependent) or photochemical (mass-independent, pre GOE) processes. Data for '36S is positive, and varies within uncertainty (0.28 ± 0.15‰). Variations of this magnitude have been observed in other localities, and are not diagnostic of any unique source or process. The sulfur isotope data imply addition of crustal sulfur to Samalpatti. In contrast, sulfur from Sevattur has a mantle-like G34S but '33S with anomalous character. These observations support the idea of a different evolutionary story for these complexes, possibly more complex than previously thought.
DS202008-1390
2020
Farquhar, J.Fitzpaynek, A., Giuliani, A., Magalhaes, N., Soltys, A., Fiorentini, M., Farquhar, J.The petrology and sulphur istopic composition of sulphide and sulphate in the Kimberley kimberlites.Goldschmidt 2020, 1p. AbstractAfrica, South Africadeposit - Kimberley

Abstract: The petrology and bulk-rock sulphur isotopic compositions of kimberlite samples from four localities (Bultfontein, De Beers, Kimberley, Wesselton) of the archetypal Kimberley cluster, South Africa, were used to investigate the origin(s) of S in kimberlites and gain insights into the occurrence of recycled crustal material in the source of Mesozoic kimberlites. The samples, which show variable degrees of alteration, are all hypabyssal and were derived from coherent root-zones as well as dykes and sills. Typical sulphide minerals are Cu-Fe-Ni-sulphides with less common pyrite, galena, sphalerite, and djerfisherite. They occur in a variety of textural associations, for example as groundmass phases, secondary inclusions in olivine, inclusions in matrix phases (e.g., phlogopite), or in carbonate-serpentine segregations. Barite is the most commonly observed sulphate phase. Bulk-sample d34SVCDT values of sulphides in fresh kimberlites, which mostly do not contain barite, vary from - 2.0 to -5.7 ‰. Slightly altered kimberlite samples, in which sulphides were generally associated with serpentine, returned somewhat higher bulk-sulphide d34SVCDT (-3.8 to +1.1 ‰). One sample from the Wesselton Water Tunnel Sills complex contains abundant barite and pyrite in its groundmass, with the latter having d34SVCDT (+0.2 to +1.9 ‰) similar to altered kimberlites. Two further altered samples returned d34SVCDT values (-10.1 to -13.0 ‰) that suggest a contribution from the local country rocks (Dwyka shale: d34SVCDT from -10.2 to -10.5 ‰). All samples have near-zero ?33S values, suggesting that material displaying mass-independent fractionation has not played an important role. The negative d34SVCDT values of fresh kimberlites from Kimberley suggest the involvement of recycled crustal material in their source, which is consistent with radiogenic isotope compositions. Overall, it appears that most kimberlitic sulphide S isotopic compositions can be explained by the action of a few typical magmatic/hydrothermal processes.
DS1992-1433
1992
Farquhar, R.M.Smith, P.E., Farquhar, R.M., Halls, H.C.U-Th-Ph isotope study of mafic dykes in the Superior province Ontario:uniformity of initial lead isotope ratios of the Hearst dykesChemical Geology, Vol. 94, No. 4, May 15, pp. 261-280OntarioGeochronology, Hearst dikes
DS1920-0030
1920
Farquharson, R.A.Farquharson, R.A.Petrological Work 1920Western Australia Geological Survey Report For 1919, P. 42.Australia, Western AustraliaLeucite, Lamproite, Fitzroy Valley
DS1920-0101
1922
Farquharson, R.A.Farquharson, R.A.Petrological Work 1922Western Australia Geological Survey Report For 1921, P. 56.Australia, Western AustraliaLeucite, Lamproite, Fitzroy Valley
DS201412-0293
2014
Farqukar, J.Giuliani, A., Phillips, D., Kamenetsky, V.S., Fiorentini, M.L., Farqukar, J., Kendrick, M.A.Stable isotope ( C,O,S) compositions of volatile rich minerals in kimberlites: a review.Chemical Geology, Vol. 374-375, pp. 61-83.Africa, South Africa, Canada, Northwest Territories, RussiaDeposit - Kimberley, Lac de Gras, Udachnaya
DS201708-1632
2017
Farr, H.Farr, H.Melt evolution of the Finsch orangeite, South Africa.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, OralAfrica, South Africadeposit - Finsch
DS201708-1633
2017
Farr, H.Farr, H.Petrography and geochronology of the Nxau kimberlites, north-west Botswana.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, PosterAfrica, Botswanadeposit - Nxau
DS201807-1489
2018
Farr, H.Farr, H., Phillips, D., Maas, R., de Wit, M.Petrography, Sr isotope geochemistry and geochronology of the Nxau-Nxau kimberlites, north west Botswana.Mineralogy and Petrology, June 14, DOI:10.1007/ s00710-018- 0593-8, 14p.Africa, Botswanadeposit - Nxau

Abstract: The Nxau Nxau kimberlites in northwest Botswana belong to the Xaudum kimberlite province that also includes the Sikereti, Kaudom and Gura kimberlite clusters in north-east Namibia. The Nxau Nxau kimberlites lie on the southernmost extension of the Congo Craton, which incorporates part of the Damara Orogenic Belt on its margin. The Xaudum kimberlite province is geographically isolated from other known clusters but occurs within the limits of the NW-SE oriented, Karoo-aged Okavango Dyke Swarm and near NE-SW faults interpreted as the early stages of the East African Rift System. Petrographic, geochronological and isotopic studies were undertaken to characterise the nature of these kimberlites and the timing of their emplacement. The Nxau Nxau kimberlites exhibit groundmass textures, mineral phases and Sr-isotope compositions (87Sr/86Sri of 0.7036?±?0.0002; 2s) that are characteristic of archetypal (Group I) kimberlites. U-Pb perovskite, 40Ar/39Ar phlogopite and Rb-Sr phlogopite ages indicate that the kimberlites were emplaced in the Cretaceous, with perovskite from four samples yielding a preferred weighted average U-Pb age of 84?±?4 Ma (2s). This age is typical of many kimberlites in southern Africa, indicating that the Xaudum occurrences form part of this widespread Late Cretaceous kimberlite magmatic province. This time marks a significant period of tectonic stress reorganisation that could have provided the trigger for kimberlite magmatism. In this regard, the Nxau Nxau kimberlites may form part of a NE-SW oriented trend such as the Lucapa corridor, with implications for further undiscovered kimberlites along this corridor.
DS1992-0448
1992
Farr, T.G.Evans, D.L., Farr, T.G., Zebker, H.A., et al.Radar interferometry studies of the earth's topographyEos, Vol. 73, No. 52, December 29, pp. 553, 557, 558GlobalRadar imaging, Interferometry
DS1992-1608
1992
Farra, V.Vinnik, L.P., Farra, V.Multiple Ses technique for measuring anistropy in the mantleGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 19, No. 5, March 3, pp. 489-492MantleAnistropy, Geophysics -seismics
DS2002-1671
2002
Farra, V.Vinnik, L., Farra, V.Subcratonic low velocity layer and flood basaltsGeophysical Research Letters, Vol.29,4,pp. 9-1,-4.MantleBasalts, Geophysics - seismics
DS200412-0231
2004
Farra, V.Bruneton, M., Pedersen, H.A., Vacher, P., Kukkonenen, I.T., Arndt, N.T., Funke, S., Friederich, W., Farra, V.Layered lithospheric mantle in the central Baltic Shield from surface waves and xenolith analysis.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 226, 1-2, pp. 41-52.Baltic Shield, Norway, Finland, RussiaGeophysics - seismics, xenoliths
DS200712-1121
2006
Farra, V.Vinnick, L., Farra, V.S velocity reversal in the mantle transition zone.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 33, 18, Sept. 28, L18316MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200712-1122
2007
Farra, V.Vinnik, L., Farra, V.Low S velocity atop the 410 km discontinuity and mantle plumes.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 262, 3-4, Oct. 30, pp. 398-412.MantleGeophysics - seismics, hot spots
DS200712-1172
2007
Farra, V.Wittlinger, G., Farra, V.Converted waves reveal a thick and layered tectosphere beneath the Kalahari super craton.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 254, 3-4, pp. 404-415.Africa, Botswana, South AfricaGeophysics - seismics
DS1985-0181
1985
Farrand, M.G.Farrand, M.G., Newton, A.W.Pseudo Igneous Phenomena in the Springfield BasinQuarterly notes, Geological Survey of South Australia, Vol. 95, pp. 2-7Australia, South AustraliaBlank
DS1993-1095
1993
Farrand, M.G.Muller, D., Morris, B.J., Farrand, M.G.Potassic alkaline lamprophyres with affinities to lamproites from the Karinya Syncline, South Australia.Lithos, Vol. 30, No. 2, June, pp. 123-137.AustraliaDikes, Lamproites, Tectonics, mineral chemistry, geochemistry, Geochemistry -olivine lamproite affinity
DS1994-1794
1994
Farrand, M.G.Townsend, I.J., Morris, B.J., Farrand, M.G.Review of diamond resources in South Australia... preliminary reportMesa (south Australia), 17p.AustraliaReview of diamond finds, South Australia
DS1997-0337
1997
Farrand, W.H.Farrand, W.H.hyper spectral imaging of KazakstanEom., Nov. pp. 22-24GlobalRemote sensing - brief overview
DS201711-2510
2017
Farrapo Albuquerque, D.Farrapo Albuquerque, D., SandFranca Lucas, G., MarceloAssumpcao, P.M., Lucas, M.B., CondoriQuispe, C., Oliveira, M.E.Crustal structure of the Amazonian craton and adjacent provinces in Brazil.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 79, pp. 431-442.South America, Brazilcraton

Abstract: The study of the crust using receiver functions can provide valuable geological information, such as average crustal composition, its formation dynamics and the tectonic evolution of a region, as well as serve as an initial reference for the generation of seismic wave velocity models to improve earthquake location. To fill in gaps in information on the crust of the Amazonian Craton and adjacent provinces in Brazil, we used receiver functions and H-k stacking to estimate crustal thicknesses and the VP/VS ratios. The results indicate that the crust of the study region is predominantly felsic, with an average VP/VS around 1.73 and an average thickness of 38.2 km, with a range of 27.4-48.6 km. Minimum curvature interpolation of the crustal thickness values has made it possible to delimitate of the Amazonian Craton, which corresponds to the area with an average thickness equal to or greater than 39 km. In addition, it was possible to identify its potential cratonic blocks, as well as the Paranapanema Block of Paraná Basin. The geometry of the craton, defined by its crustal thickness, is corroborated by the distribution of natural seismicity that accompanies its edges. These are related to suture zones between the Amazonian, São Francisco/Congo and Paranapanema paleocontinents. The sedimentary basins that have undergone rifting processes have a thinner crust, usually less than 37 km thick. Due to the great variability of the results, it was not possible to determine a characteristic value of c
DS201902-0306
2018
Farrapo Albuquetque, D.Peres Rocha, M., Assumpcao, M., Fuck, R., Araujo de Azevedo, P., Penna, Crepaldi Affonso, G.M., Sousa Lima Costa, I., Farrapo Albuquetque, D.Llithosphere expression of the boundary between the Amazonian and extra-Amazonian domains of the South American platform from travel time seismic tomography.Researchgate, AGU 1p. Preprint pdfSouth Americacraton

Abstract: The South American platform is the stable part of the South American plate, unaffected by the orogenesis of the Andes and the Caribbean. Its basement is composed of Archean and Proterozoic cratonic blocks amalgamated by mobile belts, and can be separated in two large domains or continental masses: 1) The Amazonian, Northwest-west portion, including the Amazonian craton, related to the Laurentia supercontinent; and 2) the extra-Amazonian, Central-southeast or Brasiliano domain, related to West Gondwana, formed of several paleocontinental fragments, where the São Francisco and Rio de La Plata cratons and the Paranapanema block are the largest. It has been suggested that these two domains are separated by the Transbrasiliano Lineament to the south and the Araguaia Fold Belt to the north. Teleseismic P waves from 4,989 earthquakes recorded by 339 stations operated mainly in Brazil in the last 25 years have been used for relative-time tomography. The Amazonian domain is predominantly characterized by higher velocities. The SW (extra-Amazonian) domain is characterized by several blocks with high velocities, such as in and around the Sao Francisco Craton, and the Paranapanema block. Results of P-wave travel time tomography allowed to observe a strong low-velocity anomaly near 100-200 km depth following the Araguaia-Paraguay fold belt. This strong low-velocity anomaly could be considered the limit between these two domains, reaching lithospheric depths, and does not necessarily follow the Transbrasiliano lineament, especially in its southern portion.
DS1998-0256
1998
FarrarClark, A.H., Archibald, D.A., Lee, A., Farrar, HodgsonLaser probe 40 Ar-39 Ar ages of early and late stage alteration assemblages Rosario porphyry copper moly..Economic Geology, Vol. 93, No. 3, May pp. 326-37ChileGeochronology, copper, molybdenuM., Deposit - Rosario, Argon
DS1989-0032
1989
Farrar, E.Archibald, D.A., Hanes, J.A., Queen, M., Ross, D., Farrar, E.Summary of 40Ar/30Ar geochronology in the Kapuskasing upliftGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting Program Abstracts, Vol. 14, p. A103. (abstract.)OntarioTectonics, Kapuskasing Lithoprobe
DS1993-0431
1993
Farrar, E.Farrar, E., Dixon, J.M.Ridge subduction: kinematics and implications for the nature of mantleupwellingCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 30, No. 5, May pp. 893-907MantleTectonics -subduction, Kinematic scenarios
DS1993-0589
1993
Farrar, E.Gubbels, T.L., Isaacks, B.L., Farrar, E.High level surfaces, plateau uplift, and foreland development, Bolivian central AndesGeology, Vol. 21, No. 8, August pp. 695-698BoliviaTectonics, San Juan Del Oro surface
DS1994-0709
1994
Farrar, E.Hanes, J.A., Archibald, D.A., Queen, M., Farrar, E.Constraints from 40Ar/39Ar geochronology on the tectonothermal history Of the Kapuskasing uplift.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 31, No. 7, July pp. 1146-1171.OntarioGeochronology, Tectonics -Kapuskasing uplift
DS1995-2035
1995
Farrar, E.Wasteneys, H.A., Clark, A.H., Farrar, E., Langridge, R.J.Grevillian granulite facies metamorphism in the Arequipa Massif Peru: a Laurentia Gondwana linkEarth and Plan. Sci. Letters, Vol. 132, pp. 63-73PeruCentral Andean orogenic basement, Arica Bight, Bolivian anticline
DS1992-0449
1992
Farrar, Y.J.Fardy, J.J., Farrar, Y.J.Trace element analysis of Argyle diamonds using instrumentalneutron-activation analysisJournal of Rad. Nucl. L., Vol. 164, No. 5, March 24, pp. 337-345. # HT631AustraliaDiamonds, Thermometry -trace element analysis
DS201711-2514
2017
Farre-de-Pablo, J.Gonzalez-Jimenez, J.M., Camprubi, A., Colas, V., Griffin, W.L., Proenza, J.A., O'Reilly, S.Y., Centeno-Garcia, El., Garcia-Casco, A., Belousova, E., Talavera, C., Farre-de-Pablo, J., Satsukawa, T.The recycling of chromitites in ophiolites from southwestern North America. ( Baja)Lithos, in press available, 52p.United States, Californiachromitites

Abstract: Podiform chromitites occur in mantle peridotites of the Late Triassic Puerto Nuevo Ophiolite, Baja California Sur State, Mexico. These are high-Cr chromitites [Cr# (Cr/Cr + Al atomic ratio = 0.61-0.69)] that contain a range of minor- and trace-elements and show whole-rock enrichment in IPGE (Os, Ir, Ru). That are similar to those of high-Cr ophiolitic chromitites crystallised from melts similar to high-Mg island-arc tholeiites (IAT) and boninites in supra-subduction-zone mantle wedges. Crystallisation of these chromitites from S-undersaturated melts is consistent with the presence of abundant inclusions of platinum-group minerals (PGM) such as laurite (RuS2)-erlichmanite (OsS2), osmium and irarsite (IrAsS) in chromite, that yield TMA ˜ TRD model ages peaking at ~ 325 Ma. Thirty-three xenocrystic zircons recovered from mineral concentrates of these chromitites yield ages (2263 ± 44 Ma to 278 ± 4 Ma) and Hf-O compositions [?Hf(t) = - 18.7 to + 9.1 and 18O values < 12.4‰] that broadly match those of zircons reported in nearby exposed crustal blocks of southwestern North America. We interpret these chromitite zircons as remnants of partly digested continental crust or continent-derived sediments on oceanic crust delivered into the mantle via subduction. They were captured by the parental melts of the chromitites when the latter formed in a supra-subduction zone mantle wedge polluted with crustal material. In addition, the Puerto Nuevo chromites have clinopyroxene lamellae with preferred crystallographic orientation, which we interpret as evidence that chromitites have experienced high-temperature and ultra high-pressure conditions (< 12 GPa and ~ 1600 °C). We propose a tectonic scenario that involves the formation of chromitite in the supra-subduction zone mantle wedge underlying the Vizcaino intra-oceanic arc ca. 250 Ma ago, deep-mantle recycling, and subsequent diapiric exhumation in the intra-oceanic basin (the San Hipólito marginal sea) generated during an extensional stage of the Vizcaino intra-oceanic arc ca. 221 Ma ago. The TRD ages at ~ 325 Ma record a partial melting event in the mantle prior to the construction of the Vizcaino intra-oceanic arc, which is probably related to the Permian continental subduction, dated at ~ 311 Ma.
DS201902-0270
2018
Farre-de-Pablo, J.Farre-de-Pablo, J., Proenza, J.A., Gonzales-Jimenez, J.M., Garcia-Casco, A., Colas, V., Roque-Rossell, J., Camprubi, A., Sanchez-Navas, A.A shallow origin for diamonds in ophiolitic chromitites.Geology, Vol. 46, pp. 75-78.Mexico, Pueblaophiolite

Abstract: Recent findings of diamonds in ophiolitic peridotites and chromitites challenge our traditional notion of Earth mantle dynamics. Models attempting to explain these findings involve incorporation of diamonds into chromite near the mantle transition zone. However, the occurrence of metastable diamonds in this context has not been considered. Here, we report for the first time in situ microdiamonds in chromite from ophiolitic chromitite pods hosted in the Tehuitzingo serpentinite (southern Mexico). Here, diamonds occur as fracture-filling inclusions along with quartz, clinochlore, serpentine, and amorphous carbon, thus indicating a secondary origin during the shallow hydration of chromitite. Chromite chemical variations across the diamond-bearing healed fractures indicate formation during the retrograde evolution of chromitite at temperatures between 670 °C and 515 °C. During this stage, diamond precipitated metastably at low pressure from reduced C-O-H fluids that infiltrated from the host peridotite at the onset of serpentinization processes. Diamond was preserved as a result of fracture healing at the same temperature interval in which the chromite alteration began. These mechanisms of diamond formation challenge the idea that the occurrence of diamond in ophiolitic rocks constitutes an unequivocal indicator of ultrahigh-pressure conditions.
DS202008-1396
2020
Farre-de-Pablo, J.Gonzales-Jiminez, J.M., Tassara, S., Schettino, E., Roque-Rosell, J., Farre-de-Pablo, J., Saunders, J.E., Deditius, A.P., Colas, V., Rovira-Medina, J.J., Guadalupe Davalos, M., Schilling, M., Jiminez-Franco, A., Marchesi, C., Nieto, F., Proenza, J.A., GerMineralogy of the HSE in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle - an interpretive review.Lithos, in press available, 44p. PdfMantleHSE

Abstract: The highly siderophile elements (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd, Re, Au) exist in solid solution in accessory base-metal sulfides (BMS) as well as nano-to-micron scale minerals in rocks of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). The latter include platinum-group minerals (PGM) and gold minerals, which may vary widely in morphology, composition and distribution. The PGM form isolated grains often associated with larger BMS hosted in residual olivine, located at interstices in between peridotite-forming minerals or more commonly in association with metasomatic minerals (pyroxenes, carbonates, phosphates) and silicate glasses in some peridotite xenoliths. The PGM found inside residual olivine are mainly Os-, Ir- and Ru-rich sulfides and alloys. In contrast, those associated with metasomatic minerals or silicate glasses of peridotite xenoliths consist of Pt, Pd, and Rh bonded with semimetals like As, Te, Bi, and Sn. Nanoscale observations on natural samples along with the results of recent experiments indicate that nucleation of PGM is mainly related with the uptake of HSE by nanoparticles, nanominerals or nanomelts at high temperature (> 900?°C) in both silicate and/or sulfide melts, regardless of the residual or metasomatic origin of their host minerals. A similar interpretation can be assumed for gold minerals. Our observations highlight that nanoscale processes play an important role on the ore-forming potential of primitive mantle-derived magmas parental to magmatic-hydrothermal deposits enriched in noble metals. The metal inventory in these magmas could be related with the physical incorporation of HSE-bearing nanoparticles or nanomelts during processes of partial melting of mantle peridotite and melt migration from the mantle to overlying continental crust.
DS201909-2038
2019
Farre-de-Pblo, J.Farre-de-Pblo, J., Proenza, J.A., Gonzalez-Jiminez, J.M., Garcia-Casco, A., Colas, V., Roque-Rosell, J., Camprubi, A., Sanchez-Navas, A.A shallow origin for diamonds in ophiolitic chromitites. Geology, Vol. 47, pp. e477-478.North America, Mexicomicrodiamonds

Abstract: Recent findings of diamonds in ophiolitic peridotites and chromitites challenge our traditional notion of Earth mantle dynamics. Models attempting to explain these findings involve incorporation of diamonds into chromite near the mantle transition zone. However, the occurrence of metastable diamonds in this context has not been considered. Here, we report for the first time in situ microdiamonds in chromite from ophiolitic chromitite pods hosted in the Tehuitzingo serpentinite (southern Mexico). Here, diamonds occur as fracture-filling inclusions along with quartz, clinochlore, serpentine, and amorphous carbon, thus indicating a secondary origin during the shallow hydration of chromitite. Chromite chemical variations across the diamond-bearing healed fractures indicate formation during the retrograde evolution of chromitite at temperatures between 670 °C and 515 °C. During this stage, diamond precipitated metastably at low pressure from reduced C-O-H fluids that infiltrated from the host peridotite at the onset of serpentinization processes. Diamond was preserved as a result of fracture healing at the same temperature interval in which the chromite alteration began. These mechanisms of diamond formation challenge the idea that the occurrence of diamond in ophiolitic rocks constitutes an unequivocal indicator of ultrahigh-pressure conditions.
DS200812-0340
2008
Farrell, S.Farrell, S., Clark, I., Bell, K.Sulphur isotopes in carbonatites and associated silicate rocks from the Superior Province Canada.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A258.Canada, OntarioCarbonatite
DS201012-0194
2010
Farrell, S.Farrell, S., Bell, K., Clark, I.Sulphur isotopes in carbonatites and associated silicate rocks from the Superior Province, Canada.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 98, 1-4, pp. 209-226.Canada, OntarioGeochronology
DS1996-0444
1996
Farrell, T.P.Farrell, T.P., Kratzing, D.C.Environmental effectsEnvironmental Management in Australia Minerals and Energy, UNSW Press, pp. 14-45AustraliaExploration phase, mining phase, Environmental - exploration
DS1900-0185
1903
Farrington, O.C.Farrington, O.C.Gems and Gem MineralsChicago: Mumford., DIAMONDS PP. 66-87 GlobalKimberley, Gemology, Janlib, Kimberlite
DS1900-0660
1908
Farrington, O.C.Farrington, O.C.Correlation of Distribution of Copper and Diamonds in the Glacial Drift of the Great Lakes Region.Science., Vol. 27, MAY 8TH. P. 729.United States, Great LakesDiamond Occurrence, Geomorphology
DS1920-0443
1929
Farrington, O.C.Farrington, O.C.Famous Diamonds. #3Chicago: Field Museum Nat. Hist., 27P.GlobalDiamonds Notable, Kimberley
DS200912-0560
2008
Farrington, R.OzBench, M., Regenauerlieb, K., Stegman, D.R., Morra, G., Farrington, R., Hale, A., May, D.A., Freeman, J.A model comparison study of large scale mantle lithosphere dynamics driven by subduction.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 171, 1-4, pp. 224-234.MantleTectonics
DS201112-0921
2011
Farrington, R.J.Schellart, W.P., Stegman, D.R., Farrington, R.J., Moresi, L.Influence of lateral slab edge distance on plate velocity, trench velocity, and subduction partitioning.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 116, B10, B10408.MantleSubduction
DS1991-0468
1991
Farrow, C.Farrow, C.S -geological dat a analysis and graphicsTerra Nova, Vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 212-220GlobalComputer, Graphics
DS1995-1074
1995
Farrow, C.M.Leake, B.E., Farrow, C.M., Townend, R.Potassium poor titanium fluor richterite from near Nullagine Western Australia.American Mineralogist, Vol. 80, pp. 162-4.AustraliaBasalt
DS200612-0636
2006
Farrow, C.M.Janousek, V., Farrow, C.M., Erban, V.Interpretation of whole rock geochemical dat a in igneous geochemistry: introducing geochemical Dat a Toolkit (GCDkit).Journal of Petrology, Vol. 47, 6, pp. 1255-1259.TechnologyGeochemical Data Kit
DS201412-0239
2014
Farrow, D.Farrow, D.Three dimensional resource modeling - value added.SRK and Friends Diamond Short Course, March 1, ppt p. 80-93.TechnologyResource model
DS201805-0957
2018
Farrow, D.Lepine, I., Farrow, D.3D geological modelling of the Renard 2 kimberlite pipe, Quebec, Canada: from exploration to extraction.Mineralogy and Petrology, doi.org/10.1007/s00710-018-0567-y 9p.Canada, Quebecdeposit - Renard

