Kaiser Bottom Fish OnlineFree trialNew StuffHow It WorksContact UsTerms of UseHome
Specializing in Canadian Stocks
SearchAdvanced Search
Welcome Guest User   (more...)
Home / Education
Education
 

SDLRC - Scientific Articles all years by Author - Ri-Rn


The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation
The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation is compiled by Patricia Sheahan who publishes on a monthly basis a list of new scientific articles related to diamonds as well as media coverage and corporate announcementscalled the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service that is distributed as a free pdf to a list of followers. Pat has kindly agreed to allow her work to be made available as an online digital resource at Kaiser Research Online so that a broader community interested in diamonds and related geology can benefit. The references are for personal use information purposes only; when available a link is provided to an online location where the full article can be accessed or purchased directly. Reproduction of this compilation in part or in whole without permission from the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is strictly prohibited. Return to Diamond Resource Center
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Media/Corporate References by Name for all years
A B C D-Diam Diamonds Diamr+ E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Tips for Users
Posted/Published Reference CodesThe SDLRC provides 3 types of references identified in the reference code. DS for scientific article, DM for a media article, and DC for a corporate announcement. Consider DS0512-0001. The DS stands for "diamond scientific". 05 stands for 2005, the year the reference was posted. 12 represents the month the reference was posted. For all years prior to 2015 the default month is 12. -0001 is the reference's identifier and it does not mean anything. The number below the refence code, ie 2015, is the year the article was published. Note that the posted year may sometimes be later than the published year.
Sort OrderReferences are sorted by the "author" name and when the reference was posted to the compilation.
Most RecentIf the reference code is highlighted yellow, the reference was made available through the most recent monthly compilation of new literature. Use this to check out new references. When new references are posted, we make it our priority to track down an online link and obtain an abstract. With regard to older references, tracking down an abstract and an online link is a work in progress.
Link to external location of article: If the title has a link, it means we have found a location online where you can either retrieve the full article free, or purchase access to it. The Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is not a technical article procurement service; if you want a restricted article, you must deal directly with the vendor who controls the copyright to the article.
Searching this page for a specific term or authorIn your Firefox browser click Edit in the menu bar and then Find. In the Find box that shows up at the bottom of the web page enter your search term. Firefox will highlight all occurrences. This is particularly helpful when the author you are seeking was not the lead author by whom the compilation is sorted.
Sending or sharing a referenceThe left column (Posted/Published) has an embedded hyperlink for each reference. In Firefox, if you right click on it, you can obtain the link url for that reference's location within the page, which you can copy and paste into an email or any other document. You can also use the "share this link" option to tweet, facebook etc the link.
Author Index
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years - Ri-Rn
Posted/
Published
AuthorTitleSourceRegionKeywords
DS1900-0586
1907
Rial, J.G.Rial, J.G.Diamond Mining in South Africa. #8Open Road- Chicago, MAY, PP. 284-288.Africa, South AfricaHistory, Current Activities, Kimberley And De Beers Mine
DS201012-0624
2010
RiaNovostiRiaNovostiIndia seeks long term diamond supply contracts with Russia.en.rian.ru, Oct. 1, 1p.Russia, IndiaNews item - Alrosa
DS201112-0860
2011
RianovostiRianovostiHefty 136 carat diamond discovered in Siberia. Honey yellow colour at Udachnaya.en.rian.ru, April 21, 1/8p.Russia, YakutiaNews item - diamond notable
DS1981-0347
1981
Ribalko, S.I.Ribalko, S.I.Electro-optic Studies of Accessory Diamonds from the North Shore of the Sea of Azov and Their Probable Transport Mechanism.Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk UKRAINE, SER. B., Vol. 1981, No. 10, PP. 22-26.RussiaKimberlite
DS1983-0535
1983
Ribalko, S.I.Ribalko, S.I.Microtopography of Micro Diamonds from Sedimentary Covers In the South Western Part of the Eastern European Platform And a Possible Genetic Interpretation.C.s.i.r. Translation., No. 1726, 5P.Russia, YakutiaMicro Diamonds, Genesis
DS1983-0536
1983
Ribalko, S.I.Ribalko, S.I., Kirikilitsa, S.I., Ivanchenko, V.Y., Litvin, A.L.New Discovery of Small Diamonds in the Central Dneister Region.(in Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 268, No. 5, pp. 1227-1230RussiaDneiper-donet, Micro Diamonds, Diamond Morphology
DS1987-0610
1987
Ribalko, S.I.Ribalko, S.I., Metalidi, S.V., Gamarik, M.Ya., et al.Typomorphism of diamond crystals from ancient coarse grained rocks of the northwestern Ukrainian shield.(Russian)Akad. Nauk UKR.RSR Institute Geokhim. I Fiz. Mineral.(Russian), Vol. 1987, No. 6, pp. 27-29RussiaBlank
DS1970-0979
1974
Ribaux, C.M.Ribaux, C.M.A to P 3972 Airly Mountains Capertee Prospecting ReportsNew South Wales Geological Survey, No. GS 1974/398, 23P.Australia, New South WalesProspecting, Geochemistry
DS1994-1455
1994
Ribe, N.M.Ribe, N.M., Christensen, U.R.Three dimensional modeling of plume lithosphere interactionJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 99, No. B 1, January 10, pp. 669-682HawaiiTectonics, Plume
DS1994-1456
1994
Ribe, N.M.Ribe, N.M., Christensen, U.R.Three dimensional modeling of plume lithosphere interactionJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 99, No. B 1, January 10, pp. 669-682.Hawaii, MantleTectonics, Hot Spots, Plume
DS1995-1568
1995
Ribe, N.M.Ribe, N.M., Christensen, U.R., TheibingThe dynamics of plume ridge interaction, 1. Ridge centered plumesEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 134, pp. 155-68.MantlePlumes, hot spots, Model - lubrication theory
DS2000-0590
2000
Ribe, N.M.Lowry, A.R., Ribe, N.M., Smith, R.B.Dynamic elevation of the Cordillera, western United StatesJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 105, No.B 10, Oct.10, pp.23371-90.CordilleraTectonics, Geodynamics
DS200712-0892
2007
Ribe, N.M.Ribe, N.M., Stutzmann, E., Ren, Y., Van der Hilst, R.Bucking instabilities of subducted lithosphere beneath the transition zone.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 254, 1-2, Feb. 15, pp. 173-179.MantleSubduction
DS201212-0405
2012
Ribe, N.M.Li, Z-H., Ribe, N.M.Dynamics of free subduction from 3-D boundary element modeling.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 117, B6 B06408MantleSubduction
DS201412-0510
2014
Ribe, N.M.Li, Z-H., Leo, J.F., Ribe, N.M.Subduction induced mantle flow, finite strain, and seismic anisotropy: numerical modeling.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 119, no. 6, pp. 5052-5076.MantleSubduction
DS201809-2036
2018
Ribeira, L.C.Hoover, D.B., Karfunkel, J., Walde, D., Moraes, R.A.V., Michelfelder, G., Henger, F.E., Ribeira, L.C., Krambock, K.The Alto Paranaiba region, Brazil: a continuing source for pink diamonds?The Australian Gemmologist, Vol. 26, 9-10, pp. 196-204.South America, Brazildeposit - Alto Paranaiba
DS1992-0092
1992
RibeiroBarriga, F.J.A.S., Fyfe, W.S., Landefeld, L.A., Munha, J., RibeiroMantle eduction: tectonic fluidisation at depthEarth Science Reviews, Vol. 32, pp. 123-129MantleTectonic fluidization, Seismics
DS2002-1332
2002
Ribeiro, A.Ribeiro, A.Soft plate and impact tectonicsSpringer, www.springer-ny.com/newspreviews, 260p.$70.GlobalBook - ad, Plate tectonics
DS2002-1333
2002
Ribeiro, A.Ribeiro, A.Soft plate and impact tectonicsSpringer-ny.com, 260p.approx.$70.GlobalBook - ad, Plate tectonics, global, Wilson Cycle, geodynamics
DS2002-1334
2002
Ribeiro, A.Ribeiro, A.Soft plate and impact tectonicsSpringer, 250p.MantleBook - geospheres interaction, earth processes, Valuation - example No. 4
DS201712-2708
2017
Ribeiro, A.Nascimento, D.B., Schmitt, R.S., Ribeiro, A., Trouw, R.A.J., Paschier, C.W., Basei, M.A.S.Depositional ages and provenance of the Neoproterozoic Damara Supergroup ( Northwest Namibia): implications for the Angola-Congo and Kalahari cratons connection.Gondwana Research, Vol. 52, pp. 153-171.Africa, Namibiacraton

Abstract: The Damara Orogen is composed of the Damara, Kaoko and Gariep belts developed during the Neoproterozoic Pan-African Orogeny. The Damara Belt contains Neoproterozoic siliciclastic and carbonate successions of the Damara Supergroup that record rift to proto-ocean depositional phases during the Rodinia supercontinent break up. There are two conflicting interpretations of the geotectonic framework of the Damara Supergroup basin: i) as one major basin, composed of the Outjo and Khomas basins, related to rifting in the Angola-Congo-Kalahari paleocontinent or, ii) as two independent passive margin basins, one related to the Angola-Congo and the other to the Kalahari proto-cratons. Detrital zircon provenance studies linked to field geology were used to solve this controversy. U-Pb zircon age data were analyzed in order to characterize depositional ages and provenance of the sediments and evolution of the succession in the northern part of the Outjo Basin. The basal Nabis Formation (Nosib Group) and the base of the Chuos Formation were deposited between ca. 870 Ma and 760 Ma. The upper Chuos, Berg Aukas, Gauss, Auros and lower Brak River formations formed between ca. 760 Ma and 635 Ma. It also includes the time span recorded by the unconformity between the Auros and lower Brak River formations. The Ghaub, upper Brak River, Karibib and Kuiseb formations were deposited between 663 Ma and 590 Ma. The geochronological data indicate that the main source areas are related to: i) the Angola-Congo Craton, ii) rift-related intrabasinal igneous rocks of the Naauwpoort Formation, iii) an intrabasinal basement structural high (Abbabis High), and iv) the Coastal Terrane of the Kaoko Belt. The Kalahari Craton units apparently did not constitute a main source area for the studied succession. This is possibly due to the position of the succession in the northern part of the Outjo Basin, at the southern margin of the Congo Craton. Comparison of the obtained geochronological data with those from the literature shows that the Abbabis High forms part of the Kalahari proto-craton and that Angola-Congo and Kalahari cratons were part of the same paleocontinent in Rodinia times.
DS1991-0337
1991
Ribeiro, C.C.Danni, J.C.M., Baecker, M.L., Ribeiro, C.C.The geology of the Catalao I carbonatite complexFifth International Kimberlite Conferences Field Excursion Guidebook, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 25-30BrazilGeology, Carbonatite
DS200512-0902
2005
Ribeiro, C.C.Ribeiro, C.C., Brod, J.A., Junqueira-Brod, T.C., Gaspar, J-C., Petrinovic, I.A.Mineralogical and field aspects of magma fragmentation deposits in a carbonate phosphate magma chamber: evidence from the Catalao I complex, Brazil.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 18, 3-4, March pp. 355-369.South America, BrazilCarbonatite, Lagoa Seca, APIP, chamber pipes, surge
DS201112-0026
2010
Ribeiro, D.Araujo, D., Ribeiro, D., Bulanonva, G., Smith, C., Walter, M., Kohn, S.Diamond inclusions from the Juina-5 kimberlite, Brazil.5th Brasilian Symposium on Diamond Geology, Nov. 6-12, abstract p. 43.South America, Brazil, Mato GrossoDiamond inclusions
DS201412-0826
2014
Ribeiro, F.Silva, G.M., Endo, I., Ribeiro, F.Analise magnetometrica de possiveis pipes kimberlitocos no distrito diamantifero do Abaete, MG> 6 Simposio Brasileiro de Geologia do Diamante, Aug. 3-7, 2p. AbstractSouth America, Brazil, Minas GeraisGeophysics
DS201710-2233
2017
Ribeiro, L.C.B.Hoover, D.B., Karfunkel, J., Ribeiro, L.C.B., Michelfelder, G.., Moraes, R.A.V., Krambrock, K., Quintao, D., Walde, D.Diamonds of the Alto Paranaiba, Brazil: Nixon's prediction verified?The Australian Gemmologist, Vol. 26, 5&6, pp. 88-99.South America, Brazil, Minas Geraisdeposit - Alto Paranaiba

Abstract: The authors, in a paper in this journal in 2009, note a puzzle, that in spite of extensive exploration for diamonds by major producers in the Alto Paranaiba region of West Minas Gerais State, Brazil, no primary source, such as kimberlites, for the many diamonds produced since their discovery over 250 years has been found. To answer this puzzle we propose that the diamonds are present within a large extrusive volcanic unit probably derived from the Serra Negra alkaline-carbonatitic complex which comprises a super volcano. This origin fits with the 1995 prediction of Nixon on the future direction of diamona-exploration that extrusive units may contain very large volumes of ore, and that carbonatitic emplacement sources need to be considered. The authors argue, based on available evidence from geology and geophysics, that such an origin is compatible with the known data, but that much additional information is needed to substantiate these ideas. Diamonds of the Alto Paraniaba, Brazil: Nixon's prediction verified?
DS200812-0334
2008
Ribeiro, M.L.Ezzouhari, H., Ribeiro, M.L., AitAyad, N., Moreira, M.E., Charif, A., Ramos, J.M.F., De Oliveira, D.P.S., Coke, C.The magmatic evolution at the Moroccan outboard of the West African Craton between the Late Neoproterozoic and the Early Palaeozoic.Special Publication - Geological Society of London, No. 297, pp. 329-344.Africa, MoroccoMagmatism
DS201507-0323
2016
Ribeiro, V.B.Mantovani, M.S.M., Louro, V.H.A., Ribeiro, V.B., Requejo, H.S., dos Santos, R.P.Z.Geophysical analysis of Catalao 1 alkaline carbonatite complex in Goias, Brazil.Geophysical Prospecting, Vol. 64, pp. 216-227.South America, BrazilDeposit - Catalao
DS201602-0222
2016
Ribeiro, V.B.Mantovani, M.S.M., Louro, V.H.A., Ribeiro, V.B., Requejo, H.S., Santos, R.P.Z. dos.Geophysical analysis of Catalano 1 alkaline carbonatite complex in Goias, Brazil.Geophysical Prospecting, Vol. 64, 1, pp. 216-227.South America, BrazilDeposit - Catalano 1
DS200812-0105
2008
Riboldi, S.Berderman, E., Caragheorgheopol, A., Clobanu, M., Pomorski, M., Pullia, A., Riboldi, S.,Traeger, M., Weick, H.Ion spectroscopy - a diamond characterization tool.Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 17, 7-10, pp. 1159-1163.TechnologySpectroscopy
DS2003-1368
2003
RibotTeixeira, W., Pinese, J.P.P., Iacumin, V.V., Girardi, Piccirillo, Echevests, RibotCalc alkaline and tholeiitic dyke swarms of Tandilia, Rio de la Plat a Craton, Argentina:Precambrian Research, Vol. 119, 1-4, Dec. 20, pp. 329-353.ArgentinaTrans Amazonian Orogeny
DS1993-0571
1993
Ricard, J.Gray, J., Lauriol, B., Bruneau, D., Ricard, J.Post glacial emergence of Ungava Peninsula, and its relationship to glacialhistory.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 30, No. 8, August pp. 1676-1696.QuebecGeomorphology
DS1991-1800
1991
Ricard, Y.Vigny, C., Ricard, Y., Froidevaux, C.The driving mechanism of plate tectonicsTectonophysics, Vol. 187, pp. 345-360GlobalTectonics, Plate tectonics - mechanisms
DS1993-1303
1993
Ricard, Y.Ricard, Y., Richards, M., Lithgow-Bertelloni, C., Le Stunff, Y.A geodynamic model of mantle density heterogeneityJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 98, No. B 12, December 10, pp. 21-895-21, 909.MantleGeodynamics
DS1994-0345
1994
Ricard, Y.Corrieu, V., Ricard, Y., Froidevaux, C.Converting mantle tomography into mass anomalies to predict Earth's radialviscosity.Phys. Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 84, No. 1-4, July, pp. 3-14.MantleTomography, Experimental physics
DS1996-1023
1996
Ricard, Y.Nataf, H-C., Ricard, Y.3SMACA: an a priori tomographic model of the upper mantle based on geophysical modeling.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 95, pp. 101-122.MantleGeophysics - tomography, Tomography
DS1997-0909
1997
Ricard, Y.Pili, E., Ricard, Y., Lardeaux, J.M.Lithospheric shear zones and mantle crust connectionsTectonophysics, Vol. 280, No. 1-2, Oct. 26, pp. 15-30.MantleLithosphere, Tectonics
DS1997-0915
1997
Ricard, Y.Piromallo, C., Spada, G., Ricard, Y.Sea Level fluctuations due to subduction: the role of mantle rheologyGeophys. Research Letters, Vol. 24, No. 13, July 1, pp. 1587-90MantleSubduction, Sea level
DS1999-0401
1999
Ricard, Y.Lecuyer, C., Ricard, Y.Long term fluxes and budget of ferric iron: implications for the redox states of the Earth's mantleEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 165, No. 2, Jan. 30, pp. 197-212.MantleGeochemistry, Redox - ferric iron
DS2000-0167
2000
Ricard, Y.Coltice, N., Ferrachat, S., Ricard, Y.Box modeling the chemical evolution of geophysical systems: case study of the Earth's mantle.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 27, No. 11, Jun. pp. 1579-82.MantleGeophysics - model
DS2000-0628
2000
Ricard, Y.Matas, J., Ricard, Y., Guyot, F.An improved thermodynamic model of metal olivine pyroxene stability domainsContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 140, No. 1, pp. 73-83.GlobalMineral chemistry - olivine-pyroxene
DS2001-0148
2001
Ricard, Y.Bunge, H-P., Ricard, Y., Matas, J.Non-adiabaticity in mantle convectionGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 28, No. 5, Mar. 1, pp. 879-82.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS2002-0307
2002
Ricard, Y.Coltice, N., Ricard, Y.On the origin of noble gases in mantle plumesPhilosophical Transactions, Royal Society of London Series A Mathematical, Vol.1800, pp. 2633-48.MantleGeochemistry - hot spots
DS2002-1295
2002
Ricard, Y.Rabinowicz, M., Ricard, Y., Gregoire, M.Compaction in a mantle with a very small melt concentration: implications for theEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 203, 1, pp. 205-220.MantleMagmatism, Carbonatite, Geochemistry
DS2002-1335
2002
Ricard, Y.Ricard, Y.Geophysics: mantle convection in the Earth and Planets. G. Schubert, Turcotte, D.L., Olson, P.Science, Vol. 5556, Feb. 1, p. 802.MantleBook - review
DS200512-0077
2005
Ricard, Y.Bercovici, D., Ricard, Y.Tectonic plate generation and two phase damage: void growth versus grain size reduction.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 110, B 3, B03401MantleTectonics
DS200512-0693
2005
Ricard, Y.Mattern, E., Matas, J., Ricard, Y.,Bass, J.Lower mantle composition and temperature from mineral physics and thermodynamic modelling.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 160, 3, pp. 973-990.MantleGeothermometry
DS200512-0694
2005
Ricard, Y.Mattern, E., Matas, J., Ricard, Y., Bass, J.Lower mantle composition and temperature from mineral physics and thermodynamic modelling.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 160, 3, pp. 973-990.MantleGeothermometry
DS200512-0903
2004
Ricard, Y.Ricard, Y., Coltice, N.Geophysical and geochemical models of mantle convection: successes and future challenges.Geophysical Monograph, AGU, No. 150, pp. 59-68.MantleConvection, models
DS200612-0266
2006
Ricard, Y.Coltice, N., Betrand, H., Ricard, Y., Rey, P.Global warming of the mantle at the origin of flood basalts over supercontinents.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 108, abstract only.MantleBasalts
DS200612-1158
2005
Ricard, Y.Ricard, Y., Mattern, E., Matas, J.Synthetic tomographic images of slabs from mineral physics.American Geophysical Union, Geophysical Monograph, ed. Van der Hilst, Earth's Deep mantle, structure ...., No. 160, pp. 283-200.MantleTomography, subduction
DS200712-0694
2007
Ricard, Y.Matas, J., Bass, J., Ricard, Y., Mattern, E., Bukowinski, M.S.T.On the bulk composition of the lower mantle: predictions and limitations from generalized inversion seismic profiles.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 170, 2, August pp. 764-780.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200712-0842
2007
Ricard, Y.Phillips, B.R., Coltice, N., Bertrand, H., Ricard, Y., Rey, P.Supercontinental warming, plumes and mantle evolution.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A786.MantleMagmatism
DS200812-0630
2008
Ricard, Y.Landuyt, W., Bercovici, D., Ricard, Y.Plate generation and two phase damage theory in a model of mantle convection.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 174, 3, pp. 1065-1080.MantleConvection
DS200912-0121
2009
Ricard, Y.Coltice, N., Betrand, H., Rey, P., Jourdan, F.,Ricard, Y.Global warming of the mantle beneath continents back to the Archean.Gondwana Research, Vol. 15, 3-4, pp. 264-266.MantleGeothermometry
DS201012-0745
2010
Ricard, Y.Sramek, O., Ricard, Y., Dubuffet, F.A multiphase model of core formation.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 181, 1, pp. 198-220.MantleMagmatism
DS201112-0136
2011
Ricard, Y.Cambiott, G., Ricard, Y., Sabadini, R.R.New insights into mantle convection true polar wander and rotational bulge readjustment.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 310, 3-4, pp. 538-543.MantleConvection
DS201212-0157
2012
Ricard, Y.DeBayle, E., Ricard, Y.A global shear veolocity model of the upper mantle from fundamental and higher Rayleigh mode measurements.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 117, B10, B 10308.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS201212-0172
2012
Ricard, Y.Durand, S., Chambat, F., Matas, J., Ricard, Y.Constraining the kinetics of mantle phase changes with seismic data.Geophysical Journal International, in press availableMantleGeophysics - seismics
DS201412-0051
2014
Ricard, Y.Bercovici, D., Ricard, Y.Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.Nature, Vol. 508, pp. 513-516. April 24MantleGeodynamics
DS201412-0924
2014
Ricard, Y.Tauzin, B., Ricard, Y.Seismically deduced thermodynamics phase diagrams for the mantle transition zone ( 410 and 660)Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 401, pp. 337-346.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS1996-1181
1996
Riccardi, K.Riccardi, K., Abbott, D.Increased mantle convection during the Mid Cretaceous- a comparative studyof mantle potential temperature.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 101, No. B4, April 10, pp. 8673-8684.MantleSubduction
DS2000-0650
2000
RicciMelluso, L., Morra, V., Bennio, L., Brotzu, P., RicciPetrology and geochemistry of the Tamatave dike swarm (Madagascar Cretaceous igneous province)Igc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.MadagascarDike swarm
DS1983-0614
1983
Ricci, C.A.Van bergen, M.J., Ghezzo, C., Ricci, C.A.Minette inclusions in the rhyodacitic lavas of Mt. Amiata(CentralItaly); mineralogical and chemical evidence of mixing between Tuscan and Roman type lavasJournal of Vol. Geotherm. Research, Vol. 19, No. 1-2, pp. 1-35ItalyMinette
DS2002-0558
2002
Riccomini, C.Gesicki, A.L.D., Riccomini, C., Boggiani, P.C.Ice flow direction during late Paleozoic glaciation in western Parana Basin, BrasilJournal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol.14, 8, March pp. 933-9.BrazilGeomorphology
DS200712-0386
2006
Riccomini, C.Grohmann, C.H., Riccomini, C., Machado Alves, F.SRTM based morphotectonic analysis of the Pocos de Caldas alkaline Massif, southeastern Brazil.Computers & Geosciences, Vol. January pp. 10-19.South America, BrazilGeomorphology - alkaline
DS1998-1232
1998
Rice, A.Rice, A.Can the blasting excavation engineering sciences provide insight into the processes of kimberlite erupt7th. Kimberlite Conference abstract, pp. 733.GlobalCrater, diatreme, Phreatomagmatic eruption
DS1999-0592
1999
Rice, A.Rice, A.Can the blasting excavation engineering sciences provide insight into the processes of kimberlite ...7th International Kimberlite Conference Nixon, Vol. 2, pp. 699-708.GlobalEmplacement and eruption, Genesis, diatreme wall, crater depth
DS2003-1160
2003
Rice, A.Rice, A.Do diamond inclusion ages date only the protolith, not the diamond formation?South African Journal of Science, Vol. 99, No. 5-6, pp. 227-33.South AfricaGeochronology
DS200412-1661
2003
Rice, A.Rice, A.Do diamond inclusion ages date only the protolith, not the diamond formation?South African Journal of Science, Vol. 99, no. 5-6, pp. 227-33.Africa, South AfricaGeochronology
DS1987-0611
1987
Rice, A.H.N.Rice, A.H.N.A tectonic model for the evolution of the Finnmarkian Caledonides of NorthNorway.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 24, pp. 602-16.NorwayTectonics
DS2001-0974
2001
Rice, A.H.N.Rice, A.H.N.Field evidence for thrusting of the basement rocks coring tectonic windows in the Scandinavian CaledonideNorsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, Vol.81, 4, pp. 321-8.ScandinaviaTectonics
DS1980-0088
1980
Rice, C.M.Carswell, D.A., Rice, C.M.The uranium content of garnet lherzolite xenoliths from kimberlites.Mineralogical Magazine., Vol. 43, No. 330, PP. 689-693.South Africa, LesothoPetrology
DS1980-0089
1980
Rice, C.M.Carswell, D.A., Rice, C.M.The Uranium Content of Garnet Lherzolite Xenoliths from KimberlitesMineralogical Magazine, Vol. 43, No. 330, June pp. 689-731.South Africa, LesothoXenoliths - Uranium., Deposit - Kimberley, Matsoku
DS201906-1332
2019
Rice, J.Paulen, R., Smith, R., Ross, M., Hagedorn, G., Rice, J.Ice-flow history of the Laurentide Ice sheet in the southwestern Great Slave Lake area, a shield to Cordillera transect.GAC/MAC annual Meeting, 1p. Abstract p. 156. Canada, Northwest Territoriesgeomorphology