Abstract: The Renard 2 kimberlite pipe is one of nine diamondiferous kimberlite pipes that form a cluster in the south-eastern portion of the Superior Province, Québec, Canada and is presently being extracted at the Renard Mine. It is interpreted as a diatreme-zone kimberlite consisting of two Kimberley-type pyroclastic units and related country rock breccias, all cross-cut by coherent kimberlite dykes and irregular intrusives. Renard 2 has been the subject of numerous diamond drilling campaigns since its discovery in 2001. The first two geological models modelled kimberlite and country rock breccia units separately. A change in modelling philosophy in 2009, which incorporated the emplacement envelope and history, modelled the entire intrusive event and projected the pipe shape to depth allowing for more targeted deep drilling where kimberlite had not yet been discovered. This targeted 2009 drilling resulted in a?>?400% increase in the volume of the Indicated Resource. Modelling only the kimberlite units resulted in a significant underestimation of the pipe shape. Current open pit and underground mapping of the pipe shape corresponds well to the final 2015 geological model and contact changes observed are within the expected level of confidence for an Indicated Resource. This study demonstrates that a sound understanding of the geological emplacement is key to developing a reliable 3D geological and resource model that can be used for targeted delineation drilling, feasibility studies and during the initial stages of mining.
DS2003-1335
2003
Farrow, D.J.Stiefenhofer, J., Farrow, D.J.Crater deposits of the Mwadui kimberlite8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 1, AbstractTanzaniaGeology, economics, Deposit - Williamson mine
DS200412-1929
2003
Farrow, D.J.Stiefenhofer, J., Farrow, D.J.Crater deposits of the Mwadui kimberlite.8 IKC Program, Session 1, AbstractAfrica, TanzaniaGeology, economics Deposit - Williamson mine
DS1991-0469
1991
Farshad, F.Farshad, F., LeBlanc, J.L.How to run a FORTRAN or a BASIC Computer program on PC'sGeobyte, Vol. 6, No. 2, pp. 37-39GlobalComputer, Programs -FORTRAN -PC's
DS201312-0218
2013
Faryad, S.W.Dobrzhinetskaya, L., Faryad, S.W., Hoinkes, G.Mineral transformations in HP-UHP metamorphic terranes.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 31, 1, pp. 3-4.MantleUHP
DS201312-0260
2012
Faryad, S.W.Faryad, S.W., Dobrzhinetskaya, L., Hoinkes, G., Zhang, J.Ultrahigh pressure and high-pressure metamorphic terrances in orogenic belts: reactions, fluids and geological processes.Gondwana Research, Vol. 23, 4, pp. 841-MantleUHP
DS201412-0677
2014
Faryad, S.W.Perraki, M., Faryad, S.W.First finding of microdiamond, coesite and other UHP phases in felsic granulites in the Moldanubian Zone: implications for deep subduction and a revised geodynamic model for Variscan Orogeny in the Bohemian Massif.Lithos, Vol. 202-203, pp. 157-166.EuropeCoesite, UHP
DS201810-2311
2018
Faryad, S.W.Faryad, S.W., Jedlicka, R., Hauzenberger, C., Racek, M.High pressure crystallization vs. recrystallization origin of garnet pyroxenite-eclogite within subduction related lithologies. Bohemian MassifMineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 112, 5, pp. 603-616.Europe, Austriasubduction

Abstract: Mafic layers displaying transition between clinopyroxenite and eclogite within peridotite from felsic granulite in the Bohemian Massif (Lower Austria) have been investigated. The mafic-ultramafic bodies shared a common granulite facies metamorphism with its hosting felsic rocks, but they still preserve evidence of eclogite facies metamorphism. The selected mafic layer for this study is represented by garnet with omphacite in the core of coarse-grained clinopyroxene, while fine-grained clinopyroxene in the matrix is diopside. In addition, garnet contains inclusions of omphacite, alkali feldspars, hydrous and other phases with halogens and/or CO2. Textural relations along with compositional zoning in garnet from the clinopyroxenite-eclogite layers favour solid-state recrystallization of the precursor minerals in the inclusions and formation of garnet and omphacite during subduction. Textures and major and trace element distribution in garnet indicate two stages of garnet growth that record eclogite facies and subsequent granulite facies overprint. The possible model explaining the textural and compositional changes of minerals is that the granulite facies overprint occurred after formation and exhumation of the eclogite facies rocks.
DS201903-0501
2019
Faryad, S.W.Chepurov, A., Faryad, S.W., Agashev, A.M.Experimental crystallization of a subcalcic Cr-rich pyrope in the presence of REE bearing carbonatite.Chemical Geology, carbonatite

Abstract: This paper focuses on formation of subcalcic Cr-rich garnet (up to 14.25?wt% Cr2O3) in the model ultramafic system corresponding to natural harzburgite with the presence of REE-bearing fluid phase. The experiments were carried out using a “split-sphere” type multi-anvil high-pressure apparatus (BARS) at a pressure of 5?GPa and a temperature of 1300?°C. Natural serpentine, chromite, corundum and REE-carbonatite were used as starting components. Crystallization of garnet occurred in subsolidus conditions by the reaction of orthopyroxene and spinel in the presence of fluid phase. Composition of fluid was controlled by interaction of water released by decomposition of serpentine with carbonate. By using different amounts of carbonatite (0.5 and 1.5?wt%) as a source of calcium and REE, subcalcic Cr-rich garnets with up to 3.5?wt% CaO were crystallized, which are typical for inclusions of harzburgitic paragenesis in natural diamonds. The experiments demonstrated that the rare earth elements (REE) released from the initial carbonatite were transported by the fluid and were incorporated into the newly formed garnet. The distribution of REE in garnet revealed a vivid enrichment toward the heavy REE (HREE), showing the pattern with a very steep slope. These results confirmed high partitioning of HREE into garnet. The present study indicates that the mantle carbonatites, which contain very high proportions of light REE (LREE) to HREE, can play an important role as source material in formation of REE-rich fluids to crystallize garnets with typical REE patterns in mantle peridotites.
DS202004-0510
2020
Faryad, S.W.Faryad, S.W., Cuthbert, S.J.High temperature overprint in (U)HPM rocks exhumed from subduction zones: a product of isothermal decompression or a consequence of slab break-off ( slab rollback?) Dabie Sulu, KokechtavEarth-Science Reviews, Vol. 202, 103108 14p. PdfChina, Russiasubduction

Abstract: This paper presents and discusses petrological observations from high- to ultrahigh-pressure (U)HP metamorphic terrains in relation to existing geophysical and numerical models for subduction and exhumation processes in orogenic belts. The interpretations are mostly based on observations from gneiss terrains bearing abundant bodies mafic (meta-)eclogite and ultramafic garnet peridotite and pyroxenite, exposed in collisional orogens. The inclusions and compositional zoning of minerals are considered to be first order information that is needed to constrain PT paths of HP-UHP rocks and reconstruct the related geodynamic models for subduction and exhumation of crustal and mantle rocks. The Bohemian Massif of the European Variscides is used as the basis for a model example to explain these processes, but (U)HP rocks from various other terrains are taken into consideration to discuss available PT paths in relation to proposed subduction and exhumation rates of (U)HP rocks based on geophysical and geochronological data. Primarily information used in this respect include textural relations and preserved prograde zoning in minerals from many (U)HP rocks, which reveal that a relatively cool geothermal gradient typical of subduction zones tended to prevail during the prograde and peak pressure segments of PT paths prior to initiation of exhumation and may have continued, even with cooling, if exhumation rates were rapid. The commonly applied interpretation of isothermal decompression during exhumation is critically appraised, considering whether a simple thermal relaxation (and radiogenic heating) during exhumation is responsible for formation of post-peak pressure, retrograde mineral assemblages and textures observed in (U)HP rocks. We go on to consider whether this can satisfactorily explain the often pervasive medium-pressure, high-temperature metamorphic re-equilibration of (U)HP rocks or whether an additional, external source of heat is a better explanation. We conclude that the commonly observed high-temperature metamorphic overprint exhibited by (U)HP rocks occurs mostly after rocks have been exhumed from the subduction channel and have reached normal crustal positions, when mantle upwelling resulting from slab breakoff (delamination) or slab rollback takes place at the onset of continent-continent collision. We also explore contrasting PT trajectories for mantle rocks that have been entrained into crustal material during their subduction or exhumation; PT paths of mantle and subducted crustal rocks tend to converge as mantle rocks impinge upon the cooler subduction zone and, once entrained, share a common evolution that depends on the exhumation mechanism and rate. Considering all of the data presented in this work we conclude that the diverse, polyphase metamorphic evolution exhibited by (U)HP terrains, embodied in the PT paths of HP and UHP rocks, has important consequences for reconstructing their changing thermal regimes and provides important constraints for geodynamic models involving subduction and the transition to collision.
DS1991-0470
1991
Fasken Campbell GodfreyFasken Campbell GodfreyMine closure -statutory highlightsFasken Campbell Godfrey, Booklet, approx. 50pCanadaLegal, Mine closures
DS1993-0432
1993
Fasken MartineauFasken MartineauHandbook of environmental acronymsFasken Campbell Godfrey Legal, 14pGlobalEnvironmental acronyms, Listing
DS2002-0450
2002
Fasken MartineauFasken MartineauEarly diamond royalties in CanadaGlobal Mining Group Bulletin, June 2p.CanadaNews item, Legal - deals/royalties
DS2002-0451
2002
Fasken MartineauFasken MartineauListing diamond exploration companies on the TSX. Brief comments by HigginsGlobal Mining Group Bulletin, June 2p.CanadaNews item, Legal - exchange requirements
DS1982-0202
1982
Fasnacht, T.L.Fasnacht, T.L.A Seismic Reflection Study of the Precambrian Basement Along the Wisconsin State Line.Msc. Thesis Northern Illinois, De Kalb., 103P. 1:5, 940 61 REFS.United States, Illinois, Great LakesMid Continent
DS201212-0196
2012
Fathom GeophysicsFathom GeophysicsKimberlite garnet riddle solved.fathomgeophysics.com, 5p.MantleDiamond genesis
DS201906-1271
2019
Fattorini, D.Barry, P.H., de Moor, J.M., Giovannelli, D., Schrenk, M., Hummer, D.R., Lopez, T., Pratt, C.A., Alpizar Segua, Y., Battaglia, A., Beaudry, A., Bini, G., Cascante, M., d'Errico, G., di Carlo, M., Fattorini, D., Fullerton, K., H+Gazel, E., Gonzalez, G., HalForearc carbon sink reduces long term volatile recycling into the mantle.Nature , 588, 7753, p. 487.Mantlecarbon

Abstract: Carbon and other volatiles in the form of gases, fluids or mineral phases are transported from Earth’s surface into the mantle at convergent margins, where the oceanic crust subducts beneath the continental crust. The efficiency of this transfer has profound implications for the nature and scale of geochemical heterogeneities in Earth’s deep mantle and shallow crustal reservoirs, as well as Earth’s oxidation state. However, the proportions of volatiles released from the forearc and backarc are not well constrained compared to fluxes from the volcanic arc front. Here we use helium and carbon isotope data from deeply sourced springs along two cross-arc transects to show that about 91 per cent of carbon released from the slab and mantle beneath the Costa Rican forearc is sequestered within the crust by calcite deposition. Around an additional three per cent is incorporated into the biomass through microbial chemolithoautotrophy, whereby microbes assimilate inorganic carbon into biomass. We estimate that between 1.2 × 108 and 1.3 × 1010 moles of carbon dioxide per year are released from the slab beneath the forearc, and thus up to about 19 per cent less carbon is being transferred into Earth’s deep mantle than previously estimated.
DS201112-0038
2011
Fatyanov, O.V.Asimov, P.D., Fatyanov, O.V.The melting curve of MgO from shock temperature experiments.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.459.MantleMelting - core-mantle boundary
DS1991-0096
1991
Faucheux, L.Berge, B., Faucheux, L., Schwab, K., Libchaber, A.Faceted crystal growth in two dimensionsNature, Vol. 350, No. 6316, March 28, pp. 322-324GlobalMineralogy, Crystallography - general not specific to diamonds
DS1950-0469
1959
Faul, H.Faul, H., Eldmore, P.L.D., Brannock, W.W.Age of the Fen Carbonatite and its Relation to the Oslo Region.Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 17, PP. 153-156.Norway, ScandinaviaUltramafic And Related Rocks
DS1970-0509
1972
Faul, H.Faul, H.Century Old Diamond Hoax ReexaminedGeotimes, Vol. 17, PP. 23-25.United States, California, West CoastBlank
DS200412-0535
2004
Faul, U.Faul, U., Jackson, I., Fitzgerald, J.Viscoelasticity of olivine and implications for the upper mantle.Lithos, ABSTRACTS only, Vol. 73, p. S33. abstractUnited States, New MexicoSan Carlos olivine
DS201012-0003
2010
Faul, U.Afonso, J.C., Ranalli, G., Fernandez, M., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., Faul, U.On the VpVs-Mg# correlation in mantle peridotites: implications for the identification of thermal and compositional anomalies in the upper mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 289, 3-4, pp. 606-618.MantleChemistry
DS201807-1491
2018
Faul, U.Garber, J.M., Maurya, S., Hernandez, J-A., Duncan, M.S., Zeng, Li., Zhang, H.L., Faul, U., McCammon, C., Montagner, J-P., Moresi, L., Romanowicz, B.A., Rudnick, R.L., Stixrude, L.Multidisciplinary constraints on the abundance of diamond and eclogite in the cratonic lithosphere. Mentions Jericho and Roberts VictorGeochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, https://doi.org/10.1029/2018GCC007534Globalthermobarometry

Abstract: Some seismic models derived from tomographic studies indicate elevated shear-wave velocities (=4.7 km/s) around 120-150 km depth in cratonic lithospheric mantle. These velocities are higher than those of cratonic peridotites, even assuming a cold cratonic geotherm (i.e., 35 mW/m2 surface heat flux) and accounting for compositional heterogeneity in cratonic peridotite xenoliths and the effects of anelasticity. We reviewed various geophysical and petrologic constraints on the nature of cratonic roots (seismic velocities, lithology/mineralogy, electrical conductivity, and gravity) and explored a range of permissible rock and mineral assemblages that can explain the high seismic velocities. These constraints suggest that diamond and eclogite are the most likely high-Vs candidates to explain the observed velocities, but matching the high shear-wave velocities requires either a large proportion of eclogite (>50 vol.%) or the presence of up to 3 vol.% diamond, with the exact values depending on peridotite and eclogite compositions and the geotherm. Both of these estimates are higher than predicted by observations made on natural samples from kimberlites. However, a combination of =20 vol.% eclogite and ~2 vol.% diamond may account for high shear-wave velocities, in proportions consistent with multiple geophysical observables, data from natural samples, and within mass balance constraints for global carbon. Our results further show that cratonic thermal structure need not be significantly cooler than determined from xenolith thermobarometry.
DS201808-1745
2018
Faul, U.Garber, J.M., Maurya, S., Hernandez, J-A., Duncan, M.S., Zeng, L., Zhang, H.L., Faul, U., McCammon, C., Montagner, J-P., Moresi, L., Romanowicz, B.A., Rudnick, R.L., Stixrude, L.Multidisciplinary constraints on the abundance of diamond and eclogite in the cratonic lithosphere.G3 Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, http:/orchid.org/0000-0001-5313-0982Mantleeclogite
DS1999-0202
1999
Faul, U.H.Falloon, T.J., Green, D.H., Faul, U.H.Peridotitic melting at 1 and 1.5 GPa: an experimental evaluation of techniques using diamond aggregates...Journal of Petrology, Vol. 40, No. 9, Sept. pp. 1343-76.GlobalPetrology - experimental, Melting - near solidus melts, mineral mixes
DS200512-0280
2005
Faul, U.H.Faul, U.H., Jackson, I.The seismological signature of temperature and grain size variations in the upper mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 234, 1-2, pp. 119-134.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200812-1254
2008
Faul, U.H.Wiens, D.A., Condor, J.A., Faul, U.H.The seismic structure and dynamics of the mantle wedge.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 36, May, pp. 421-455.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS201012-0135
2010
Faul, U.H.Dalton, C.A., Faul, U.H.The oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: clues from joint interpretation of global velocity and attenuation models.Lithos, In press available, 45p.MantleGeophysics
DS201312-0295
2013
Faul, U.H.Garapic, G., Faul, U.H., Brisson, E.High resolution imaging of the melt distribution in partially molten upper mantle rocks: evidence for wetted two grain boundaries.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 14, 3, pp. 556-566.MantleMelting
DS201804-0681
2018
Faul, U.H.Cline, C.J. II, Faul, U.H., David, E.C., Berry, A.J., Jackson, I.Redox influenced seismic properties of upper mantle olivine.Nature, Vol. 555, March 15, pp. 255-258.Mantlegeophysics - seismics

Abstract: Lateral variations of seismic wave speeds and attenuation (dissipation of strain energy) in the Earth’s upper mantle have the potential to map key characteristics such as temperature, major-element composition, melt fraction and water content1,2,3. The inversion of these data into meaningful representations of physical properties requires a robust understanding of the micromechanical processes that affect the propagation of seismic waves2,3. Structurally bound water (hydroxyl) is believed to affect seismic properties2,3 but this has yet to be experimentally quantified. Here we present a comprehensive low-frequency forced-oscillation assessment of the seismic properties of olivine as a function of water content within the under-saturated regime that is relevant to the Earth’s interior. Our results demonstrate that wave speeds and attenuation are in fact strikingly insensitive to water content. Rather, the redox conditions imposed by the choice of metal sleeving, and the associated defect chemistry, appear to have a substantial influence on the seismic properties. These findings suggest that elevated water contents are not responsible for low-velocity or high-attenuation structures in the upper mantle. Instead, the high attenuation observed in hydrous and oxidized regions of the upper mantle (such as above subduction zones) may reflect the prevailing oxygen fugacity. In addition, these data provide no support for the hypothesis whereby a sharp lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary is explained by enhanced grain boundary sliding in the presence of water.
DS201804-0719
2018
Faul, U.H.Marquardt, K., Faul, U.H.The structure and composition of olivine grain boundaries: 40 years of studies, status and current developments.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 45, 2, pp. 139-172.Mantleolivines

Abstract: Interfaces in rocks, especially grain boundaries in olivine dominated rocks, have been subject to about 40 years of studies. The grain boundary structure to property relation is fundamental to understand the diverging properties of polycrystalline samples compared to those of single crystals. The number of direct structural observations is small, i.e. in range of 100 micrographs, and the number of measurements of properties directly linked to structural observations is even smaller. Bulk aggregate properties, such as seismic attenuation, rheology and electrical conductivity, are sensitive to grain size, and seem to show influences by grain boundary character distributions. In this context we review previous studies on grain boundary structure and composition and plausible relations to bulk properties. The grain boundary geometry is described using five independent parameters; generally, their structural width ranges between 0.4-1.2 nm and the commonly used 1 nm seems a good approximation. This region of enhanced disorder is often enriched in elements that are incompatible in the perfect crystal lattice. The chemical composition of grain boundaries depends on the bulk rock composition. We determined the 5 parameter grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) for polycrystaline Fo90 and studied structure and chemistry at the nm-scale to extend previous measurements. We find that grain boundary planes close to perpendicular to the crystallographic c-direction dominate the grain boundary network. We conclude that linking grain boundary structure in its full geometric parameter space to variations of bulk rock properties is now possible by GBCD determination using EBSD mapping and statistical analyses.
DS1998-0411
1998
Faulkner, P.A.Faulkner, P.A.Subsidence, heat flow and the break up of GondwanaJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, 1A, p. 70. AbstractGondwanaTectonics
DS200812-0537
2008
FaureKamenetsky, M.B., Kamenenetsky, V.S., Sobolev, A.V., Golovin, Sharygin, Demouchy, Faure, KuzminOlivine in the Udachnaya East kimberlite ( Yakutia, Russia): morphology, compositional zoning and origin.9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractRussiaDeposit - Udachnaya petrograaphy
DS200812-0541
2008
FaureKamenetsky, V.S., Kamentsky, M.B., Sobolev, A.V., Golovin, A.V., Demouchy, S., Faure, Sharygin, KuzminOlivine in the Udachnaya east kimberlite ( Yakutia, Russia): types, compositions and origins.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 49, 4, pp. 823-839.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Udachnaya
DS1960-0850
1967
Faure, D.Kaplan, G., Faure, D., Ellroy, R., Heilammer, R.Contribution a L'etude de L'origine des LamproitesCentr. Rech. ( Pau-snpa ) Bulletin., Vol. 1, No. 1, PP. 153-159.Australia, Western AustraliaLeucite, Lamproite, Mt. North, Geochronology, K Ar, Rb Sr
DS2003-0393
2003
Faure, F.Faure, F., Trolliard, G., Nicollet, C., Montel, J.M.A developmental model of olivine morphology as a function of the cooling rate and theContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 145, 2, pp. 251-63.MantleBlank
DS200412-0536
2003
Faure, F.Faure, F., Trolliard, G., Nicollet, C., Montel, J.M.A developmental model of olivine morphology as a function of the cooling rate and the degree of undercooling.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 145, 2, pp. 251-63.MantleMineral chemistry
DS200712-0947
2006
Faure, F.Schiano, P., Provost, A., Clocchiatti, R., Faure, F.Transcrystalline melt migration and Earth's mantle.Science, Vol. 314, Nov. 10, pp. 970-974.MantleTectonics, volcanism, geothermometry, melting
DS201912-2798
2019
Faure, F.Laumonier, M., Laporte, D., Faure, F., Provost, A., Schiano, P., Ito, K.An experimental study of dissolution and precipitation of forsterite in a thermal gradient: implications for cellular growth of olivine phenocrysts in basalt and melt inclusion formation.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 174, 21p. PdfMantlebasanite

Abstract: The morphology of crystals in magmas strongly depends on the temperature regime of the system, in particular the degree of undercooling and the cooling rate. To simulate low degrees of undercooling, we developed a new experimental setup based on thermal migration, in which large cylinders of forsterite (single crystals) immersed in haplobasaltic melt were subjected to a temperature gradient. As forsterite solubility is sensitive to temperature, the forsterite on the high-temperature side undergoes dissolution and the dissolved components are transported toward the low-temperature side where a layer of newly grown forsterite forms (up to 340 µm thick after 101 h). A striking feature is that the precipitation process does not produce a planar front of forsterite advancing at the expense of liquid: the growth front shows a fingered outline in planar section, with solid lobes separated by glass tubes that are perpendicular to the growth front. We ascribe this texture to cellular growth, a type of growth that had not been experimentally produced so far in silicate systems. We find that the development of cellular growth requires low degrees of undercooling (a few °C) and large crystal-liquid interfaces (~?1 mm across or more), and that it occurs at a growth rate of the order of 10-9 m/s. We found natural occurrences of cellular growth on the rims of olivines from basanites, but otherwise cellular textures are poorly documented in natural volcanic rocks. Melt inclusions were produced in our experiments, showing that they can form in olivine at relatively slow rates of growth (10-9 m/s or lower).
DS1960-0340
1963
Faure, G.Fairbairn, H.W., Faure, G., Pinson, W.H., Hurley, P.M., Powell.Initial Ratio of Strontium 87 to Strontium 86 Whole Rock Age and Discordant Biotite in the Montregian Igneous Province Quebec.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 68, PP. 6515-6522.Canada, QuebecBlank
DS1987-0720
1987
Faure, G.Strobel, M.L., Faure, G.Transport of indicator clasts by ice sheets and the transporthalf-distance: a contribution to prospecting for ore depositsJournal of Geology, Vol. 95, pp. 687-697Ontario, Michigan, Ohio, IndianaGeomorphology
DS1989-0062
1989
Faure, G.Balasubramaniam, K.S., Faure, G., Goni, J., Grubb, P.L.C.Weathering : its products and deposits.Vol. 1. processes. Vol. IIGeotechnicsAugustithis Publishing, (Greece), Vol. I 462p. $ 50.00 Vol. II 672p. $ 65.00GlobalWeathering, Deposits -processes
DS2000-0283
2000
Faure, G.Faure, G.Plumes pp. 57-59. Alkalic igneous rocks on continents pp. 281-299. Europe pp. 307-16. Scandinavia pp. 317-21. Kola pp. 322-4. Australia pp. 334-42. Wyoming p.324-33Springer: Origin of Igneous rocks, Mantle, Africa, Australia, North America, MontanaGeochronology
DS200612-0660
2006
Faure, K.Kamenetsky, V.S., Kamenetsky, M.B., Sharygin, V.V., Maas, R., Faure, K., Sobolev, A.V.Why are Udachnaya East pipe kimberlites enriched in Cl and alkalis but poor in H2O?Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 3. abstract only.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Udachnaya mineral chemistry
DS200712-0504
2006
Faure, K.Kamenetsky, V.S., Kamenetsky, M.B., Sharygin, V.V., Faure, K., Golovin, A.V.Chloride and carbonate immiscible liquids at the closure of the kimberlite magma evolution ( Udachnaya-East kimberlite, Siberia).Chemical Geology, Available in press,Russia, SiberiaDeposit - Udachnaya, geochronology
DS200712-0507
2007
Faure, K.Kamenetsky, V.S., Kamenetsky, M.B., Shaygin, V.V., Faure, K., Golovin, A.V.Chloride and carbonate immiscible liquids at the closure of the kimberlite magma evolution ( Udachnaya-East kimberlite) Siberia.Chemical Geology, Vol. 237m 3-4, March 5, pp. 384-400.Russia, SiberiaDeposit - Udachnaya
DS1993-0310
1993
Faure, M.Da Silva, F.C.A., Chauvet, A., Faure, M.Early-Proterzoic Orogeny (Transamazonian) and syntectonic granite emplacement in the Rio Itapicuru greenstone belt, Bahia-BrasilComptes Rendus Academy Science Paris, Tomb. 316, Series II, pp. 1139-1146BrazilGreenstone belt, Tectonics
DS1999-0208
1999
Faure, M.Faure, M., Lin, W., Shu, L., Scharer, U.Tectonics of the Dabie Shan and possible exhumation mechanisms of ultra high pressure rocks.Terra Nova, Vol. 11, No. 6, Dec. pp. 251-8.China, easternTectonics, ultra high pressure (UHP)
DS2000-0284
2000
Faure, M.Faure, M., Lin, W., Scharer, U.Tectonics of the Dabie Shan (eastern China) and possible exhumation mechanism of ultra high pressure ..Terra Nova, Vol. 11, No. 6, pp. 251-65.China, eastern Chinaultra high pressure (UHP) - Dabie Shan, Tectonics
DS2001-0314
2001
Faure, M.Faure, M., Lin, W., Le Breton, N.Where is the North Chin a - South Chin a block boundary in eastern Chin a?Geology, Vol. 29, No. 2, Feb. pp. 119-22.ChinaTectonics, ultra high pressure (UHP), Qinling Dabie Shan belt
DS2003-0394
2003
Faure, M.Faure, M., Lin, W., Monie, P., Le Breton, N., Pouissineau, S., Panis, D., Deloule, E.Exhumation tectonics of the ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks in the Qinling orogenTectonics, Vol. 22, 3, 10.1029/2002TC001450ChinaTectonics - subduction
DS2003-0395
2003
Faure, M.Faure, M., Lin, W., Monie, P., Le Breton, N., Pouissineau, S., Panis, D., Deloule, E.Exhumation tectonics of the ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks in the Qinling orogenTectonics, Vol. 22, 3, 10.1029/2002TC001450China, ShandongUHP
DS2003-0396
2003
Faure, M.Faure, M., Lin, W., Scharer, U., Shu, L., Sun, Y., Arnaud, N.Continental subduction and exhumation of UHP rocks. Structural and geochronologicalLithos, Vol. 70, 3-4, pp. 213-41.ChinaUHP, geochronology
DS200412-0537
2003
Faure, M.Faure, M., Lin, W., Monie, P., Le Breton, N., Pouissineau, S., Panis, D., Deloule, E.Exhumation tectonics of the ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks in the Qinling orogen in east China: new petrological structuraTectonics, Vol. 22, 3, 10.1029/2002TC001450China, ShandongUHP
DS200412-0538
2003
Faure, M.Faure, M., Lin, W., Scharer, U., Shu, L., Sun, Y., Arnaud, N.Continental subduction and exhumation of UHP rocks. Structural and geochronological insights from the Dabie Shan, East China.Lithos, Vol. 70, 3-4, pp. 213-41.ChinaUHP, geochronology
DS200912-0213
2009
Faure, M.Faure, M., Shu, L., Wang, B., Charvet, J., Choulet, F., Monie, P.Intracontinental subduction: a possible mechanism for the early Paleozoic orogen of SE China.Terra Nova, Vol. 21, pp. 360368.ChinaSubduction
DS1993-0158
1993
Faure, O.K.Branchu, P., Faure, O.K., et al.Africa as source and sink for atmospheric carbon dioxideSpecial issue, pp. 41-50AfricaMantle, Degassing
DS200812-1183
2008
Faure, P.Trap, P., Faure, P., Lin, M., Bruguier, O., Monie, P.Contrasted tectonic styles for the Paleoproterozoic evolution of the North Chin a Craton: evidence for a 2.1 Ga thermal and tectonic event in the Fuping Massif.Journal of Structural Geology, Vol. 30, 9, pp. 1109-1125.ChinaCraton, not specific to diamonds
DS1996-0445
1996
Faure, S.Faure, S., Tremblay, A., Angelier, J.Alleghanian paleostress reconstruction in Appalachians: intraplatede formation Laurentia and Gondwana.Geological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 108, No. 11, Nov. pp. 1467-80.Quebec, New BrunswickTectonics
DS200512-0281
2005
Faure, S.Faure, S., Fallara, F., Godey, S.3D architecture of the North American lithosphere by seismic tomography: implications for regional diamond exploration.Quebec Exploration Conference, 1p. abstractCanada, QuebecTomography
DS201412-0150
2013
Faure Walker, J.P.Cowie, P.A., Scholz, C.H., Roberts, G.P., Faure Walker, J.P., Steer, P.Viscous roots of active seismogenic faults revealed by geologic slip rate variations.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 6, 12, pp. 1036-1040.Europe, ItalyDuctile crust
DS1970-0261
1971
Faure-Muret, A.Choubert, G., Faure-Muret, A.Bouclier Eburneen or Libero-ivorienIn: Tectonique De L'afrique, Unesco Earth Sci. Ser., No. 6, PP. 185-200.West Africa, Guinea, Ivory Coast, LiberiaStructure, Tectonics
DS2001-0315
2001
Faurie, C.Faurie, C., Ferra, C., Medori, P., Devaux, J.Ecology - science and practiceBalkema Publishing, 340p. $ 50.00 approx.GlobalBook - ad, Ecology
DS1995-0521
1995
Faust, J.Faust, J.Hydrogen partitioning in natural peridotite at upper end and lower mantleconditions.Eos, Vol. 76, No. 46, Nov. 7. p.F531. Abstract.MantlePeridotite
DS2003-0397
2003
Faust, L.J.Faust, L.J., Knittle, E., Williams, O.Constraints on the speciation of hydrogen in Earth's transition zonePhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 136, April 15, 1-2, pp. 93-105.MantleDiscontinuity
DS200412-0539
2003
Faust, L.J.Faust, L.J., Knittle, E., Williams, O.Constraints on the speciation of hydrogen in Earth's transition zone.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 136, April 15, 1-2, pp. 93-105.MantleDiscontinuity
DS2000-0285
2000
Fava, N.Fava, N., Gaspar, J.C.Pyrochlore varieties from the Catalao 1 carbonatite complex, BrasilIgc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.BrazilCarbonatite, Deposit - Catalao-1
DS202004-0538
2020
Favila-Harris, P.Taylor, R.N., Favila-Harris, P., Branney, M.J., Farley, E.M.R., Gernon, T.M., Palmer, M.R.Dynamics of chemically pulsing mantle plume.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 537, 116182 14p. PdfMantlehotspot

Abstract: Upwelling plumes from the deep mantle have an impact on the Earth's surface for tens to hundreds of millions of years. During the lifetime of a mantle plume, periodic fluctuations in its composition and temperature have the potential to generate changes in the nature and volume of surface volcanism. We constrain the spatial and temporal scale of compositional changes in a plume using high-resolution Pb isotopes, which identify chemical pulses emerging from the Canary Islands hotspot over the last ~15 million years (Myr). Surface volcanism spanning ~ 400 km along the island chain changes composition systematically and synchronously, representing a replenishment of the plume head by a distinct mantle flavour on timescales of 3-5 Myr. These low-frequency compositional changes are also recorded by individual volcanoes, and comprise a sequence of closely-spaced isotopic trajectories. Each trajectory is maintained for ~1 Myr and is preceded and followed by ~0.3 Myr transitions to magmas with distinct isotope ratios. Relatively sharp transitions between periods of sustained isotopic stability require discrete yet coherent heterogeneities rising at speeds of ~100-200 km Myr-1 and extending for ~150 km vertically in the conduit. The long-term synchronous changes require larger scale isotopic domains extending ~600 km vertically through in the plume stem. These observations demonstrate that plumes can chemically “pulse” over short and long-timescales reflecting the characteristics and recycling history of the deep mantle.
DS1988-0210
1988
Favret, P.D.Favret, P.D., Williams, R.T.Basement beneath the Blue Ridge and Inner Piedmont in north-eastern Georgia and the Carolinas: a preserved, late Proterozoic, rifted continentalmarginGeological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin, Vol. 100, No. 12, December pp. 1999-2007Georgia, CarolinasProterozoic, Basement
DS200412-1745
2004
Favretto, S.Schena, G., Favretto, S., Santoro, L., Pasini, A., Bettuzzi, M., Casali, F., Mancini, L.Detecting microdiamonds in kimberlite drill hole cores by computed tomography.International Journal of Mineral Processing, 16p.TechnologyMineral processing - microdiamonds
DS1994-0476
1994
Fawcett, A.Dyer, B.C., Fawcett, A.The use of tomographic imaging in mineral explorationExploration and Mining Geology, Vol. 3, No. 4, Oct. pp. 383-388ZimbabweTomography, chromite, Remote sensing
DS1980-0143
1980
Fawcett, J.J.Gittins, J., Fawcett, J.J., Brooks, C.K., Rucklidge, J.C.Intergrowths of Nepheline Potassium Feldspar and Kalsilite Potassium Feldspar: a Re-examination of the Pseudo-leucite Problem.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 73, PP. 119-126.Greenland, BatbjergRelated Rocks, Leucite, Mineral Chemistry
DS1981-0102
1981
Fawcett, J.J.Brooks, C.K., Fawcett, J.J., Gittins, J., Rucklidge, J.C.The Batbjerb Complex, East Greenland: a Unique Ultrapotassic Caledonian Intrusion.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 18, No. 2, PP. 274-285.GreenlandLeucite
DS1991-0471
1991
Fawcett, P.J.Fawcett, P.J., Barron, E.J.A geological perspective on climatic change: computer simulation of ancientclimatesGeoscience Canada, Vol. 18, No. 3, pp. 111-117GlobalGlobal warming, Ancient climates
DS201112-0131
2011
Fay, J.M.D.Cabral, R.A., Jackson, M.G., Rose-Koga, E.F., Fay, J.M.D., Shimizu, N.Volatile and trace element abundances in HIMU melt inclusions.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.610.Polynesia, Cook IslandsWater, carbonatite
DS201606-1124
2016
Faye, J.Uggerhoj, U.I., Mikkelsen, R.E., Faye, J.Earth's core is two and half years younger than its crust.European Journal of Physics, Vol. 37, 3, 7p.MantleCore
DS1960-0041
1960
Faynsteyn, G.K.Faynsteyn, G.K., et al.Preliminary Dat a on Some Controls of the Distribution of Triassic Diamond Deposits in Western Yakutia.Gosgeolotekhizdat., No. 2.RussiaKimberlite
DS1987-0202
1987
Fayziyev, A.R.Fayziyev, A.R., Iskandarov, F. SH.A new type of fluorspar deposit in the Pamirs.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), No. 6, pp. 375-378RussiaCarbonatite
DS1985-0317
1985
Fayzullin, R.M.Kamenev, YE.A., Fayzullin, R.M.Geologic Models for Apatite Nepheline Mineral DepositsInternational Geology Review, Vol. 27, No. 6, June pp. 678-683RussiaAlkaline Rocks
DS1990-0464
1990
Fazakerly, V.W.Fazakerly, V.W.Bow River alluvial diamond depositIn: Geology of the Mineral Deposits of Australia and Papua New Guinea ed., Vol. 2, pp. 1659-1664AustraliaAlluvials, Deposit -Bow River
DS2003-1558
2003
Fe, B.Zheng, Y.F., Gong, B., Zhao, Z.F., Fe, B., Li, Y.L.Two types of gneisses associated with eclogite at Shuanghe in the Dabie terrane:Lithos, Vol. 70, 3-4, pp. 321-343.ChinaUHP, eclogites
DS200412-2225
2003
Fe, B.Zheng, Y.F., Gong, B., Zhao, Z.F., Fe, B., Li, Y.L.Two types of gneisses associated with eclogite at Shuanghe in the Dabie terrane: carbon isotope, zircon Y.F. dating and oxygen iLithos, Vol. 70, 3-4, pp. 321-343.ChinaUHP, eclogites
DS202004-0530
2020
Feather, R.Post, J.E., Feather, R., Butler, J.E.Kimberley diamond acquired by the Smithsonian Institution and its flourescence and phosphorescence characteristics revealed. 55.08 ctJournal of Gemmology, Vol. 37, 1, pp. 14, 15.Africa, South Africa, United Statesflourescence
DS201412-0240
2014
Feather, R.C.II.Feather, R.C.II.Beyond Hope: some other notable diamonds at the Smithsonian Institution - Part 1.Rocks and Minerals, Jan.-Feb. pp. 27-29.TechnologyDiamonds notable -
DS201412-0241
2014
Feather, R.C.II.Feather, R.C.II.Beyond Hope: some other notable diamonds at the Smithsonian Institution.Rocks and Minerals, Vol. 89, 1, pp. 27-29.TechnologyDiamonds notable
DS2002-0854
2002
Featherstone, W.Kirby, J., Featherstone, W.Processing high resolution grids of gravimetric terrain correction and complete bouguer corrections over Australia.Exploration Geophysics, Vol. 33, 3-4, pp. 161-65.AustraliaGeophysics - gravity
DS1995-0522
1995
Featherstone, W.E.Featherstone, W.E.The Global Positioning System (GPS) and its use in geophysicalexplorationExploration Geophysics, Vol. 26, No. 1, March pp. 1-18GlobalGeophysics, GPS
DS1998-0412
1998
Featherstone, W.E.Featherstone, W.E., Dentith, M.C.A geodetic approach to gravity dat a reduction for geophysicsComputers and Geosciences, Vol.23, No. 10, pp. 1063-70GlobalGeophysics, geodesy, Gravity data
DS1999-0361
1999
Featherstone, W.E.Kirby, J.F., Featherstone, W.E.Terrain correcting Australian gravity observations using the nationaldigital elevation model....Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 46, No. 4, Aug. pp. 555-62.AustraliaGeophysics - gravity, fast Fourier transforM.
DS2002-0452
2002
Featherstone, W.E.Featherstone, W.E., Kirby, J.F.New high resolution grid of gravimetric terrain corrections over AustraliaAustralian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 49, No. 5, pp. 773-4.AustraliaGeophysics - gravity
DS2003-0398
2003
Featherstone, W.E.Featherstone, W.E.Improvement to long wavelength Australian gravity anomalies expected from theExploration Geophysics, Vol. 34, 1-2, pp. 69-76.AustraliaGeophysics - gravity ( not specific to diamonds)
DS200412-0540
2003
Featherstone, W.E.Featherstone, W.E.Improvement to long wavelength Australian gravity anomalies expected from the CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE dedicated satellite gravimetExploration Geophysics, Vol. 34, 1-2, pp. 69-76.AustraliaGeophysics - gravity ( not specific to diamonds)
DS200912-0415
2009
Featherstone, W.E.Kuhn, M., Featherstone, W.E., Kirby, J.F.Complete spherical Bouguer gravity anomalies over Australia.Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 56, 2, March pp. 213-223.AustraliaGeophysics - gravity
DS1859-0051
1835
Featherstonehaugh, G.W.Featherstonehaugh, G.W.Geological Report of an Examination Made in 1834 of the Elevated Country between the Missouri and Red Rivers.Report To The House of Representatives, Washington., 97P.United States, Gulf Coast, Arkansasdeposit -Magnet Cove
DS1859-0053
1836
Featherstonhaugh, G.W.Featherstonhaugh, G.W.Report of a Geological Reconnaissance Made in 1835 from The seat of the Government by Way of the Green Bay and Wisconsin Territory to the Coteau de Prairie.Washington., 168P.United StatesGeology
DS1859-0092
1847
Featherstonhaugh, G.W.Featherstonhaugh, G.W.A Canoe Voyage Up the Minnay Sotor; with an Account of the Lead and Copper Deposits in Wisconsin; of the Gold Region In the Cherokee Country and Sketches of Popular Manners.London: R. Bentley, TWO VOLUMESUnited States, North Carolina, Wisconsin, Appalachia, Great LakesTravelogue
DS2001-0072
2001
FebgBai, W. Yang, Robinson, Febg, Zhang, Yan, HuStudy of diamonds from chromitites in the Luobusa ophiolite, TibetActa Geologica Sinica, Vol. 75, No. 3, pp. 409-17.China, TibetChromitites - diamond
DS200712-0419
2006
Fecher, J.Hatch, D., Kuna, S., Fecher, J.Evaluation of an airship platform for airborne gravity gradiometry.AESC2006, Melbourne, Australia, 6p.TechnologyGravity gradiometer, FTG, Zeppelin
DS200812-1096
2008
Fecht, H.J.Sommer, A.P., Zhu, D., Fecht, H.J.Genesis on diamonds.Crystal Growth & Design, Vol. 8, 8, pp.2628-2629.TechnologyDiamond genesis
DS201610-1874
2016
Fedele, L.Jean, M.M., Taylor, L.A., Howarth, G.H., Peslier, A.H., Fedele, L., Bodnar, R.J., Guan, Y., Doucet, L.S., Ionov, D.A., Logvinova, A.M., Golovin, A.V., Sobolev, N.V.Olivine inclusions in Siberian diamonds and mantle xenoliths: contrasting water and trace -element contents.Lithos, in press available 11p.Russia, SiberiaDiamond inclusions
DS201612-2318
2016
Fedele, L.Lustrino, M., Agostini, S., Chalal, Y., Fedele, L., Stagno, V., Colombi, F., Bouguerra, A.Exotic lamproites or normal ultrapotassic rocks? The Late Miocene volcanic rocks from Kef Hahouner, NE Algeria, in the frame of the circum-Mediterranean lamproites.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, in press available 15p.Africa, AlgeriaLamproite

Abstract: The late Miocene (11-9 Ma) volcanic rocks of Kef Hahouner, ~ 40 km NE of Constantine (NE Algeria), are commonly classified as lamproites in literature. However, these rocks are characterized by an anhydrous paragenesis with plagioclase and Mg-rich olivine phenocrysts, set in a groundmass made up of feldspars, pyroxenes and opaque minerals. Thus, we classify the Kef Hahouner rocks as ultrapotassic shoshonites and latites, having K2O > 3 wt.%, K2O/Na2O > 2.5, MgO > 3-4 wt.%, SiO2 < 55-57 wt.% and SiO2/K2O < 15. All the investigated samples show primitive mantle-normalized multi-element patterns typical of orogenic (arc-type) magmas, i.e. enriched in LILE (e.g. Cs, Rb and Ba) and LREE (e.g. La/Yb = 37-59) with respect to the HFSE, peaks at Pb and troughs at Nb and Ta. Initial isotopic ratios are in the range of 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70874-0.70961, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.51222-0.51223, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.54-18.60, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.62-15.70 and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.88-39.16. The Kef Hahouner volcanic rocks show multi-element patterns similar to the other circum-Mediterranean lamproites and extreme Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions. Nevertheless, the abundant plagioclase, the presence of Al-rich augite coupled with high Al2O3 whole rock compositions (9.6-21.4 wt.%), and the absence of phlogopite are all at inconsistent with the definition of lamproite. We reviewed the rocks classified as lamproites worldwide, and found that many of these rocks, as for the Kef Hahouner samples, should be actually defined as "normal" potassic to ultrapotassic volcanic rocks. Even the grouping of lamproites into "orogenic" and "anorogenic" types appears questionable.
DS201902-0293
2019
Fedele, L.Lustrino, M., Fedele, L., Agostini, S., Prelevic, D., Salari, G.Leucitites within and around the Mediterranean area. Lithos, Vol. 324-325, pp. 216-233.Europeleucitites

Abstract: Leucite-bearing volcanic rocks are commonly found within and around the Mediterranean area. A specific type of this rock group are leucitites. They are found both in a hinterland position of active and fossil subduction systems as well as in foreland tectonic settings, but none have been found in the Maghreb (N Africa) and Mashreq (Middle East) areas. Here a review of the main leucitite occurrences in the circum-Mediterranean area is presented, with new whole-rock, mineral chemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios on key districts, with the aim of clarifying the classification and genesis of this rock type. Many of the rocks classified in literature as leucitites do not conform to the IUGS definition of leucitite (i.e., rocks with >10?vol% modal leucite and with foids/(foids + feldspars) ratio?>?0.9, with leucite being the most abundant foid). Among circum-Mediterranean rocks classified as leucitites in the literature, we distinguish two types: clinopyroxene-olivine-phyric (COP) and leucite- phyric (LP) types. Only the second group can be truly classified as leucitite, being characterized by the absence or the very rare presence of feldspars, as well as by ultrapotassic composition. The COP group can be distinguished from the LP group on the basis of lower SiO2, Na2O?+?K2O, K2O/Na2O, Al2O3, Rb and Ba, and higher MgO, TiO2, Nb, Cr and Ni. The LP group shows multi-elemental patterns resembling magmas emplaced in subduction-related settings, while COP rocks are much more variable, showing HIMU-OIB-like to subduction-related-like incompatible element patterns. COP rocks are also characterized generally by more homogeneous isotopic compositions clustering towards low Sr and high Nd isotopic ratios, while LP leucitites plot all in the enriched Sr-Nd isotopic quadrant. LP rocks usually have lower 206Pb/204Pb and higher 207Pb/204Pb. This study shows that the geochemical signal of mantle melts does not always reflect the tectonic setting of magma emplacement, suggesting paying extreme attention in proposing geodynamic reconstructions on the basis of chemical data only.
DS1994-0508
1994
Federico, M.Federico, M., Peccerillo, A., et al.Mineralization and geochem. study granular xenoliths from Alban Hillsvolcano, Italy: an evolutionary processes in potassic magma.Contr. Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 116, No. 3, pp. 384-401.ItalyAlkaline rocks, Xenoliths
DS1984-0270
1984
Federman, D.Federman, D.Irradiated Diamonds: a Cure for the Coming Cape Diamond GlutModern Jeweller., Vol. 83, No. 9, PP. 54-60.South AfricaMarket
DS1985-0182
1985
Federman, D.Federman, D.Diamonds and the HolocaustModern Jeweler, Vol. 84, No. 5, pp. 39-46. p. 72GlobalDiamond Cutting, Economics
DS1986-0236
1986
Federman, D.Federman, D.Move over Brasil here comes East AfricaModern Jeweler, Vol. 85, No. 1, pp. 40-45BrazilEast Africa
DS1986-0237
1986
Federman, D.Federman, D.Move over Brasil, here comes East AfricaModern Jeweler, Vol. 85, No. 1, pp. 40-45BrazilEconomics
DS1989-0417
1989
Federman, D.Federman, D.Your next diamond sales frontier: fancy colorsModern Jeweler, Vol. 88, No. 3, pp. 50-56AustraliaEconomics, Argyle-coloured diamonds
DS1990-0465
1990
Federman, D.Federman, D.Fancy pink diamond -jet-set pet rockModern Jeweler, No. 3, March p. 40AustraliaNews item, Pink diamonds
DS1990-0466
1990
Federman, D.Federman, D.Fancy colours - next diamond sales frontierModern Jeweler, No. 3, March p. 51-55GlobalNews item, Fancy coloured diamonds
DS1996-0446
1996
Federman, D.Federman, D.Looking westward: the first American mine... Kelsey LakeModern Jeweler, March pp. 31-32.ColoradoNews item, Redaurum Limited
DS1985-0183
1985
Federoseev, D.V.Federoseev, D.V., Semenovatianshanskaia, A.S., Kliuev, I.A.Mass Crystallization of Diamonds in the Region of its Thermodynamic Stability.Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk. SSSR., Vol. 281, No. 5, PP. 1192-1195.RussiaCrystallography
DS1984-0271
1984
Federoseyev, D.V.Federoseyev, D.V., Semenova-Tyan-Shanskaya, A.S.Kinetics of nucleation of diamonds in a colloidal solution of carbon inmetalDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 274, Jan-Feb, No. 1-6, pp. 161-163RussiaDiamond Morphology
DS200912-0166
2008
Federov, A.E.Denisov, G.G.,Novikov, V.V., Federov, A.E.Gravitational interactions of the solid core and the Earth's mantle and variations in the length of the day.Astronomy Reports, Vol. 52, 12, pp. 1027-1034.MantleCore
DS1994-1393
1994
Federov, I.I.Pokhilenko, L.N., Federov, I.I., Pokhilenko, N.P., et al.Fluid regime of formation of mantle rocks according to dat a of chromatographic analysis and thermodynamic cal.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 35, No. 4, pp. 60-64.RussiaMantle, Kimberlites
DS1994-1666
1994
Federov, I.I.Sonin, V.M., Bagryantsev, D.G., Federov, I.I., Chepurov.A.Formation of corrosion figures on diamond crystalsRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 35, No. 6, pp. 57-61.RussiaDiamond morphology
DS1995-0306
1995
Federov, I.I.Chepurov, A.I., Federov, I.I., Sonin, V.M.Experimental simulation of diamond genesisProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 109.GlobalPetrology -experimental, Diamond genesis
DS2000-0916
2000
Federov, I.I.Sonin, V.M., Federov, I.I., Pokhilenko, L., PokhilenkoDiamond oxidation rate as related to oxygen fugacityGeol. Ore Dep., Vol. 42, No. 6, pp. 496-503.RussiaDiamond - geochemistry
DS200812-0216
2008
Federov, I.I.Cheperuv, A.I., Federov, I.I., Sonin, V.M., Logvinova, A.M., Chepurov, A.A.Thermal effect on sulfide inclusions in diamonds ( from experimental data).Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 49, 10, pp. 738-742.TechnologyThermometry
DS200812-0341
2008
Federov, I.I.Federov, I.I., Chepurov, A.I., Sonin, V.M., Chepurov, A.A., Logvina, A.M.Experimental and thermodynamic study of the crystallization of diamond and silicates in a metal silicate carbon system.Geochemistry International, Vol. 46, 4, pp. 340-350.TechnologyGeochemistry - diamond
DS200912-0111
2009
Federov, I.I.Chepurov, A.I., Zhimulev, E.I., Eliseev, A.P., Sonin, V.M., Federov, I.I.The genesis of low - N diamonds.Geochemistry International, Vol. 47, 5, pp. 522-525.TechnologyType IIa
DS1960-0784
1967
Federov, N.N.Balakshin, G.D., Savrasov, D., Federov, N.N.Possibilite D'emploi de Leves Aeromagnetiques Pour Les Recherches de Kimberlites et de Carbonatites En Yakoutie.Razv. I Okhr. Nedr. Sssr., Vol. 33, No. 3, PP. 43-46. French Geological Survey (BRGM) TRANSLATION No. 5368.RussiaBlank
DS1987-0364
1987
Federov, V.I.Komogorova, L.G., Stadnik, E.V., Federov, V.I.Phytogeochemical investigations in contours of kimberlite bodies. (Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 297, No. 2, pp. 468-470RussiaBlank
DS1989-0822
1989
Federov, V.I.Komogorova, L.G., Stadnik, Ye.V., Federov, V.I.Phytogeochemical surveys within kimberlite bodiesDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 297, No. 1-6, pp. 184-185RussiaUdachanaya, Dalnyaya, Zarnitsa, biochemistry, kimberlite fields, Geochemistry -dispersion
DS1985-0184
1985
Federov, V.S.Federov, V.S., Kotelnikov, D.D., Cherenkova, A.F.Specific features of the supergene alteration of kimberlites of a pipe from Maimecha Kotui province.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR.(Russian), Vol. 285, No. 2, pp. 425-430RussiaBlank
DS1998-0891
1998
Federova, E.N.Logvinova, A.M., Federova, E.N., Sobolev, N.V.Microdiamonds from the Yubileinaya kimberlite pipe, Yakutia: morphology, physical properties, inclusions..7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 512-14.Russia, YakutiaDiamond morphology, mineral inclusions, Deposit - Yubileynaya
DS200812-0683
2008
Federova, E.N.Logvinova, A.M., Wirth, R., Federova, E.N., Sobolev, N.V.Nanometre-sized mineral and fluid inclusions in cloudy Siberian diamonds: new insights on diamond formation.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 317-331.Russia, SiberiaDiamond genesis
DS1995-0523
1995
Federowich, J.S.Federowich, J.S.Geodynamic evolution and thermal history of the central Flin Flon Domain, Trans Hudson Orogen: constraints from Structural development 40 Ar 39 Ar and stable isotopeTectonics, Vol. 14, No. 2, April pp. 472-503ManitobaGeothermometry, Geodynamics -Trans Hudson Orogen
DS1993-0446
1993
Fedi, M.Florio, G., Fedi, M., Rapolla, A., Fountain, D.M., Shive, P.N.Anisotropic magnetic susceptibility in the continental lower crust and its implications for the shape of magnetic anomalies.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 20, No. 23, December 14, pp. 2623-2626.MantleGeophysics Magnetics
DS201809-2015
2018
Fedi, M.Di Massa, D., Fedi, M., Florio, G., Vitale, A., Viezzoli, A., Kaminski, V.Joint interpretation of AEM and aeromagnetic dat a acquired over the Drybones kimberlite, NWT ( Canada).Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 158, pp. 48-56.Canada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Drybones