Abstract: Fieldwork conducted since 2010 by the Geological Survey of Canada under the GEM programs has revealed a more complex glacial history of the southern Great Slave Lake region of the Northwest Territories than was previously reported. New reconstructions of the Laurentide Ice Sheet paleo-ice flow history have been established from field observations of erosional and/or depositional ice-flow indicators (e.g. striae, bedrock grooves, till clast fabrics, and streamlined landforms), new geochronological constraints, and interpretations of glacial stratigraphy. Three distinct ice-flow phases are consistently observed in areas proximal to the western margin of the Canadian Shield between the Slave River near Fort Smith and Hay River further west. These phases are: 1) an oldest southwest flow; 2) a long-term sustained ice flow to the northwest; and, 3) a youngest west-southwest flow during Late Wisconsin deglaciation, which includes extensions of the Great Slave Lake and Hay River ice streams further east than previous mapped. At Hay River approaching the eastern limit of soft Cretaceous bedrock of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin, the ice flow pattern no longer shows the aforementioned consistent chronology. From Hay River to the Liard River, near the zone where the Laurentide and Cordilleran ice sheet coalesced, a thinning ice profile, topographic highlands such as the Cameron Hills and Horn Plateau, and the deep basin that Great Slave Lake currently occupies, played a significant role on the dynamics of the Laurentide Ice Sheet during early ice advance, retreat during Marine Isotope Stage 3, Late Wisconsin advance and deglaciation. Other factors, such as increased sediment supply and clay content from Cretaceous shale bedrock were also significant in influencing ice-sheet behaviour. The role of elevated porewater pressures over subglacial clay-rich sediments controlled the extent and dynamics of several discordant ice streams in upland and lowland regions within the study area.
DS1983-0406
1983
Rice, J.M.Lieberman, J.L., Rice, J.M.Prograde Metamorphism of Marble and Peridotite in the Seiadultramafic Complex, California.Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 15, N0. 4, P. 436. (abstract.).California, West CoastHarzburgite, Enstatite
DS1992-0300
1992
Rice, L.R.Cope, L.W., Rice, L.R.Practical placer miningAmerican Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME)., 110p. approx. $ 40.00BookMining, Alluvials, Table of contents
DS201212-0584
2012
Rice, M.D.Rice, M.D., Tierney, S., O'Hagan, S., Lyons, D., Green, M.B.Knowledge, influence and firm level change: a geographic analysis of board membership associated with Canada's growing and declining businesses.Geoforum, Vol. 43, pp. 959-968.CanadaCSR - governance
DS2002-0789
2002
rice, N.J.Jones, A.P., Price, G.D., rice, N.J., DeCarli, P.S., Clegg, R.A.Impact induced melting and the development of large igneous provincesEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 202, 3-4, pp. 551-61.GlobalMagmatism - not specific to diamonds
DS1992-1273
1992
Rice, R.J.Rice, R.J.Recent developments in Precambrian sedimentary geologyCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 29, No. 12, December pp. 2521-2522CanadaSedimentary, Precambrian
DS201112-0415
2011
Ricgardson, C.Hartley, R.A., Roberts, G.G., White, N., Ricgardson, C.Transient convective uplift of an ancient buried landscale.Nature Geoscience, in press availableMantle, Europe, ScotlandConvection
DS1995-1569
1995
Rich, A.Rich, A.Metallic and industrial mineral assessment report on diamond exploration permits.Alberta Geological Survey, MIN 1995008AlbertaExploration - assessment, New Claymore Resources Ltd.
DS1989-1267
1989
Rich, D.Rich, D.Image storage has geologic applicationsGeotimes, Vol. 34, No. 9, September pp. 10-11GlobalComputer, Brief overview - images
DS1986-0665
1986
Rich, D.C.Rich, D.C.A different Kimberley, a new diamond mine in AustraliaGeography, Vol. 71, No. 310, January pp. 76-77GlobalBlank
DS1995-1570
1995
Rich, P.Rich, P.Letter - with regard to recovery factor and sampling statistics for gold and diamond recovery....Minerals Industry International, No. 1025, July pp. 34-35.BrazilAlluvials, sampling, dredging, recovery factors, Diamonds
DS1996-1182
1996
Rich, P.Rich, P.Placer evaluation: new methods make alluvial gold worth another lookMinerals Industry International, Nov. pp. 44-48GlobalGold, economics, Placers, alluvials, technology, techniques
DS1997-0955
1997
Rich, P.J.H.Rich, P.J.H.Placer evaluation: a response to a replyMinerals Industry International, Sept. pp. 46-49GlobalAlluvial gold not specific to diamonds, Placer, sampling, dredging, mining
DS1975-0393
1976
Rich, V.I.Rich, V.I.Neokouchennaya Istoriya Iskusstvenzykh AlmazovUnknown, RussiaKimberlite, Kimberley, Janlib
DS1970-0664
1973
Richard, B.Dempster, A.N., Richard, B.Regional Geology and StructureMaseru: Lesotho Nat. Dev. Corp. Lesotho Kimberlites Editor N, PP. 1-19.LesothoTectonics
DS1996-1183
1996
Richard, D.Richard, D., Marty, B., Chaussidon, M., Arndt, N.Helium isotope evidence for a lower mantle component in depleted ArcheankomatiiteScience, Vol. 273, July 5, pp. 93-94Mantle, Ocean Island BasaltsKomatiite, Geochronology
DS1996-1184
1996
Richard, D.Richard, D., Marty, B., Chaussidon, M., Arndt, N.Helium isotopic evidence for a lower mantle component in depleted ArcheankomatiiteScience, Vol. 273, July 5, pp. 93-95OntarioKomatiites, Deposit -Alexo
DS1990-1226
1990
Richard, G.Richet, P., Robie, R.A., Hemingway, B.S., Beuville, D., Richard, G.Thermodynamic and melting properties of pyrope (Mg3Al2Si3O12)Terra, Abstracts of Experimental mineralogy, petrology and, Vol. 2, December abstracts p. 93AlpsMantle, Pyrope
DS2002-1336
2002
Richard, G.Richard, G., Monnereau, M., Ingrin, J.Is the transition zone an empty water reservoir? Influences from numerical model of mantle dynamics.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 205, 1-2, pp. 37-51.MantleWater
DS200612-0561
2006
Richard, G.Heir Majumder, C.A., Travis, B.J., Belanger, E., Richard, G., Vincent, A.P., Yuen, D.A.Efficient sensitivity analysis for flow and transport in the Earth's crust and mantle.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 166, 2, pp. 907-922.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200712-0893
2006
Richard, G.Richard, G., Bercovici, D., Karato, S-I.Slab dehydration in the Earth's mantle transition zone.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 251, 1-2, Nov. 15, pp. 156-167.MantleWater
DS200712-0894
2007
Richard, G.Richard, G., Monnereau, M., Rabinowicz, M.Slab dehydration and fluid migration at the base of the upper mantle: implications for deep earthquake mechanisms.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 168, 3, pp. 1291-1304.MantleSlab melting
DS200912-0625
2009
Richard, G.C.Richard, G.C., Bercovici, D.Water induced convection in the Earth's mantle transition zone.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 114, B1 B01205.MantleConvection
DS1910-0209
1911
Richard, L.M.Richard, L.M.Diamonds; DahlOnega Nugget, 1911Dahlonega Nugget., MAY 26TH.United States, Gulf Coast, Arkansas, Appalachia, GeorgiaNews Item
DS1970-0589
1972
Richard, R.Richard, R.Final Report of the PhotogeologistMaseru Department of Mines Geol. Spec. Report, No. 2LesothoPhotogeology, Sensing
DS1982-0233
1982
Richard, R.S.Gurney, J.J., Harris, J.W., Richard, R.S.Silicate and Oxide Inclusions in Diamonds from Orapa Mine, Botswana.Proceedings of Third International Kimberlite Conference, TERRA COGNITA, ABSTRACT VOLUME., Vol. 2, No. 3, P. 201, (abstract.).BotswanaKimberlite, Garnet, Eclogite, Websterite
DS201012-0625
2010
Richards, B.Richards, B., McClung, C.R., Voljoen, F.Characterization of the Kolo kimberlite pipe: constraints on the composition and genesis of the Diamondiferous lithospheric mantle below Kaapvaal.Geological Society of America Abstracts, 1/2p.Africa, LesothoDeposit - Kolo
DS1985-0409
1985
Richards, B.D.Mansker, W.L., Richards, B.D., Cole, G.P.A Review and Comparison of Known and Recently Discovered Kimberlites in the Riley County, Kansas District.Preprint Paper Geological Society of America (gsa) Southeastern Section- Arkans, 22P.United States, Central States, KansasKimberlite Occurrences, Geology, Age, Geophysics, Magnetic
DS1985-0410
1985
Richards, B.D.Mansker, W.L., Richards, B.D., Cole, G.P.A Review and Comparison of Kansas KimberlitesGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 17, No. 3, P. 166. (abstract.).United States, Kansas, Central StatesWinkler, Stockdale, Bala
DS1987-0434
1987
Richards, B.D.Mansker, W.L., Richards, B.D., Cole, G.P.A note on newly discovered kimberlites in Riley County, KansasMantle metasomatism and alkaline magmatism, edited E. Mullen Morris and, No. 215, pp. 197-205KansasGeophysics
DS201312-0743
2013
Richards, D.A.Richards, D.A., Andersen, M.B.Time constraints and tie-points in the Quaternary period.Elements, Vol. 9, pp. 45-51.TechnologyGeochronology - radioisotope
DS1975-1200
1979
Richards, D.J.Richards, D.J.Airborne Geophysics in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa.Botswana Geological Survey, Bulletin. No. 22, PP. 141-157.South AfricaRegional Tectonics, Geophysics
DS1991-0604
1991
Richards, D.R.Greene, L.C., Richards, D.R., Johnson, R.A.Crustal structure and tectonic evolution of the Anza rift, northern SOURCE[ TectonophysicsTectonophysics, Vol. 197, No. 2-4, November pp. 203-212KenyaTectonics, Rift system
DS1995-0248
1995
Richards, D.R.Butler, R.F., Richards, D.R., Semepere, T., Marshall, L.G.Paleomagnetic determinations of vertical axis tectonic rotation from Late Cretaceous and Paleoene strataGeology, Vol. 23, No. 9, Sept. pp. 799-802BoliviaStratigraphy, Paleomagnetism
DS202008-1400
2020
Richards, F.D.Hoggard, M.J., Czarnota, K., Richards, F.D., Huston, D.L., Jaques, A.L., Ghelichkhan, S.Global distribution of sediment hosted metals controlled by craton edge stability. ( not specific to diamonds but of interest)Nature Geoscience, Vol. 13, pp. 504-510.Mantlelithospheric thickness

Abstract: Sustainable development and the transition to a clean-energy economy drives ever-increasing demand for base metals, substantially outstripping the discovery rate of new deposits and necessitating dramatic improvements in exploration success. Rifting of the continents has formed widespread sedimentary basins, some of which contain large quantities of copper, lead and zinc. Despite over a century of research, the geological structure responsible for the spatial distribution of such fertile regions remains enigmatic. Here, we use statistical tests to compare deposit locations with new maps of lithospheric thickness, which outline the base of tectonic plates. We find that 85% of sediment-hosted base metals, including all giant deposits (>10?megatonnes of metal), occur within 200?kilometres of the transition between thick and thin lithosphere. Rifting in this setting produces greater subsidence and lower basal heat flow, enlarging the depth extent of hydrothermal circulation available for forming giant deposits. Given that mineralization ages span the past two?billion?years, this observation implies long-term lithospheric edge stability and a genetic link between deep Earth processes and near-surface hydrothermal mineral systems. This discovery provides an unprecedented global framework for identifying fertile regions for targeted mineral exploration, reducing the search space for new deposits by two-thirds on this lithospheric thickness criterion alone.
DS1990-1407
1990
Richards, J.A.Srinivasan, A., Richards, J.A.Knowledge based techniques for multi-source classificationInternational Journal of Remote Sensing, Vol. 11, No. 3, March, pp. 505-542GlobalRemote sensing, GIS, Computer systems
DS2001-0877
2001
Richards, J.P.Paganelli, F., Grunsky, E.C., Richards, J.P.Radarset Land sat 7 Thematic Mapper integration for kimberlite exploration in the Buffalo Head Hills area.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting Abstracts, Vol. 26, p. 110-11.abstract.AlbertaRemote sensing - LANDSAT.
DS2001-0878
2001
Richards, J.P.Paganelli, F., Grunsky, E.C., Richards, J.P.Structural emplacement of RADARSAT-1 principal component imagery and its potential application to kimberlitic exploration in the Buffalo Head Hills area.Alberta Energy and Utilities Board and Alberta Geological Survey, Report 2001-03, 47p.Alberta, north centralStructure - model
DS2002-1201
2002
Richards, J.P.Paganelli, F., Richards, J.P., Grunsky, E.C.Integration of Structural, Gravity and Magnetic Dat a Using the Weights of EvidenceNatural Resources Research, Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 219-236northern central AlbertaWeights of evidence method, favourability, kimberlite exploration, Buffalo
DS2002-1202
2002
Richards, J.P.Pagnelli, F., Richards, J.P., Grunsky, E.C.Integration of structural, gravity and magnetic dat a using the weights of evidenceNatural Resources Research, Vol. 11,3,pp. 219-36.AlbertaGeophysics - gravity, magnetics, Exploration techniques
DS200912-0066
2009
Richards, J.P.Bowes-Lyon, M.C., Richards, J.P., McGee, T.M.Socio-economic impacts of the Nanisivik and Polaris mines, Nunavut, Canada.Springer Richards, J.P.Editor Mining Society and a sustainable world, 36p. preprintCanada, NunavutCSR - not specific to diamonds
DS201412-0654
2002
Richards, J.P.Paganelli, F., Richards, J.P., Grunsky, E.C.Integration of structural, gravity and magnetic dat a using the weights of evidence method as a tool for kimberlite exploration in the Buffalo Head Hills, northern central Alberta CanadaNatural Resources Research, Vol. 11, 3, pp. 219-Canada, AlbertaGeophysics
DS201412-0736
2014
Richards, J.P.Richards, J.P.Making faults run backwards: the Wilson Cycle and ore deposits.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 51, pp. 1-6.MantleTectonics
DS201412-0737
2014
Richards, J.P.Richards, J.P.Making faults run backwards: the Wilson cycle and ore deposits.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 51, 3, pp. 266-271.GlobalWilson cycle
DS201608-1450
2016
Richards, J.P.Wang, R., Collins, W.J., Weinberg, R.F., Li, J-X., Li, Q-Y., He, W-Y., Richards, J.P., Hou, Z., Zhou, Li-M., Stern, R.A.Xenoliths in ultrapotassic volcanic rocks in the Lhasa block: direct evidence for crust mantle mixing and metamorphism in the deep crust.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, in press available 19p.Asia, TibetMelting