Abstract: We present the joint interpretation of airborne electromagnetic and aeromagnetic data, acquired to study kimberlite pipes. We analyse the data surveyed in 2005 over Drybones Bay, Archean Slave Province of the Northwest Territories, northern Canada. This area hosts a recently discovered kimberlite province with >150 kimberlite pipes. Magnetic and electromagnetic data were each one modelled by 1D inversion. For magnetic data we inverted vertical soundings built through upward continuations of the measured data at various altitudes. The validity of the method was prior verified by tests on synthetic data. Electromagnetic data were processed and inverted using the modified AarhusINV code, with Cole-Cole modelling, in order to take into account induced polarization effects, consisting in negative voltages and otherwise skewed transients. The integrated study of the two kinds of data has led to a better understanding of the structures at depth, even though the comparison between the magnetic and the electromagnetic models shows the different sensitivity of the two methods with respect to the geological structure at Drybones Bay.
DS1999-0209
1999
Fedikow, M.Fedikow, M., Nielsen, E.Multimedia geochemical and mineralogical surveys in assessing base and precious metal... diamond potential.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Geological Association of Canada (GAC)/Mineralogical Association of Canada (MAC)., Vol. 24, p. 38. abstractManitobaAlkaline rocks
DS1996-0447
1996
Fedikow, M.A.F.Fedikow, M.A.F., Nielsen, E., Sailerova, E.Operation Superior: multimedia geochemical surveys Echimamish, Carrot Rivers, Munro lake greenstone belt.Man. Geological Survey Report Activities, pp. 5-8.ManitobaGeochemistry - exploration
DS1997-0338
1997
Fedikow, M.A.F.Fedikow, M.A.F., Nielsen, E., Conley, G.G., Matile, G.Operation Superior: multimedia geochemical surveys Edmund Lake, Sharpe lake greenstone belt #1Man. Geological Survey Report Activities, pp. 4-5.ManitobaGeochemistry - exploration
DS1997-0844
1997
Fedikow, M.A.F.Nielsen, E., Fedikow, M.A.F.Results of belt scale kimberlite indicator mineral surveys Northern Superior Province, 1996.Man. Geological Survey Convention '97, p. 42.ManitobaGeochemistry - exploration
DS1998-0413
1998
Fedikow, M.A.F.Fedikow, M.A.F., Nielsen, E., Conley, G.G., Matile, G.Operation Superior: multimedia geochemical surveys Edmund Lake, Sharpe lake greenstone belt #2Man. Geological Survey Open File, No. 98-5, 410p.ManitobaGeochemistry - exploration
DS1999-0210
1999
Fedikow, M.A.F.Fedikow, M.A.F., Nielsen, E., Conley, G.G., Lenton, P.G.Operation Superior: multimedia geochemical surveys Webber, Knife, Goose lakes and Echimamish greenstoneMan. Geological Survey Open File, No. 99-8, 400p.ManitobaGeochemistry - exploration
DS2000-0286
2000
Fedikow, M.A.F.Fedikow, M.A.F., Nielsen, E.Operation Superior, multimedia geochemical surveys in the Knee Lake greenstone belt ( northern half) northern Superior Province, Manitoba. NTS 53LManitoba Report of Activities, pp. 105-7.ManitobaGeochemistry
DS2000-0287
2000
Fedikow, M.A.F.Fedikow, M.A.F., Nielsen, E., Conley, G.G., Lenton, P.G.Operation Superior: multimedia geochemical surveys Knee Lake greenstone belMan. Geological Survey Open File, No. 2000-2, CD ROM $ 10.00ManitobaGeochemistry - exploration
DS2001-0316
2001
Fedikow, M.A.F.Fedikow, M.A.F., Nielsen, E.Multimedia geochemical and mineralogical surveys, northern Knee lake Fish Lake greenstone belt, northern Superior province.Manitoba Report of Activities, pp. 108-10.ManitobaGeochemistry, Majescor Resources Inc.
DS2001-0317
2001
Fedikow, M.A.F.Fedikow, M.A.F., Nielsen, E., Conley, G.G., lenton, P.G.Operation Superior kimberlite indicator mineral survey results (2000) for the northern Knee Lake greenstone belt, northern Superior Province.Manitoba Report of Activities, 59p.ManitobaGeochemistry
DS2001-0318
2001
Fedikow, M.A.F.Fedikow, M.A.F., Nielsen, E., Conley, G.G., lenton, P.G.Operation Superior: compilation of kimberlite indicator mineral survey resultsManitoba Report of Activities, Open File, 60p.ManitobaGeochemistry
DS2002-1134
2002
Fedikow, M.A.F.Nielsen, E., Fedikow, M.A.F.Kimberlite indicator mineral survey lower Hayes River, ManitobaManitoba Geological Survey, Geoscientific Paper, 11p.ManitobaGeochemistry
DS200412-1434
2002
Fedikow, M.A.F.Nielsen, E., Fedikow, M.A.F.Kimberlite indicator mineral survey lower Hayes River, Manitoba.Manitoba Geological Survey, Geoscientific Paper, 11p.Canada, ManitobaGeochemistry
DS201212-0155
2012
Fedikow, M.A.F.De Sousa, H.A.F., Fedikow, M.A.F., Ryder, J., Turner, N., Halliday, M.Application of weak leaches in kimberlite exploration.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractCanada, OntarioGeochemistry
DS1995-0524
1995
Fedo, C.M.Fedo, C.M., Eriksson, K.A., Blenkinsop, T.G.Geologic history of the Archean Buhwa greenstone belt and surrounding gneiss terrane, evolution Limpopo beltCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 11, Nov. pp. 1977-1990ZimbabweGreenstone belt, Archean, Limpopo Belt
DS1995-0525
1995
Fedo, C.M.Fedo, C.M., Nesbitt, H.W., Young, G.M.Unravelling the effects of potassium metasomatism in sedimentary rocks andpaleosols, with implications ..Geology, Vol. 23, No. 10, October pp. 921-924GlobalPaleosols, Paleoweathering
DS1996-0448
1996
Fedo, C.M.Fedo, C.M., Eriksson, K.A.Stratigraphic framework of the equivalent to 3.0 Ga Buhwa greenstone belt:a unique stable shelf successionPrecambrian Research, Vol. 77, No. 3-4, April pp. 161-178ZimbabweArchean Zimbabwe Craton, Limpopo Belt, Stratigraphy
DS1989-1376
1989
Fedodosova, S.P.Sharkov, Ye.V., Lazko, Ye.Ye, Fedodosova, S.P., Khanna, S., AliPegmatoid hornblende clinopyroxene xenoliths with barium zeolite from diatremes of northwestern SyriaInternational Geology Review, Vol. 31, No. 4, April pp. 380-386SyriaXenoliths, Diatremes
DS2000-0288
2000
Fedorenko, V.Fedorenko, V., Czamanske, G., Diems, D.Field and geochemical studies of the melilite bearing Arydzhangsky suite and overall perspective on alkalineInternational Geology Review, Vol. 42, No. 9, Sept. pp. 769-804.Russia, SiberiaAlkaline - ultramafic - flood - volcanics, Melilite
DS200712-0147
2006
Fedorenko, V.Carlson, R.W., Czamanske, G., Fedorenko, V., Ilupin, I.A comparison of Siberian meimichites and kimberlites: implications for the source of high Mg alkalic flood basalts.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 7, Q11014 Nov. 21RussiaDeposit - Meymecha-Kotuy - geochemistry
DS1988-0211
1988
Fedorenko, V.A.Fedorenko, V.A., Petukhov, I.E.A generalized scheme for identifying effusive rocks from the Norilsk region based on petrochemical data. (Russian)Geologii i Geofiziki, (Russian), No. 6, pp. 74-85RussiaPicrite, Norilsk Region
DS1993-1760
1993
Fedorenko, V.A.Wooden, J.L., Czamanske, G.K., Fedorenko, V.A., Arndt, N.T., Chauvel, C.Isotopic and trace element constraints on mantle and crustal contributions to Siberian continental flood basalts, Noril'sk area, SiberiaGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 57, pp. 3677-3704Russia, SiberiaGeochronology, Basalts, Noril'sk
DS1995-0774
1995
Fedorenko, V.A.Hawkesworth, C.J., Lightfoot, P.C., Fedorenko, V.A.Magma differentiation and mineralization in the Siberian continental floodbasaltsLithos, Vol. 34, No. 1-3, Jan. pp. 61-88Russia, SiberiaMagmatism, Flood basalts
DS2003-0749
2003
Fedorenko, V.A.Kravchenko, S.M., Czamanske, G., Fedorenko, V.A.Geochemistry of carbonatites of the Tomtor MassifGeochemistry International, Vol. 41, 6, pp. 545-58.RussiaCarbonatite
DS2003-0750
2003
Fedorenko, V.A.Kravchenko, S.M., Czamanske, G., Fedorenko, V.A.Geochemistry of carbonatites of the Tomtor MassifGeochemistry International, Vol. 41, 6, pp. 545-59.RussiaCarbonatite
DS200412-1053
2003
Fedorenko, V.A.Kravchenko, S.M., Czamanske, G., Fedorenko, V.A.Geochemistry of carbonatites of the Tomtor Massif.Geochemistry International, Vol. 41, 6, pp. 545-58.RussiaCarbonatite
DS1997-0339
1997
Fedorenko, V.S.Fedorenko, V.S., Kalinin, E.V., Poletaev, A.I.Construction of geodynamic models of the endogenic and exogenic activity Of the earth's crustMoscow University of Bulletin, Vol. 51, No. 5, pp. 40-43RussiaGeodynamic, tectonic
DS1995-0177
1995
Fedoroff, N.Botha, G.A., Fedoroff, N.Paleosols in Late Quaternary colluvium, northern KwaZulu-Natal, SouthAfrica.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 21, No. 3, August pp. 291-312.South AfricaGeomorphology, Paleosols
DS2001-1105
2001
FedorovSonin, V.M., Zhimulev, Fedorov, Tomilenko, ChepurovEtching of diamond crystals in a dry silicate melt at high pressure-temperature parameters.Geochemistry International, Vol. 39, No. 3, pp. 268-74.GlobalDiamond - experimental petrology, Morphogenesis
DS1994-0299
1994
Fedorov, A.I.Chepurov, A.I., Fedorov, A.I., Sonin, V.M., Sobolev, N.V.Diamond formation in the system (iron, nickel) S-C H at high pressure/temperature parameters. (Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk. SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 336, No. 2, May pp. 238-240. # NR556RussiaDiamond genesis, Iron, nickel
DS200612-0389
2005
Fedorov, H.Fedorov, H., Chepurov, A.I., Chepurov, A.A., Kuroedov, A.V.Estimation of the rate of post crystallization self-purification of diamond from metal inclusions in the Earth's mantle.Geochemistry International, Vol. 43, 12, pp. 1235-1239.MantleDiamond inclusions
DS200712-1018
2007
Fedorov, I.Sonin, V., Zhimulev, E., Afanasev, V., Fedorov, I., Cheperov, A.Diamond interaction with silicate melts in a hydrogen atmosphere.Geochemistry International, Vol. 45, 4, pp. 399-404.TechnologyMelting
DS200712-1019
2007
Fedorov, I.Sonin, V., Zhimulev, E., Afanasev, V., Fedorov, I., Cheperov, A.Diamond interaction with silicate melts in a hydrogen atmosphere.Geochemistry International, Vol. 45, 4, pp. 399-404.TechnologyMelting
DS200712-1020
2006
Fedorov, I.Sonin, V., Zhimulev, E., Fedorov, I., Cheperov, A.Effect of oxygen fugacity on the etching rate of diamond crystals in silicate melt.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 48, 6, pp. 499-501.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200712-1021
2006
Fedorov, I.Sonin, V., Zhimulev, E., Fedorov, I., Cheperov, A.Effect of oxygen fugacity on the etching rate of diamond crystals in silicate melt.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 48, 6, pp. 499-501.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200812-1099
2008
Fedorov, I.A.I.A.Sonin, V.A.M.A., Zhimulev, E.A.I.A., Chepurov, A.A.I.A., Fedorov, I.A.I.A.Diamond stability in NaCl and NaF melts at high pressure.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 420, 1, pp. 641-643.TechnologyUHP
DS1991-0472
1991
Fedorov, I.I.Fedorov, I.I., Chepurov, A.I., Osorgin, N.Y., Dokol, A.G., Sobolev, V.The experimental and thermodynamic modelling of C-O-H fluid in equilibrium with graphite and diamond at high pressuret parameters.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 320, No. 3, pp. 710-713RussiaExperimental mineralogy, Graphite, diamond
DS1992-0450
1992
Fedorov, I.I.Fedorov, I.I., Chepurov, A.I., Osorgin, N. Yu., Sokol, A.G.Modeling of component composition of graphite and diamond equilibrated C-O-H fluid at high temperatures and pressuresRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 33, No. 4, pp. 61-68RussiaDiamond morphology, Experimental petrology
DS1993-0433
1993
Fedorov, I.I.Fedorov, I.I., Chepurov, A.I., Osorgin, N.Yu., Sokol, A.G., Sobolev, V.Experimental modeling and thermodydnamic analysis of C-O-H fluid in equilibrium with graphite and diamond at high pressures and temperatures.Doklady Academy of Sciences USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 321, No. 8, August 1993, pp. 163-166.Russia, Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)Geothermometry, Graphite/diamond interface
DS1996-0267
1996
Fedorov, I.I.Chepurov, A.I., Fedorov, I.I., Sonin, V.M., Sobolev, N.V.Diamond formation in the system (iron, nickel)-S-C-H at high pressures andtemperatures.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 338, No. 7, Jan. pp. 61-65.GlobalPetrology -experimental, Diamond genesis
DS1997-1086
1997
Fedorov, I.I.Sonin, V.M., Zhiumulev, E.I., Fedorov, I.I., Osorgin, N.Y.Etching of diamond crystals in silicate melt in the presence of aqueous fluid under high pressure-T parameters.Geochemistry International, Vol. 35, No. 4, pp. 393-397.GlobalPetrology - experimental, Diamond morphology
DS1998-0243
1998
Fedorov, I.I.Chepurov, A.I., Fedorov, I.I., Sonin, V.M.Experimental studies of diamond formation at high pressureT parameters (supplement to model for natural diamond).Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 39, No. 2, pp. 240-9.GlobalDiamond morphology, Pressure, metamorphism
DS1998-0414
1998
Fedorov, I.I.Fedorov, I.I., Bagryantsev, D.G., Chepurov, OsoginExperimental investigation of the volatiles captured by crystallizingdiamonds.Geochemistry International, Vol. 36, No. 4, pp. 361-366.RussiaDiamond inclusions, Petrology - experimental
DS1999-0128
1999
Fedorov, I.I.Chepurov, A.I., Fedorov, I.I., Osorgin, N.Y.Diamond formation during reduction of oxide and silicate carbon systems at high pressure/temperature conditions.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol.11, No. 2, Mar. pp. 355-62.GlobalDiamond genesis
DS2002-0453
2002
Fedorov, I.I.Fedorov, I.I., Chepurov, A.A., Dereppe, J.M.Redox conditions of metal carbon melts and natural diamond genesisGeochemical Journal, Vol.36, pp. 247-253.GlobalGeothermometry, Experimental data - thermodynamics
DS200412-2228
2004
Fedorov, I.I.Zhimulev, E.I., Sonin, V.M., Fedorov, I.I., Tomilenko, A.A., Pkhilenko, L.N., Chepurov, A.I.Diamond stability with respect to oxidation in experiments with minerals from mantle xenoliths at high P T parameters.Geochemistry International, Vol. 42, 6, pp. 520-525.MantleDiamond morphology, etching
DS200612-0390
2006
Fedorov, I.I.Fedorov, I.I., Chepurov, A.I., Sonin, V.M., Zhimulev, E.I.Experimental study of the effect of high pressure and high temperature on silicate and oxide inclusions in diamonds.Geochemistry International, Vol. 44, 10, pp. 1048-1052.TechnologyUHP, diamond inclusions
DS200712-0306
2006
Fedorov, I.I.Fedorov, I.I., Chepurov, A.I., Sonin, V.M., Zhimulev, E.I.Experimental study of the effect of high pressure and high temperature on silicate and oxide inclusions in diamonds.Geochemistry International, Vol. 44, 10, pp. 1048-TechnologyUHP - diamond inclusions
DS200712-1022
2007
Fedorov, I.I.Sonin, V.M., Zhimulev, E.I., Afanasev, V.P., Fedorov, I.I., Chepurov, A.I.Diamond interaction with silicate melts in a hydrogen atmosphere.Geochemistry International, Vol. 45, 4, pp. 399-404.MantleDiamond genesis
DS200712-1023
2006
Fedorov, I.I.Sonin, V.M., Zhimulev, E.I., Fedorov, I.I., Chepurov, A.I.Effect of oxygen fugacity on the etching rate of diamond crystals in silicate melt.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 48, 6, pp. 499-501.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200812-0217
2008
Fedorov, I.I.Chepunov, A.I., Fedorov, I.I., Sonin, V.M., Logvinova, A.M., Chepunov, A.A.Thermal effect on sulfide inclusions in diamonds ( from experimental data).Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 49, pp. 738-742.Russia, YakutiaTechnology - sulphide inclusions, UHP
DS200812-0905
2008
Fedorov, L.I.Pokhilenko, L.N., Pokhilenko, N.P., Fedorov, L.I., Tomilenko, A.A., Usova, L.V., Fomina, L.N., Sobolev, V.S.Fluid regime pecularities of the lithosphere mantle of the Siberian Platform.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., 2008 pp. 122-136.Russia, SiberiaMantle chemistry
DS1990-0467
1990
Fedorov, P.I.Fedorov, P.I., Dubik, F.Yu.The late Cretaceous shoshonitic assemblage of central KamchatkaInternational Geology Review, Vol. 32, No. 10, October pp. 972-980RussiaShoshonites, Related rocks
DS1990-0468
1990
Fedorov, P.I.Fedorov, P.I., Kazimirov, A.D.Mineralogy and geochemistry of island arc picrites, as illustrated by an example from the southern part of the Olyutorskaya zone of the KoryakHighlandsDoklady Academy of Sciences USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 306, No. 3, pp. 148-152RussiaPicrites -analyses, Geochemistry
DS1970-0329
1971
Fedorov, P.T.Krivonos, V.F., Fedorov, P.T.New Dat a on the Nature of Local Pipe Like Magnetic Anomalies on the Eastern Part of the Anabar Anteclise.Geologii i Geofiziki, No. 6, PP. 96-104.Russia, YakutiaKimberlite, Geophysics
DS1987-0203
1987
Fedorov, V.S.Fedorov, V.S., Kotelnikov, D.D., Cherenkova, A.F.Supergene alteration of kimberlite pipe of the Maymecha Kotuy petrographic provinceDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 285, No. 1-6, August pp. 75-79RussiaBlank
DS1987-0204
1987
Fedorov, V.S.Fedorov, V.S., Kotelnikov, D.D., Cherenkova, A.F.Supergene alteration of kimberlite in a pipe of the MaymechaKotuy petrographic provinceDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 285, No. 6, pp. 75-79.RussiaBlank
DS1989-0258
1989
Fedorov, V.S.Cherenkov, V.G., Kotelnikov, D.D., Cherenkova, A.F., Fedorov, V.S.Sequence of supergene alterations in kimberlites of the Maimecha Kotuiprovince.(Russian)Byull. Mosk. O-Va, Ispyt. Prir. Otd. Geol., (Russian), Vol. 64, No. 1, pp. 91-100RussiaAlteration, Kimberlites
DS200412-0541
2004
Fedorov, Y.N.Fedorov, Y.N., Krinochkin, V.G., Ivanov, K.S., Krasnobaev, A.A., Kaleganov, B.A.Stages of tectonic reactivation of the west Siberian platform ( based on K Ar dating).Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 397, 5, pp. 628-631.Russia, SiberiaTectonics
DS1999-0825
1999
Fedorova, E.N.Zedgenizov, D.A., Fedorova, E.N., Shatsky, V.S.Microdiamonds from the Udachnaya kimberlite pipeRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 39, No. 6, pp. 756-764.Russia, Siberia, YakutiaMicrodiamonds - mineral chemistry, Deposit - Udachnaya
DS200512-1233
2003
Fedorova, E.N.Zedgenizov, D.A., Reutsky, V.N., Shatsky, V.S., Fedorova, E.N.Impurities and carbon isotope compositions of microdiamonds with extra faces from the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 44, 9, pp. 834-41.Russia, YakutiaDiamond inclusions - Udachnaya
DS200612-1195
2006
Fedorova, E.N.Rylov, G.M., Fedorova, E.N., Sobolev, N.V.Study of the internal structure of imperfect diamond crystals by the Lane-SR method.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 47, 2, pp. 249-256.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200712-0922
2007
Fedorova, E.N.Rylov, G.M., Fedorova, E.N., Logvinova, A.M., Pokhilenko, N.P., Kulipanov, G.N., Sobolev, N.V.The peculiarities of natural plastically deformed diamond crystals from Internationalnaya pipe, Yakutia.Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A., Vol. 575, 1-2, pp. 152-154.RussiaDiamond morphology
DS200812-0684
2008
Fedorova, E.N.Logvinova, A.M., Wirth, R., Fedorova, E.N., Sobolev, N.V.Multi phase assemblages of nanometer sized inclusions in cloudy Siberian diamonds: evidence from TEM.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., 2008 pp. 53-70.Russia, SiberiaDiamond inclusions
DS200812-0987
2007
Fedorova, E.N.Rylov, G.M., Fedorova, E.N., Logvinova, A.M., Pokhilenko, N.P.The pecularities of natural plastically deformed diamond crystals from International pipe.Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A., Vol. 575, no. 1/2, pp. 152-154.TechnologyDeposit - International
DS201212-0197
2012
Fedorova, E.N.Fedorova, E.N., Logvinova, A.M., Mashkovtsev, R., Sobolev, N.V.Internal structure and color of the natural plastically deformed diamonds from the Internationalnaya kimberlite pipe, Yakutia.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractRussia, YakutiaDeposit - Internationnaya
DS201502-0074
2015
Fedorova, E.N.Logvinova, A.M., Taylor, L.A., Fedorova, E.N., Yelisseyev, A.P., Wirth, R., Howarth, G., Reutsky, V.N., Sobolev, N.V.A unique Diamondiferous peridoite xenolith from the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe, Yakutia: role of subduction in diamond formation.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 56, 1, pp. 306-320.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Udachnaya
DS201911-2565
2019
Fedorova, E.N.Soboelev, N.V., Logvinova, A.M., Tomilenko, A.A., Wirth, R., Bulbak, T.A., Lukyanova, L.I., Fedorova, E.N., Reutsky, V.N., Efimova, E.S.Mineral and fluid inclusions in diamonds from the Urals placers, Russia: evidence for solid molecular N2 and hydrocarbons in fluid inclusions.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 266, pp. 197-212.Russia, Uralsdiamond inclusions

Abstract: The compositions of mineral inclusions from a representative collection (more than 140 samples) of diamonds from the placer deposits in the Ural Mountains were studied to examine their compositional diversity. The overwhelming majority of rounded octahedral and dodecahedral stones typical of placers contain eclogitic (E-type) mineral inclusions (up to 80%) represented by garnets with Mg# 40-75 and Ca# 10-56, including the unique high calcic “grospydite” composition, omphacitic pyroxenes containing up to 65% of jadeite, as well as kyanite, coesite, sulfides, and rutile. Peridotitic (P-type) inclusions are represented by olivine, subcalcic Cr-pyrope, chrome diopside, enstatite and magnesiochromite that are typical for diamonds worldwide. Comparing the chemical composition of olivine, pyrope and magnesiochromite in diamonds of the Urals, north-east of the Siberian platform placers and Arkhangelsk province kimberlites show striking similarity. There are significant differences only in the variations of carbon isotopic composition of the diamonds from the placers of the Urals and north-east of the Siberian platform. One typical rounded dodecahedral diamond was found to contain abundant primary oriented submicrometer-sized (<3.0?µm) octahedral fluid inclusions identified by transmission electron microscopy, which caused the milky color of the entire diamond crystal. The electron energy-loss spectrum of a singular inclusion has a peak at ~405?eV, indicating that nitrogen is present. The Raman spectra with peaks at 2346-2350?cm-1 confirmed that nitrogen exists in the solid state at room temperature. This means that fossilized pressure inside fluid inclusions may be over 6.0 GPa at room temperature, so the diamond may be considered sublithospheric in origin. However, identification of unique fluid inclusions in one typical placer diamond allows one to expand the pressure limit to at least more than 8.0 GPa. The volatile components of four diamonds from the Urals placers were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). They are represented (rel. %) by hydrocarbons and their derivatives (14.8-78.4), nitrogen and nitrogenated compounds (6.2-81.7), water (2.5-5.5), carbon dioxide (2.8-12.1), and sulfonated compounds (0.01-0.96). It is shown that high-molecular-weight hydrocarbons and their derivatives, including chlorinated, nitrogenated and sulfonated compounds, appear to be stable under upper mantle P-T conditions. A conclusion is drawn that Urals placer diamonds are of kimberlitic origin and are comparable in their high E-type/P-type inclusion ratios to those from the northeastern Siberian platform and in part to diamonds of the Arkhangelsk kimberlite province.
DS201611-2105
2016
Fedorova, N.M.Fedorova, N.M., Bzhenov, M.L., Meert, J.G., Kuznetsov, N.B.Edicaran-Cambrian paleogeography of Baltica: a paleomagnetic view from a diamond pit on the White Sea east coast.Lithosphere, Vol. 8, 5, pp. 564-573.Russia, Baltic ShieldPaleogeography