Abstract: Felsic granulite xenoliths entrained in Miocene (~13 Ma) isotopically evolved, mantle-derived ultrapotassic volcanic (UPV) dykes in southern Tibet are refractory meta-granitoids with garnet and rutile in a near-anhydrous quartzo-feldspathic assemblage. High F-Ti (~4 wt.% TiO2 and ~3 wt.% F) phlogopite occurs as small inclusions in garnet, except for one sample where it occurs as flakes in a quartz-plagioclase-rich rock. High Si (~3.45) phengite is found as flakes in another xenolith sample. The refractory mineralogy suggests that the xenoliths underwent high-T and high-P metamorphism (800-850 °C, >15 kbar). Zircons show four main age groupings: 1.0-0.5 Ga, 50-45, 35-20, and 16-13 Ma. The oldest group is similar to common inherited zircons in the Gangdese belt, whereas the 50-45 Ma zircons match the crystallization age and juvenile character (eHfi +0.5 to +6.5) of Eocene Gangdese arc magmas. Together these two age groups indicate that a component of the xenolith was sourced from Gangdese arc rocks. The 35-20 Ma Miocene ages are derived from zircons with similar Hf-O isotopic composition as the Eocene Gangdese magmatic zircons. They also have similar steep REE curves, suggesting they grew in the absence of garnet. These zircons mark a period of early Miocene remelting of the Eocene Gangdese arc. By contrast, the youngest zircons (13.0 ± 4.9 Ma, MSWD = 1.3) are not zoned, have much lower HREE contents than the previous group, and flat HREE patterns. They also have distinctive high Th/U ratios, high zircon d18O (+8.73-8.97 ‰) values, and extremely low eHfi (-12.7 to -9.4) values. Such evolved Hf-O isotopic compositions are similar to values of zircons from the UPV lavas that host the xenolith, and the flat REE pattern suggests that the 13 Ma zircons formed in equilibrium with garnet. Garnets from a strongly peraluminous meta-tonalite xenolith are weakly zoned or unzoned and fall into four groups, three of which are almandine-pyrope solid solutions and have low d18O (+6 to 7.5 ‰), intermediate (d18O +8.5 to 9.0 ‰), and high d18O (+11.0 to 12.0 ‰). The fourth is almost pure andradite with d18O 10-12 ‰. Both the low and intermediate d18O groups show significant variation in Fe content, whereas the two high d18O groups are compositionally homogeneous. We interpret these features to indicate that the low and intermediate d18O group garnets grew in separate fractionating magmas that were brought together through magma mixing, whereas the high d18O groups formed under high-grade metamorphic conditions accompanied by metasomatic exchange. The garnets record complex, open-system magmatic and metamorphic processes in a single rock. Based on these features, we consider that ultrapotassic magmas interacted with juvenile 35-20 Ma crust after they intruded in the deep crust (>50 km) at ~13 Ma to form hybridized Miocene granitoid magmas, leaving a refractory residue. The ~13 Ma zircons retain the original, evolved isotopic character of the ultrapotassic magmas, and the garnets record successive stages of the melting and mixing process, along with subsequent high-grade metamorphism followed by low-temperature alteration and brecciation during entrainment and ascent in a late UPV dyke. This is an excellent example of in situ crust-mantle hybridization in the deep Tibetan crust.
DS1960-0475
1964
Richards, J.R.Lovering, J.F., Richards, J.R.K-ar Age Study of Possible Lower Crust and Upper Mantle Inclusions in Deep Seated Intrusions.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 69, PP. 4895-4901.Australia, New South Wales, South Africa, United States, HawaiiKimberlite, Delegate, Orange Free State, Roberts Victor
DS1994-1457
1994
Richards, K.Richards, K., Chandra, S., Friend, P.Avulsive channel systems: characteristics and examplesBest, and Bristow, Braided Rivers Geological Society of London, No. 75, pp. 195-203GlobalGeomorphology, Braided rivers
DS1994-1458
1994
Richards, K.Richards, K., Chandra, S., Friend, P.Avulsive channel systems: characteristics and examplesBest, and Bristow, Braided Rivers Geological Society of London, No. 75, pp. 195-203.GlobalGeomorphology, Braided rivers
DS1994-1471
1994
Richards, K.S.Robertson-Rintoul, M.S.E., Richards, K.S.Braided channel pattern and palaeohydrology using an index of totalsinuosity.Best, and Bristow, Braided Rivers Geological Society of London, No. 75, pp. 113-118.GlobalGeomorphology, Braided -channel pattern
DS1995-1180
1995
Richards, K.S.Mattikalli, N.M., Devereux, B.J., Richards, K.S.Integration of remotely sensing satellite images with a Geographical Information systemComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 21, No. 8, October pp. 947-956GlobalRemote sensing, GIS
DS1993-1303
1993
Richards, M.Ricard, Y., Richards, M., Lithgow-Bertelloni, C., Le Stunff, Y.A geodynamic model of mantle density heterogeneityJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 98, No. B 12, December 10, pp. 21-895-21, 909.MantleGeodynamics
DS201212-0304
2012
Richards, M.Hoink, T., Lenardic, A., Richards, M.Depth dependent viscosity and mantle stress amplification: implicaions for the role of the asthenosphere in maintaining plate tectonics.Geophysical Journal International, in press availableMantleConvection
DS1990-1223
1990
Richards, M.A.Richards, M.A., Lithgow, C.The dynamical significance of the hotspot reference frameEos, Vol. 71, No. 43, October 23, p. 1567 AbstractGlobalHotspots, Tectonics
DS1991-0412
1991
Richards, M.A.Duncan, R.A., Richards, M.A.Hotspots, mantle plumes, flood basalts and true polar wanderReviews of Geophysics, Vol. 29, No. 1, February pp. 31-50GlobalMantle, Hotspots
DS1992-0426
1992
Richards, M.A.Engebretson, D.C., Richards, M.A.180 Million years of subductionGsa Today, Vol. 2, No. 5, May pp. 92, 93, 94, 100GlobalSubduction, Hot spots
DS1992-1274
1992
Richards, M.A.Richards, M.A., Engebretson, D.C.Large scale mantle convection and the history of subductionNature, Vol. 355, No. 6359, January 30, pp. 437-440MantleConvection, Subduction -general
DS1995-1102
1995
Richards, M.A.Lithgow-Bertelloni, C., Richards, M.A.Cenozoic plate driving forcesGeophysical Research. Letters, Vol. 22, No. 11, June 1, pp. 1317-20.MantlePlate tectonics, Subduction, slabs
DS1997-0759
1997
Richards, M.A.Megnin, C., Bunge, H.P., Richards, M.A.Imaging 3 D spherical convection models: what can seismic tomography tellus about mantle dynamics.Geophysical research Letters, Vol. 24, No. 11, June 1, pp. 1299-1302.MantleGeophysics - seismics, Tomography
DS1998-0880
1998
Richards, M.A.Lithgow-Bertelloni, C., Richards, M.A.The dynamics of Cenozoic and Mesozoic plate motionsReviews of Geophysics, Vol. 36, No. 1, Feb. pp. 27-78.GlobalSubduction zones, geodynamics, Plate tectonics
DS1999-0593
1999
Richards, M.A.Richards, M.A.Earth Science: prospecting for Jurassic slabsNature, Vol. 397, No. 6716, Jan. 21, p. 203.MantleSubduction, Slabs
DS1999-0594
1999
Richards, M.A.Richards, M.A., Bunge, H.P., Baumgardner, J.R.Polar wandering in mantle convection modelsGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 26, No. 12, June 15, pp. 1777-80.MantleConvection
DS2002-0225
2002
Richards, M.A.Bunge, H.P., Richards, M.A., Baumgardner, J.R.Mantle circulation models with sequential dat a assimilation: inferring present day mantle structure from plate motion histories.Philosophical Transactions, Royal Society of London Series A Mathematical, Vol.1800, pp. 2545-68.MantleGeochemistry - model, tectonics
DS2002-1547
2002
Richards, M.A.Stegman, D.R., Richards, M.A., Baumgardner, J.R.Effects of depth dependent viscosity and plate motions on maintaining a relatively uniform mid-ocean ridge basalt reservoir in whole mantle flow.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 107, No. 6, ETG 5 DOI 10.1029/2001JB000192MantleGeophysics - seismics, mantle flow
DS2003-0652
2003
Richards, M.A.Jellinek, A.M., Gonnermann, H.M., Richards, M.A.Plume capture by divergent plate motions: implications for the distribution of hotspotsEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 205, 3-4, pp. 361-78.MantleGeothermometry, Core - mantle boundary
DS200412-0691
2004
Richards, M.A.Gonnermann, H.M., Jellinek, A.M., Richards, M.A., Manga, M.Modulation of mantle plumes and heat flow at the core mantle boundary by plate scale flow: results from laboratory experiments.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 226, 1-2, pp. 53-67.MantleGeothermometry, boundary
DS200612-0798
2006
Richards, M.A.Lenardic, A., Richards, M.A., Busse, F.H.Depth dependent rheology and the horizontal length scale of mantle convection.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 111, B7 B07404MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200612-0799
2006
Richards, M.A.Lenardic, A., Richards, M.A., Busse, P.H.Depth dependent rheology and the horizontal length scale of mantle convection.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 111, B7 B07404MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS201809-2026
2018
Richards, M.A.Gibson, S.A., Richards, M.A.Delivery of deep sourced, volatile rich plume material to the global ridge system.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 499, pp. 205-218.Oceanplumes, hotspots

Abstract: The global mid-ocean ridge (MOR) system represents a major site for outgassing of volatiles from Earth's mantle. The amount of H2O released via eruption of mid-ocean ridge basalts varies along the global ridge system and greatest at sites of interaction with mantle plumes. These deep-sourced thermal anomalies affect approximately one-third of all MORs - as reflected in enrichment of incompatible trace elements, isotope signatures and elevated ridge topography (excess melting) - but the physical mechanisms involved are controversial. The “standard model” involves solid-state flow interaction, wherein an actively upwelling plume influences the divergent upwelling generated by a mid-ocean ridge so that melting occurs at higher pressures and in greater amounts than at a normal spreading ridge. This model does not explain, however, certain enigmatic features including linear volcanic ridges radiating from the active plume to the nearby MOR. Examples of these are the Wolf-Darwin lineament (Galápagos), Rodrigues Ridge (La Réunion), Discovery Ridge (Discovery), and numerous smaller ridge-like structures associated with the Azores and Easter-Salas y Gómez hot spots. An important observation from our study is that fractionation-corrected MORB with exceptionally-high H2O contents (up to 1.3 wt.%) are found in close proximity to intersections of long-lived plume-related volcanic lineaments with spreading centres. New algorithms in the rare-earth element inversion melting (INVMEL) program allow us to simulate plume-ridge interactions by mixing the compositions of volatile-bearing melts generated during both active upwelling and passively-driven corner-flow. Our findings from these empirical models suggest that at sites of plume-ridge interaction, moderately-enriched MORBs (with 0.2-0.4 wt.% H2O) result from mixing of melts formed by: (i) active upwelling of plume material to minimum depths of ~35 km; and (ii) those generated by passive melting at shallower depths beneath the ridge. The most volatile-rich MORB (0.4-1.3 wt.% H2O) may form by the further addition of up to 25% of “deep” small-fraction plume stem melts that contain >3 wt.% H2O. We propose that these volatile-rich melts are transported directly to nearby MOR segments via pressure-induced, highly-channelised flow embedded within a broader “puddle” of mostly solid-state plume material, spreading beneath the plate as a gravity flow. This accounts for the short wavelength variability (over 10s of km) in geochemistry and bathymetry that is superimposed on the much larger (many 100s of km) “waist width” of plume-influenced ridge. Melt channels may constitute a primary delivery mechanism for volatiles from plume stems to nearby MORs and, in some instances, be expressed at the surface as volcanic lineaments and ridges. The delivery of small-fraction hydrous melts from plume stems to ridges via a two-phase (melt-matrix) regime implies that a parallel, bimodal transport system is involved at sites of plume-ridge interaction. We estimate that the rate of emplacement of deep-sourced volatile-rich melts in channels beneath the volcanic lineaments is high and involves 10s of thousands of km3/Ma. Since mantle plumes account for more than half of the melt production at MORs our findings have important implications for our understanding of deep Earth volatile cycling.
DS201809-2081
2018
Richards, M.A.Richards, M.A., Lenardic, A.The Cathles parameter (Ct): a geodynamic definition of the asthenosphere and implications for the nature of plate tectonics.Researchgate, researchgate.net/ publication/ 326722590 46p.Mantlegeophysics

Abstract: A weak asthenosphere, or low viscosity zone (LVZ) underlying Earth’s lithosphere has historically played an important role in interpreting isostasy, post-glacial rebound (PGR), and the seismic low velocity zone, as well as proposed mechanisms for continental drift, plate tectonics, and post-seismic relaxation (PSR). Careful consideration of the resolving power of PGR, PSR, and geoid modeling studies suggests a sublithospheric LVZ perhaps ~100-200 km thick with a viscosity contrast of ~100-1000. Ab initio numerical models of plate-like boundary layer motions in mantle convection also suggest a key role for the LVZ. Paradoxically, a thinner LVZ with a strong viscosity contrast is most effective in promoting plate-like surface motions. These numerical results are explained in terms of the reduction in horizontal shear dissipation due to an LVZ, and a simple scaling theory leads to somewhat non-intuitive model predictions. For example, an LVZ causes stress magnification at the base of the lithosphere, enhancing plate boundary formation. Also, flow within the LVZ may be driven by the plates (Couette flow), or pressure-driven from within the mantle (Poiseuille flow), depending upon the degree to which plates locally inhibit or drive underlying mantle convection. For studies of the long-wavelength geoid, PGR, and mantle convection, a simple dimensionless parameter controls the effect of the LVZ. This “Cathles parameter” is given by the expression Ct=v*(D/L)3, where v* is the viscosity contrast and D is the thickness of the LVZ, and L is the flow wavelength, emphasizing the tightly-coupled, largely un-resolvable tradeoff between LVZ thickness and viscosity contrast.
DS201812-2872
2018
Richards, M.A.Richards, M.A., Lenardic, A.The Cathles parameter ( Ct): a geodynamic definition of the asthenosphere and implications for the nature of plate tectonics.researchgate.com, doi:10.1029/2018 /GC007664 46p.Mantlegeodynamics

Abstract: The Earth's global system of tectonic plates move over a thin, weak channel ("low viscosity zone") in the mantle immediately underlying the plates. This weak channel is commonly referred to as the asthenosphere, and its presence accounts for a number of important Earth observations, including isostasy (e.g., support for the uplift of large mountain ranges), the shape of the Earth's gravity field, the response of the Earth's surface to the removal of large ice sheets ("postglacial rebound"), and the relationship between plate motions and underlying thermal convection in the mantle. In this paper, we show that these phenomena can be understood in terms of a single unifying parameter consisting of the viscosity contrast between the asthenosphere and the underlying mantle, and the cube of the thickness of the asthenosphere. We propose to call this the "Cathles parameter" in recognition of the author who first recognized its importance in postglacial rebound studies.
DS201902-0312
2018
Richards, M.A.Richards, M.A., Lenardic, A.The Cathles Parameter ( Ct): a geodynamic definition of the asthenosphere and implications for the nature of plate tectonics.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 19, 12, pp. 4858-4875.Mantleplate tectonics

Abstract: The Earth's global system of tectonic plates move over a thin, weak channel (flow-viscosity zone) in the mantle immediately underlying the plates. This weak channel is commonly referred to as the asthenosphere, and its presence accounts for a number of important Earth observations, including isostasy (e.g., support for the uplift of large mountain ranges), the shape of the Earth's gravity field, the response of the Earth's surface to the removal of large ice sheets (postglacial rebound), and the relationship between plate motions and underlying thermal convection in the mantle. In this paper, we show that these phenomena can be understood in terms of a single unifying parameter consisting of the viscosity contrast between the asthenosphere and the underlying mantle, and the cube of the thickness of the asthenosphere. We propose to call this the "Cathles parameter" in recognition of the author who first recognized its importance in postglacial rebound studies.
DS1986-0023
1986
Richards, M.N.Andrews, R.L., Richards, M.N., Jaques, A.L., Knutson, J., TownendThe Cummins Range carbonatite, Western AustraliaProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 12-14AustraliaCarbonatite
DS1860-1099
1899
Richards, R.H.Richards, R.H.Diamond Washing. In: Progress in Ore Dressing and Gold Milling. KamfersdamThe Mineral Industry During 1898., Vol. 7, PP. 757-759.Africa, South AfricaDiamond Mining
DS200812-0956
2007
Richards, S.Richards, S., Lister, G., Kennett, B.A slab in depth: three dimensional geometry and evolution of the Indo-Australian plate.Geochemical, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 8, 12, Dec. 14, 11p.Australia, IndiaSlab subduction
DS200912-0336
2009
Richards, S.Jelsma, H., Barnett, W., Richards, S., Lister, G.Tectonic setting of kimberlites.Lithos, In press - available 30p.Africa, South AfricaTectonics
DS1990-1224
1990
Richards, S.M.Richards, S.M.The role of research and development in successful explorationAustralian Geologist, Newsletter No. 77, pp. 6-8AustraliaResearch and development, Exploration
DS1995-1571
1995
Richards, T.Richards, T.Palabora igneous complex, South AfricaThe Gangue, No. 49, July pp. 1, 3-5South AfricaAlkaline, copper, apatite, Deposit -Palabora
DS1996-0826
1996
RichardsonLecheminant, A.N., Richardson, D.G., DiLabio, RichardsonSearching for diamonds in Canada. See seperate referencesGeological Survey of Canada, Open file 3228, 268p. $ 52.00CanadaNatmap project, Diamond exploration areas
DS1920-0042
1920
Richardson, C.H.Richardson, C.H.The Mineralogy of Kentucky; a Description of the Physical And Chemical Properties of Minerals Native to Kentucky. Two Seperate Geological papers by J.s. Hudnall and E.f. Cash and C.f. Allen.Frankfort: Kentucky Geological Survey, SER. IV, Vol. 27, 170P.United States, Kentucky, AppalachiaBlank
DS1998-1233
1998
Richardson, C.N.Richardson, C.N.Melt flow in a variable viscosity matrixGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 25, No. 7, Apr. 1, pp. 1099-1102.MantleRheology, Melt
DS1996-1185
1996
Richardson, D.Richardson, D., Birkett, T.C.Carbonatite associated deposits, 1996Geological Survey of Canada Colloquium, Jan. 22-24th., Poster display onlyCanadaCarbonatite
DS1994-1616
1994
Richardson, D.G.Sinclair, W.D., Richardson, D.G.Studies of rare metal deposits in the Northwest TerritoriesGeological Survey of Canada Bulletin, No. 475, 96p. $ 15.00Northwest TerritoriesAlkaline rocks, Rare earths
DS1995-1572
1995
Richardson, D.G.Richardson, D.G.Investigations completed by Saskatchewan and Geological Society of Canada (GSC) Agreement on Mineral Development1990-1995.see separate itemsGeological Survey of Canada Open File, No. 3119, 302p. approx. $ 50.00SaskatchewanMineral deposits -all commodities, Kimberlite pp. 197-254.
DS1995-1573
1995
Richardson, D.G.Richardson, D.G., Birkett, T.C.Carbonatite associated deposits, 1995Geological Survey of Canada, Geology of Canada, No. 8, pp. 541-559.CanadaCarbonatite, Review
DS1995-1762
1995
Richardson, D.G.Sinclair, W.D., Richardson, D.G.Studies of rare metal deposits in the Northwest TerritoriesGeological Survey of Canada Bulletin, No. 475, $ 12.00Northwest TerritoriesPegmatites, Magmatism, Deposit -Thor Lake
DS1996-0825
1996
Richardson, D.G.LeCheminant, A.N., Richardson, D.G., Dilabio, R.N., et al.Searching for diamonds in Canada -forwardGeological Survey of Canada, LeCheminant ed, OF 3228, pp. 1-4.CanadaHistory
DS1996-0826
1996
Richardson, D.G.Lecheminant, A.N., Richardson, D.G., DiLabio, RichardsonSearching for diamonds in Canada. See seperate referencesGeological Survey of Canada, Open file 3228, 268p. $ 52.00CanadaNatmap project, Diamond exploration areas
DS1999-0595
1999
Richardson, D.G.Richardson, D.G.North Baffin partnership project, Northwest Territories- summary ofinvestigations.Geological Survey of Canada Open file, No. 3637, 128p. $ 35.00Northwest Territories, Baffin IslandGeology
DS201911-2522
2018
Richardson, E.T.Frankfurter, R., Kardas-Nelson, M., Benton, A., Barrie, M.B., Dibba, Y., Farmer, P., Richardson, E.T.Indirect rule redux: the political economy of diamond mining and its relation to the Ebola outbreak in Kono district, Sierra Leone.Review of African Political Economy, Vol. 45, no. 158, pp. 522-540.Africa, Sierra Leonehistory

Abstract: This article explores the relationship between the 2014-2016 Ebola outbreak and the political economy of diamond mining in Kono District, Sierra Leone. The authors argue that foreign companies have recycled colonial strategies of indirect rule to facilitate the illicit flow of resources out of Sierra Leone. Drawing on field research conducted during the outbreak and in its aftermath, they show how this ‘indirect rule redux’ undermines democratic governance and the development of revenue-generation institutions. Finally, they consider the linkages between indirect rule and the Ebola outbreak, vis-à-vis the consequences of the region’s intentionally underdeveloped health care infrastructure and the scaffolding of outbreak containment onto the paramount chieftaincy system.
DS2001-1069
2001
Richardson, et al.Shirey, S.B., Harris, James, Deines, Richardson, et al.Geochemical and geophysical perspectives on diamond formation beneath southern Africa.Slave-Kaapvaal Workshop, Sept. Ottawa, 3p. abstractSouth AfricaGeochemistry - diamond inclusions, Diamond - genesis
DS201212-0293
2012
Richardson, F.R.Henderson, C.M.B., Richardson, F.R., Charnock, J.M.The Highwood Mountains potassic igneous province, Montana: mineral fractionation trends and magmatic processes revisited.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 76, 4, pp. 1005-1051.United States, MontanaHighwood Mountains
DS1920-0246
1925
Richardson, G.Richardson, G.On the Diamond Trail in British GuyanaLondon: Methuen., 289P., ILLUS.GuyanaKimberlite, Kimberley, Janlib, Travelogue
DS1920-0398
1928
Richardson, H.T.Robinson, L.C., Hudnall, J.S., Richardson, H.T.Reconnaissance Map of Elliott County, KentuckyKentucky Geological Survey Ser. 6, Appalachia, KentuckyMap, General Geology
DS1990-1079
1990
Richardson, J.M.Mustard, P.S., Richardson, J.M.A lotus 1-2-3 template for triangular plotsGeobyte, Vol. 5, No. 2, April pp. 47-53GlobalComputer, Lotus -plots
DS1994-1617
1994
Richardson, J.M.Sinclair, W.D., Richardson, J.M., Heagy, A.E., Garson, D.Mineral deposits of Canada -preliminary map and deposit listGeological Survey of Canada Open file, No. 2874, 34p. 1 disk. total cost $ 47.30CanadaMineral deposit listing, Map
DS1986-0759
1986
Richardson, J.W.Jr.Smyth, J.R., Smith, J.V., Artioli, G., Richardson, J.W.Jr., KvickCrystal structure of coesite at 15 and 198 K from single crystal eurton and X-ray diffraction, test of bonding modelsGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstract Volume, Vol. 18, No. 6, p. 756. (abstract.)South AfricaRoberts Victor deposit, Crystallography
DS1999-0596
1999
Richardson, K.Richardson, K.Diamond exploration work on the Spirit River propertyAlberta Geological Survey, MIN 19990006AlbertaExploration - assessment, Mine Geo Research Inc.
DS200812-0957
2007
Richardson, K.Richardson, K.A perspective of marine mining within De Beers.Journal of South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 107, 6, pp. 393-402.Africa, South AfricaMining
DS1995-1574
1995
Richardson, K.A.Richardson, K.A., Katsube, T.J., Mwenifumbi, Killeen etalGeophysical studies of kimberlites in SaskatchewanGeological Survey of Canada Open File, No. 3119, pp. 197-206.SaskatchewanGeophysics, Kimberlite
DS1996-1186
1996
Richardson, K.A.Richardson, K.A.Geophysical exploration and geographic information system (GIS)applications.Geological Survey of Canada, LeCheminant ed, OF 3228, pp. 225-228.CanadaGeophysics, Remote Sensing, GIS
DS1900-0105
1902
Richardson, L.Richardson, L.A Sketch of North CarolinaCharleston: Lucas Richardson., 160P.United States, North Carolina, AppalachiaDiamond Occurrence
DS1991-1418
1991
Richardson, M.J.Richardson, M.J.The future of placersAmerican Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME), Meeting to be held Feb. 25-28th. Denver, Colorado, AbstractGlobalPlacer, Mining operations -gold
DS2001-1068
2001
Richardson, Menzies et al.Shirey, S.B., Carlson, R.W., Richardson, Menzies et al.Archean emplacement of eclogitic components into the lithospheric mantle during formation of Kaapvaal CratonGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 28, No. 13, July 1, pp. 2509-12.South AfricaEclogites, Craton
DS1970-0813
1973
Richardson, N.R.Richardson, N.R.Economic Potential of the Mano Godua KimberliteGeological Survey LIBERIA OPEN FILE REPORT., 15P.GlobalBlank
DS1993-1304
1993
Richardson, O.Richardson, O.Environmental decision making and Ontario's mining industryCrs Perspectives, No. 45, July/August pp. 2-9OntarioEnvironmental, Legal
DS1988-0569
1988
Richardson, P.R.Richardson, P.R., Gesing, R.Prospects for minerals in the 90's. Eighteenth CRS PolicyDiscussionSeminarCentre for Resource Studies, 131pCanadaEconomics, Book -Table of contents
DS1991-1419
1991
Richardson, P.R.Richardson, P.R.World class mineral operationsCrs Perspectives, No. 36, June pp. 2-12GlobalEconomics, Mineral operations -not specific to diamonds
DS1992-1275
1992
Richardson, P.R.Richardson, P.R.Mining -the systems revolutionCentre For Resource Studies, No. 39, April pp. 15-28CanadaEconomics, Mining -relating to other business techniques, systems
DS1993-1305
1993
Richardson, P.R.Richardson, P.R.What role for marketing in the mineral industries?Crs Perspectives, No. 42, January pp. 10-21CanadaEconomics, Marketing
DS1996-1609
1996
Richardson, R.<.Zoback, M.L., Richardson, R.<.Stress perturbation association with the Amazonas and other ancient continental rifts.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 101, No. 3, March 10, pp. 5459-Brazil, South AmericaTectonics, Rifting -Gondwanaland
DS1991-1420
1991
Richardson, R.M.Richardson, R.M., Reding, L.M.North American plate dynamics #1Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 96, No. B7, July 10, pp. 12, 201-12, 224North AmericaTectonics, Plate
DS1991-1421
1991
Richardson, R.M.Richardson, R.M., Reding, L.M.North American plate dynamics #2Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. Paper # 91JB00958United States, CanadaTectonics, Plates, Paper
DS1994-0318
1994
Richardson, R.M.Coblentz, D.D., Richardson, R.M., Sandiford, M.On the gravitational potential of the Earth's lithosphereTectonics, Vol. 13, No. 4, August pp. 929-945MantleTectonics
DS1994-0320
1994
Richardson, R.M.Coblenz, D.D., Richardson, R.M.On the gravititaional potential of the Earth's ; ithosphereTectonics, Vol. 13, No. 4, Aug. pp. 929-45.MantleGeophysics - gravity
DS1996-1610
1996
Richardson, R.M.Zoback, M.L., Richardson, R.M.Stress perturbation associated with the Amazonas and other ancient continental riftsJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 101, No. B3, March 10, pp. 5459-75South AmericaTectonic correlations, Seismics, crustal zones
DS201511-1829
2015
Richardson, R.M.Coblentz, D., Van Wijk, J., Richardson, R.M., Sandiford, M.The upper mantle geoid: implications for continental structure and the intraplate stress field.Geological Society of America Special Paper, No. 514, pp. SPE514-13.MantleGeophysics - seismics

Abstract: We use the fact that geoid anomalies are directly related to the local dipole moment of the density-depth distribution to help constrain density variations within the lithosphere and the associated tectonic stresses. The main challenge with this approach is isolating the upper mantle geoid contribution from the full geoid (which is dominated by sources in the lower mantle). We address this issue by using a high-pass spherical harmonic filtering of the EGM2008-WGS84 geoid to produce an "upper mantle" geoid. The tectonic implications of the upper mantle are discussed in terms of plate tectonics and intraplate stresses. We find that globally there is about a 9 meter geoid step associated with the cooling oceanic lithosphere that imparts a net force of ~2.5x1012 N/m in the form of "ridge push" - a magnitude that is consistent with 1-d models based on first-order density profiles. Furthermore, we ind a consistent 6 meter geoid step across passive a continental margin which has the net effect of educing the compressive stresses in the continents due to the ridge force. Furthermore, we use the pper mantle geoid to reevaluate the tectonic reference state which previously studies estimated using n assumption of Airy-based isostasy. Our evaluation of the upper mantle geoid confirms the near quivalence of the gravitational potential energy of continental lithosphere with an elevation of about 750 meters and the mid-ocean ridges. This result substantiates early conclusions about the tectonic reference state and further supports the prediction that continental regions are expected to be in a slightly extensional state of stress.
DS1996-0560
1996
Richardson, R.R.Grana, J.P., Richardson, R.R.Tectonic stress within the New Madrid seismic zoneJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 101, No. B3, March 10, pp. 5445-58.MidcontinentTectonics, Geophysics -seismics
DS1998-1623
1998
Richardson, S.Zartman, R.E., Richardson, S., Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.Uranium-thorium-lead ages of megacrystic zircon from the Monastery kimberlite, FreeState, South Africa.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 989-91.South AfricaGeochronology, tectonics, Deposit - Monastery
DS201201-0846
2012
Richardson, S.Harte, B., Richardson, S.Mineral inclusions in diamonds track the evolution of a Mesozoic subducted slab beneath West Gondwanaland.Gondwana Research, Vol. 21, 1, pp. 236-245.Mantle, Gondwana, South America, BrazilMicrodiamonds
DS201212-0286
2012
Richardson, S.Harte, B., Richardson, S.Diamonds from Juina, Brazil, track the evolution of a subducted mantle.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractSouth America, BrazilDeposit - Juina
DS201708-1746
2017
Richardson, S.Richardson, S.Old unradiogenic Os in deep mantle metallic liquid from large gem II a diamonds.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, OralMantlediamond morphology
DS1982-0518
1982
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Erlank, A.J., Shimizu, N.Nd Isotopic Disequilibrium in Garnet Peridotites from the Bultfontein Kimberlite and Implications for Mantle Metasomatic Component Addition.Proceedings of Third International Kimberlite Conference, TERRA COGNITA, ABSTRACT VOLUME., Vol. 2, No. 3, PP. 231-232, (abstract.).South AfricaKimberlite, Geochronology
DS1984-0606
1984
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H.Evolution of enriched mantle from derivative basalt, peridotite and diamond inclusion geochemistryPh.D. Thesis, Mass Institute Technology, 191pSouth Africa, LesothoGeochronology, Isotope, Thaba Putsoa, Bultfontein, Kimberle, Diamond Inclusion
DS1984-0607
1984
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Gurney, J.J., Erlank, A.J., Harris, J.W.Origin of Diamonds in Old Enriched MantleNature., Vol. 310, No. 5974, JULY 19TH. PP. 198-202.South AfricaBultfontein, Finsch, Kimberley, Geochronology, Genesis
DS1985-0082
1985
Richardson, S.H.Boyd, F.R., Gurney, J.J., Richardson, S.H.Evidence for a 150-200 Km Thick Archaean Lithosphere from Diamond Inclusion Thermobarometry.Nature., Vol. 315, No. 6018, MAY 30TH. PP. 387-388.South AfricaInclusions, Garnet, Mineral Chemistry, Geobarometry, Analyses
DS1985-0560
1985
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Erlank, A.J., Hart, S.R.Kimberlite borne garnet peridotite xenoliths from old enriched subcontinental lithosphereEarth Planet. Sci. Letters, Vol. 75, No. 2-3, Oct. pp. 116-128GlobalMantle
DS1986-0666
1986
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H.Origin of diamonds of peridotitic and eclogitic parageneses #2Geological Society of Australia Abstract Series, No. 16, pp. 418-419AustraliaBlank
DS1986-0667
1986
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H.Origin of diamonds of peridotitic and eclogitic paragenesesá#1Proceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held, No. 16, pp. 418-420South AfricaFinsch, Eclogite
DS1986-0668
1986
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H.Latter day origin of diamonds of eclogitic paragenesisNature, Vol. 322, August 14, pp. 623-626South Africa, AustraliaKimberley, Finsch, Argyle, Premier, Lamproite, Eclogite
DS1986-0734
1986
Richardson, S.H.Shimizu, N., Richardson, S.H.Trace element characteristics of sub calcic garnetsEos, Vol. 67, No. 16, April 22, p. 394. AbstractSouth AfricaFinch, Kimberley, Petrology, Garnets, Pyrope
DS1987-0612
1987
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H.Chemical evolution of 3.5 Ga old continental lithosphere beneath southernAfricaTerra Cognita, Conference abstracts Oceanic and Continental Lithosphere:, Vol. 7, No. 4, Autumn, abstract only p. 624South AfricaBlank
DS1987-0673
1987
Richardson, S.H.Shimizu, N., Richardson, S.H.Trace element abundance patterns of garnet inclusions in peridotite suitediamondsGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 51, No.3, March pp. 755-758GlobalGeochemistry, rare earth elements (REE).
DS1989-1268
1989
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H.As definitive as ever: a reply to 'Archean diamond xenocrysts in kimberlites- how definitive is theevidence? by R.T. PidgeonGeological Society of Australia Inc. Blackwell Scientific Publishing, Special, No. 14, Vol. 2, pp. 1070-1074GlobalPeridotitic-eclogitic diamonds
DS1989-1269
1989
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H.Radiogenic isotope studies of diamond inclusionsDiamond Workshop, International Geological Congress, July 15-16th. editors, pp. 87-90. AbstractSouth AfricaDiamond morphology, Diamond Inclusions Kimber
DS1990-1225
1990
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Erlank, A.J., Harris, J.W., Hart, S.R.Eclogitic diamonds of Proterozoic age from Cretaceous kimberlitesNature, Vol. 346, No. 6279, July 5, pp. 54-56South Africa, BotswanaGeochronology, Eclogitic diamonds
DS1993-1306
1993
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Harris, J.M., Gurney, J.J.3 generations of diamonds from old continental mantleNature, Vol. 366, No. 6452, November 18, pp. 256-258.MantleDiamond, Genesis
DS1995-0384
1995
Richardson, S.H.Daniels, L.R.M., Richardson, S.H., Menzies, A.H., De BruinDiamondiferous garnet macrocrysts in the Newlands kimberlite, South Africa-rosetta stones from KaapvaalProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 121-123.South AfricaHarzburgites, Deposit -Newlands
DS1997-0956
1997
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Harris, J.W.Antiquity of peridotitic diamonds from the Siberian CratonEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 151, No. 3-4, Oct. 1, pp. 271-Russia, SiberiaGeochronology, Peridotitic diamonds
DS1998-1234
1998
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Chinn, I.L., Harris, J.W.Age and origin of eclogitic diamonds from the Jwaneng kimberlite, Botswana.7th. Kimberlite Conference abstract, pp. 734-6.BotswanaGeochronology, geochemistry, Deposit - Jwaneng
DS1999-0597
1999
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Chinn, I.L., Harris, J.W.Age and origin of eclogitic diamonds from the Jwaneng kimberlite, Botswana7th International Kimberlite Conference Nixon, Vol. 2, pp. 709-13.BotswanaGenesis, Deposit - Jwaneng
DS2001-0975
2001
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Shirey, Harris, CarlsonThe life and times of multiple generations of diamonds from the Kaapvaal Craton keel.Slave-Kaapvaal Workshop, Sept. Ottawa, 2p. abstractSouth AfricaDiamond - genesis, Diamond - inclusions
DS2001-0976
2001
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Shirey, S.B., Harris, J.W., CarlsonArchean subduction recorded by Re Os isotopes in eclogite sulphide -T inclusions in kimberley diamonds.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 191, No. 3-4, pp. 257-66.South AfricaSubduction, geochronology, Deposit - Kimberley
DS2002-1465
2002
Richardson, S.H.Shirey, S.B., Harris, J.W., Richardson, S.H., Fuch, M.J., James, D.E., CartignyDiamond genesis, seismic structure and evolution of the Kaapvaal Zimbabwe CratonScience, No. 5587, Sept. 6, pp. 1683-5.South Africa, ZimbabweTectonics - diamond genesis, Geophysics - seismics
DS2003-1161
2003
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Shirey, S.B., Harris, J.W.Episodic diamond genesis and Kaapvaal Craton evolution8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, AbstractSouth AfricaDiamonds, Geochronology
DS2003-1267
2003
Richardson, S.H.Shirey, S.B., Harris, J.W., Richardson, S.H.,Fouch, M., James, D.E., CartignyRegional patterns in the paragenesis and age of inclusions in diamond, diamondLithos, Vol. 71, 2-4, pp. 243-258.South AfricaDiamond inclusions
DS2003-1268
2003
Richardson, S.H.Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H., Harris, J.W.Integrated models of diamond formation and craton evolution8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 9, AbstractSouth Africa, ZimbabweCraton studies - lithosphere, Review
DS2003-1470
2003
Richardson, S.H.Westerlund, K.J., Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H., Gurney, J.J., Harris, J.W.RE Os isotope systematics of peridotitic diamond inclusion sulfides from the Panda8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, POSTER abstractNorthwest TerritoriesDiamonds - inclusions, Deposit - Panda
DS2003-1474
2003
Richardson, S.H.Whitehead, K., Richardson, S.H.A geochemical study of peridotitic diamonds from Premier mine8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, POSTER abstractSouth AfricaDiamonds - geochemistry, Deposit - Premier
DS200412-0431
2004
Richardson, S.H.De Wit, M.J., Richardson, S.H., Ashwal, L.D.Kaapvaal Craton special volume - an introduction.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 107, 1/2, pp. 1-6.Africa, South AfricaHistory - Kaapvaal project
DS200412-1662
2003
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Shirey, S.B., Harris, J.W.Episodic diamond genesis and Kaapvaal Craton evolution.8 IKC Program, Session 3, AbstractAfrica, South AfricaDiamonds Geochronology
DS200412-1663
2004
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Shirey, S.B., Harris, J.W.Episodic diamond genesis at Jwaneng, Botswana, and implications for Kaapvaal craton evolution.Lithos, Vol. 77, 1-4, Sept. pp. 143-154.Africa, BotswanaDiamond inclusions, eclogite, peridotite, sulfide, geoc
DS200412-1806
2003
Richardson, S.H.Shirey, S.B., Harris, J.W., Richardson, S.H.,Fouch, M., James, D.E., Cartigny, P.,Deines, P., Vijoen, F.Regional patterns in the paragenesis and age of inclusions in diamond, diamond composition and the lithospheric seismic structurLithos, Vol. 71, 2-4, pp. 243-258.Africa, South AfricaDiamond inclusions
DS200412-1807
2003
Richardson, S.H.Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H., Harris, J.W.Integrated models of diamond formation and craton evolution.8 IKC Program, Session 9, AbstractAfrica, South Africa, ZimbabweCraton studies - lithosphere Review
DS200412-1808
2004
Richardson, S.H.Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H., Harris, J.W.Age, paragenesis and composition of diamonds and evolution of the Precambrian mantle lithosphere of southern Africa.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 107, 1/2, pp. 91-106.Africa, South AfricaDiamond genesis, geochronology
DS200412-1809
2004
Richardson, S.H.Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H., Harris, J.W.Integrated models of diamond formation and craton evolution.Lithos, Vol. 77, 1-4, Sept. pp. 923-944.AfricaKimberley area, diamond inclusions, sulfide, silicate
DS200412-2104
2004
Richardson, S.H.Westerlund, K.J., Gurney, J.J., Carlson, R.W., Shirey, S.B., Hauri, E.H., Richardson, S.H.A metasomatic origin for late Archean eclogitic diamonds: implications from internal morphology of diamonds and Re Os and S isotSouth African Journal of Geology, Vol. 107, 1/2, pp. 119-130.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Klipspringer, Jurassic, sulfide inclusions
DS200512-1232
2005
Richardson, S.H.Zartman, R.E., Richardson, S.H.Evidence from kimberlitic zircon for a decreasing mantle Th/U since the Archean.Chemical Geology, Vol. 220, 3-4, pp. 263-283.MantleGeochronology
DS200612-1159
2006
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Harris, J.W., Pomi, P.F.Antiquity of harzburgitic diamonds from the Venetia kimberlite, Limpopo Belt, Kaapvaal Craton.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 17. abstract only.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Venetia,diamond genesis
DS200612-1522
2006
Richardson, S.H.Westerlund, K.J., Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H., Carlson, R.W., Gurney, J.J., Harris, J.W.A subduction wedge origin for Paleoarchean peridotitic diamonds and harzburgites from the PAnd a kimberlite, Slave Craton: evidence from Re Os isotope systematics.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 152, 3, pp. 275-294.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesSubduction, deposit - Panda
DS200812-0958
2008
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Shirey, S.B.Continental mantle signature of Bushveld magmas and coeval diamonds.Nature, Vol. 453, June 12, pp. 910-913.Africa, South AfricaEmplacement, Premier, geochronology
DS200812-1060
2008
Richardson, S.H.Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H., Pearson, D.G., Carlson, R.W., Harris, J.W.Eclogitic sulfide and silicate inclusions in diamonds and subcontinental geological processes.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A862.Africa, Botswana, South AfricaDeposit - Jwaneng, Koffiefontein, Orapa, Premier,Venetia
DS200912-0296
2009
Richardson, S.H.Helmsteadt, H.H., Gurney, J.J., Richardson, S.H.Diamond ages and lithosphere evolution: applications to diamond exploration.GAC/MAC/AGU Meeting held May 23-27 Toronto, Abstract onlyTechnologyDiamond genesis and craton evolution
DS200912-0626
2009
Richardson, S.H.Richardson, S.H., Pomi, P.F., Shirey, S.B., Harris, J.W.Age and origin of peridotite diamonds from Venetia, Limpopo belt, Kaapval- Zimbabwe Craton.Lithos, In press available, 35p.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Venetia
DS201012-0254
2010
Richardson, S.H.Gurney, J.J., Helmstaedt, H.H., Richardson, S.H., Shirey, S.B.Diamonds through time.Economic Geology, Vol. 105, 3, pp. 689-712.GlobalHistory of diamond genesis
DS201012-0725
2010
Richardson, S.H.Smit, K.V., Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H., Le Roex, A.P., Gurney, J.J.Re-Os isotopic composition of peridotitic sulphide inclusions in diamonds from Ellendale, Australia: age constraints on Kimberley cratonic lithosphere.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 74, 11, pp. 3292-3306.AustraliaDeposit - Ellendale
DS201012-0821
2010
Richardson, S.H.Viljoen, K.S., Harris, J.W., Ivanic, T., Richardson, S.H., Whitehead, K.Trace element geochemistry and Ni thermometry of garnet inclusions in peridotitic diamonds from Premier and Finsch, South Africa: implications - diamond formationInternational Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 187.Africa, South AfricaGeochemistry
DS201112-0429
2010
Richardson, S.H.Helmstaedt, H.H., Gurney, J.J., Richardson, S.H.Ages of cratonic diamond and lithosphere evolution: constraints on Precambrian tectonics and diamond exploration.The Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 48, 6, pp. 1385-1408.Canada, GlobalGeochronology, craton roots, UHP
DS201112-0951
2011
Richardson, S.H.Shire, S.B., Van Kranendonk, M., Richardson, S.H.SCLM and crustal evidence for 3 GA onset of plate tectonics with implications for the Superior Province.Geological Society of America, Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, Oct. 9-12, abstractCanada, Europe, GreenlandMelting
DS201112-0952
2011
Richardson, S.H.Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H.Start of the Wilson Cycle at 3 Ga shown by diamonds from subcontinental mantle.Science, Vol. 333, July 21, pp. 434-436.MantleSubduction, plate tectonics, mineral inclusions
DS201112-0953
2011
Richardson, S.H.Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H., Van Kranendonk, M.J.3 Ga onset of the supercontinent cycle: SCLM and crustal evidence.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1863.Europe, GreenlandCraton, subduction
DS201212-0650
2012
Richardson, S.H.Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H.Evidence from inclusions in diamonds for 3 Ga onset of the supercontinent cycle: implications for geodynamics and diamond formation.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractGlobalDiamond inclusions
DS201412-0327
2014
Richardson, S.H.Gurney, J.J., Kahle, R., Kahle, B., Richardson, S.H., du Plessis, A.X-ray Cat scanning of Diamondiferous mantle xenoliths.GSSA Kimberley Diamond Symposium and Trade Show provisional programme, Sept. 12, title onlyTechnologyX-Ray scanning
DS201412-0949
2014
Richardson, S.H.Viljoen, K.S., Harris, J.W., Richardson, S.H., Gray, K.Trace element chemistry of peridotitic garnets in diamonds from the Premier ( Cullinan) and Finsch kimberlites, South Africa: contrasting styles of mantle metasomatism.Lithos, Vol. 208-209, pp. 1-15.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Premier, Finsch
DS201701-0031
2016
Richardson, S.H.Smith, E.M., Shirey, S.B., Nestola, F., Bullock, E.S., Wang, J., Richardson, S.H., Wang, W.Large gem diamonds from metallic liquid in Earth's deep mantle.Science, Vol. 354, 6318, pp. 1403-1405.MantleDiamond genesis