Abstract: The controversial late Ediacaran to Cambrian paleogeography is largely due to the paucity and low reliability of available paleomagnetic poles. Baltica is a prime example of these issues. Previously published paleomagnetic results from a thick clastic sedimentary pile in the White Sea region (northern Russia) provided valuable Ediacaran paleontological and paleomagnetic data. Until recently, Cambrian-age rocks in northern Russia were known mostly from boreholes or a few small outcrops. A recent mining operation in the Winter Coast region exposed >60 m of red sandstone and siltstone of the Cambrian Brusov Formation from the walls of a diamond pit. Paleomagnetic data from these rocks yield two major components. (1) A single-polarity A component is isolated in ~90% of samples between 200 and 650 °C. The corresponding pole (Pole Latitutde, Plat = 20°S; Pole Longitude, Plong = 227°E, a95 = 7°) agrees with the Early Ordovician reference pole for Baltica. (2) A dual-polarity B component is identified in ~33% of samples, mostly via remagnetization circles, isolated from samples above 650 °C. The corresponding pole (Plat = 12°S; Plong = 108°E, a95 = 5°) is close to other late Ediacaran data but far from all younger reference poles for Baltica. We argue for a primary magnetization for the B component and the secondary origin of the other Cambrian poles from Baltica. This in turn requires a major reshuffling of all continents and blocks around the North Atlantic. The early stages of Eurasia amalgamation and models for the evolution of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt require revision.
DS200712-0307
2007
Fedorovich, A.N.Fedorovich, A.N., Yurevich, S.M., Iljich,R.A.Prediction of and searching for kimberlites by multispectral satellite images (MSI) on the basis of the stability theory of frames and encoding images.IAGOD Meeting held August 2006, Abstract, 5p.TechnologyRemote sensing - hyperspectral
DS201012-0719
2009
Fedorovsky, V.S.Sklyarov, E.V., Fedorovsky, V.S., Kotov, A.B., Lavrenchuk, A.V., Mazukebzov, A.M., Levitsky, V.I., et al.Carbonatites in collisional settings and pseudo-carbonatites of the Early Paleozoic Olkhon collisional system.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 50, 12, pp. 1091-1106.RussiaTectonics
DS1995-0526
1995
Fedorowich, J.S.Fedorowich, J.S., Jain, J.C., Kerrich, R., Sopuck, V.Trace element analysis of garnet by laser-ablation microprobe ICP-MS....pyrope garnet.Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 33, No. 2, April pp. 469-480.Wyoming, South AfricaGarnet -mass spectrometry, Deposit -Schaffer, Frank Smith
DS1987-0423
1987
Fedorseev, D.F.Loladze, N.T., Polyakov, V.P., Fedorseev, D.F.Dependence of diamond formation on the crystallite size Of the starting carbonaceous material.(Russian)Kolloidn. Zh.(Russian), Vol. 49, No. 2, pp. 352-353GlobalCrystallography
DS200812-0342
2008
Fedortchouk, T.Fedortchouk, T., Canil, D.Resorbed diamond surfaces: a tool to investigate oxidizing fluids.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A260.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS1999-0109
1999
Fedortchouk, Y.Canil, D., Fedortchouk, Y.Garnet dissolution and the emplacement of kimberlitesEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 167, No. 3-4, Apr. 15, pp. 227-38.GlobalKimberlites, Petrology - genesis
DS1999-0110
1999
Fedortchouk, Y.Canil, D., Fedortchouk, Y.Crystal liquid equilibration temperatures for vanadium and applications to mantle melts andresidues.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Geological Association of Canada (GAC)/Mineralogical Association of Canada (MAC)., Vol. 24, p. 19. abstractMantleGarnet lherzolites, Petrology - experimental
DS2000-0136
2000
Fedortchouk, Y.Canil, D., Fedortchouk, Y.Clinopyroxenite liquid partitioning for vanadium and the oxygen fugacity during formation of cratonic mantleJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol.105, No.11, Nov.10, pp.26003-16.MantleLithosphere - mineral chemistry
DS2000-0289
2000
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Canil, D.Experimental study of corona growth on garnet - olivine interfaces and application to kimberlite borne xenolithGeological Association of Canada (GAC)/Mineralogical Association of Canada (MAC) 2000 Conference, 1p. abstractGlobalPetrology - experimental, kelphite, Magma history
DS2003-0399
2003
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Canil, D., Carlson, J.A.Oxygen fugacity of kimberlite magmas and their relationship to the characteristics of8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, POSTER abstractNorthwest TerritoriesDiamonds - inclusions, Geochronology, morphology
DS2003-0524
2003
Fedortchouk, Y.Gurney, J.J., Hildebrand, P., Carlson, J., Dyke, D., Fedortchouk, Y.Diamonds from the Ekati core and buffer zone properties8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, AbstractNorthwest TerritoriesDiamonds - inclusions, Deposit - Ekati
DS200412-0542
2004
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Canil, D.Intensive variables in kimberlite magmas, Lac de Gras, Canada and implications for diamond survival. Leslie, Aaron, Grizzly andJournal of Petrology, Vol. 45, 9, pp. 1725-1745.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesChromite, crystallization temperature, olivine, oxygen
DS200412-0752
2003
Fedortchouk, Y.Gurney, J.J., Hildebrand, P., Carlson, J., Dyke, D., Fedortchouk, Y.Diamonds from the Ekati core and buffer zone properties.8 IKC Program, Session 3, AbstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDiamonds - inclusions Deposit - Ekati
DS200412-0753
2004
Fedortchouk, Y.Gurney, J.J., Hildebrand, P.R., Carlson, J.A., Fedortchouk, Y., Dyck, D.R.The morphological characteristics of diamonds from the Ekati property, Northwest Territories, Canada.Lithos, Vol. 77, 1-4, Sept. pp. 21-38.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDiamond morphology, colour
DS200512-0282
2005
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Canil, D., Carlson, J.A.Dissolution forms in Lac de Gras diamonds and their relationship to the temperature and redox state of kimberlite magma.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 150, 1, pp. 54-69.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDiamond morphology
DS200712-0308
2006
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Canil, D.What determines the morphology of a resorbed diamond?Gems & Gemology, 4th International Symposium abstracts, Fall 2006, p.146. abstract onlyTechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200712-0309
2007
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Canil, D., Sements, E.Mechanisms of diamond oxidation and their bearing on the fluid composition in kimberlite magmas.American Mineralogist, Vol. 92, 7, pp. 1200-1212.MantleMagmatism - diamond genesis
DS200812-0343
2008
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Matveev, S., Charnell, C., Carlson, J.A.Kimberlitic fluid as recorded by dissolving diamonds and crystallizaing olivine phenocrysts in five Lac de Gras kimberlites, Northwest Territories, Canada.9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Ekati
DS200912-0214
2009
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y.Diamond morphology: link to metasomatic events in the mantle or record of evolution of kimberlitic fluid?GAC/MAC/AGU Meeting held May 23-27 Toronto, Abstract onlyCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Ekati
DS200912-0215
2009
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Canil, D.Diamond oxidation at atmospheric pressure; development of surface features and the effect of oxygen fugacity.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 21, 3, June pp. 623-635.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200912-0216
2009
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Canil, D.Diamond oxidation at atmospheric pressure: development of surface features and the effect of oxygen fugacity.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 21, 3, pp. 623-635.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200912-0303
2009
Fedortchouk, Y.Hitchie, L., Fedortchouk, Y.Experimental study of diamond dissolution in Cl-H2O systems: implications for mechanisms of diamond oxidation and kimberlitic fluids.EOS Transaction of AGU, Vol. 90, no. 22 1p. abstractTechnologyDiamond oxidation
DS201112-0315
2011
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Manghnani, M.H., Hushur, A., Shiryaev, A., Nestola, F.An atomic force microscopy study of diamond dissolution features: the effect of H2O and CO2 in the fluid on diamond morphology.American Mineralogist, Vol. 96, pp. 1768-1775.TechnologyDiamond resorption
DS201112-0316
2011
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Zhang, Z.Diamond record of metasomatism.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.833.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesEkati mine
DS201112-0317
2011
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Zhang, Z.Diamond resorption: link to metasomatic events in the mantle or record of magmatic fluid in kimberlitic magma?The Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 49, 3, pp. 707-719.MantleMetasomatism
DS201212-0198
2012
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Hilchie, L., McIssac, E.Diamond survival in kimberlite magma: the importance of fluid.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractMantleDiamond genesis
DS201212-0651
2012
Fedortchouk, Y.Shiryaev, A., Gainutdinov, R., Fedortchouk, Y.Deformation induced defects in diamonds: contribution of small angle X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy.emc2012 @ uni-frankfurt.de, 1p. AbstractTechnologyDiamond microscopy
DS201212-0818
2012
Fedortchouk, Y.Zhang, Z., Fedortchouk, Y.Records of mantle metasomatism in the morphology of diamonds from the Slave craton.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 24, 4, pp. 619-632.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit -
DS201312-0261
2013
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y.Diamond dissolution in COH fluids.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractTechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201312-0262
2013
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., McIssac, E.Surface dissolution features on kimberlitic chromites as indicators of magmatic fluid and diamond quality.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 1, Special Issue of the Journal of the Geological Society of India,, Vol. 1, pp. 297-308.TechnologyMineral chemistry
DS201312-0263
2013
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Skvortsova, V.L., Zhang, Z.A review of experimental dat a of diamond dissolution with the focus on morphological features.GAC-MAC 2013 SS4: from birth to the mantle emplacement in kimberlite., abstract onlyMantleDiamond morphology
DS201312-0289
2013
Fedortchouk, Y.Gainutdinov, R.V., Shiryaev, A.A., Boyko, V.S., Fedortchouk, Y.Extended defects in natural diamonds: an atomic force microscopy investigation.Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 40, pp. 17-23.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201312-0517
2013
Fedortchouk, Y.Kressall, R.D., Fedortchouk, Y.Major and trace element composition of Fe-Ti oxides from the Lac de Gras kimberlites.GAC-MAC 2013 SS4: Diamond: from birth to the mantle emplacement in kimberlite., abstract onlyCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Lac de Gras
DS201312-0685
2012
Fedortchouk, Y.Paterson, N., Fedortchouk, Y.Determining the presence of aqueous fluids in Canadian kimberlites.Atlantic Geology, Vol. 48, p. 43. 1p abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesLac de Gras, Ekati
DS201312-0832
2013
Fedortchouk, Y.Skvortsova, V.L., Fedortchouk, Y., Shiryaev, A.A.Micromorphology of diamond resorption at 100 kPa: the role of metal ions.Goldschmidt 2013, 1p. AbstractTechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201312-1012
2013
Fedortchouk, Y.Zhang, Z., Fedortchouk, Y., Hanley, J.J.Pressure effect on diamond resorption morphology.GAC-MAC 2013 SS4: from birth to the mantle emplacement in kimberlite., abstract onlyMantleDiamond morphology
DS201412-0242
2014
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y.Evolution of diamond resorption morphology from the mantle source to the emplacement of kimberlite at the surface: review of experimental data.ima2014.co.za, AbstractMantleDiamond morphology
DS201412-0243
2014
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y.Linking together the dissolution and reaction features of kimberlite hosted diamond and Fe-Ti oxides with magmatic fluid and its role in kimberlite emplacement.ima2014.co.za, AbstractMantleMagmatism
DS201412-0356
2014
Fedortchouk, Y.Hilchie, L., Fedortchouk, Y., Matveev, S., Kopylova, M.G.The origin of high hydrogen content in kimberlitic olivine: evidence from hydroxyl zonation in olivine from kimberlites and mantle xenoliths.Lithos, Vol. 202-203, pp. 429-441.Canada, Nunavut, Northwest Territories, Africa, LesothoDeposit - Jericho, Beartooth, Pipe 200, Matsoku
DS201412-0480
2014
Fedortchouk, Y.Kressall, R.D., Fedortchouk, Y., McCammon, C., Elliott, B.Fe-Ti oxides in kimberlites: implications for kimberlites from the Ekati diamond mine, Northwest Territories.2014 Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Poster, p. 87, abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Ekati
DS201511-1834
2015
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y.Diamond resorption features as a new method of examining conditions of kimberlite emplacement.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 170, 19p.GlobalDiamond morphology - etch pits

Abstract: The study develops a new approach utilizing parameters of trigonal etch pits on diamond crystals to infer the conditions of diamond residence in kimberlite magma. Diamond crystals from dissolution experiments conducted at 1 GPa and 1150-1350 °C in the presence of H2O-rich or CO2-rich fluid were studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM data of resorbed diamond surfaces show that much deeper surface relief was produced in CO2 fluid. It also clearly distinguishes the profiles of the trigonal etch pits forming regular flat-bottomed trigons in H2O fluid, and round- or pointed-bottomed trigons in CO2 fluid. The relationship between the diameter and the depth of the trigonal pits is found to be another important indicator of the fluid composition. Dissolution in H2O fluid develops trigons with constant diameter and variable depth where the diameter increases with temperature. Trigons developed in CO2 fluid have a large range of diameters showing a strong positive correlation with the depth. The developed criteria applied to the natural diamond crystals from three Ekati Mine kimberlites indicate significant variation in CO2-H2O ratio and temperature of their magmatic fluid. This conclusion based on diamond resorption agrees with the mineralogy of microphenocrysts and groundmass of the studied kimberlites offering new method to study crystallization conditions of kimberlite magma. Keywords
DS201512-1952
2015
Fedortchouk, Y.Milligan, R., Fedortchouk, Y., Normandeau, P.X., Fulop, A.Comparative study of composition and occurrence of apatite in Snap Lake and Ekati kimberlites.43rd Annual Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts, abstract p. 69.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Snap Lake, Ekati

Abstract: Kimberlites are volcanic ultra-potassic rocks present mostly in cratonic settings and some are diamond bearing. Kimberlite magma is derived from the upper mantle, however, its primary composition is still unknown. Assimilation of mantle and crustal material, loss of volatiles during eruption and high degree of alteration all result in variable compositions of kimberlite magma reaching the surface. Studies have shown that kimberlitic fluid has a significant effect on the quality and preservation of diamonds carried to the surface. By better understanding the primary composition of kimberlites, and the processes that drive kimberlite eruption, we can attempt to gain some diagnostic knowledge of the economic viability of a particular kimberlite. Apatite is a common mineral in kimberlite, which composition is sensitive to volatiles and the presence of magmatic fluid. This study will look at the variation of apatite in kimberlites, how different geology indicates their different fluid histories, and the potential for using apatite as an indicator of fluid content and composition in kimberlite magma. The study uses polished sections from different kimberlite lithologies within the Snap Lake kimberlite and from six Ekati Mine kimberlites. Apatite grains were examined using scanning electron microscope (back scatter imaging) and composition was obtained with wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy mode of electron-microprobe analyzes. Snap Lake is a single dyke of coherent kimberlite facies. The dyke intruded in a near-horizontal orientation, and has an average vertical thickness of 2.5 m. There is significant incorporation of crustal material, and the kimberlite is highly altered, possibly a result of interaction with abundant xenoliths. The studied Ekati kimberlites include: two coherent kimberlites - Grizzly and Leslie, and four kimberlites with resedimented volcaniclastic kimberlite facies – Misery, Koala, Panda, and Beartooth. These kimberlites show significant variations in the apatite crystallizing from the melts. At Snap Lake apatite occurs late, interstitially in the groundmass. These anhedral apatites appear to have no zonation, and crystallize around microphenocrysts of olivine and phlogopite. There is also a late component of apatite, possibly associated with carbonate veins that fracture olivine macrocrysts. Sub- to euhedral apatite grains (max 50 µm) crystalize in a carbonate host within a fracture or crack in olivine macrocrysts. In the Ekati kimberlites, apatite is extremely rare to absent in Misery, Panda, and Beartooth kimberlites, but abundant in Grizzly, Koala, and Leslie. Leslie has plenty of euhedral zoned and unzoned apatite associated with monticellite set in carbonate matrix. Grizzly has abundant small (~10 µm) anhedral apatite. Koala contains both anhedral and euhedral apatite, some of which is zoned. The presentation will report the initial results of this study and possible applications for the behavior of volatiles in the studied kimberlite magmas and examine their relationship with the features of the diamond population.
DS201604-0602
2016
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Zhang, Z., Chinn, I.Diamond resorption features as a new method for examining conditions of kimberlite emplacement.GAC MAC Meeting Special Session SS11: Cratons, kimberlites and diamonds., Keynote abstractTechnologyEmplacement

Abstract: The study develops a new approach utilizing parameters of trigonal etch pits on diamond crystals to infer the conditions of diamond residence in kimberlite magma. Diamond crystals from dissolution experiments conducted at 1 GPa and 1150-1350 °C in the presence of H2O-rich or CO2-rich fluid were studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM data of resorbed diamond surfaces show that much deeper surface relief was produced in CO2 fluid. It also clearly distinguishes the profiles of the trigonal etch pits forming regular flat-bottomed trigons in H2O fluid, and round- or pointed-bottomed trigons in CO2 fluid. The relationship between the diameter and the depth of the trigonal pits is found to be another important indicator of the fluid composition. Dissolution in H2O fluid develops trigons with constant diameter and variable depth where the diameter increases with temperature. Trigons developed in CO2 fluid have a large range of diameters showing a strong positive correlation with the depth. The developed criteria applied to the natural diamond crystals from three Ekati Mine kimberlites indicate significant variation in CO2-H2O ratio and temperature of their magmatic fluid. This conclusion based on diamond resorption agrees with the mineralogy of microphenocrysts and groundmass of the studied kimberlites offering new method to study crystallization conditions of kimberlite magma.
DS201608-1418
2016
Fedortchouk, Y.Kueter, N., Soesilo, J., Fedortchouk, Y., Nestola, F., Belluco, L., Troch, J., Walle, M., Giuillong, M., Von Quadt, A., Driesner, T.Tracing the depositional history of Kalimantan diamonds by zircon provenance and diamond morphology studies. ( kimberlite or lamproite)Lithos, in press availableIndonesia, BorneoDeposit - Kalimantan

Abstract: Diamonds in alluvial deposits in Southeast Asia are not accompanied by indicator minerals suggesting primary kimberlite or lamproite sources. The Meratus Mountains in Southeast Borneo (Province Kalimantan Selatan, Indonesia) provide the largest known deposit of these so-called “headless” diamond deposits. Proposals for the origin of Kalimantan diamonds include the adjacent Meratus ophiolite complex, ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes, obducted subcontinental lithospheric mantle and undiscovered kimberlite-type sources. Here we report results from detailed sediment provenance analysis of diamond-bearing Quaternary river channel material and from representative outcrops of the oldest known formations within the Alino Group, including the diamond-bearing Campanian-Maastrichtian Manunggul Formation. Optical examination of surfaces of diamonds collected from artisanal miners in the Meratus area (247 stones) and in West Borneo (Sanggau Area, Province Kalimantan Barat;
DS201612-2312
2016
Fedortchouk, Y.Kotkova, J., Fedortchouk, Y., Jakubova, P., Whitehouse, M., Wirth, R.Bohemian microdiamonds: diamond forming media and carbon source.Acta Geologica Sinica, Vol. 90, 1, July abstract P. 217-219.EuropeMicrodiamonds
DS201707-1342
2017
Fedortchouk, Y.Kueter, N., Soesilo, J., Fedortchouk, Y., Nestola, F., Belluco, L., Troch, J., Walle, M., Guillong, M., Von Quadt, A., Driesner, T.Tracing the depositional history of Kalimantan diamonds by zircon proveneance and diamond morphology studies. Appendix 1 and 2Academia.edu, Supplementary material app. 1 and 2, both 10p.Asia, Kalimantandeposit - Kalimantan

Abstract: Diamonds in alluvial deposits in Southeast Asia are not accompanied by indicator minerals suggesting primary kimberlite or lamproite sources. The Meratus Mountains in Southeast Borneo (Province Kalimantan Selatan, Indonesia) provide the largest known deposit of these so-called “headless” diamond deposits. Proposals for the origin of Kalimantan diamonds include the adjacent Meratus ophiolite complex, ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes, obducted subcontinental lithospheric mantle and undiscovered kimberlite-type sources. Here we report results from detailed sediment provenance analysis of diamond-bearing Quaternary river channel material and from representative outcrops of the oldest known formations within the Alino Group, including the diamond-bearing Campanian–Maastrichtian Manunggul Formation. Optical examination of surfaces of diamonds collected from artisanal miners in the Meratus area (247 stones) and in West Borneo (Sanggau Area, Province Kalimantan Barat; 85 stones) points toward a classical kimberlite-type source for the majority of these diamonds. Some of the diamonds host mineral inclusions suitable for deep single-crystal X-ray diffraction investigation. We determined the depth of formation of two olivines, one coesite and one peridotitic garnet inclusion. Pressure of formation estimates for the peridotitic garnet at independently derived temperatures of 930–1250 °C are between 4.8 and 6.0 GPa. Sediment provenance analysis includes petrography coupled to analyses of detrital garnet and glaucophane. The compositions of these key minerals do not indicate kimberlite-derived material. By analyzing almost 1400 zircons for trace element concentrations with laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) we tested the mineral's potential as an alternative kimberlite indicator. The screening ultimately resulted in a small subset of ten zircons with a kimberlitic affinity. Subsequent U–Pb dating resulting in Cretaceous ages plus a detailed chemical reflection make a kimberlitic origin unfavorable with respect to the regional geological history. Rather, trace elemental analyses (U, Th and Eu) suggest an eclogitic source for these zircons. The age distribution of detrital zircons allows in general a better understanding of collisional events that formed the Meratus orogen and identifies various North Australian Orogens as potential Pre-Mesozoic sediment sources. Our data support a model whereby the majority of Kalimantan diamonds were emplaced within the North Australian Craton by volcanic processes. Partly re-deposited into paleo-collectors or residing in their primary host, these diamond-deposits spread passively throughout Southeast Asia by terrane migration during the Gondwana breakup. Terrane amalgamation events largely metamorphosed these diamond-bearing lithologies while destroying the indicative mineral content. Orogenic uplift finally liberated their diamond-content into new, autochthonous placer deposits.
DS201708-1634
2017
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y.Three styles of diamond resorption in a single kimberlite: does crustal xenolith play a role?11th. International Kimberlite Conference, OralTechnologyDiamond resorption

Abstract: Kimberlite magmas, the primary source of diamonds, have many features indicative of explosive eruptions and high volatile contents. The main approaches used to establish exsolution of fluid during magma ascent include theoretical modeling and experimental estimates of volatile solubility in kimberlite-like melts. Both approaches are hampered by the poorly constrained composition of kimberlite melts. Resorption features on diamonds are very sensitive to the presence and composition of the kimberlite fluid as well as to temperature and pressure. Here, we use direct evidence from diamond resorption features as a new method for investigating the parameters of fluid exsolution. The method is based on experimental reproduction of diamond resorption in kimberlite melts with and without an exsolved fluid phase. We studied 802 diamonds from two kimberlites (BK1 and AK15) from the Orapa cluster, Botswana. Samples from the BK1 pipe include three lithologies: two coherent kimberlites (CK-A and CK-B) and a pyroclastic kimberlite (massive volcaniclastic kimberlite, MVK). The known depth of diamond samples in each kimberlite lithology allows us to demonstrate an increase in the intensity of kimberlite-induced resorption with depth of diamond recovery in the drill holes. Each kimberlite lithology has a different proportion of diamonds with kimberlite-induced resorption, which is unique in style in each lithology: glossy surfaces in MVK due to reaction with C-O-H fluid, rough corroded surfaces in CK-B due to reaction with volatile-undersaturated melt, and a combination of glossy surfaces with corroded features in CK-A due to an overprint of melt resorption after fluid resorption. Both diamond resorption and kimberlite textures in the BK1 kimberlite show evidence of fluid exsolution only in CK-A and MVK lithologies, but no fluid presence in CK-B. The observed diamond resorption features may be controlled by (1) a temporary separation of the rising magma column into a bubblerich head and bubble-poor volatile-depleted tail and (2) fluid exsolution at depths greater than decompressional degassing. We discuss how the depth of fluid exsolution from kimberlite melt may affect the diamond grade and the resorption of diamond populations in a kimberlite.
DS201708-1635
2017
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y.Diamond surface features and metasomatic processes in subcratonic mantle.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, PosterMantlemetasomatism
DS201709-2020
2017
Fedortchouk, Y.Kotova, J., Fedortchouk, Y., Wirth, R., Whitehouse, M., JakubovaUHP-UHT melting and diamond formation. MicrodiamondsGoldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.MantleUHP