Abstract: The redox state of Earth’s convecting mantle, masked by the lithospheric plates and basaltic magmatism of plate tectonics, is a key unknown in the evolutionary history of our planet. Here we report that large, exceptional gem diamonds like the Cullinan, Constellation, and Koh-i-Noor carry direct evidence of crystallization from a redox-sensitive metallic liquid phase in the deep mantle. These sublithospheric diamonds contain inclusions of solidified iron-nickel-carbon-sulfur melt, accompanied by a thin fluid layer of methane ± hydrogen, and sometimes majoritic garnet or former calcium silicate perovskite. The metal-dominated mineral assemblages and reduced volatiles in large gem diamonds indicate formation under metal-saturated conditions. We verify previous predictions that Earth has highly reducing deep mantle regions capable of precipitating a metallic iron phase that contains dissolved carbon and hydrogen.
DS201809-2091
2018
Richardson, S.H.Smith, E., Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H., Nestola, F., Bullock, E.S., Wang, J., Wang, W.Blue boron-bearing diamonds from Earth's lower mantle.Nature, Vol. 560, Aug. 2, pp. 84-97.Mantlediamond - Type Ilb blue

Abstract: Geological pathways for the recycling of Earth’s surface materials into the mantle are both driven and obscured by plate tectonics1,2,3. Gauging the extent of this recycling is difficult because subducted crustal components are often released at relatively shallow depths, below arc volcanoes4,5,6,7. The conspicuous existence of blue boron-bearing diamonds (type IIb)8,9 reveals that boron, an element abundant in the continental and oceanic crust, is present in certain diamond-forming fluids at mantle depths. However, both the provenance of the boron and the geological setting of diamond crystallization were unknown. Here we show that boron-bearing diamonds carry previously unrecognized mineral assemblages whose high-pressure precursors were stable in metamorphosed oceanic lithospheric slabs at depths reaching the lower mantle. We propose that some of the boron in seawater-serpentinized oceanic lithosphere is subducted into the deep mantle, where it is released with hydrous fluids that enable diamond growth10. Type IIb diamonds are thus among the deepest diamonds ever found and indicate a viable pathway for the deep-mantle recycling of crustal elements.
DS201809-2092
2018
Richardson, S.H.Smith, E.M., Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H., Nestola, F., Bullock, E.S., Wang, J., Wang, W.Boron bearing, type llb diamonds from superdeep subduction.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractMantlesubduction

Abstract: Type IIb diamonds, such as the Hope diamond, contain trace amounts of boron and are prized for their blue colors. Since boron is a quintessential crustal element, it is completely unexpected in diamond-forming fluids at mantle depths. Despite the mineralogical/geochemical interest in type IIb diamonds, almost nothing is known about how they form chiefly because of their rarity (=0.02% of all diamonds) and high gem value. To investigate the type of mantle host rock, the depth of origin (lithospheric vs. convecting mantle), and the source of boron, the high-volume diamond grading stream of the Gemological Institute of America was systematically screened to find type IIb diamonds with inclusions. Over a period of about two years, 46 prospective samples were identified and examined optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and infrared/Raman spectroscopy; a few diamonds were also analyzed for carbon isotopic composition and polished for electron probe microanalysis of inclusions. The examined inclusions represent retrogressed highpressure minerals, from metabasic to metaperidotitic hosts in the lowermost mantle transition zone (MTZ) to lower mantle (LM). These include former CaSiO3-perovskite, majorite, bridgmanite, stishovite, calcium-ferrite-type phase, and ferropericlase. The variably light carbon isotope compositions and inclusion mineralogy indicate diamond growth in deeply subducted oceanic lithosphere (crust and mantle). Some inclusions are found to have coexisting fluid (CH4 ± H2) that suggests the original high-pressure minerals interacted with hydrous media. We propose that the boron resided in serpentinized oceanic lithosphere. During subduction, the serpentine was metamorphosed to dense hydrous magnesium silicates (DHMS) that retained some boron. Upon breakdown in the MTZ/LM, these DHMS yielded boron-bearing hydrous fluids conducive to diamond growth.
DS201907-1575
2019
Richardson, S.H.Smith, E.M., Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H., Nestola, F., Bullocks, E.S., Wang, J., Wang, W.Reply to: Evidence for two blue (type Ilb) diamond populations. ( Moore and Helmstaedt Nature Vol. 570, E26-27.Nature, Vol. 570, E28-29.Mantleboron
DS1995-0967
1995
Richardson, S.H. Harris et al.Kivets, G.B., Gurney, J.J., Richardson, S.H. Harris et al.A detailed geochemical study of a suite of Diamondiferous eclogite xenoliths from the Kaavallei.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 279-281.South AfricaEclogites, Deposit -Kaavallei
DS1981-0348
1981
Richenda Minerals Pty. LtdRichenda Minerals Pty. LtdTr 7679h, Tr 7680h, and Tr 7681h Turtle Creek Base Metals And Diamond Exploration Lennard River Sheet.West Australia Geological Survey Open File., No. GSWA 1200, ROLL 403 M 2716, 45P.Australia, Western AustraliaProspecting, Geophysics, Geochemistry
DS2000-0558
2000
RichertLe Gall, B., Tiercelin, J.J., Richert, Gente, SturchioA morphotectonics study of an extensional fault zone in a magma rich rift:the Baringo trachyte fault systemTectonophysics, Vol. 320, No. 2, May 15, pp. 87-106.KenyaTectonics - central Kenya Rift
DS1988-0693
1988
Richert, J.P.Tiercelin, J.J., Chorowicz, J., Bellon, H., Richert, J.P., et al.East African rift system: offset, age and tectonic significance of the Tanganyika-Rukwa -Malawi intracontinental transcurrent fault zoneTectonophysics, Vol. 148, No. 3/4, May 1, pp. 241-252East AfricaBlank
DS201312-0692
2013
Riches, A.Pearson, D.G., Brin, L., Liu, J., Riches, A., Stachel, T., Mather, K.A., Kjarsgaard, B.A.Canada's Arctic cratons: how many, how old, how come?2013 Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts, p. 49-50.Canada, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Victoria Island, Parry PeninsulaGeochronology - mantle peridotites
DS201809-2060
2018
Riches, A.Liu, J., Brin, L.E., Pearson, D.G., Bretschneider, L., Luguet, A., van Acken, D., Kjarsgaard, B., Riches, A., Miskovic, A.Diamondiferous Paleoproterozoic mantle roots beneath Arctic Canada: a study of mantle xenoliths from Parry Peninsula and Central Victoria Island.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2018.08.010 78p.Canada, Nunavut, Parry Peninsula. Central Victoria Islandxenoliths

Abstract: While the mantle roots directly beneath Archean cratons have been relatively well studied because of their economic importance, much less is known about the genesis, age, composition and thickness of the mantle lithosphere beneath the regions that surround the cratons. Despite this knowledge gap, it is fundamentally important to establish the nature of relationships between this circum-cratonic mantle and that beneath the cratons, including the diamond potential of circum-cratonic regions. Here we present mineral and bulk elemental and isotopic compositions for kimberlite-borne mantle xenoliths from the Parry Peninsula and Central Victoria Island, Arctic Canada. These xenoliths provide key windows into the lithospheric mantle underpinning regions to the North and Northwest of the Archean Slave craton, where the presence of cratonic material has been proposed. The mantle xenolith data are supplemented by mineral concentrate data obtained during diamond exploration. The mineral and whole rock chemistry of peridotites from both localities is indistinguishable from that of typical cratonic mantle lithosphere. The cool mantle paleogeotherms defined by mineral thermobarometry reveal that the lithospheric mantle beneath the Parry Peninsula and Central Victoria Island terranes extended well into the diamond stability field at the time of kimberlite eruption, and this is consistent with the recovery of diamonds from both kimberlite fields. Bulk xenolith Se and Te contents, and highly siderophile element (including Os, Ir, Pt, Pd and Re) abundance systematics, plus corresponding depletion ages derived from Re-Os isotope data suggest that the mantle beneath these parts of Arctic Canada formed in the Paleoproterozoic Era, at ~2?Ga, rather than in the Archean. The presence of a diamondiferous Paleoproterozoic mantle root is part of the growing body of global evidence for diamond generation in mantle roots that stabilized well after the Archean. In the context of regional tectonics, we interpret the highly depleted mantle compositions beneath both studied regions as formed by mantle melting associated with hydrous metasomatism in the major Paleoproterozoic Wopmay-Great Bear-Hottah arc systems. These ~2?Ga arc systems were subsequently accreted along the margin of the Slave craton to form a craton-like thick lithosphere with diamond potential thereby demonstrating the importance of subduction accretion in building up Earth’s long-lived continental terranes.
DS201809-2062
2018
Riches, A.Liu, J., Pearson, D.G., Bretschneider, L., Luguet, A., Van Acken, D., Kjarsgaard, B., Riches, A., Miskovic, A.Diamondiferous Proterozoic mantle roots beneath Arctic Canada.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractCanada, Parry Peninsula, Victoria Islandxenoliths

Abstract: The mantle roots directly beneath Archean cratons have been relatively well studied because of their economic importance, yet much less is known about the genesis, age, composition and thickness of the mantle lithosphere beneath the regions surrounding these cratons. However, it is critically important to establish the nature of the relationship between this circum-cratonic mantle and that beneath the cratons, including the diamond potential of circum-cratonic regions. Here we present mineral and bulk elemental and isotopic compositions for kimberlite-borne mantle xenoliths from the Parry Peninsula (PP) and Central Victoria Island (CVI), Arctic Canada. These xenoliths provide key windows into the lithospheric mantle underpinning regions to the North and Northwest of the Slave craton, where the presence of cratonic mantle has been proposed. The mineral and whole rock chemistry of peridotites from both localities is indistinguishable from that of typical cratonic mantle lithosphere. The cool mantle geotherms defined by mineral thermobarometry reveal that the lithospheric mantle beneath the PP and CVI terranes extended well into the diamond stability field at the time of kimberlite eruption, consistent with the recovery of diamonds from both kimberlite fields. Bulk Se, Te, and highly siderophile element abundance systematics, plus Re-Os isotope age data suggest that the mantle beneath these parts of Arctic Canada formed at ~2 Ga, rather than in the Archean. The presence of a diamondiferous Paleoproterozoic mantle root is part of the growing body of evidence for peridotitic diamond generation in mantle roots that stabilized well after the Archean. In the context of regional tectonics, the highly depleted mantle compositions beneath both regions developed during mantle melting associated with hydrous metasomatism in the major Paleoproterozoic Wopmay- Great Bear-Hottah arc systems. These terranes were subsequently accreted along the margin of the Slave craton to form a craton-like thick lithosphere with significant diamond potential.
DS201710-2273
2017
Riches, A. J.V.Van der Meer, Q., Klaver, M., Reisberg, L., Riches, A. J.V., Davies, G.R.Preservation of an Archean whole rock Re-Os isochron for the Venetia lithospheric mantle: evidence for rapid crustal recycling and lithosphere stabilization at 3.3 Ga.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 216, pp. 242-263.Africa, South Africadeposit - Venetia
DS200712-0604
2007
Riches, A.J.V.Le Roux, V., Bodinier, J-L., Tommasi, A., Alard, O., Dautria, J-M., Vauchez, A., Riches, A.J.V.The lherz spinel lherzolite: refertilized rather than pristine mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 259, 3-4, pp. 599-612.MantleLherzolite chemistry
DS200712-0605
2007
Riches, A.J.V.Le Roux, V., Bodinier, J-L., Tommasi, A., Alard, O., Dautria, J-M., Vauchez, A., Riches, A.J.V.The lherz spinel lherzolite: refertilized rather than pristine mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 259, 3-4, pp. 599-612.MantleLherzolite chemistry
DS200712-0895
2007
Riches, A.J.V.Riches, A.J.V., Rogers, N.W., Charlier, B.L.A., Bodinier, J-L.A reappraisal of the petrology and origins of the Lherz peridotite.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A838.EuropeMantle composition
DS201012-0626
2010
Riches, A.J.V.Riches, A.J.V., Liu, Y., Day, J.M.D., Spetsius, Z.V., Taylor, L.A.Evolution of the Siberian platform: constraints from Diamondiferous xenoliths of Nyurbinskaya.Goldschmidt 2010 abstracts, abstractRussiaDeposit - Nyurbinskaya
DS201012-0627
2010
Riches, A.J.V.Riches, A.J.V., Liu, Y., Day, J.M.D., Spetsius, Z.V., Taylor, L.A.Subducted oceanic crust as diamond hosts revealed by garnets of mantle xenoliths from Nyyurbinskaya, Siberia.Lithos, In press available, 54p.Russia, YakutiaPetrology
DS201112-0111
2011
Riches, A.J.V.Brin, L.E., Pearson, D.G., Riches, A.J.V., Miskovic, A., Kjarsgaard, B.A., Kienlen, B., Reford, S.W.Evaluating the northerly extent of the Slave Craton in the Canadian Arctic.Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts for 2011, Poster abstract p. 95.Canada, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Victoria Island, Parry PeninsulaKimberlite borne - xenoliths -
DS201112-0861
2010
Riches, A.J.V.Riches, A.J.V., Liu, Y., Day, J.M.D., Spetsius, Z.V., Taylor, L.A.Subducted oceanic crust as diamond hosts revealed by garnets of mantle xenoliths from Nyurbinskaya, Siberia.Lithos, Vol. 120, pp. 368-378.Russia, SiberiaEclogite, genesis
DS201112-0862
2011
Riches, A.J.V.Riches, A.J.V., Pearson, D.G., Kjarsgaard, B.A., Jackson, S.E., Stachel, T., Armstrong, J.P.Deep lithosphere beneath the Rae Craton: peridotite xenoliths from Repulse Bay, Nunavut.Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts for 2011, abstract p. 74-75.Canada, Nunavut, Victoria Island, Parry PeninsulaMineralogy
DS201212-0009
2012
Riches, A.J.V.Alifirova, T.A., Pokhilenko, L.N., Ovchinnikov, Y.I., Riches, A.J.V., Taylor, L.A.Petrologic origin of exsolution textures in mantle minerals: evidence in pyroxenitic xenoliths from Yakutia kimberlites.International Geology Review, in press availableRussia, YakutiaPetrology
DS201212-0011
2012
Riches, A.J.V.Aliforova, T.A., Pokhilenko, L.N., Ovchinnikov, Y.I., Donnelly, C.L., Riches, A.J.V., Taylor, L.A.Petrologic origin of exsolution textures in mantle minerals: evidence in pyroxenite xenoliths from Yakutia kimberlites.International Geology Review, Vol. 54, 9, pp. 1071-1092.RussiaDeposit - Yakutia
DS201212-0585
2012
Riches, A.J.V.Riches, A.J.V., Pearson, D.G., Stern, R.A., Ickert, R.B., Kjarsgaard, B.A., Jackson, S.E., Ishikawa, A.Multi-stage metasomatism of a Roberts Victor eclogite linked to the formation and destruction of diamond.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractAfrica, South AfricaDeposit - Roberts Victor
DS201601-0028
2016
Riches, A.J.V.Liu, J., Riches, A.J.V., Pearson, D.G., Luo, Y., Kienlen, B., Kjarsgaard, B.A., Stachel, T., Armstrong, J.P.Age and evolution of the deep continental root beneath the central Rae craton, northern Canada.Precambrian Research, Vol. 272, pp. 168-174.CanadaGeocronology, metasomatism, tectonics

Abstract: Canada is host to at least six separate cratons that comprise a significant proportion of its crustal extent. Of these cratons, we possess knowledge of the cratonic lithospheric roots beneath only the Slave craton and, to a lesser extent, the Superior craton, despite the discovery of many new diamond-bearing kimberlites in Canada's North. Here we present the first age, composition and geothermal information for kimberlite-borne peridotite xenoliths from two localities within the central Rae craton: Pelly Bay and Repulse Bay. Our aim is to investigate the nature and evolution of the deep lithosphere in these regions and to examine how events recorded in the mantle may or may not correlate with the complex history of crustal evolution across the craton. Peridotite xenoliths are commonly altered by secondary processes including serpentinization, silicification and carbonation, which have variably affected the major element compositions. These secondary processes, as well as mantle metasomatism recorded in pristine silicate minerals, however, did not significantly modify the relative compositions of platinum-group elements (PGE) and Os isotope ratios in the majority of our samples from Pelly Bay and Repulse Bay, as indicated by the generally high absolute PGE concentrations and mantle-like melt-depleted PGE patterns. The observed PGE signatures are consistent with the low bulk Al2O3 contents (mostly lower than 2.5%) of the peridotites, as well as the compositions of the silicate and oxide minerals. Based on PGE patterns and Os model ages, the peridotites from both localities can be categorized into three age groups: Archean (3.0-2.6 Ga overall; 2.8-2.6 Ga for Pelly Bay and 3.0-2.7 Ga for Repulse Bay), Paleoproterozoic (2.1-1.7 Ga), and "Recent" (<1 Ga, with model ages similar to the ca. 546 Ma kimberlite eruption age). The Archean group provides the first direct evidence of depleted Archean lithospheric mantle forming coevally with the overlying Archean crustal basement, indicating cratonization of the Rae during the Archean. The subtle difference in Os model ages between Pelly Bay and Repulse Bay coincides with the age difference between crustal basement rocks beneath these two areas, supporting the suggestion that the Rae craton was assembled by collision of separate two Archean blocks at 2.7-2.6 Ga. The Paleoproterozoic peridotites are interpreted to represent newly formed lithospheric mantle, most likely associated with regional-scale underplating during the 1.77-1.70 Ga Kivalliq-Nueltin event via removal of the lower portion of Archean lithospheric mantle followed by replacement with juvenile Paleoproterozoic lithospheric mantle. The existence of multiple age clusters in the lithosphere at each locality is consistent with the observation of present-day seismic lithospheric discontinuities (0540 and 0545) that indicate two or more layers of fossil lithospheric mantle fabric beneath this region. Our data define a shallow mantle lithosphere layer dominated by Archean depletion ages underlain by a layer of mixed Archean and Paleoproterozoic ages. This lithospheric mantle structure is probably a response to complex tectonic displacement of portions of the lithospheric mantle during Paleoproterozoic orogeny/underplating. The best equilibrated Archean and Paleoproterozoic peridotites at both Pelly Bay and Repulse Bay define a typical cratonic geotherm at the time of kimberlite eruption, with a ~200 km thick lithospheric root extending well into the diamond stability field, in keeping with the diamondiferous nature of the kimberlites. Such thick lithosphere remains in place to the present day as suggested by seismic and magnetotelluric studies (0540, 0545 and 0550). The metasomatically disturbed peridotites in the Rae lithospheric mantle, yielding model ages indistinguishable from kimberlite eruption, may represent parts of the Rae craton mantle root that show anomalous magnetotelluric signatures.
DS201601-0040
2015
Riches, A.J.V.Riches, A.J.V., Ickert, R.B., Pearson, D.G., Stern, R.A., Jackson, S.E., Ishikawa, A.In situ oxygen isotope, major-, and trace element constraints on the metasomatic modification and crustal origin of a Diamondiferous eclogite from Roberts Victor, Kaapvaal Craton.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, in press available, 45p.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Roberts Victor
DS201602-0219
2016
Riches, A.J.V.Liu, J., Riches, A.J.V., Pearson, D.G., Luo, Y., Kienlen, B., Kjarsgaard, B.A., Stachel, T., Armstrong, J.P.Age and evolution of the deep continental root beneath the central Rae craton, northern Canada.Precambrian Research, Vol. 272, pp. 168-184.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology

Abstract: Canada is host to at least six separate cratons that comprise a significant proportion of its crustal extent. Of these cratons, we possess knowledge of the cratonic lithospheric roots beneath only the Slave craton and, to a lesser extent, the Superior craton, despite the discovery of many new diamond-bearing kimberlites in Canada's North. Here we present the first age, composition and geothermal information for kimberlite-borne peridotite xenoliths from two localities within the central Rae craton: Pelly Bay and Repulse Bay. Our aim is to investigate the nature and evolution of the deep lithosphere in these regions and to examine how events recorded in the mantle may or may not correlate with the complex history of crustal evolution across the craton. Peridotite xenoliths are commonly altered by secondary processes including serpentinization, silicification and carbonation, which have variably affected the major element compositions. These secondary processes, as well as mantle metasomatism recorded in pristine silicate minerals, however, did not significantly modify the relative compositions of platinum-group elements (PGE) and Os isotope ratios in the majority of our samples from Pelly Bay and Repulse Bay, as indicated by the generally high absolute PGE concentrations and mantle-like melt-depleted PGE patterns. The observed PGE signatures are consistent with the low bulk Al2O3 contents (mostly lower than 2.5%) of the peridotites, as well as the compositions of the silicate and oxide minerals. Based on PGE patterns and Os model ages, the peridotites from both localities can be categorized into three age groups: Archean (3.0-2.6 Ga overall; 2.8-2.6 Ga for Pelly Bay and 3.0-2.7 Ga for Repulse Bay), Paleoproterozoic (2.1-1.7 Ga), and “Recent” (<1 Ga, with model ages similar to the ca. 546 Ma kimberlite eruption age). The Archean group provides the first direct evidence of depleted Archean lithospheric mantle forming coevally with the overlying Archean crustal basement, indicating cratonization of the Rae during the Archean. The subtle difference in Os model ages between Pelly Bay and Repulse Bay coincides with the age difference between crustal basement rocks beneath these two areas, supporting the suggestion that the Rae craton was assembled by collision of separate two Archean blocks at 2.7-2.6 Ga. The Paleoproterozoic peridotites are interpreted to represent newly formed lithospheric mantle, most likely associated with regional-scale underplating during the 1.77-1.70 Ga Kivalliq-Nueltin event via removal of the lower portion of Archean lithospheric mantle followed by replacement with juvenile Paleoproterozoic lithospheric mantle. The existence of multiple age clusters in the lithosphere at each locality is consistent with the observation of present-day seismic lithospheric discontinuities (0540 and 0545) that indicate two or more layers of fossil lithospheric mantle fabric beneath this region. Our data define a shallow mantle lithosphere layer dominated by Archean depletion ages underlain by a layer of mixed Archean and Paleoproterozoic ages. This lithospheric mantle structure is probably a response to complex tectonic displacement of portions of the lithospheric mantle during Paleoproterozoic orogeny/underplating. The best equilibrated Archean and Paleoproterozoic peridotites at both Pelly Bay and Repulse Bay define a typical cratonic geotherm at the time of kimberlite eruption, with a ~200 km thick lithospheric root extending well into the diamond stability field, in keeping with the diamondiferous nature of the kimberlites. Such thick lithosphere remains in place to the present day as suggested by seismic and magnetotelluric studies (0540, 0545 and 0550). The metasomatically disturbed peridotites in the Rae lithospheric mantle, yielding model ages indistinguishable from kimberlite eruption, may represent parts of the Rae craton mantle root that show anomalous magnetotelluric signatures.
DS201603-0417
2016
Riches, A.J.V.Riches, A.J.V., Ickert, R.B., Pearson, D.G., Stern, R.A., Jackson, S.E., Ishikawa, A., Kjarsgaard, B.A., Gurney, J.J.In situ oxygen-isotope, major, and trace element constraints on the metasomatic modification and crust origin of a Diamondiferous eclogite from Roberts Victor, Kaapvaal craton.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 174, pp. 345-359.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Roberts Victor
DS201709-2068
2017
Riches, A.J.V.van der Meer, Q.H.A., Klaver, M., Reisberg, L., Riches, A.J.V., Davies, G.R.Preservation of an Archaean whole rock Re-Os isochron for the Venetia lithospheric mantle: evidence for rapid crustal recycling and lithospheric stabilization at 3.3 Ga.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, in press available, 22p.Africa, South Africadeposit - Venetia

Abstract: Re-Os and platinum group element analyses are reported for peridotite xenoliths from the 533 Ma Venetia kimberlite cluster situated in the Limpopo Mobile Belt, the Neoarchaean collision zone between the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons. The Venetian xenoliths provide a rare opportunity to examine the state of the cratonic lithosphere prior to major regional metasomatic disturbance of Re-Os systematics throughout the Phanerozoic. The 32 studied xenoliths record Si-enrichment that is characteristic of the Kaapvaal lithospheric mantle and can be subdivided into five groups based on Re-Os analyses. The most pristine group I samples (n = 13) display an approximately isochronous relationship and fall on a 3.28 ± 0.17 Ga (95 % conf. int.) reference line that is based on their mean TMA age. This age overlaps with the formation age of the Limpopo crust at 3.35–3.28 Ga. The group I samples derive from ~50 to ~170 km depth, suggesting coeval melt depletion of the majority of the Venetia lithospheric mantle column. Group II and III samples have elevated Re/Os due to Re addition during kimberlite magmatism. Group II has otherwise undergone a similar evolution as the group I samples with overlapping 187Os/188Os at eruption age: 187Os/188OsEA, while group III samples have low Os concentrations, unradiogenic 187Os/188OsEA and were effectively Re-free prior to kimberlite magmatism. The other sample groups (IV and V) have disturbed Re-Os systematics and provide no reliable age information. A strong positive correlation is recorded between Os and Re concentrations for group I samples, which is extended to groups II and III after correction for kimberlite addition. This positive correlation precludes a single stage melt depletion history and indicates coupled remobilisation of Re and Os. The combination of Re-Os mobility, preservation of the isochronous relationship, correlation of 187Os/188Os with degree of melt depletion and lack of radiogenic Os addition puts tight constraints on the formation and subsequent evolution of Venetia lithosphere. First, melt depletion and remobilisation of Re and Os must have occurred within error of the 3.28 Ga mean TMA age. Second, the refractory peridotites contain significant Re despite recording >40 % melt extraction. Third, assuming that Si-enrichment and Re-Os mobility in the Venetia lithospheric mantle were linked, this process must have occurred within ~100 Myr of initial melt depletion in order to preserve the isochronous relationship. Based on the regional geological evolution, we propose a rapid recycling model with initial melt depletion at ~3.35 Ga to form a tholeiitic mafic crust that is recycled at ~3.28 Ga, resulting in the intrusion of a TTG suite and Si-enrichment of the lithospheric mantle. The non-zero primary Re contents of the Venetia xenoliths imply that TRD model ages significantly underestimate the true depletion age even for highly depleted peridotites. The overlap of the ~2.6 Ga TRD ages with the time of the Kaapvaal-Limpopo collision is purely fortuitous and has no geological significance. Hence, this study underlines the importance of scrutiny if age information is to be derived from whole rock Re-Os analyses.
DS201902-0319
2019
Riches, A.J.V.Scott, J.M., Liu, J., Pearson, D.G., Harris, G.A., Czertowicz, T.A., Woodland, S.J., Riches, A.J.V., Luth, R.W.Continent stabilization by lateral accretion of subduction zone-processed depleted mantle residues: insights from Zealandia.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 507, pp. 175-186.Mantleperidotite

Abstract: To examine how the mantle lithosphere stabilises continents, we present a synthesis of the mantle beneath Zealandia in the SW Pacific Ocean. Zealandia, Earth's “8th continent”, occurs over 4.9 M km2 and comprises a fore-arc, arc and back-arc fragment rifted from the Australia-Antarctica Gondwana margin 85 Myr ago. The oldest extant crust is ~500 Ma and the majority is Permian-Jurassic. Peridotitic rocks from most known locations reveal the underpinning mantle to comprise regional domains varying from refractory (Al2O3 < 1 wt%, olivine Mg# > 92, spinel Cr# up to 80, Pt/Ir < 1) to moderately depleted (Al2O3 = 2-4 wt%, olivine Mg# ~90.5, spinel Cr# < ~60). There is no systematic distribution of these domains relative to the former arc configuration and some refractory domains underlie crust that is largely devoid of magmatic rocks. Re-depletion Os model ages have no correlation with depletion indices but do have a distribution that is very similar to global convecting mantle. Whole rock, mineral and isotopic data are interpreted to show that the Zealandia mantle lithosphere was constructed from isotopically heterogeneous convecting mantle fragments swept into the sub-arc environment, amalgamated, and variably re-melted under low-P hydrous conditions. The paucity of mafic melt volumes in most of the overlying crust that could relate to the depleted domains requires melting to have been followed by lateral accretion either during subduction or slab rollback. Recent Australia-Pacific convergence has thickened portions of the Zealandia mantle to >160 km. Zealandia shows that the generation of refractory and/or thick continental lithosphere is not restricted to the Archean. Since Archean cratons also commonly display crust-mantle age decoupling, contain spinel peridotites with extreme Cr# numbers that require low-P hydrous melting, and often have a paucity of mafic melts relative to the extreme depletion indicated by their peridotitic roots, they too may - in part - be compilations of peridotite shallowly melted and then laterally accreted at subduction margins.
DS1990-1226
1990
Richet, P.Richet, P., Robie, R.A., Hemingway, B.S., Beuville, D., Richard, G.Thermodynamic and melting properties of pyrope (Mg3Al2Si3O12)Terra, Abstracts of Experimental mineralogy, petrology and, Vol. 2, December abstracts p. 93AlpsMantle, Pyrope
DS1991-1229
1991
Richet, P.Neuville, D.R., Richet, P.Viscosity and mixing in molten (Calcium, magnesium) pyroxenes and garnetsGeochim. et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 55, pp. 1011-1020GlobalMineralogy -experimental, Garnets
DS1991-1708
1991
Richet, P.Tequil, C., Robie, R.A., Hemingway, B.S., Neuville, D.R., Richet, P.Melting and thermodynamic properties of pyrope (MgsAl2Si3O12)Geochim. et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 55, pp. 1005-1010GlobalMineralogy -experimental, Pyrope
DS1999-0404
1999
Richet, P.Lejeune, A.M., Bottinga, Y., Richet, P.Rheology of bubble bearing magmasEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 166, No. 1-2, Feb. 28, pp. 71-84.GlobalMagmatism
DS200612-0156
2006
Richet, P.Bourova, E., Richet, P., Petitet, J-P.Coesite ( SiO2) as an extreme case of superheated crystal: an X-ray diffraction study up to 1776 K.Chemical Geology, Vol. 229, 1-3, May 16, pp. 57-63.TechnologyMineralogy - coesite
DS200612-0959
2006
Richet, P.Mysen, B., Richet, P.Silicate glasses and melts.Elsevier, 5600p. approx. $ 140 USMantleBook - melting, metal oxide-silica systems
DS201112-0863
2010
Richet, P.Richet, P., Henderson, G.S., Neuville, D.R.Thermodynamics: the oldest branch of earth sciences?Elements, Vol. 6, pp. 287-292.MantleGeothermometry
DS201112-0864
2010
Richet, P.Richet, P., Ottonello, G.Thermodynamics of phase equilibration temperatures in magma.Elements, Vol. 6, pp. 315-320.MantleMagmatism
DS201711-2526
2017
Richet, P.Richet, P.The creation of the world and the birth of chronology. HISTORYComptes Rendus Geoscience, Vol. 349, pp. 226-232.Technologyhistory

Abstract: The eternity of the world and, correlatively, the cyclical nature of time were agreed upon by all Greek philosophical schools except the Platonists. As for matter, all of them posited that it was eternal so that the idea that something could be made from nothing was considered as pure absurdity. With the advent of Christianity, however, a matter coeternal with God raised fundamental theological difficulties. Toward the end of the second century, apologists such as Tatian the Assyrian, Theophilus of Antioch, Irenaeus of Lyons or Tertullian thus emphasized God's absolute freedom and power by claiming that Creation had been made from nothing. Along with the Passion of Christ and the Last Judgment, the initial moment defined by the Creation then conferred to time an irreversible, linear orientation and to history both a new sense and an obsessing concern for chronology. Unambiguously, the Creation became the reference point for the world's history. From Scripture analyses, one determined that it took place about 5500 years earlier within a framework where the History of man and that of the earth were not distinct. Having designed a consistent, universal time scale from chronological data recorded for all ancient peoples, Eusebius of Caesarea could thus attribute to the Great Flood the fossils found on the top of Mount Lebanon. The short Mosaic chronologies were eventually rejected during the 18th century, but Eusebius’ chronological procedure was unknowingly transposed when a relative geological timescale was then set up from the fossil record. The close association of Creation with Christian dogma in turn induced some circles to reject the second law of thermodynamics at the end of the 19th century and, a few decades later, the thesis of an expanding universe. In both cases, the reason was that continuously increasing entropy would imply some low-entropy initial state akin to a Creation.
DS201811-2604
2018
Richetti, P.C.Richetti, P.C., Schmitt, R.S., Reeves, C.Dividing the South American continent to fit a Gondwana reconstruction: A model based on continental geology.Tectonophysics, Vol. 747-748, pp. 79-98.South Americaplate tectonics