Abstract: Exhumed ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) terranes, involving slices of deeply subducted crustal rocks, provide unique material for studying material transfer in subduction zones. Diamond-bearing UHP rocks with sedimentary protoliths allow for tracing melting processes at both UHP and UHT including carbon cycling in the Earth. We studied microdiamonds and associated phases in two contrasting lithologies, (1) acid, quartzofeldpathic UHP gneiss composed of garnet, kyanite, feldspar, quartz and biotite, with a high ASI characteristic of sedimentary rocks, and (2) intermediate garnet-clinopyroxene rock containing quartz, feldspar, minor kyanite and biotite, which is metaluminous. Whereas rock (1) contains exclusively single octahedral diamonds with perfect crystal shape in garnet, kyanite (more common) and zircon, the microdiamonds in the rock (2) occur mostly as clusters of cuboid shape in garnet and zircon. Micro-Raman and FIB TEM data document presence of graphite, quartz and rutile at diamond/host interface or in separate multiple solid inclusions (MSI) whereas carbonates are practically absent. The morphology and lack of inclusions reflect relatively slow growth of the octahedral diamonds (rock 1) at lower fluid supersaturation. Individual deep and symmetrical negative trigons (AFM) on the (111) plane suggest dissolution by a residual silicate-carbonate melt. In contrast, polycrystallline character of diamond cuboids (rock 2) along with their common dissolution and formation of numerous tetragonal etch pits reflect relatively rapid growth of these grains from highly supersaturated fluid/melt. Peak P-T conditions for the UHP rocks of = 1100ºC at 4.5 GPa are located above the phengite dehydration melting curve, where silicate melts are produced and may coexist with carbonate melts. In view of the light carbon isotope composition and lack of carbonates, we suggest that the diamonds crystallized from the graphitized primordial organic matter under reducing conditions at presence of silicate melt.
DS201710-2226
2017
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Chinn, I.L., Kopylova, M.G.Three styles of diamond resorption in a single kimberlite: effects of volcanic degassing and assimilation.Geology, Vol. 45, 10. pp. 871-874.Africa, Botswanadeposit - Orapa BK1 and AK15

Abstract: Kimberlite magmas, the primary source of diamonds, have many features indicative of explosive eruptions and high volatile contents. The main approaches used to establish exsolution of fluid during magma ascent include theoretical modeling and experimental estimates of volatile solubility in kimberlite-like melts. Both approaches are hampered by the poorly constrained composition of kimberlite melts. Resorption features on diamonds are very sensitive to the presence and composition of the kimberlite fluid as well as to temperature and pressure. Here, we use direct evidence from diamond resorption features as a new method for investigating the parameters of fluid exsolution. The method is based on experimental reproduction of diamond resorption in kimberlite melts with and without an exsolved fluid phase. We studied 802 diamonds from two kimberlites (BK1 and AK15) from the Orapa cluster, Botswana. Samples from the BK1 pipe include three lithologies: two coherent kimberlites (CK-A and CK-B) and a pyroclastic kimberlite (massive volcaniclastic kimberlite, MVK). The known depth of diamond samples in each kimberlite lithology allows us to demonstrate an increase in the intensity of kimberlite-induced resorption with depth of diamond recovery in the drill holes. Each kimberlite lithology has a different proportion of diamonds with kimberlite-induced resorption, which is unique in style in each lithology: glossy surfaces in MVK due to reaction with C-O-H fluid, rough corroded surfaces in CK-B due to reaction with volatile-undersaturated melt, and a combination of glossy surfaces with corroded features in CK-A due to an overprint of melt resorption after fluid resorption. Both diamond resorption and kimberlite textures in the BK1 kimberlite show evidence of fluid exsolution only in CK-A and MVK lithologies, but no fluid presence in CK-B. The observed diamond resorption features may be controlled by (1) a temporary separation of the rising magma column into a bubble-rich head and bubble-poor volatile-depleted tail and (2) fluid exsolution at depths greater than decompressional degassing. We discuss how the depth of fluid exsolution from kimberlite melt may affect the diamond grade and the resorption of diamond populations in a kimberlite.
DS201804-0687
2018
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y.Dissolution features on diamond surfaces: what can they tell us?Vancouver Kimberlite Cluster talk, 1p. AbstractMantlediamond morphology

Abstract: Diamonds are valued for their brilliance achieved by faceting of diamond crystals into the cut shapes that most efficiently reflect the light. However, diamond cut removes the long history of diamond growth and dissolution recorded in the surface features on rough diamonds. Growth features on diamond surfaces reflect the conditions of diamond-forming events in the mantle but are rarely preserved on natural diamonds due to their partial dissolution. The majority of natural diamonds show surface features resulted from dissolution both in the mantle source due to metasomatism and in the kimberlite magma during the ascent to the Earth’s surfaces. Mantle-derived resorption features can be preserved on diamonds enclosed in mantle xenoliths and protected from the interaction with the kimberlite magma during the ascent. The diamonds exposed to the reaction with the kimberlite magma develop kimberlite-induced dissolution features. This talk will discuss the large diversity of surface dissolution features on diamonds recovered from kimberlites. It will examine how the shape, size, and orientation of certain features can be used to deduce the conditions of kimberlite emplacement using the results of diamond dissolution experiments and observations on natural diamonds. The talk will discuss what we can learn about the behavior of volatiles and exsolution of fluid in kimberlite magma and how this supports or contradicts to what we know about kimberlitic fluid. The results of experiments conducted at mantle conditions are used to examine the kind of dissolution surfaces developed by diamonds during mantle metasomatism in fluids, in aqueous silicate melts and in carbonatitic melts. Comparison to the features of natural diamonds will assess what media dissolves diamond in the mantle, the prevalent diamond-destructive metasomatic agent, and will try to explain the repetitive cycles of growth and dissolution events recorded in single diamond crystals.
DS201808-1763
2018
Fedortchouk, Y.Li, Z., Fedortchouk, Y., Fulop, A., Chinn, I.L., Forbes, N.Positively oriented trigons - a unique resorption feature of diamonds from Snap Lake kimberlite dyke, Canada.minsocam.org/ MSA/AMMin/ special-collections, doi.org/10.2138/am-2018-6496. 48p. Canada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Snap Lake
DS201809-2020
2018
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Chinn, I., Liebske, C., McCammon, C.Mantle metasomatism as recorded in diamond dissolution features.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractAfrica, Botswanadeposit - Orapa

Abstract: Roots of continental cratons keep a long record of multiple metasomatic events, but their trace is complicated due to the mixed signals left by these events in the composition of mantle silicate minerals. Simple composition helps diamonds to provide a more robust record of the latest metasomatic events which they witnessed. Growth and dissolution features on the diamond surface are sensitive to the composition of the reacting media. In this study we use mantle-derived resorption features on natural diamonds to examine the nature of metasomatic events in diamondiferous mantle lithologies. We use experiments at mantle conditions to examine how the composition of fluids and melts affect diamond resorption. We then compare these results to the features of natural diamonds to determine which of the tested compositions could have acted as metasomatic agents in Earth’s cratonic roots. Diamond dissolution experiments conducted at 6 GPa, 1200 - 1500oC using synthetic MgO-CaO-SiO2-CO2-H2O system examined the effect of CHO fluid, silica-saturated CHO fluid, aqueous and “dry” silica-carbonate and carbonate melts. Results show that the main control of diamond resorption morphology is the state of the reacting media: fluid vs. melt. We compared the experimental results to diamonds with mantle-derived resorption features from two kimberlites from the Orapa kimberlite cluster (Botswana). We identified twelve mantle-derived resorption types, none of which resembled the products of resorption in fluids. Most of the observed resorption types could be produced by dissolution in mantle melts with variable proportions of carbonate and silicate components and in the range of temperatures. The most abundant resorption type resembles the product of diamond dissolution in carbonate melts at temperatures above 1450oC. Our results suggest that fluid-metasomatism is not destructive for diamonds while melt-metasomatism is. The lower hydrous carbonated solidus of lherzolite compared to harzburgite can result in the shift the process from diamond growth in fluids to diamond dissolution in melts due to metasomatic transformation of harzburgite into lherzolite.
DS201810-2312
2009
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Matveev, S.Surface features on diamonds and water content of olivine from kimberlite as indicators of fluid systems in kimberlite magma. EkatiAtlantic Geology, Vol. 45, p. 28. 1p. AbstractCanada, Northwest Territoriesmagmatism
DS201811-2590
2018
Fedortchouk, Y.Li, Z., Fedortchouk, Y., Fulop, A., Chinn, I.L., Forbes, N.Positively oriented trigons on diamonds from the Snap Lake kimberlite dike, Canada: implications for fluids and kimberlite cooling rates.American Mineralogist, Vol. 103, pp. 1634-1648.Canada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Snap Lake

Abstract: The role of fluid(s) in the formation of different lithological facies of kimberlites is still poorly understood. The uncertainty in the composition of kimberlite melts hampers understanding the composition of volatiles, the depth of exsolution, and the effect on magma ascent and fragmentation. Recent estimates of H2O and CO2 solubility in kimberlite-like magmas suggest very shallow exsolution of fluid, while many features of kimberlites indicate the presence of significant fluid fraction at depth. Deep magmatic fluid produces negative trigonal etch pits on natural diamonds, the characteristics of which depend on the temperature and composition of the fluid. Positively oriented trigonal etch pits are very rare on natural diamonds and are likely a feature of resorption events unique to only some kimberlite magmas. Here we present the first systematic study of positively oriented trigonal etch pits on natural diamonds from Snap Lake kimberlite dike, Northwest Territories, Canada. The study used 91 micro-diamonds selected from a population of 251 diamonds representative of all six kimberlite litho-facies identified in the Snap Lake dike. We established that unlike the majority of diamonds from kimberlite pipes in the Northwest Territories, every studied Snap Lake diamond shows positively oriented trigons. These trigons cover the whole diamond surface starting from the {111} faces and continuing over the resorbed edges. They overprint negatively oriented trigons and modify them into hexagons. Atomic force microscopy obtained detailed geometry of 154 positive trigons on 14 diamonds. Three distinct trigon morphologies dependent on the type of the crystal lattice defect were recognized. The point-bottomed shape and positive correlation between the depth and diameter of the individual pits suggest a high CO2 content in the fluid. Comparison with the existing experimental data on positive trigons implies resorption at low-pressure conditions in the 800-1000 °C temperature range by trapped magmatic fluid after the dike emplacement. The intensity of this late resorption event (and the size of the positive trigons) increases from the dike contact with the country rock into the interior of the dike. Such a late resorption event is absent in the majority of kimberlites, which form pipes, and might be a specific feature of hypabyssal kimberlite bodies (dikes). The absence of positive trigons on diamonds from the majority of kimberlites suggests very quick magma cooling below ~800 °C after the pipe emplacement, precluding the development of any late resorption features. Our study shows that for kimberlitic magmas, for which mineral chemistry is unable to provide a robust record of magmatic fluid, morphological details of dissolution features on the surface of diamond and other mantle-derived minerals can serve as a fluid proxy. Better constraints of the pressure, temperature, and oxygen fugacity of the reversal in the trigon orientation on diamond may help to reconstruct the emplacement path of geologically diverse kimberlite bodies.
DS201901-0032
2018
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Liebske, C., McCammon, C.Diamond destruction and growth during mantle metasomatism: an experimental study of diamond resorption features.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 506, pp. 493-506.Mantlemetasomatism

Abstract: Most diamonds found in kimberlites show complex patterns of growth and dissolution (resorption) surface features. Populations of diamonds from within single kimberlite bodies commonly contain a large diversity of diamond surface forms, some of which are a result of dissolution in kimberlite magma and others are inherited from the mantle. Morphological studies of natural diamonds differentiated features produced during dissolution in kimberlite magma and during mantle metasomatism. The former features were experimentally reproduced at 1 3 GPa and used to infer the presence and composition of magmatic fluid in different kimberlites. However, the mantle-derived resorption features have not been reproduced experimentally and the composition and origins of their formative solvents are unknown. Here we report the results of diamond dissolution experiments conducted in a multi-anvil apparatus at 6 GPa and 1200 to 1500 °C in synthetic CaO MgO SiO2 CO2 H2O system. The experiments produced very different diamond resorption morphologies in COH fluid, in silicate-saturated fluid, and in silicate and carbonate melts. Dissolution in SiO2-free COH fluid developed rounded crystal forms with shallow negative trigons, striations and hillocks, which are commonly observed on natural diamonds and are similar in 6 GPa and in 1 3 GPa experiments. However, silicate-saturated fluid produced very different resorption features that are rarely observed on natural diamonds. This result confirms that natural, SiO2-poor fluid-induced resorption develops under the comparatively low-pressures of kimberlite ascent, because at mantle pressures the high content of SiO2 in fluids would produce features like those from the silicate-saturated experiments. Comparison of the experimental products from this study to natural diamond resorption features from the literature suggests that natural diamonds show no record of dissolution by fluids during mantle metasomatism. Diamond resorption morphologies developed in experiments with silicate carbonate melts closely resemble many of the mantle-derived resorption features of natural diamonds, whose diversity can result from variable SiO2 concentration in carbonatitic melts and temperature variation. The experimental results imply that metasomatism by fluids does not dissolve diamond, whereas metasomatism by melts is diamond-destructive. The repetitive growth-dissolution patterns of natural diamonds could be due to diamond growth from fluids in harzburgitic lithologies followed by its dissolution in partial melts.
DS201903-0508
2019
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y.A new approach to understanding diamond surface features based on a review of experimental and natural diamond studies.Earth-Science Reviews, 10.1016/j.earscirev .2019.02.013 56p.Canada, Northwest Territories, Africa, Botswanadiamond morphology

Abstract: Diamonds originate deep in the Earth's mantle since billions of years ago. Through their long history diamonds accumulate information about the Earth's evolution, and preserve it owing to their extreme chemical and mechanical stability. The surface of natural diamonds shows a variety of growth and dissolution features, which reflect the diversity of conditions in the mantle and in kimberlite magma, providing an important clue for understanding the deep regions of subcratonic mantle. However, such studies are hampered by an absence of a systematic approach for studying diamond surface features and morphology. This review integrates studies of natural diamonds with the results of diamond dissolution experiments to explore the origin of the most typical resorption features of diamonds and the information they provide. It uses detailed studies of over ~ 3500 diamonds from eight kimberlite bodies in the Northwest Territories in Canada and Orapa kimberlite cluster in Botswana, and the data from diamond dissolution experiments covering a pressure range of between 0.1?MPa - 7.5?GPa, temperature range of between 900?°C - 1750?°C, and over 12 log units of oxygen fugacity values. Examining the effects of these parameters on diamond resorption morphology shows that the shape and size of the etch pits depends on the temperature and H2O:CO2 ratio in the fluid, whereas pressure affects the efficiency of diamond crystal shape transformation from octahedral into rounded resorbed forms. The effect of pressure on the physical properties of the reacting fluid / melt controls the character of diamond etching. A comparison between the experimentally-induced and naturally occurring diamond resorption demonstrates a clear difference between the features developed in kimberlite magma and features inherited from the mantle source. Kimberlite-induced resorption on diamonds shows a strong correlation with the geology and emplacement mode of the hosting kimberlite unit. Low-relief surfaces develop on diamonds from pyroclastic kimberlites in all kimberlite classes, whereas surface features on diamonds from coherent kimberlites differ between kimberlite localities and often show corrosive character. Diamond resorption morphology can offer a robust method to better understand emplacement processes in different kimberlite localities, which are a matter of significant debate. The proposed here classification scheme for diamond resorption features is based on the features observable under a stereomicroscope. It helps differentiating resorption produced in the mantle source from that in the kimberlite magma and assigning diamond resorption to a particular mode of kimberlite emplacement, or a mantle metasomatic event.
DS201906-1284
2019
Fedortchouk, Y.Chow, R., Fedortchouk, Y., Normandeau, P.Trace element partitioning between apatite and kimberlite-like melts: implications for volatile degassing and formation of different kimberlite facies.GAC/MAC annual Meeting, 1p. Abstract p. 71.Mantlekimberlites

Abstract: Primary melt composition of kimberlites remains poorly constrained due to the contamination from mantle and crustal rocks, loss of volatiles during emplacement, significant alteration, and the lack of any quenched melts. Additionally, kimberlite bodies have multiple morphologies of which their emplacement mechanism remains elusive. Apatite is a common accessory mineral in kimberlite. Its structure incorporates many trace elements of which partitioning depends on the composition of the melt. Concentrations of trace elements in kimberlitic apatite can help to assess the content of carbonate and silicate components in kimberlite melt. Apatite is also often used as an indicator mineral of magma degassing in igneous systems. As such, it should be applied to kimberlitic systems to study the volatile behaviour during emplacement. However, the existing estimates for the trace elements partitioning in apatite provide controversial estimates for carbonatitic melts and estimates for silicate melts use compositions very different than the composition of kimberlites. This study experimentally determines partition coefficients of trace elements and kimberlite-like melts. The experiments were done in piston cylinder apparatus at 1250-1350 °C and 1-2 Gpa. Partition coefficients for Nb, Sr, Rb, Zr, Sm, Cs, Hf, La, Yb, and Eu were examined in synthetic compositions representing evolved kimberlite melts: three lamproitic compositions (17-23 wt % SiO2 and 9-33 wt % CO2) and a composition modelled after a magmatic kimberlite (14-29 wt % SiO2 and 7-33 wt % CO2). The effects of melt composition, temperature, pressure, water, and oxygen fugacity have been tested. The obtained partition coefficients were applied to natural kimberlitic apatites from Ekati Mine (Canada) and Orapa cluster (Botswana) to model kimberlite melt composition. Observed variation in the presence, textures, and composition of natural apatites relative to depth in kimberlite pipes of differing lithologies is compared to experimental run products to infer crystallization conditions of different kimberlite bodies.
DS201912-2773
2019
Fedortchouk, Y.Chow, R., Fedortchouk, Y., Normandeau, P.X.Trace element partitioning between apatite and kimberlite melts: implications to crystallization conditions of kimberlite magma.Yellowknife Forum NWTgeoscience.ca, abstract volume poster p.103.Mantlemagmatism

Abstract: Kimberlites are the deepest mantle magmas to reach the surface of the Earth and the hosts of the major primary diamond deposits. The enigmatic nature of kimberlites owning to poorly constrained triggers of kimberlite magmatism, melt composition, and crystallization conditions, are mostly limited by unknown content and composition of volatiles. The content and ratio of H2O and CO2 are important parameters of magma emplacement. They are essential for the mantle melting and rapid ascent of kimberlites. Volatiles also greatly affect diamond preservation in kimberlites during the ascent to the surface. Apatite has been used as an indicator of volatiles in different magmatic systems. Partitioning of trace elements between apatite and a melt is also sensitive to the carbonate component in the melt. This makes apatite potentially very useful indicator of evolution of melt composition and fluid during kimberlite ascent and emplacement. However, trace element partition coefficients between apatite and melts have been determined for compositions much more SiO2-rich than kimberlites, whereas coefficients in carbonate melts show large discrepancies. This study presents experimentally determined trace element partition coefficients (D) between apatite and synthetic analogues of kimberlite (SiO2 content ranging from 11 to 23 wt%) and carbonatite melts (SiO2 content <1 wt% and 4.5 wt%). The experiments were conducted in piston-cylinder apparatus at 1150o, 1250o, 1350o, at 1 and 2 GPa, and at oxygen fugacity -3.97, 0.27, 4.83 log units relative to fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer. We demonstrate the increase of DREE for Rare Earth Elements (REE) with increase in SiO2 of the melt and the effect of apatite composition (natural Durango apatite vs. synthetic apatite) on D and substitution mechanism. We found no effect of temperature, pressure, water content, and oxygen fugacity on D in these low SiO2 melts. This allows us to use trace element content of natural apatite to examine the composition of kimberlite magma. We apply the results to apatite from two kimberlite classes: Class 1 composite kimberlite pipe from Orapa cluster (Botswana) with hypabyssal coherent and volcaniclastic kimberlite facies and Class 3 kimberlite pipes from Ekati Mine (Northwest Territories, Canada) filled with effusive coherent kimberlites in Leslie pipe and both volcaniclastic and coherent kimberlites in Boa pipe, and discuss how changes in SiO2 content of kimberlite melt affect apatite saturation. We further apply our experimentally determined DREE to model the composition of evolved kimberlite melt using published bulk rock and apatite compositions in kimberlites.
DS202008-1365
2020
Fedortchouk, Y.Abersteiner, A., Kamenetsky, V.S., Goemann, K., Kjarsgaard, B.A., Fedortchouk, Y., Ehrig, K., Kamenetsky, M.Evolution of kimberlite magmas in the crust: a case study of groundmass and mineral hosted inclusions in the Mark kimberlite ( Lac de Gras, Canada).Lithos, in press available, 55p. PdfCanada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Mark

Abstract: Kimberlites are the surface manifestation of deeply-derived (>150 km) and rapidly ascended magmas. Fresh kimberlite rocks are exceptionally rare, as most of them are invariably modified by pervasive deuteric and/or post-magmatic fluids that overprint the original mineralogy. In this study, we examined fresh archetypal kimberlite from the Mark pipe (Lac de Gras, Canada), which is characterised by well-preserved olivine and groundmass minerals. The sequence of crystallisation of the parental melt and its major compositional features, including oxygen fugacity, were reconstructed using textural relationships between magmatic minerals, their zoning patterns and crystal/melt/fluid inclusions. Crystal and multiphase primary, pseudosecondary and secondary melt/fluid inclusions in olivine, Cr-diopside, spinel, perovskite, phlogopite/kinoshitalite, apatite and calcite preserve a record of different stages of kimberlite melt evolution. Melt/fluid inclusions are generally more depleted in silica and more enriched in alkalis (K, Na), alkali-earth (Ba, Sr) and halogens (Cl, F) relative to the whole-rock composition of the Mark kimberlite. These melt/fluid inclusion compositions, in combination with presence of elevated CaO (up to 1.73 wt%), in Mg-rich olivine rinds, crystallisation of groundmass kinoshitalite, carbonates (calcite, Sr-Ba-bearing) and alkali-enriched rims around apatite suggest that there was progressive enrichment in CO2, alkalis and halogens in the evolving parental melt. The Mark kimberlite groundmass is characterised by the following stages of in-situ crystallisation: (1) olivine rims around xenocrystic cores + Cr-spinel/TIMAC. (2) Mg-rich olivine rinds around olivine rims/cores + MUM-spinel (followed by pleonaste and Mg-magnetite) + monticellite (+ partial resorption of olivine, along with the formation of ferropericlase and CO2 as a result of decarbonation reactions) + perovskite + apatite. (3) Olivine outmost rinds, which are coeval with phlogopite/kinoshitalite + apatite + sulphides + carbonate (calcite, Ba-Sr-Na-bearing varieties). In addition, oxygen fugacity of the Mark kimberlite was constrained by olivine-chromite, perovskite and monticellite oxygen barometry and showed that the parental melt became progressively more oxidised in response to fractional crystallisation. (4) Deuteric (i.e. late-stage magmatic) and/or post-magmatic (i.e. external fluids) alteration of magmatic minerals (e.g., olivine, monticellite, ferropericlase) and crystallisation of mesostasis serpentine, K-bearing chlorite and brucite (i.e. replacement of ferropericlase). The absence of any alkali (Na, K) and halogen (F, Cl) rich groundmass minerals in the Mark kimberlite may be attributed to these elements becoming concentrated in the late-stage melt where they potentially formed unstable, water-soluble carbonates (such as those observed in melt inclusions). Consequently, these minerals were most likely removed from the groundmass by deuteric and/or post-magmatic alteration.
DS202008-1389
2020
Fedortchouk, Y.Fedortchouk, Y., Chinn, I.L.Crystallization conditions of kimberlite magma.Goldschmidt 2020, 1p. AbstractAfrica, Botswana, Canada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Orapa, Lac de Gras

Abstract: Experiments on diamond crystallization in kimberlite melt were performed for 40 h at 6.3 GPa in the temperature range of 1300-1570 °C and at 7.5 GPa in the temperature range of 1450-1570 °C, using a multianvil high-pressure apparatus of split-sphere type. Group I kimberlite from the Udachnaya-East pipe and a synthetic multicomponent mixture modeling the average composition of group II kimberlites were used as starting materials. The experiments have shown that diamond growth on seed crystals in the kimberlite melt in equilibrium with olivine, pyroxene, and garnet starts from 1400 °C at 7.5 GPa and from 1520 °C at 6.3 GPa. Diamond nucleation requires higher temperature and pressure, 1570 °C and 7.5 GPa. The alkali-enriched and silicate-depleted derivates of kimberlite melts ensure the growth and nucleation of diamond at lower P and T values: 1400 °C at 7.5 GPa and 1520 °C at 6.3 GPa. The results obtained evidence that temperature, pressure, and the composition of crystallization medium are the main factors controlling diamond formation processes in the kimberlite melts and their derivates.
DS202012-2257
2020
Fedortchouk, Y.Zhang, Z., Fedortchouk, Y., Hanley, J.J., Kerr, M.Diamond resorption and immiscibility of C-O-H fluid in kimberlites: evidence from experiments in H2O-CO2-SiO2-MgO-CaO system at 1-3 GPa.Lithos, in press available 15p. PdfMantlediamond morphology

Abstract: Kimberlites are the deepest sourced magmas emplaced at the Earth's surface. They provide a “window” into the processes at the base of the subcratonic mantle. A better understanding of the origin, composition, and emplacement mechanisms of kimberlites is hampered by uncertainties in the contents of the two main volatiles, H2O and CO2. Diamond dissolution in H2O and in CO2 fluids produces distinct resorption features offering an opportunity to determine the composition of the magmatic fluid in kimberlites. Here we examined the relationship between H2O:CO2 ratio of the fluid and the style of diamond resorption by conducting experiments in C-O-H fluid saturated with silicates with variable H2O:CO2 ratios at the conditions of kimberlite ascent of 1-3 GPa and 1150-1350 °C. Our results showed that the geometry of etch pits on diamond and the resorption style evolve consistently as bulk CO2 content of the fluid changes from 0 to 50 to 50-90 and 90-100 mol%. The fluid composition at the run conditions was monitored by entrapment of synthetic fluid inclusions in olivine and quartz. The inclusions demonstrated the existence of a fluid miscibility gap at 1-3 GPa and 1250 °C with two fluid endmembers, an aqueous and a carbonic phase, which H2O:CO2 ratio at 1 GPa determined with confocal Raman microscopy is (H2O)0.62(CO2)0.38 and (H2O)0.12(CO2)0.88 respectively. Hence, diamond resorption morphology depends on the proportions of the end-member aqueous and carbonic fluids, which vary with the bulk composition of the fluid. The different density and ability of aqueous and carbonic fluids to dissolve silicates (olivine) would promote their separation in the rising magma column. Concentration of the lower density aqueous fluid towards the tip of the propagating dyke would facilitate more efficient fracturing of the country rocks and faster ascent of the kimberlite magma causing explosive eruption. We propose that preferential attachment of aqueous fluid bubbles would help to increase the buoyancy of olivine xenocrysts and possibly diamond in the kimberlite magma offering a mechanism for transporting the heavy mantle cargo.
DS2001-0157
2001
Fedortchuk, Y.Canil, D., Fedortchuk, Y.Olivine liquid partitioning of vanadium and other trace elements, apllications to modern and ancient picritesCanadian Mineralogist, Vol. 39, No. 2, Apr. pp. 319-30.MantleMelting, basalts - not specific to diamonds
DS201012-0195
2010
Fedortchuk, Y.Fedortchuk, Y., Matveev, S., Carlson, J.A.H2O and CO2 in kimberlitic fluid as recorded by diamonds and olivines in several Ekati diamond mine kimberlites, Northwest Territories, Canada.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 289, 3-4, pp. 549-559.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Ekati
DS201112-0732
2011
Fedortchuk, Y.Nestola, F., Nimis, P., Ziberna, L., Longo, M., Marzoli, A., Harris, J.W., Manghnani, M.H., Fedortchuk, Y.First crystal structure determination of olivine in diamond: composition and implications for provenance in the Earth's mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 305, 1-2, pp. 249-255.MantleInclusion - olivine in diamond
DS201412-1027
2014
Fedortchuk, Y.Zhang, Z., Fedortchuk, Y., Hanley, J.Experimental constraints of diamond destructive fluids in kimberlite magma and in the sub-cratonic lithosphere.Goldschmidt Conference 2014, 1p. AbstractMantleKimberlite magmatism
DS1995-0527
1995
Fedorwich, J.S.Fedorwich, J.S., et al.Geodynamic evolution and thermal history of the central Flin Flon Domain, Trans Hudson Orogen. Structure..Tectonics, Vol. 14, No. 2, Apr. pp. 472-503.ManitobaTectonics, argon-argon dating
DS1987-0424
1987
Fedoseev, D.F.Loladze, N.T., Polyakov, V.P., Fedoseev, D.F.Dependence of the diamond formation process on the size of the crystallites of the starting carbonaceous material (technicalnote)Colloid. Journal, Vol. 9, No.2, Mar-Apr. pp. 307-308GlobalBlank
DS201904-0765
2018
Fedoseev, D.G.Pakhomova, V.A., Fedoseev, D.G., Kultenko, S.Y., Karabtsov, A.A., Tishkina, V.B., Solyanik, V.A., Kamynin, V.A.Synthetic moissanite coated with diamond film imitating rough diamond.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 54, 4, 4p.Russiamoissanite
DS1984-0272
1984
Fedoseev, D.V.Fedoseev, D.V., Vnukov, S.P., et al.High Temperature Graphitization of Diamond PowdersDoklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 279, No. 1, PP. 149-153.RussiaBlank
DS1985-0185
1985
Fedoseev, D.V.Fedoseev, D.V., Semenova-Tyanshanskaya, A.S., Klyuev, IU.Mass Crystallization of Diamond in the Regio of its Thermodynamic Stability.Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk SSSR., Vol. 281, No. 5, PP. 1192-1195.RussiaDiamond Mass Crystal, Morphology, Crystallography
DS1986-0238
1986
Fedoseev, D.V.Fedoseev, D.V., Dergagin, B.V.Colloidal theory of the nucleation and growth of diamonds under highpressure.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 286, No. 1, pp. 113-116RussiaDiamond morphology
DS1981-0155
1981
Fedoseyev, D.V.Fedoseyev, D.V.Homogeneous Growth of Diamond at High PressureZhurnal Fiz. Khimiy, Vol. 55, No. 3, PP. 756-757.RussiaBlank
DS1984-0273
1984
Fedoseyev, D.V.Fedoseyev, D.V., Semenova, A.S., et al.Kinetics of Nucleation of Diamonds in a Colloidal Solution Of Carbon in Metal.Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 274, No. 1-6, PP. 161-163.RussiaDiamond Morphology
DS1986-0239
1986
Fedoseyev, D.V.Fedoseyev, D.V., Semenova, Tyan-Shanskaya, A.S., Klyuyev, Yu.A.Large scale crystallization of diamond in the zone of itsthermodynamicstabilityDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 281, No. 1-6, November pp. 144-147RussiaDiamond Morphology, Crystallography
DS1987-0205
1987
Fedoseyev, D.V.Fedoseyev, D.V.Distribution of synthetic diamond crystals according to the strength andsize.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR*(in Russian), Vol. 294, No. 5, pp. 1122-1125RussiaDiamond, Morphology
DS1987-0206
1987
Fedoseyev, D.V. SemonovaFedoseyev, D.V. Semonova, Tyan Shaskaya, A.S.Distribution of synthetic diamond crystals according to strength andsize.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk. SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 294, No. 5, pp. 1122-1125RussiaDiamond size
DS202006-0949
2020
Fedotchouk, Y.Skvortsova, V.L., Shiryae, A.A., Fedotchouk, Y.Influence of ions on diamond resorption.Diamonds & Related Materials, Vol. 104, 9p. PdfMantlediamond morphology

Abstract: The paper presents a summary of extensive experiments on diamond resorption rates in presence of various ions performed at Prof. Rudenko lab at Moscow State University. For the first time all experimental data are shown together allowing direct comparison. Surface features of the samples etched in different conditions were studied using optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. It is shown that catalytic theory of diamond resorption, a variant of topochemical adsorption theory of crystal etching, explains dramatic differences between activities of ions from different groups of periodic table on diamond resorption rate at least on qualitative level. Strong variations in surface features on diamonds etched in presence of ions with various catalytic activities are observed.
DS1994-0095
1994
Fedotov, Zh.A.Balashov, Yu.Z., Fedotov, Zh.A., et al.Rubidium-Strontium dating of the lower volcanogenic series in the Pechenga Compex, Kola PeninsulaGeochemistry International, Vol. 31, No. 7, pp. 85-90GlobalGeochronology, sulphides, Pechenga Complex
DS201012-0013
2010
Fedotov, Zn.A.Arzamastsev, A.A., Fedotov, Zn.A., Arzamastseva, L.V., Travin, A.V.Paleozoic tholeiite magmatism in the Kola igneous province: spatial distribution, age, relations with alkaline magmatism.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 430, 2, pp. 205-209.Russia, Kola PeninsulaMagmatism
DS200712-0078
2007
Fedotova, A.Bibikova, E., Fedotova, A., Claesson, S.REE pattern and oxygen isotopes in zircons from different rocks the Fennoscandian and Ukrainian shields as indicators of their genesis.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A89.Europe, Kola Peninsula, Fennoscandia, UkraineGeochronology
DS201804-0672
2017
Fedyanin, A.S.Baryshnikov, V.D., Fedyanin, A.S., Pul, E.K., Baryshnikov, D.V.Geomechanical monitoring of open pit bottom reserves in Mir mine, Alrosa: results.Journal of Mining Science, Vol. 53, 1, pp. 34-42.Russiadeposit - Mir

Abstract: The authors propose methods and means to monitor deformation and subsidence of ore crown under mining of open-pit bottom reserves by room-and-pillar system with cemented backfill in Mir Mine, ALROSA. The article describes layout and data of geomechanical monitoring. The mechanism of ore subsidence at the lower boundary of the safety pillar is determined.
DS1970-0077
1970
Fedynsky, V.V.Fedynsky, V.V., Brodovoi, V.V., Gelamkov, V.A.Geophysics in Prospecting for Mineral Deposits in the UssrGeological Survey of Canada (GSC) Economic Geology Report, No. 26, PP. 667-687.Russia, YakutiaKimberlite, Geophysics
DS200512-0283
2004
Fee, D.Fee, D., Duecker, K.Mantle transition zone topography and structure beneath the Yellowstone hotspot.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 31, 18, Sept. 28, 10.1029/2004 GLO20636.MantlePlume
DS201911-2542
2019
Fee, D.Lyons, J.J., Haney, M.M., Fee, D., Wech, A.G., Waythomas, C.F.Infrasound from giant bubbles during explosive submarine eruptions. BogoslofNature Geoscience, 10.1038/s41561-019-0461-0United States, Alaskavolcano

Abstract: Shallow submarine volcanoes pose unique scientific and monitoring challenges. The interaction between water and magma can create violent explosions just below the surface, but the inaccessibility of submerged volcanoes means they are typically not instrumented. This both increases the risk to marine and aviation traffic and leaves the underlying eruption physics poorly understood. Here we use low-frequency sound in the atmosphere (infrasound) to examine the source mechanics of shallow submarine explosions from Bogoslof volcano, Alaska. We show that the infrasound originates from the oscillation and rupture of magmatic gas bubbles that initially formed from submerged vents, but that grew and burst above sea level. We model the low-frequency signals as overpressurized gas bubbles that grow near the water-air interface, which require bubble radii of 50-220?m. Bubbles of this size and larger have been described in explosive subaqueous eruptions for more than a century, but we present a unique geophysical record of this phenomenon. We propose that the dominant role of seawater during the effusion of gas-rich magma into shallow water is to repeatedly produce a gas-tight seal near the vent. This resealing mechanism leads to sequences of violent explosions and the release of large, bubble-forming volumes of gas—activity we describe as hydrovulcanian.
DS1993-0434
1993
Feeley, T.C.Feeley, T.C.Crustal modification during subduction zone magmatism: evidence from the southern Salar de Uyuni region, central AndesGeology, Vol. 21, No. 11, November pp. 1019-1022Chile, BoliviaTectonics, Magmatism
DS1994-1293
1994
Feely, M.O'Connor, P.J., Hogelsberger, H., Feely, M., Rex, D.C.Fluid inclusion studies, rare-earth element chemistry and age of hydrothermal fluid mineralization in w Ireland- link continental rifting?Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (IMM) Bulletins, Vol. 102, pp. B141-B148IrelandGeochemistry, Geochronology
DS2002-1083
2002
Feely, M.Moore, K.R., Costanzo, A., Feely, M.The carbonatite alkaline rock association in Sao Paulo State, Brasil18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.253.Brazil, Sao PauloJacupirangaCarbonatite Complex, Pocos de Caldas Massif
DS200612-0281
2006
Feely, M.Costanzo, A., Moore, K.R., Wall, F., Feely, M.Fluid inclusions in apatite from Jacupiranga calcite carbonatites: evidence for a fluid stratified carbonatite magma chamber.Lithos, In press available,South America, Brazil, Sao PauloCarbonatite, magmatism, chambers
DS201012-0126
2010
Feely, M.Costanzo, A., Moore, K.R., Feely, M.The influence of carbonatite during petrogenesis of nepheline syenites at the Pocos de Caldas Complex, Brazil: evidence from geochemistry and fluid inclusionsInternational Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 567.South America, Brazil, Sao PauloCarbonatite
DS1991-0473
1991
Fefelov, N.N.Fefelov, N.N., Kostrovlisky, S.I., Zarudnev, N.V.lead isotope composition and lead-lead age of kimberlites of Siberia.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 320, No. 6, pp. 1466-1469. # HB276Russia, SiberiaGeochronology, Kimberlites
DS1992-0451
1992
Fefelov, N.N.Fefelov, N.N., Kostrovitskii, S.I., Zarudneva, N.V.Lead isotope composition in Russian kimberlitesSoviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 33, No. 11, pp. 85-90.RussiaGeochronology
DS1994-0509
1994
Fefelov, N.N.Fefelov, N.N., Kostrovitskiy, S.I., Zarudneva, N.V.Isotopic composition of lead and its use to date Siberian kimberlitesDoklady Academy of Sciences USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 321A, No. 9, January pp. 186-189.Russia, SiberiaGeochronology, Kimberlites
DS200712-0876
2007
FeflovRasskazov, S.V., Ilyasova, A.M., Konev, A.A., Yasnygina, Maslovskaya, Feflov, Demonterova, SaraninaGeochemical evidence of the Zadoi alkaline ultramafic Massif, Cis Sayan area southern Siberia.Geochemistry International, Vol. 45, 1, pp. 1-14.Russia, SiberiaAlkalic
DS1980-0124
1980
Fehlberg, B.Fehlberg, B., Meridian Oil NL.Progress and Final Reports on El 545 Ooldea Area, South Australia.South Australia Open File., No. E3794, 18P. UNPUBL.Australia, South AustraliaProspecting, Geophysics, Airborne Magnetics, Ground, Gravity
DS2002-0454
2002
Fehler, M.C.Fehler, M.C., Huang, L.Modern imaging using seismic reflection dataAnnual Review of Earth Planeray Sciences, Vol.30,pp. 259-84.GlobalGeophysics - seismics, Overview
DS2002-0455
2002
Fehler, M.C.Fehler, M.C., Huang, L.Modern imaging using seismic reflection dataAnnual Review of Earth Planetary Science, Vol.30,pp. 259-84.GlobalGeophysics - seismics, Overview
DS2003-0400
2003
Fehler, M.C.Fehler, M.C., Huang, L.Modern imaging using seismic reflection dataAnnual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 30, 26p.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS202012-2206
2020
Fehrenbach, J.Borisova, A.Y., Bindeman, I.N., Toplis, M.J., Zagrtdenov, N.R., Guignard, J., Safonov, O.G., Bychkov, A.Y., Shcheka, S., Melnik, O.E., Marcelli, M., Fehrenbach, J.Zircon survival in shallow asthenosphere and deep lithosphere.American Mineralogist, Vol. 105, pp. 1662-1671. pdfMantlemelting

Abstract: Zircon is the most frequently used mineral for dating terrestrial and extraterrestrial rocks. However, the system of zircon in mafic/ultramafic melts has been rarely explored experimentally and most existing models based on the felsic, intermediate and/or synthetic systems are probably not applicable for prediction of zircon survival in terrestrial shallow asthenosphere. In order to determine the zircon stability in such natural systems, we have performed high-temperature experiments of zircon dissolution in natural mid-ocean ridge basaltic and synthetic haplobasaltic melts coupled with in situ electron probe microanalyses of the experimental products at high current. Taking into account the secondary fluorescence effect in zircon glass pairs during electron microprobe analysis, we have calculated zirconium diffusion coefficient necessary to predict zircon survival in asthenospheric melts of tholeiitic basalt composition. The data imply that typical 100 micron zircons dissolve rapidly (in 10 hours) and congruently upon the reaction with basaltic melt at mantle pressures. We observed incongruent (to crystal ZrO2 and SiO2 in melt) dissolution of zircon in natural mid-ocean ridge basaltic melt at low pressures and in haplobasaltic melt at elevated pressure. Our experimental data raise questions about the origin of zircons in mafic and ultramafic rocks, in particular, in shallow oceanic asthenosphere and deep lithosphere, as well as the meaning of the zircon-based ages estimated from the composition of these minerals. Large size zircon megacrysts in kimberlites, peridotites, alkali basalts and other magmas suggest the fast transport and short interaction between zircon and melt.The origin of zircon megacrysts is likely related to metasomatic addition of Zr into mantle as any mantle melting episode should obliterate them.
DS200612-0914
2006
FeiMibe, K., Kanzaki, Kawamoto, Matsukage, Fei, OnoSecond critical end point and properties of aequeous fluid in a hydrous upper mantle.International Mineralogical Association 19th. General Meeting, held Kobe, Japan July 23-28 2006, Abstract p. 132.MantleMagmatism
DS200812-0959
2008
FeiRicolleau, A., Fei, Cottrell, Watson, Zhang, Fiquet, Auzende, Roskosz, Morard, PrakapenkaNew constraints on the pyrolitic model under lower mantle conditions.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A795.MantleX-ray diffraction
DS200612-0603
2006
Fei, H.Hou, Z., Tian, S., Yuan, Z., Xie, Y., Yin, S., Yi, L., Fei, H., Yang, Z.The Himalayan collision zone carbonatites in western Sichuan, SW China: petrogenesis, mantle source and tectonic implication.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, in pressAsia, ChinaCarbonatite
DS200912-0313
2009
Fei, H.Hou, Z., Tian, S., Xie, Y., Yang, Z., Yuan, Z., Yin, S., Yi, L., Fei, H., Zou, T., Bai, G., Li, X.The Himalayan Mianning Dechang REE belt associated with carbonatite alkaline complexes eastern Indo Asian collision zone, SW China.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 36, 1-3, pp. 65-89.ChinaCarbonatite
DS201707-1322
2017
Fei, H.Fei, H., Yamazaki, D., Sakurai, M., Miyajima, N., Ohfuji, H., Katsura, T., Yamamoto, T.A nearly water-saturated mantle transition zone inferred from mineral viscosity. Wadsleyite, ringwooditeScience Advances, Vol. 3, 6, 7p.Mantlewater

Abstract: An open question for solid-earth scientists is the amount of water in Earth’s interior. The uppermost mantle and lower mantle contain little water because their dominant minerals, olivine and bridgmanite, have limited water storage capacity. In contrast, the mantle transition zone (MTZ) at a depth of 410 to 660 km is considered to be a potential water reservoir because its dominant minerals, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, can contain large amounts of water [up to 3 weight % (wt %)]. However, the actual amount of water in the MTZ is unknown. Given that water incorporated into mantle minerals can lower their viscosity, we evaluate the water content of the MTZ by measuring dislocation mobility, a property that is inversely proportional to viscosity, as a function of temperature and water content in ringwoodite and bridgmanite. We find that dislocation mobility in bridgmanite is faster by two orders of magnitude than in anhydrous ringwoodite but 1.5 orders of magnitude slower than in water-saturated ringwoodite. To fit the observed mantle viscosity profiles, ringwoodite in the MTZ should contain 1 to 2 wt % water. The MTZ should thus be nearly water-saturated globally.
DS201906-1318
2019
Fei, H.Liu, Z., Liu, L., Huang, M., Fei, H., Zhou, J., Zhang, Y., Hao, Z.New progress in deep Earth exploration and application. Overview of conferenceActa Geologica Sinica, Vol. 93, 2, pp. 499-501. in ENGChinageodynamics
DS201911-2534
2019
Fei, H.Ishi, T., Huang, R., Myhill, R., Fei, H., Koemets, I., Liu, Z., Maeda, F., Yuan, L., Wang, L., Druzhbin, D., Yamamoto, T., Bhat, S., Farla, R., Kawazoe, T., Tsujino, N., Kulik, E., Higo, Y., Tange, H., Katsura, T.Sharp 660 km discontinuity controlled by extremely narrow binary post-spinel transition.Nature Geosciences, Vol. 12, pp. 869-872.Mantlediscontinuity

Abstract: The Earth’s mantle is characterized by a sharp seismic discontinuity at a depth of 660?km that can provide insights into deep mantle processes. The discontinuity occurs over only 2?km—or a pressure difference of 0.1?GPa—and is thought to result from the post-spinel transition, that is, the decomposition of the mineral ringwoodite to bridgmanite plus ferropericlase. Existing high-pressure, high-temperature experiments have lacked the pressure control required to test whether such sharpness is the result of isochemical phase relations or chemically distinct upper and lower mantle domains. Here, we obtain the isothermal pressure interval of the Mg-Fe binary post-spinel transition by applying advanced multi-anvil techniques with in situ X-ray diffraction with the help of Mg-Fe partition experiments. It is demonstrated that the interval at mantle compositions and temperatures is only 0.01?GPa, corresponding to 250?m. This interval is indistinguishable from zero at seismic frequencies. These results can explain the discontinuity sharpness and provide new support for whole-mantle convection in a chemically homogeneous mantle. The present work suggests that distribution of adiabatic vertical flows between the upper and lower mantles can be mapped on the basis of discontinuity sharpness.
DS200612-0829
2006
Fei, P.X.Liu, W., Fei, P.X.Methane rich fluid inclusions from ophiolitic dunite and post collisional mafic/ultramafic intrusion: the mantle dynamics underneath the Paleo-Asian Ocean floorEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 242, 3-4, pp. 286-301.AsiaGeodynamics
DS1985-0589
1985
Fei, Y.Saxena, S.K., Fei, Y.High Pressure Phase Equilibrium in the System Iron-magnesium-si-oGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 17, No. 7, P. 708. (abstract.).GlobalExperimental Petrology, Perovskite, Petrogenesis
DS1992-1478
1992
Fei, Y.Stixrude, L., Hemley, R.J., Fei, Y., Mao, H.K.Thermoeleasticity of silicate perovskite and magnesiowustite and stratification of the earth's mantleScience, Vol. 257, August 21, pp. 1099-1101MantleStratification, Perovskite
DS1993-1384
1993
Fei, Y.Saxena, S.K., Chatterjee, N., Fei, Y., Shen, G.Thermodynamic dat a on oxides and silicatesSpringer Verlag Publishing, 428p. ISBN 0-387-56898-0 approx. $ 100.00GlobalGeochemistry, Experimental petrology
DS1996-0449
1996
Fei, Y.Fei, Y., Wang, Y.Maximum solubility of FeO in (magnesium, iron) SiO3 perovskite as a function of temperature at 26 GPa:FeO low mantleJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 101, No. 5, May 10, pp. 1525-30.MantlePerovskite
DS1998-0415
1998
Fei, Y.Fei, Y.Solid solutions and element partitioning at high pressures andtemperatures.Reviews in Mineralogy, Vol. 37, pp. 343-368.MantleMineralogy, Petrology - experimental
DS2001-0479
2001
Fei, Y.Hirose, K., Fei, Y., Funakoshi, K.I.In situ measurements of the phase transistion boundary ...Mg3Al2Si3O12: implications for nature seismic...Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 184, No.3-4, Jan.30, pp.567-74.MantleGeophysics - seismic, Discontinuities
DS2001-0683
2001
Fei, Y.Li, J., Fei, Y., Mao, H.K., Hirose, K., Shieh, S.R.Sulfur in the Earth's coreEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 193, No. 3-4, pp.509-14.MantleSulphur, Geochemistry
DS2003-0026
2003
Fei, Y.Araujo, D.P., Gaspar, J.C., Fei, Y., Hauri, E.H., Hemley, R., Bulanova, G.P.Mineralogy of diamonds from the Juin a Province, Brazil8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, POSTER abstractBrazilDiamonds
DS2003-0733
2003
Fei, Y.Koch-Muller, M., Dera, M., Fei, Y., Reno, B., Sobolev, N., Hauri, E.OH in synthetic and natural coesiteAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 88, 10, Oct. pp. 1436-45.GlobalMineralogy - coesite
DS2003-1414
2003
Fei, Y.Van Orman, J.A., Fei, Y., Hauri, E.H., Wang, J.Diffusion in MgO at high pressures: constraints on deformation mechanisms andGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 2, Jan. 15. p. 28.MantleGeochemistry
DS200412-0433
2004
Fei, Y.De, S., Heaney, P.J., Fei, Y., Vicenzi, E.P.Microstructural study of synthetic sintered diamond and comparsion with carbonado, a natural polycrstalline diamond.American Mineralogist, Vol. 89, 2-3, Feb. Mar. pp. 439-46.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200412-0690
2004
Fei, Y.Gong, Z., Fei, Y., Dai, F., Zhang, L., Jing, F.Equation of state and phase stability of mantle perovskite up to 140 GPa shock pressure and its geophysical implications.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 31, 4, Feb. 28, DOI 1029/2004 GLO19132MantleGeophysics - UHP
DS200412-0834
2004
Fei, Y.Hirose, K., Shimizu, N., Van Westrenen, W., Fei, Y.Trace element partitioning in the Earth's lower mantle and implications for geochemical consequences of partial melting at the cPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 146, 1-2, pp. 249-260.MantleGeochemistry
DS200412-1024
2003
Fei, Y.Koch-Muller, M., Dera, M., Fei, Y., Reno, B., Sobolev, N., Hauri, E., Wysoczanski, R.OH in synthetic and natural coesite.American Mineralogist, Vol. 88, 10, Oct. pp. 1436-45.TechnologyMineralogy - coesite
DS200412-2041
2003
Fei, Y.Van Orman, J.A., Fei, Y., Hauri, E.H., Wang, J.Diffusion in MgO at high pressures: constraints on deformation mechanisms and chemical transport at the core mantle boundary.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 2, Jan. 15. p. 28.MantleGeochemistry
DS200512-0517
2005
Fei, Y.Keshav, S., Corgne, A., Gudfinnasson, G.H., Bizimis, M., McDonough, W.F., Fei, Y.Kimberlite petrogenesis: insights from clinopyroxene melt partitioning experiments at 6 GPa in the CaO MgO Al2O3 SiO2 CO2 system.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 69, 11, June 1, pp. 2829-2845.Africa, South AfricaGroup I, modeling
DS200612-0279
2006
Fei, Y.Corgne, A., Keshav, S., Fei, Y., McDonough, W.F.How much potassium is in the Earth's core? New insights from partitioning experiments.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 114. abstract only.MantleMineral chemistry
DS200712-0201
2007
Fei, Y.Corgne, A., Keshav, S., Fei, Y., McDonough, W.F.How much potassium is in the Earth's core? New insights from partitioning experiments.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 256, 3-4, pp. 567-576.MantleGeochemistry
DS200712-0310
2007
Fei, Y.Fei, Y.Experimental contraints on the chemistry and density of the Earth's lower mantle.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p.186-187.MantlePerovskite
DS200712-0311
2007
Fei, Y.Fei, Y.Experimental contraints on the chemistry and density of the Earth's lower mantle.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p.186-187.MantlePerovskite
DS200812-0344
2008
Fei, Y.Fei, Y., Ricolleau, A.Constraints on deep Earth heterogeneities from mineral physics data.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A260.MantleUHP
DS201012-0400
2010
Fei, Y.Komabayashi, T., Fei, Y.Internally consistent thermodynamic database for iron to the Earth's core conditions.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 115, B3, BO3202.MantleGeothermometry
DS201112-0318
2011
Fei, Y.Fei, Y., Zhang, Chi., Tao, R.Efficient carbon leaching in silicate through fluid/melt migration and implications for diamond formation.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.835.MantleRedox reaction
DS201212-0133
2012
Fei, Y.Corgne, A., Armstrong, L.S., Keshav, S., Fei, Y., McDonough, W.F., Minarik, W.G., Moreno, K.Trace element partitioning between majoritic garnet and silicate melt at 10-17 Gpa: implications for deep mantle processes.Lithos, Vol. 148, pp. 128-141.Africa, South Africa, GuineaDeposit - Kankan
DS201212-0701
2012
Fei, Y.Stagno, V., Fei, Y., McCammon, C.A., Frost, D.J.Redox equilibration temperatures within eclogite assemblages as function of pressure and temperature: implications for the deep carbon cycle.emc2012 @ uni-frankfurt.de, 1p. AbstractMantleRedox
DS201312-0282
2013
Fei, Y.Frost, D.J., Stagno, V., McCammon, C.A., Fei, Y.The stability of carbonate melt in eclogite rocks with respect to oxygen fugacity. Diamond formation.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractMantleRedox
DS201412-0987
2014
Fei, Y.Wood, B., Fei, Y., Sharar, A., Corgne, A., Bouhifd, A.Formation and evolution and composition of Earth's core.Goldschmidt Conference 2014, 1p. AbstractMantleCore
DS201503-0179
2015
Fei, Y.Stagno, V., Frost, D.J., McCammon, C.A., Mohseni, H., Fei, Y.The oxygen fugacity at which graphite or diamond forms from carbonate bearing melts in eclogitic rocks.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 169, 18p.TechnologyRedox, carbonatite, geobarometry
DS201705-0890
2017
Fei, Y.Xu, C., Kynicky, J., Tao, R., Liu, X., Zhang, L., Pohanka, M., Song, W., Fei, Y.Recovery of an oxidized majorite inclusion from Earth's deep asthenosphere.Science Advances, Vol. 3, 4, e1601589MantleEclogite