Abstract: The South American continental plate has been affected by intraplate deformation since the start of West Gondwana disruption in the Lower Cretaceous (about 140?Ma). That the present shape of South America is not precisely the same as its shape in reassembled Gondwana partly explains the imperfect fits of the conjugate margins of the South Atlantic proposed since the first reconstruction models of the early 20th century. Several attempts at defining subplates within South America have been published but not all take account of existing knowledge of its continental geology. Here a subdivision into eight rigid subplates is proposed, based primarily on geological and tectonic evidence. Our model is tested against three published models of a multi-subplate Africa, as re-shaped to the pre-breakup outline of that continent, by visual fitting and the use of piercing points. The South America blocks were rotated and the Euler poles calculated interactively in reconstruction software. All three proposed fits had overlapping block margins within South America, indicating post-breakup rifting, except for the Transbrasiliano lineament. This NNE-SSW crustal-scale shear zone was used as a boundary for seven of the eight blocks. It is clearly the main intraplate accommodation zone in South America and an important piercing point in relation to the Kandi lineament in West Africa. The other block boundaries correspond to narrow zones with sedimentary basins and/or dyke swarms that have developed since South Atlantic opening. Each fit required a different configuration of the South America subplates since the pre-rift disposition of the African subplates also differ from each other, contributing to the uncertainty in any detailed reassembly.
DS201812-2873
2018
Richetti, P.C.Richetti, P.C., Schmitt, R.S., Reeves, C.Dividing the South American continent to fit a Gondwana reconstruction: a model based on continental geology.Tectonophysics, Vol. 747-748, pp. 79-98.South Americatectonics

Abstract: The South American continental plate has been affected by intraplate deformation since the start of West Gondwana disruption in the Lower Cretaceous (about 140?Ma). That the present shape of South America is not precisely the same as its shape in reassembled Gondwana partly explains the imperfect fits of the conjugate margins of the South Atlantic proposed since the first reconstruction models of the early 20th century. Several attempts at defining subplates within South America have been published but not all take account of existing knowledge of its continental geology. Here a subdivision into eight rigid subplates is proposed, based primarily on geological and tectonic evidence. Our model is tested against three published models of a multi-subplate Africa, as re-shaped to the pre-breakup outline of that continent, by visual fitting and the use of piercing points. The South America blocks were rotated and the Euler poles calculated interactively in reconstruction software. All three proposed fits had overlapping block margins within South America, indicating post-breakup rifting, except for the Transbrasiliano lineament. This NNE-SSW crustal-scale shear zone was used as a boundary for seven of the eight blocks. It is clearly the main intraplate accommodation zone in South America and an important piercing point in relation to the Kandi lineament in West Africa. The other block boundaries correspond to narrow zones with sedimentary basins and/or dyke swarms that have developed since South Atlantic opening. Each fit required a different configuration of the South America subplates since the pre-rift disposition of the African subplates also differ from each other, contributing to the uncertainty in any detailed reassembly.
DS2002-1337
2002
Richmond, A.Richmond, A.An a analysis of a remotely sensed circular feature near lake Spring, Missouri.Computers and Geosciences, Vol. 28,4,pp.555-65.GlobalGeostatistics - kriging
DS1996-1198
1996
RichterRochell, A., Heusser, E., Kirsten, T., Oehm, J., RichterA noble gas profile across a Hawaiian mantle xenolith: coexisting accidental and cognate noble gases derivedGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 60, No. 23, pp. 4773-83.Mantle, HawaiiGeochemistry - ultramafic xenoliths, Geochronology
DS1991-0929
1991
Richter, C.Krejci, D., Richter, C.SPLIT: a Turbo-C program for the graphical representation and seperation of fault slip dat a setsComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 17, No. 6, pp. 801-812GlobalComputers, Program -SPLIT.
DS1994-1459
1994
Richter, C.Richter, C., Krejci, D.The representation of directional geological data: TEC-hardware independent high quality graphicsComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 23-30GlobalComputer Program, Graphics
DS1985-0494
1985
Richter, F.M.Nielson-Pike, J.E., Frey, F.A., Richter, F.M., Mysen, B.O.Multistage Mantle ProcessesGeology, Vol. 13, No. 10, PP. 742-743.United States, West Coast, California, Spain, South Africa, Hawaii, AustraliaKimberlite, Genesis, Penrose Conference Discussion
DS1988-0570
1988
Richter, F.M.Richter, F.M.A major change in the thermal state of the earth at the Archean Proterozoic boundary: consequences for the nature and preser-vation of continental lithosphereJournal of Petrology, Special Volume 1988- Oceanic and Continental, pp. 39-52North AmericaMidcontinent, Geothermometry
DS1992-1344
1992
Richter, F.M.Schrag, D.P., DePaolo, D.J., Richter, F.M.Oxygen isotope exchange in a two layer model of oceanic crustEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 111, No. 2-4, July pp. 305-318MantleCrust, Oceanic-two layer, Layering, differentiation
DS200612-0907
2006
Richter, F.M.Mendybaev, R.A., Richter, F.M., Davis, A.M.Crystallization of melilite from CMAS - liquids and the formation of the melilite mantle of Type B1 CAIs: experimental simulations.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 10, May 15, pp. 2622-2642.TechnologyMelilite
DS1993-1307
1993
Richter, K.Richter, K., Carmichael, I.S.E.Mega-xenocrysts in alkali olivine basalts: fragments of disrupted mantleassemblages.American Mineralogist, Vol. 78, No. 11, 12, November-December pp. 1230-1245.California, MexicoXenocrysts, Dish Hill
DS1996-1187
1996
Richter, K.Richter, K., Carmichael, I.S.E.Phase equilibration temperatures of phlogopite lamprophyres from west Mexico: biotite liquid equilibration temperatures and PT estimates...Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 123, No. 2, pp. 1-21.MexicoLamporphyres, Igneous rocks -biotite
DS200612-0006
2005
Richter, W.Akinin, V.V., Sobolev, A.V., Ntaflos, T., Richter, W.Clinopyroxene megacrysts from Enmelen melanephelinitic volcanoes (Chukchi Peninsula, Russia): application to composition and evolution of mantle melts.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 150, 1, pp. 85-101.RussiaNephelinite
DS1999-0617
1999
RiciputiRuzicka, A., Riciputi, Taylor, Snyder, GreenwoodPetrogenesis of mantle derived sulphide inclusions in Yakutian diamonds: chemical and isotopic disequilibriuM.7th International Kimberlite Conference Nixon, Vol. 2, pp. 741-49.Russia, YakutiaQuenching from high temperatures, Deposit - Mir, 23rd., Aikhal, Udachnaya
DS1990-1227
1990
Riciputi, L.R.Riciputi, L.R., Valley, J.W., McGregor, V.R.Conditions of Archean granulite metamorphism in theGodthab-Fiskenaessetregion, southern West GreenlandJournal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 8, No. 2, March pp. 171-190GreenlandMetamorphism, Granulite
DS1985-0254
1985
Rickard, . R.S.Gurney, J.J., Harris, J.W., Rickard, . R.S., Moore, R.O.Inclusions in Premier Mine DiamondsTransactions Geological Society of South Africa, Vol. 88, pt. 2, May-August pp. 301-310South AfricaMineralogy, Geothermometry
DS1988-0571
1988
Rickard, D.Rickard, D.Account of a deep hole. (Kola).Essay-review of USSR book "the Superdeep well of the Kola Peninsula"Geol. Mag, Vol. 125, No. 6, pp. 659-661. Database # 17554RussiaDeep drilling, Shield
DS1997-0617
1997
Rickard, P.S.Kopylova, M.G., Rickard, P.S., Kleyenstueber, Taylor, Gurney, DanielsFirst occurrence of strontian K-chromium-loparite and chromium- chevkinite indiamonds.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 38, No. 2, pp. 405-420.ZimbabweDiamond inclusions, Deposit - River Ranch
DS1970-0525
1972
Rickard, R.Hawthorne, J.B., Harris, J.W., Gurney, J.J., Rickard, R.Inclusions in Diamonds from Southern AfricaPreprint, 21p.South AfricaDiamond Inclusions, Deposit - Premier, Finsch, Koffiefontein
DS1975-1044
1979
Rickard, R.S.Gurney, J.J., Harris, J.W., Rickard, R.S.Silicate and Oxide Inclusions in Diamond from the Finsch Kimberlite Pipe.Proceedings of Second International Kimberlite Conference, Proceedings Vol. 1, PP. 1-15.South AfricaMineralogy
DS1982-0234
1982
Rickard, R.S.Gurney, J.J., Harris, J.W., Rickard, R.S.The Abundance and Chemistry of Minerals Associated with Diamonds at Roberts Victor Mine.Proceedings of Third International Kimberlite Conference, TERRA COGNITA, ABSTRACT VOLUME., Vol. 2, No. 3, P. 200, (abstract.).South AfricaKimberlite, Chemistry, Olivine, Harzburgite, Garnet, Eclogite
DS1983-0275
1983
Rickard, R.S.Haggerty, S.E., Smyth, J.R., Erlank, A.J., Rickard, R.S., Danchi.Lindsleyite (ba) and Mathiasite (k): Two New Chromium Titanaetes in the crichtonite Series from the Upper Mantle.American MINERALOGIST., Vol. 68, PP. 494-505.South AfricaKimberlite, Rare Earth Elements (ree), Mineral Chemistry, Analyses
DS1984-0328
1984
Rickard, R.S.Gurney, J.J., Harris, J.W., Rickard, R.S.Silicate and Oxide Inclusions in Diamonds from the Orapa Mine, Botswana.Proceedings of Third International Kimberlite Conference., Vol. 2, PP. 3-9.BotswanaAnalyses, Geothermometry, Geobarometry, Mineral Chemistry
DS1984-0329
1984
Rickard, R.S.Gurney, J.J., Harris, J.W., Rickard, R.S.Minerals Associated With Diamonds from the Roberts Victor MineProceedings of Third International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, PP. 25-32.South AfricaAnalyses, Isotope, Mineral Chemistry
DS1986-0323
1986
Rickard, R.S.Gurney, J.J., Harris, J.W., Rickard, R.S., Cardoso, P.Mineral inclusions in diamonds from Koffiefontein mineProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 389-391South AfricaKoffiefontein, Diamond morphology
DS1986-0581
1986
Rickard, R.S.Moore, R.O., Otter, M.L., Rickard, R.S., Harris, J.W., Gurney, J.J.The occurrence of moissanite and ferro-periclase as inclusionsindiamondProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 409-411South Africa, ColoradoMonastery, Sloan, Diamond morphology
DS1989-1270
1989
Rickard, R.S.Rickard, R.S., Harris, J.W., Gurney, J.J., Cardos, P.Mineral inclusions in diamonds from the Koffiefontein mineGeological Society of Australia Inc. Blackwell Scientific Publishing, Special, No. 14, Vol. 2, pp. 1054-1062South AfricaDiamond inclusions, Deposit -Koffiefontein
DS1991-0880
1991
Rickard, R.S.Kirkley, M.B., Gurney, J.J., Rickard, R.S.Jwaneng framesites -inclusions and carbon isotopesProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 225-227BotswanaJwaneng, framesites, Geochronology
DS1991-1422
1991
Rickard, R.S.Rickard, R.S., Gurney, J.J., Harris, J.W.Mineral inclusions in diamonds from Jagersfontein mineProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 336-338South AfricaDiamond inclusions, Peridotite, mineral chemistry, analyses
DS1994-0915
1994
Rickard, R.S.Kirkley, M.B., Gurney, J.J., Rickard, R.S.Jwaneng framesite: carbon isotopes and inclusion compositionsProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, pp. 127-135.BotswanaMineral chemistry, Deposit -Jwaneng
DS1995-0703
1995
Rickard, R.S.Gurney, J.J., Harris, J.W., Otter, M.L., Rickard, R.S.Jwaneng diamond inclusionsProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 208-10.BotswanaDiamond inclusions, Deposit -Jwaneng
DS1995-1000
1995
Rickard, R.S.Kopylova, M.G., Rickard, R.S., Kleyenstueber, DanielsThe first finding of chromium-Sr Loparite type and chromium Chevkinite type minerals indiamonds.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 292-294.ZimbabweDiamond inclusions, Deposit -River Ranch
DS1920-0247
1925
Rickard, T.A.Rickard, T.A.A Journey to South Africa. Part Ii. from Cape Town to Johannesburg.Engineering and Mining Journal, Vol. 120, JULY 11TH. PP. 57-59.South AfricaTravelogue
DS1920-0248
1925
Rickard, T.A.Rickard, T.A.The Great Diamond Hoax. How a Colorado Desert Was Salted With Gems in 1872.Engineering and Mining Journal, Vol. 119, MAY 30TH. PP. 884-888.United States, Arizona, Colorado PlateauBlank
DS1930-0120
1932
Rickard, T.A.Rickard, T.A.A History of American MiningNew York: Mcgraw Hill, 419P.United States, Arizona, Colorado PlateauBlank
DS1930-0199
1935
Rickard, T.A.Rickard, T.A.The Great Diamond Hoax (1935)Engineering and Mining Journal, Vol. MAY 30TH.United States, California, West CoastBlank
DS201804-0731
2018
Rickard, W.Reddy, S., Saxey, D., Rickard, W., Fougerouse, D.Atom probe microscopy and potential applications to diamond research.4th International Diamond School: Diamonds, Geology, Gemology and Exploration Bressanone Italy Jan. 29-Feb. 2nd., pp. 36-37. abstractTechnologydiamond inclusions
DS1989-1271
1989
Rickard, Y.Rickard, Y., Vigny, C.Mantle dynamics with induced plate tectonicsJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 94, No. B 12, December 10, pp. 17, 523-17, 542GlobalMantle, Tectonics
DS1992-0416
1992
Ricken, W.Einsele, G., Ricken, W., Seilacher, A.Cycles and events in stratigraphySpringer-Verlag, 1040pGlobalStratigraphy, Ad -outline
DS1994-1460
1994
Ricken, W.Ricken, W.Sedimentation as a three component systemSpringer-Verlag, 211p. $ 60.00GlobalBook -ad, Sedimentation
DS201212-0586
2012
Rickers, F.Rickers, F., Fichtner, A., Trampert, J.Imaging mantle plumes with instantaneous phase measurements of diffracted waves.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 190, 1, pp. 650-664.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS2001-0977
2001
Rickers, K.Rickers, K., Mezger, K., Raith, M.M.Evolution of the continental crust in the Proterozoic eastern Gnats belt, new constraints for Rodinia reconstPrecambrian Research, Vol. 112, No. 3-4, Dec. 10, pp. 183-210.IndiaGeochronology - Sm neodymium Rb Sr lead lead, Gondwana
DS1984-0608
1984
Ricketts, B.Ricketts, B., et al.Volcanic style in the Strand Fiord Formation ( Upper Cretaceous) Axel Heiberg Island.Polar res., 3. n.s pp. 107-22.Northwest Territories, Axel Heiberg IslandMagmatism, Sverdrup Basin
DS1989-1272
1989
Ricketts, B.D.Ricketts, B.D.Uniformitarianism- a metaphor of human experienceModern Geology, Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 69-82GlobalHistory, UniformitarianisM.
DS1982-0519
1982
Ricketts, C.Ricketts, C., Geopeko ltd., PEKO WALLSEND OPERATIONS LTD.El 3010 Daly River Northern Territory Final Report 27/10/81to 23/9/82.Northern Territory Geological Survey, No. CR 82/350, 5P.Australia, Northern TerritoryProspecting, Geochemistry
DS1982-0520
1982
Ricketts, C.Ricketts, C., Geopeko ltd., WALLSEND OPERATIONS LTD.El 3011 Daly River Northern Territory Final Report 27/10/81to 23/9/82.Northern Territory Geological Survey, No. CR 82/351, 6P.Australia, Northern TerritoryProspecting, Geochemistry
DS2000-0819
2000
Rickus, J.E.Rickus, J.E., Northcote, G.Ore reserve estimationMin. Res. Ore Res. Est. AusIMM Guide, Mon. 23, pp. 413-20.AustraliaEconomics - geostatistics, ore reserves, exploration, Not specific to diamonds
DS1960-1011
1968
Rickwood, P.C.Rickwood, P.C.On Recasting Analyses of Garnet into End Member MoleculesContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 18, pp. 175-98.GlobalMineral Chemistry, Garnet - Analyses
DS1960-1012
1968
Rickwood, P.C.Rickwood, P.C., Mathias, M., Siebert, J.C.A Study of Garnets from Eclogite and Peridotite Xenoliths Found Inkimberlite.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 19, pp. 271-301.South AfricaGarnet Mineralogy, Deposit - Bultfontein, De Beers, Dutoitspan, Kamfersdam
DS1960-1013
1968
Rickwood, P.C.Rickwood, P.C., Mathias, M., Siebert, J.C.A Study of Garnets from Eclogite and Peridotite Xenoliths Found in Kimberlite.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 19, No. 4, PP. 271-301.South AfricaPetrography, Mineralogy
DS1960-1164
1969
Rickwood, P.C.Mathias, M., Rickwood, P.C.Ultramafic Xenoliths in the Matsoku Kimberlite Pipe, Lesotho in Upper Mantle Project.Geological Society of South Africa SPECIAL Publishing, No. 2, PP. 359-369.LesothoGeology
DS1960-1198
1969
Rickwood, P.C.Rickwood, P.C.The Nature and Occurrences of Non-eclogite Ultramafic Xenoliths in the Kimberlites of Southern Africa.Geological Survey of South Africa SPECIAL Publishing, No. 2, PP. 395-416.South AfricaGeology, Petrography
DS1960-1199
1969
Rickwood, P.C.Rickwood, P.C.Some Aspects of the Mineral Chemistry and Petrology of the Garnetiferous Ultramafic Xenoliths in the Kimberlites of South Africa.Cape Town: Ph.d. Thesis, University Cape Town., South AfricaKimberlite, Xenoliths
DS1960-1200
1969
Rickwood, P.C.Rickwood, P.C., Gurney, J.J., White-Cooper, D.R.R.The Nature and Occurrences of Eclogite Xenoliths in the Kimberlites of Southern Africa.Geological Survey of South Africa SPECIAL Publishing, No. 2, PP. 371-393.South AfricaGeology, Petrography
DS1970-0133
1970
Rickwood, P.C.Mathias, M., Siebert, J.C.L., Rickwood, P.C.Some Aspects of the Mineralogy and Petrology of Ultramafic Xenoliths in Kimberlite.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 26, No. 2, PP. 75-123.Tanzania, East AfricaMineralogy, Petrology
DS1970-0184
1970
Rickwood, P.C.Rickwood, P.C., Mathias, M.Diamondiferous Eclogite Xenoliths in KimberliteLithos, Vol. 3, No. 3, PP. 223-235.South AfricaPetrology, Petrography
DS1987-0566
1987
Rickwood, P.C.Parker, A.J., Rickwood, P.C., Baillie, P.W., McClenaghan, M.P.Mafic dyke swarms of Australiain: Mafic dyke swarms, Editors, Halls, H.C., Fahrig, W.F. Geological, Special Paper 34, pp. 401-417AustraliaKimberley Basin, Canning Basin p. 408, southeast Victoria p. 4, Kimberlite, Lamproite
DS1989-1273
1989
Rickwood, P.C.Rickwood, P.C.Boundary lines within petrologic diagrams which uses oxides of major andminorelementsLithos, Vol. 22, No. 4, April pp. 247-264GlobalGeochemistry, Petrologic diagrams
DS200412-1530
2004
Ricolleau, A.Perrillat, J.P., Ricolleau, A., Daniel, I., Fiquet, G., Mezouar, M., Cardon, H.Phase transformations of MORB in the lower mantle.Lithos, ABSTRACTS only, Vol. 73, p. S87. abstractMantleSubduction
DS200412-1664
2004
Ricolleau, A.Ricolleau, A., Perrillat, J.P., Fiquet, G., Menguy, N., Daniel, I., Addad, A., Vanni, C.The fate of subducted basaltic crust in the Earth's lower mantle: an experimental petrological study.Lithos, ABSTRACTS only, Vol. 73, p. S93. abstractMantleSubduction
DS200612-1077
2006
Ricolleau, A.Perrillat, J.P., Ricolleau, A., Daniel, I., Fiquet, G., Mezouar, M., Guignot, N., Cardon, H.Phase transformations of subducted basaltic crust in the upmost lower mantle.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 157, 1-2, pp. 139-149.MantleUHP, subduction
DS200712-0045
2007
Ricolleau, A.Badro, J., Ryerson, F.J., Webe, P.K., Ricolleau, A., Fallon, S.J., Hutcheon, I.D.Chemical imaging with NanSIMS: a window into deep Earth geochemistry.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 262, 3-4, Oct. 30, pp. 543-551.MantleGeochemistry
DS200812-0344
2008
Ricolleau, A.Fei, Y., Ricolleau, A.Constraints on deep Earth heterogeneities from mineral physics data.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A260.MantleUHP
DS200812-0959
2008
Ricolleau, A.Ricolleau, A., Fei, Cottrell, Watson, Zhang, Fiquet, Auzende, Roskosz, Morard, PrakapenkaNew constraints on the pyrolitic model under lower mantle conditions.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A795.MantleX-ray diffraction
DS1998-1235
1998
Ricou, L.E.Ricou, L.E.Plate network division - its effect on mantle convection and the two hotspot domains.Terra Nova, Vol. 10, No. 4, pp. 201-205.MantleTectonics, Hot spots
DS1998-1236
1998
Ricou, L.E.Ricou, L.E., Besse, J.Improving the fit of GondwanaJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, 1A, p. 159. AbstractGondwanaTectonics
DS200412-1665
2004
Ricou, L.E.Ricou, L.E.Earth's tectonic history revisited in the light of episodic misfits between plate network and mantle convection.Tectonophysics, Vol. 384, 1-4, pp. 285-300.MantleTectonics - convection
DS1990-1454
1990
Ridd, M.Taylor, W.R., Jaques, A.L., Ridd, M.Nitrogen defect aggregation characteristics of some Australasian diamonds:time-temperature constraints on the source regions of pipe and alluvialdiamondsAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 75, No. 11-12, November-December pp. 1290-1310AustraliaDiamond morphology, Nitrogen
DS1990-0935
1990
Riddle, C.Lightfoot, P.C., Riddle, C.An introductory guide to sampling for geoanalysisOntario Geological Survey, Geoscience Laboratories, 18pOntarioSampling, Geoanalysis
DS1993-1308
1993
Riddle, C.Riddle, C.Analysis of geological materialsMarcel Dekker Inc, 470pCanadaTable of contents, Geochemistry -analytical methods
DS1991-1423
1991
Riddler, G.P.Riddler, G.P.Exploration strategy and the natural environment from grass roots tojumbosInstitute of Mining and Metallurgy (IMM) Minerals Industry International, September pp. 8-12GlobalEconomics, Law-environmental
DS1995-0516
1995
Riddler, G.P.Eur Ing, Riddler, G.P.Towards an international classification of reserves and resourcesAustralian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (AusIMM) Bulletin, No. 1, Feb. pp. 31-39AustraliaGeostatistics, Ore reserves
DS2002-1338
2002
Riddler, G.P.Riddler, G.P.Mineral exploration results - dilemmas for definition and reportingAustralian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, No. 3/2002, pp.3-12.AustraliaMineral reserves - definitions, category
DS2003-1162
2003
Rider, P.J.Rider, P.J., Roodt, A.Diamond value management, knowledge management and the measurement of valueJournal South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 103, 9, pp. 551-556. Ingenta 1035419928GlobalBlank
DS200412-1666
2003
Rider, P.J.Rider, P.J., Roodt, A.Diamond value management knowledge management and the measurement of value addition.Journal of the South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 103, 9, pp. 551-556. Ingenta 1035419928GlobalResource evaluation
DS1989-1274
1989
Ridge, J.D.Ridge, J.D.Annotated bibliographies of mineral deposits in Europe.Part 2. Central and southern EuropePergamon Press, DUE MAY 1989 approx. 500p. approx. $ 120.00 United StatesEuropeBibliography -deposits, Book -ad
DS1990-1228
1990
Ridky, R.W.Ridky, R.W., Bindschadler, R.A.Reconstruction and dynamics of the Late Wisconsin "Ontario" ice dome in the Finger Lakes regionGeological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin, Vol. 102, No. 8, August pp. 1055-1064GlobalGeomorphology, Finger Lakes area
DS1989-1546
1989
Ridler, R.H.Veizer, J., Hoefs, J., Ridler, R.H., Jensen, L.S., Lowe, D.R.Geochemistry of Precambrian carbonates. 1. Archean hydrothermal systemsGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 53, No. 4, April pp. 845-858. Database # 17926GlobalGeochemistry, Precambrian
DS1994-0190
1994
Ridley, J.Bourne, B.T., Trench, A., Dentith, M.C., Ridley, J.Physical property variations within Archean granite greenstone terrane..the influence of metamorphic gradeAseg Volume, Vol. 24, No. 3, 4, pp. 367-374Australiametamorphism, Yilgarn Craton
DS1989-0828
1989
Ridley, J.R.Kramers, J.D., Ridley, J.R.Can Archean granulites be direct crystallization products from a sialicmagma layerGeology, Vol. 17, No. 5, May pp. 442-445GlobalMagma, Granulites
DS1990-1229
1990
Ridley, J.R.Ridley, J.R., Kramers, J.D.The evolution and tectonic consequence of a tonalitic magma layer withIn the Archean continentsCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, No. 2, February pp. 219-228Ontario, Southern AfricaTectonics, Craton
DS2002-1665
2002
Ridley, J.R.Vielreicher, N.M., Ridley, J.R., Groves, D.I.Marymia: an Archean, amphibolite facies hosted orogenic lode gold deposit overprinted by Paleoproterozoic....Mineralium Deposita, Vol.AustraliaMetallogeny - base metal mineralization, Deposit - Marymia
DS1975-0169
1975
Ridley, R.I.Reid, A.M., Donaldson, C.H., Brown, R.W., Ridley, R.I., Dawson.Mineral Chemistry of Peridotite Xenoliths from the Lashainevolcano, Tanzania.Physics and Chemistry of the Earth., Vol. 9, PP. 525-544.Tanzania, East AfricaMineral Chemistry
DS1970-0669
1973
Ridley, W.I.Donaldson, C., Reid, A.M., Ridley, W.I.The Igwisi Hills Extrusive Kimberlites1st International Kimberlite Conference, EXTENDED ABSTRACT VOLUME, PP. 93-94.Tanzania, East AfricaGeology
DS1975-1010
1979
Ridley, W.I.Elthon, D., Ridley, W.I.The Oxide and Silicate Mineral Chemistry of a Kimberlite From the Premier Mine: Implications for the Evolution of Kimberlitic Magmas.Proceedings of Second International Kimberlite Conference, Proceedings Vol. 1, PP. 206-216.South AfricaKimberlite Genesis
DS1987-0350
1987
Ridley, W.I.King, T.V.V., Ridley, W.I.Relation of the spectroscopic reflectance of olivine to mineral chemistryand some remote sensing implicationsJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 92, No. B11, October 10, pp. 11, 457-11, 469GlobalBlank
DS1989-0523
1989
Ridley, W.I.Goldman, D.S., Perfit, M.R., Ridley, W.I.Petrology and geochemistry of the Thirtynine mile volcanic field, Colorado: an intracontinental shoshonitic suiteNew Mexico Bureau of Mines Bulletin., Continental Magmatism Abstract Volume, Held, Bulletin. No. 131, p. 111. AbstractColoradoShoshonite
DS1999-0598
1999
Ridley, W.I.Ridley, W.I.Earth's mantle geochemistryEncyclopedia Geochemistry, Marshall and Fairbridge, pp. 162-7.GlobalMantle, geochemistry
DS201609-1712
2016
Ridolfi, F.Comin-Chiaramonti, P., Renzulli, A., Ridolfi, F., Enrich, G.E.R., Gomes, C.B., De Min, A., Azzone, R.G., Ruberti, E.Late stage magmatic to deuteric metasomatic accessory minerals from the Cerro Boggiani agpaitic complex ( Alto Paraguay alkaline province.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 71, pp. 248-261.South America, ParaguayCarbonatite