Abstract: Minerals recovered from the deep mantle provide a rare glimpse into deep Earth processes. We report the first discovery of ferric iron-rich majoritic garnet found as inclusions in a host garnet within an eclogite xenolith originating in the deep mantle. The composition of the host garnet indicates an ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic origin, probably at a depth of ~200 km. More importantly, the ferric iron-rich majoritic garnet inclusions show a much deeper origin, at least at a depth of 380 km. The majoritic nature of the inclusions is confirmed by mineral chemistry, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy, and their depth of origin is constrained by a new experimental calibration. The unique relationship between the majoritic inclusions and their host garnet has important implications for mantle dynamics within the deep asthenosphere. The high ferric iron content of the inclusions provides insights into the oxidation state of the deep upper mantle.
DS201708-1636
2017
Fei, Y.Fei, Y.Stability of Fe3+ bearing majorite in the Earth's mantle.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, OralMantlemajorite
DS201803-0455
2018
Fei, Y.Jackson, C.R., Bennett, N.R., Du, Z., Cottrell, E., Fei, Y.Early episodes of high pressure core formation preserved in plume mantle.Nature , Vol. 553, 7689, pp. 491-495.Mantleplumes

Abstract: The decay of short-lived iodine (I) and plutonium (Pu) results in xenon (Xe) isotopic anomalies in the mantle that record Earth’s earliest stages of formation1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8. Xe isotopic anomalies have been linked to degassing during accretion2,3,4, but degassing alone cannot account for the co-occurrence of Xe and tungsten (W) isotopic heterogeneity in plume-derived basalts9,10 and their long-term preservation in the mantle. Here we describe measurements of I partitioning between liquid Fe alloys and liquid silicates at high pressure and temperature and propose that Xe isotopic anomalies found in modern plume rocks (that is, rocks with elevated 3He/4He ratios) result from I/Pu fractionations during early, high-pressure episodes of core formation. Our measurements demonstrate that I becomes progressively more siderophile as pressure increases, so that portions of mantle that experienced high-pressure core formation will have large I/Pu depletions not related to volatility. These portions of mantle could be the source of Xe and W anomalies observed in modern plume-derived basalts2,3,4,9,10. Portions of mantle involved in early high-pressure core formation would also be rich in FeO11,12, and hence denser than ambient mantle. This would aid the long-term preservation of these mantle portions, and potentially points to their modern manifestation within seismically slow, deep mantle reservoirs13 with high 3He/4He ratios.
DS201803-0481
2018
Fei, Y.Tao, R., Fei, Y., Bullock, E.S., Xu, C., Zhang, L.Experimental investigation of Fe3+ rich majoritic garnet and its effect on majorite geobarometer.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 225, pp. 1-16.Technologygeobarometry

Abstract: Majoritic garnet [(Ca, Mg, Fe2+)3(Fe3+, Al, Si)2(SiO4)3] is one of the predominant and important constituents of upper mantle peridotite and ultra-deep subducted slabs. Majoritic substitution in garnet depends on pressure, and it has been used to estimate the formation pressure of natural majoritic garnet. Ferric iron (Fe3+) substitution occurs in natural majoritic garnets from mantle diamonds and shocked meteorites. However, available majorite geobarometers were developed without considering the effect of Fe3+ substitution in the structure. In this study, we systematically synthesized Fe3+- bearing majoritic garnets from 6.5?GPa to 15?GPa to evaluate the effect of Fe3+ on the majorite geobarometer. The Fe3+ contents of synthetic majoritic garnets were analyzed using the "Flank method" with the electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The results were compared with those based on the charge balance calculations. From the known synthesis pressures and measured Fe3+ contents, we developed a new majorite geobarometer for Fe3+-bearing majoritic garnets. Our results show that the existing majorite geobarometer, which does not take into account the Fe3+ substitution, could underestimate the formation pressure of majoritic garnets, especially for samples with a high majoritic component.
DS202005-0742
2020
Fei, Y.Keshav, S., Corgne, A., Gudfinnsson, G.H., Fei, Y.Major and trace element partitioning between majoritic garnet, clinopyroxene, and carbon dioxide-rich liquid in model carbonated peridotite at 10 Gpa and interpretations of the element chemistry of majoritic garnet inclusions in diamonds from the subcontiLithos, Vol. 362-363, 11p. PdfSouth America, Brazil, Guineadiamond inclusions

Abstract: Experimentally determined major and trace element partition coefficients between majoritic garnet, clinopyroxene, and carbon dioxide-rich liquid are reported at 10 GPa and 1800 °C in a model carbonated peridotite composition in the system CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-CO2. Besides majoritic garnet, the liquid coexists with forsterite, orthopyroxene, and clinopyroxene, making melting phase relations invariant at fixed pressure and temperature conditions. Partition coefficients span a wide range of values - for instance, Sr, Nb, Ba, La, and Ce are highly incompatible in majoritic garnet, while Ca, Y, Nb, and Ho are moderately incompatible, and Lu, Si, Al, and Mg are compatible. Strong fractionation of light rare earth elements (e.g., La, Ce, Nd, Sm) and high field strength elements (e.g., Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf, Th) is seen between majoritic garnet and liquid. The experimentally determined partitioning values are used to calculate compositions of melts in equilibrium with majoritic garnet inclusions in diamonds from select localities in Brazil and Guinea. The calculated melts largely straddle those between documented carbonatites, kimberlites, and alkali basalts, low-degree mantle melting products from carbonated peridotite. This resemblance firmly suggests that majoritic garnet inclusions in diamonds from Brazil and Guinea can simply be interpreted as precipitates from such melts, thereby offering an alternative to the hypothesis that the element chemistry of such inclusions in diamonds can largely, and sometimes only, be ascribed to subducted oceanic crust, and further that, fusion of this crust may limit the terrestrial 'carbon recycling' at depths much beyond corresponding to those of Earth's transition zone.
DS202009-1667
2020
Fei, Y.Stagno, V., Fei, Y.The redox boundaries of Earth's interiors.Elements, Vol. 16, 3, pp. 167-172.Mantleredox

Abstract: he interior of the Earth is an important reservoir for elements that are chemically bound in minerals, melts, and gases. Analyses of the proportions of redox-sensitive elements in ancient and contemporary natural rocks provide information on the temporal redox evolution of our planet. Natural inclusions trapped in diamonds, xenoliths, and erupted magmas provide unique windows into the redox conditions of the deep Earth, and reveal evidence for heterogeneities in the mantle’s oxidation state. By examining the natural rock record, we assess how redox boundaries in the deep Earth have controlled elemental cycling and what effects these boundaries have had on the temporal and chemical evolution of oxygen fugacity in the Earth’s interior and atmosphere.
DS200412-2210
2003
Fei, Y.W.Zhang, R.Y., Zhai, S.M., Fei, Y.W., Liou, J.G.Titanium solubility in coexisting garnet and clinopyroxene at very high pressure: the significance of exsolved rutile in garnet.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 216, 4, Dec. 10, pp. 591-601.TechnologyUHP, solubility
DS2003-1549
2003
Fei, Y.W..Zhang, R.Y., Zhai, S.M., Fei, Y.W.., Liou, J.G.Titanium solubility in coexisting garnet and clinopyroxene at very high pressure: theEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 216, 4, Dec. 10, pp. 591-601.GlobalBlank
DS2002-1466
2002
Feigelson, B.Shiryaev, A., Dembo, K., Klyuev, Y., Naletov, A., Hutchison, M.T., Feigelson, B.Small angle X ray scattering investigation of extended defects in diamonds18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.75.MantleUHP mineralogy - type Ib and IIa
DS200912-0022
2009
Feigelson, B.N.Babich, Y.V., Feigelson, B.N.Spatial distribution of the nitrogen defects in syntheic diamond monocrystals: dat a of IR mapping.Geochemistry International, Vol. 47, 1, pp. 94-98.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201012-0030
2010
Feigelson, B.N.Babich, Yu.V., Feigelson, B.N., Babich, I.yu., Chepurov, A.I.Specifics of the distribution of nitrogen defects in synthetic diamonds of cubic habit: IR mapping data.Geochemistry International, Vol. 48, 10, pp. 1028-1034.TechnologyDiamond crystallography
DS201212-0045
2012
Feigelson, B.N.Baich, Yu.V., Feigelson, B.N., Yelisseyev, A.P., Chepuov, A.I.Nitrogen in corporation in octahedral diamonds grown in the Fe-Ni-C systemGeochemistry International, Vol. 50, 2, pp. 179-184.TechnologyDiamond genesis
DS201611-2098
2016
Feigelson, B.N.Babich, Yu.V., Feigelson, B.N., Chepurov, A.I.Manifestation of nitrogen interstitials in synthetic diamonds obtained usign a temperature gradient technqiue ( Fe-Ni-C system).Geochemistry International, Vol. 54, 10, pp. 992-927.TechnologySynthetics

Abstract: The IR-peak 1450 cm-1 (H1a-center) associated with nitrogen interstitials have been studied in nitrogen-bearing diamonds synthesized at high P-T parameters in the Fe-Ni-C system. FTIR study shows that manifestation of this nitrogen form is restricted to the regions of active transformation of C-defects into A-defects, which confirms the connection of its formation with C => A aggregation process. An examination of the dependence of the 1450 cm-1 peak on the degree of nitrogen aggregation indicates that H1a-centers are not only formed during C/A aggregation but also disappear simultaneously with the end of C => A transformation. Established facts suggest direct involving of nitrogen as interstitials in the C => A aggregation and serve as strong experimental argument in support of the "interstitial" mechanism of nitrogen migration during aggregation in diamonds containing transition metals.
DS201705-0813
2017
Feigelson, B.N.Butler, J.E., Feigelson, B.N.Laboratory-Grown Diamonds.lithographie.org, No. 19, pp. 114-127.TechnologyBook - synthetics
DS1988-0300
1988
Feigenson, M.Herzberg, C., Feigenson, M., kuba, C., Ohtani, E.Majorite fractionation recorded in the geochemistry of peridotites from South AfricaNature, Vol. 332, No. 6167, April 28, pp. 823-826South AfricaBlank
DS1986-0240
1986
Feigenson, M.D.Feigenson, M.D.Continental alkali basalts as mixtures of kimberlite and depleted mantle evidence from Kilbourne Hole maar, New MexicoGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 13, No. 9, September pp. 965-968New MexicoMantle
DS200612-1558
2005
Feigenson, M.D.Xu, Y.G., Ma, J.L, Frey, F.A., Feigenson, M.D., Liu, J.F.Role of lithosphere asthenosphere interaction in the genesis of Quaternary alkali and tholeitic basalts from Datong, western North Chin a Craton.Chemical Geology, Vol. 224, 4, pp. 247-271.ChinaAlkalic
DS200612-0385
2006
FeiglFadil, A., Vernant, P., McClusky, S., Reilinger, R., Gomez, F., Ben Sari, D., Mourabit, Feigl, BarazangiActive tectonics of the western Mediterranean: geodetic evidence for rollback of a delaminated subcontinental lithospheric slab beneath the Rif Mountains, Morocco.Geology, Vol. 34, 7, July pp. 529-532.Africa, MoroccoTectonics, continental dynamics
DS1998-0956
1998
Feigl, K.L.Massonet, D., Feigl, K.L.Radar interferometry and its application to changes in the earth'ssurface.Reviews of Geophysics, Vol. 36, No. 4, Nov. pp. 441-500.GlobalRemote sensing, Radar - general review not specific to diamonds
DS200612-0038
2006
Feigl, K.L.Arnadottir, T., Jiang, W., Feigl, K.L., Geirsson, H., Sturkell, E.Kinematic models of plate boundary deformation in southwest Iceland derived from GPS observations.Journal of Geophysical Research,, Vol. 111, B7, B7402Europe, Iceland, mantleGeophysics - seismics
DS201802-0283
2017
Feijo, A.Zagainy, A.K., Mikoev, I.L., Ustinov, V.N., Feijo, A., Antonov, S.A.Structural tectonic and geophysical premises of kimberlites localization on the territory of Angola. ***IN RUSOres and Metals ***IN RUS, no. 4, pp. 42-49. pdfAfrica, Angolakimberlite - pipes
DS201312-0266
2013
Feinberg, J.M.Ferre, E.C., Friedman, S.A., Martin-Hernandez, F., Feinberg, J.M., Conder, J.A., Ionov, D.A.The magnetism of mantle xenoliths and potential implications for sub-Moho magnetic sources.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 40, 1, pp. 105-110.MantleMagnetism
DS201412-0255
2014
Feinberg, J.M.Friedman, S.A., Feinberg, J.M., Ferre, E.C., Demory, F., Martin-Hernandez, F., Condor, J.A., Rochette, P.Craton vs rift uppermost mantle contributions to magnetic anomalies in the United States interior.Tectonophysics, Tecto9071R.docxUnited States, Montana, Colorado PlateauGeophysics - magnetics
DS202008-1385
2020
Feinberg, J.M.Drenth, B.J., Souders, A.K., Schulz, K.J., Feinberg, J.M., Anderson, R.R., Chandler, V.W., Cannon, W.L., Clark, R.J.Evidence for a concealed Midcontinent Rift related northeast Iowa intrusive complex.Precambrian Research, in press available, 43p. PdfUnited States, Iowageophysics - seismics

Abstract: Large amplitude aeromagnetic and gravity anomalies over a ~9500 km2 area of northeast Iowa and southeast Minnesota have been interpreted to reflect the northeast Iowa intrusive complex (NEIIC), a buried intrusive igneous complex composed of mafic/ultramafic rocks in the Yavapai Province (1.8-1.7 Ga). Hundreds of meters of Paleozoic sedimentary cover and a paucity of basement drilling have prevented detailed studies of the NEIIC. Long considered, but not proven, to be related to the ~1.1 Ga Midcontinent Rift System (MRS), the NEIIC is comparable in areal extent to the richly mineralized Duluth Complex and is similarly located near the margin of the MRS. New geochronological and geophysical data together support an MRS affinity for the NEIIC. A dike swarm imaged in aeromagnetic data is cut by intrusions of the NEIIC, and a new apatite U-Pb date of ~1170 Ma on one of the dikes thus represents a maximum age for the NEIIC. A minimum age constraint is suggested by (1) large-volume magmatism associated with the MRS that was the last such event to affect the region; and (2) the presence of reversely magnetized dikes, similar in character to MRS-related dikes elsewhere, that cut several intrusions of the NEIIC. The NEIIC is largely characterized by the presence of multiple zoned intrusions, many of which contain large volumes of mafic-ultramafic rocks and have strong geophysical similarities to alkaline intrusive complexes elsewhere, including the MRS-related Coldwell Complex of Ontario. The largest of the zoned intrusions are ~40 km in diameter and are interpreted to have thicknesses of many kilometers. Suspected faults, alignments of intrusions, and intrusive margins tend to be aligned along northwest and northeast trends that match the trends of the Belle Plaine fault zone and Fayette structural zone, both previously interpreted as pre-MRS, possibly lithospheric-scale discontinuities that may have controlled NEIIC emplacement. These interpretations collectively imply notable potential for the NEIIC to host several different types of undiscovered base metal and critical mineral deposits.
DS202010-1839
2020
Feinberg, J.M.Drenth, N.J., Souders, A.K., Schulz, K.J., Feinberg, J.M., Anderson, R.R., Chandler, V.W., Cannon, W.F., Clark, R.J.Evidence for a concealed Midcontinent Rift related northeast Iowa intrusive complex.Precambrian Research, Vol. 347, 105845, 23p. PdfUnited States, Iowageochronology, geophysics - gravity

Abstract: Large amplitude aeromagnetic and gravity anomalies over a ~9500 km2 area of northeast Iowa and southeast Minnesota have been interpreted to reflect the northeast Iowa intrusive complex (NEIIC), a buried intrusive igneous complex composed of mafic/ultramafic rocks in the Yavapai Province (1.8-1.7 Ga). Hundreds of meters of Paleozoic sedimentary cover and a paucity of basement drilling have prevented detailed studies of the NEIIC. Long considered, but not proven, to be related to the ~1.1 Ga Midcontinent Rift System (MRS), the NEIIC is comparable in areal extent to the richly mineralized Duluth Complex and is similarly located near the margin of the MRS. New geochronological and geophysical data together support an MRS affinity for the NEIIC. A dike swarm imaged in aeromagnetic data is cut by intrusions of the NEIIC, and a new apatite U-Pb date of ~1170 Ma on one of the dikes thus represents a maximum age for the NEIIC. A minimum age constraint is suggested by (1) large-volume magmatism associated with the MRS that was the last such event to affect the region; and (2) the presence of reversely magnetized dikes, similar in character to MRS-related dikes elsewhere, that cut several intrusions of the NEIIC. The NEIIC is largely characterized by the presence of multiple zoned intrusions, many of which contain large volumes of mafic-ultramafic rocks and have strong geophysical similarities to alkaline intrusive complexes elsewhere, including the MRS-related Coldwell Complex of Ontario. The largest of the zoned intrusions are ~40 km in diameter and are interpreted to have thicknesses of many kilometers. Suspected faults, alignments of intrusions, and intrusive margins tend to be aligned along northwest and northeast trends that match the trends of the Belle Plaine fault zone and Fayette structural zone, both previously interpreted as pre-MRS, possibly lithospheric-scale discontinuities that may have controlled NEIIC emplacement. These interpretations collectively imply notable potential for the NEIIC to host several different types of undiscovered base metal and critical mineral deposits.
DS200912-0217
2009
Feineman, M.Feineman, M.Eclogite fluids vs slab derived' fluids: simple compositional models.Goldschmidt Conference 2009, p. A361 Abstract.MantleSubduction
DS202009-1614
2020
Feineman, M.Brovarone, A.V., Butch, C.J., Ciappa, A., Cleaves, H.J., Elmaleh, A., Faccenda, M., Feineman, M., Hermann, J., Nestola, F., Cordone, A., Giovannelli., D.Let there be water: how hydration/dehydration reactions accompany key Earth and life processes.American Mineralogist, Vol. 105, pp. 1152-1160. pdfMantlecarbon

Abstract: Water plays a key role in shaping our planet and making life possible. Given the abundance of water on Earth's surface and in its interior, chemical reactions involving water, namely hydration and dehydration reactions, feature prominently in nature and are critical to the complex set of geochemical and biochemical reactions that make our planet unique. This paper highlights some fundamental aspects of hydration and dehydration reactions in the solid Earth, biology, and man-made materials, as well as their connections to carbon cycling on our planet.
DS2003-0401
2003
Feineman, M.D.Feineman, M.D., De Paolo, D.J.Steady state 226 Ra 230 Th disequilibrium in mantle minerals: implications for meltEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 215, 3-4, pp. 339-55.MantleMelting, geochronology
DS200412-0543
2003
Feineman, M.D.Feineman, M.D., De Paolo, D.J.Steady state 226 Ra 230 Th disequilibrium in mantle minerals: implications for melt transport rates in island arcs.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 215, 3-4, pp. 339-55.MantleMelting, geochronology
DS201212-0798
2012
Feineman, M.D.Yakob, J.L., Feineman, M.D., Deane, J.A., Eggler, D.H., Penniston-Dorland, S.C.Lithium partitioning between olivine and diopside at upper mantle conditions: as experimental study.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 329-330, pp. 11-21.MantleTechnology
DS201810-2307
2018
Feineman, M.D.Cruz-Uribe, A.M., Feineman, M.D., Zack, T., Jacob, D.E.Asssessing trace element (dis) equilibrium and the application of single element thermometers in metamorphic rocks.Lithos, Vol. 314-315, pp. 1-15.Globalthermobarometry

Abstract: Empirical and experimental calibration of single element solubility thermometers, such as Zr-in-rutile, Zr-in-titanite, Ti-in-zircon, and Ti-in-quartz, within the past 13 years has greatly expanded our ability to assess the pressure and temperature conditions of individual minerals associated with specific textures in metamorphic rocks. Combined with advances in in situ techniques for analyzing trace concentrations, this has led to an increase in the combined use of single element thermometers, geochronometers, and isotope ratios, often simultaneously, in metamorphic minerals. Here we review the calibration and application of single element thermometers at the pressure and temperature conditions of interest in metamorphic rocks. We discuss to what extent accessory phase equilibrium and trace element equilibrium are attained in metamorphic systems, and the thermodynamic and kinetic framework within which trace element equilibrium is assessed. As an example, we present a comprehensive study of trace element distribution during rutile replacement by titanite in rocks that experienced high-temperature amphibolite-facies overprinting and those that underwent low-temperature blueschist-facies overprinting from a variety of subduction-related terranes worldwide. We find that trace element distributions approach equilibrium partition coefficients in rocks from amphibolite-facies overprinted terranes, whereas trace element distributions do not approach equilibrium in rocks that experienced blueschist-facies overprinting. We caution that single element thermometers that rely upon slow-diffusing high field strength elements should not be applied to rocks equilibrated at <600 °C unless attainment of trace element equilibrium can be demonstrated.
DS1987-0207
1987
Feininger, T.Feininger, T.Allochthonous terranes in the Andes of Ecuador and northwestern PeruCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 24, pp. 266-78.GlobalCraton, Pinon Terrane
DS1989-0638
1989
Feininger, T.Higgins, M.D., Feininger, T., Martignole, J., Nantel, S.The Sept Iles layered mafic intrusion and the anorthosite complex of Riviere PentecoteGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Field Trip, May 17-21, NoQuebecXenoliths
DS1990-0947
1990
Feininger, T.Loncarevic, B.D., Feininger, T., Lefebvre, E.J.The Sept-Iles layered mafic intrusion: geophysical expressionCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, No. 4, April pp. 501-512QuebecGeophysics, Layered intrusion
DS1995-0528
1995
Feininger, T.Feininger, T.A report on the derivation and proper use of the term anorthositeCanadian Mineralogist, Vol. 33, No. 4, August pp. 913-916GlobalMineralogy, Terminology - anorthosite classification
DS1995-0529
1995
Feininger, T.Feininger, T., Goodacre, A.K.The eight classical Montregian hills at depth and the mechanism of theirintrusion.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 9, Sept. pp. 1350-1364.QuebecGeophysics -gravity Alkaline rocks, Deposit - Montregian Hills area
DS1998-0416
1998
Feinstein, S.Feinstein, S., Eyal, Y., Bell, J.S.Implications of meso-structures for deformational history of Moose Mountain structure, Canadian RockiesJournal of Structural Geology, Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 55-66.AlbertaStructure - faults
DS1998-1104
1998
Feinstein, S.Osadetz, K.G., Kohn, B.P., Feinstein, S., Price, R.A.Aspects of foreland belt thermal and geological history fission track data: age Lewis thrust, Flathead fault..Reservoir, Vol. 25, No. 1.p.9 abstract.AlbertaGeochronology
DS1992-0452
1992
Feir, G.Feir, G.A note about ASCII dat a files. suggestion to make handling and exchanging files easierGeobyte, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 15-17GlobalComputer, ASCII files
DS1980-0325
1980
Feitosa, V.M.N.Svisero, D.P., Coimbra, A.M., Feitosa, V.M.N.Mineralogic and Chemical Study of Concentrates of the Diamond Romaria Mine, Romaria, Minas Gerais.Anais Do Congresso, 31st., Vol. 3, PP. 1776-1788.BrazilMineralogy, Genesis
DS1984-0274
1984
Feitosa, V.M.N.Feitosa, V.M.N., Svisero, D.P.Conglomerados Diamantiferos Da Regiao de Romaria-mgAnais Do Xxxiii Congresso Brasileiro De Geologia., PP. 4, 995-5, 005.GlobalConglomerates, Petrology, Petrography, Genesis
DS200612-1209
2006
Fekiacova, J.Salters, V.J., Blichert Toft, V.J., Fekiacova, J., Sachikocher, A., Bizimis, M.Isotope and trace element evidence for depleted lithosphere in the source of enriched Kolau basalts.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 151, 3, pp. 297-312.RussiaGeochronology
DS202001-0030
2019
Fekkak, A.Najih, A., Montero, P., Verati, C., Chabou, M.C., Fekkak, A., Baidder, L., Ezzouhairi, H., Bea, F., Michard, A.Initial Pangean rifting north of the West African craton: insights from late Permian U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar dating of alkaline magmatism from the eastern Anti-Atlas ( Morocco).Journal of Geodynamics, Vol. 132, 17p.Africa, Moroccocamptonites

Abstract: Numerous mafic dykes, sills and laccoliths crop out in the southern part of the Tafilalt basin (Eastern Anti-Atlas, Morocco). These rocks intrude the mildly folded Ordovician to Early Carboniferous formations, consisting mainly of lamprophyric dolerites and camptonites with minor gabbros and syenodiorites. Previous geochemical studies have shown tha