Abstract: This work describes rare accessory minerals in volcanic and subvolcanic silica-undersaturated peralkaline and agpaitic rocks from the Permo-Triassic Cerro Boggiani complex (Eastern Paraguay) in the Alto Paraguay Alkaline Province. These accessory phases consist of various minerals including Th-U oxides/silicates, Nb-oxide, REE-Sr-Ba bearing carbonates-fluorcarbonates-phosphates-silicates and Zr-Na rich silicates. They form a late-stage magmatic to deuteric/metasomatic assemblage in agpaitic nepheline syenites and phonolite dykes/lava flows made of sodalite, analcime, albite, fluorite, calcite, ilmenite-pyrophanite, titanite and zircon. It is inferred that carbonatitic fluids rich in F, Na and REE percolated into the subvolcanic system and metasomatically interacted with the Cerro Boggiani peralkaline and agpaitic silicate melts at the thermal boundary layers of the magma chamber, during and shortly after their late-stage magmatic crystallization and hydrothermal deuteric alteration.
DS200712-0138
2007
Ridolfi, L.Camporeale, C., Perona, P., Porporato, A., Ridolfi, L.Hierarchy of models for meandering rivers and related morphodynamic processes.Reviews of Geophysics, Vol. 45, 1, RG1001TechnologyGeomorphology
DS1996-0604
1996
Rieber, M.Harris, D., Rieber, M.Commentary and critique of accounting for mineral resources: issues andBEA's initial estimatesNonrenewable Resources, Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 7- 21United StatesGeostatistics, reserves, depletion, Economics - accounting, green accounting, Government
DS2001-0575
2001
Riedel, M.R.Karato, S-I., Riedel, M.R., Yuen, D.A.Rheological structure and deformation of subducted slabs in the mantle transition zone: implications....Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 127, No. 1-4, Dec. 1, pp. 83-108.MantleCirculation, Subduction - geodynamics, rheology
DS1991-1757
1991
Riedel, W.R.Tway, L.E., Riedel, W.R.An intelligent entry and retrieval system for geological databasesGeobyte, Vol. 6, No. 4, August pp. 11-17GlobalComputers, Program -PROLOG Knowledge Pro
DS1984-0609
1984
Riedinger, C.L.Riedinger, C.L., Bustin, R.M., Rouse, G.E.New evidence for the chronology of the Eurekan Orogeny from south central Ellesmere island.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 21, pp. 1286-95.Northwest Territories, Ellesmere IslandEurekan Orogeny, Geochronology
DS201801-0015
2018
Rieger, S.M.Friedrich, A.M., Bunge, H-P., Rieger, S.M., Ghelichkhan, S., Nerlich, R.Stratigraphic framework for the plume mode of mantle convection and the analysis of inter regional unconformities on geological maps.Gondwana Research, Vol. 53, 1, pp. 159-188.Mantleconvection

Abstract: Mantle convection is a fundamental planetary process. Its plate mode is established and expressed by plate tectonics. Its plume mode also is established and expressed by interregional geological patterns. We developed both an event-based stratigraphic framework to illustrate the surface effects predicted by the plume model of Griffiths et al. (1989) and Griffiths and Campbell (1990) and a methodology to analyze continent-scale geological maps based on unconformities and hiatuses. The surface expression of ascending plumes lasts for tens-of-millions-of-years and rates vary over a few million years. As the plume ascends, its surface expression narrows, but increases in amplitude, leaving distinct geological and stratigraphic patterns in the geologic record, not only above the plume-head center, but also above its margins and in distal regions a few thousands-of-kilometers from the center. To visualize these patterns, we constructed sequential geological maps, chronostratigraphic sections, and hiatus diagrams. Dome-uplift with erosion (Sengör, 2001) and the flood basalts (Duncan and Richards, 1991; Ernst and Buchan, 2001a) are diagnostic starting points for plume-stratigraphic analyses. Mechanical collapse of the dome results in narrow rifting (Burke and Dewey, 1973), drainage-network reorganization (Cox, 1989), and flood-basalt eruption. In the marginal region, patterns of vertical movement, deformation and surface response are transient and complex. At first, the plume margin is uplifted together with the central region, but then it subsides as the plume ascents farther; With plume-head flattening, the plume margin experiences renewed outward-migrating surface uplift, erosion, broad crustal faulting, and drainage reorganization. Knickpoint migration occurs first inward-directed at ½ the rate of plume ascent and later outward-directed at the rate of asthenospheric flow. Interregional-scale unconformity-bounded stratigraphic successions document the two inversions. The distal regions, which did not experience any plume-related uplift, yield complete sedimentary records of the event; Event-related time gaps (hiatuses) in the sedimentary record increase towards the center, but the event horizon is best preserved in the distal region; it may be recognized by tracing its contacts from the center outwards. We extracted system- and series-hiatuses from interregional geological maps and built hiatus maps as proxies for paleo-dynamic topography and as a basis for comparison with results from numerical models. Interregional-scale geological maps are well suited to visualize plume-related geological records of dynamic topography in continental regions. However, geological records and hiatus information at the resolution of stages will be needed at interregional scales. The plume-stratigraphic framework is event-based, interregional, but not global, with time-dependent amplitudes that are significantly larger than those of global eustatic sea-level fluctuations. Global stratigraphic syntheses require integration of plate- and plume-stratigraphic frameworks before eustatic contributions may be assessed.
DS201810-2372
2018
Rielli A.Rielli A., Tomkins, A.G., Nebel, O., Raveggi, M., Jeon, H., Martin, L., Laure, A., Janaina, N.Sulfur isotope and PGE systematics of metasomatised mantle wedge.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 497, 1, pp. 181-192.Mantlemetasomatism

Abstract: At convergent margins fluids liberated from subducting slabs metasomatise the overlying mantle wedge, enriching it in volatiles, incompatible elements and possibly ore-forming metals. Despite the genetic link between this process, the genesis of arc magmas, and formation of porphyry Cu-Au deposits, there is currently little understanding of the behaviour of chalcophile and siderophile elements during subduction-related mantle metasomatism. In this study, we report sulfur isotopic compositions and PGE concentrations of sulfides in a suite of garnet peridotites from the Western Gneiss Region of Norway, sampling mantle wedge from ~100 to ~250 km depth. Sulfides hosted in metasomatised samples have deviated from typical mantle values, ranging between -10.0 and +5.4‰, indicating derivation of sulfur from subducted crust. Sulfides in pervasively metasomatised samples have atypical PGE signatures, with strong enrichment in Os and Ru relative to Ir, whereas channelised fluid flow produced sulfides extremely enriched in Pd, up to 700 times the concentration found in non-metasomatised samples. These signatures are reconcilable with a high oxidation state of the metasomatising agents and demonstrate that subduction can recycle chalcophile and siderophile elements into and within the mantle, along with sulfur. We further show that because the solubility of Os and Ru in fluids is redox sensitive, and Pd is more soluble than the I-PGE, ratios such as Os/Ir, Ru/Ir plotted against Pd/Ir can be used to trace the metasomatic oxidation of mantle samples, mantle-derived magmas and porphyry Cu±Au deposits. This geochemical insight is used to show that Au-rich porphyry Cu deposits are derived from more oxidised mantle wedge than Au-poor porphyry deposits.
DS201708-1657
2017
Riemer, W.Campebll, D., Puumala, M., Eichenberg, D., Riemer, W., Wahl, R.Diamond field trip Marathon-White Ricer area. Guidebook, 15p. Pdf availableCanada, Ontarioguidebook
DS1995-0361
1995
Ries, A.C.Coward, M.P., Ries, A.C.Early Precambrian processesGeological Society of London Special Publ, No. 95, 300p. approx. $ 100.00Mantle, Zimbabwe, Australia, South Africa, ScotlandBook -table of contents, Tectonics, greenstone belts, Craton
DS1900-0268
1904
Ries, H.Ries, H.Notes on the Mineral Development in the Region Around Ithaca New York.New York State Mus. Annual Report, Vol. 56, PP. 207-208.United States, Appalachia, New YorkGeology, Mineralogy
DS1920-0249
1925
Ries, H.Ries, H.British Columbia: Olivine Mountain, Tulameen DistrictIn: Economic Geology Publishing J. Wiley, P. 382.Canada, British ColumbiaGeology
DS1989-0690
1989
Riffel, B.F.Issa Filho, A., Riffel, B.F.Geologic, petrolographic and petrochemical aspects ofAngolacarbonatitesXiii International Geochemical Exploration Symposium, Rio 89 Brazilian Geochemical, pp. 64-65AngolaCarbonatite, Petrography
DS1991-0479
1991
Riffel, B.F.Filho, A.I., Dos Santos, A.B.R.M., Riffel, B.F., Lapido-LoureiroAspects of the geology, petrology and chemistry of Angolan carbonatitesJournal of Geochemical Exploration, Special Publications Geochemical Exploration, Vol. 40, No. 1-3, pp. 205-226AngolaCarbonatite, Petrology
DS2003-0022
2003
Riffel, B.F.Antonini, P., Conim Chiaramonti, P., Gomes, C.B., Censi, P., Riffel, B.F.The Early Proterozoic carbonatite complex of Angico dos Dias, Bahia State, Brazil:Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 67, 5, pp. 1039-58.Brazil, BahiaCarbonatite, geochronology
DS200412-0043
2003
Riffel, B.F.Antonini, P., Comin-Chiaramonti, P., Gomes, C.B., Censi, P., Riffel, B.F., Yamamoto, E.The Early Proterozoic carbonatite complex of Angico dos Dias, Bahia State, Brazil: geochemical and Sr Nd isotopic evidence for aMineralogical Magazine, Vol. 67, 5, pp. 1039-57.South America, BrazilGeochronology, carbonatites
DS200712-1007
2007
Riffel, S.B.Soares, P.C., Riffel, S.B.Hypsemtric curves as a tool for paleosurface mapping.Mathematical Geology, Vol. 38, 6, pp. 679-695.TechnologyPaleosurfaces - geomorphology not specific to diamonds
DS2003-0021
2003
Riffell, B.F.Antonini, P., Comin Chiaramonti, P., Gomes, C.B., Censi, P., Riffell, B.F.The Early Proterozoic carbonatite complex of Angico dos Dias, Bahia State, Brazil:Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 67, 5, pp. 1039-58.Brazil, BahiaCarbonatite
DS1995-1575
1995
Riganti, A.Riganti, A., Wilson, A.H.Geochemistry of the mafic /ultramafic volcanic associates of the Nondweni greenstone belt, petrogenesisLithos, Vol. 34, No. 1-3, Jan. pp. 235-250South AfricaVolcanics, Nondweni greenstone belt
DS202010-1866
2020
Rigaudier, T.Piani, L., Marrocchi, Y., Rigaudier, T.Earth's water may have been inherited from material similar to enstatite chondrite metorites.Science, Vol. 369, 6507, pp. 110-1113. doi. 10.1126/ science.aba.1948Mantlewater

Abstract: The abundances of Earth's chemical elements and their isotopic ratios can indicate which materials formed Earth. Enstatite chondrite (EC) meteorites provide a good isotopic match for many elements but are expected to contain no water because they formed in the hot inner Solar System. This would require Earth's water to be from a different source, such as comets. Piani et al. measured hydrogen contents and deuterium/hydrogen ratios (D/H) in 13 EC meteorites (see the Perspective by Peslier). They found far more hydrogen than is commonly assumed, with D/H close to that of Earth's mantle. Combining these data with cosmochemical models, they show that most of Earth's water could have formed from hydrogen delivered by EC meteorites.
DS200812-0960
2008
Rigby, M.Rigby, M., Mouri, H., Brandl, G.A review of the pressure temperature time evolution of the Limpopo Belt: contraints for a tectonic model.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 50, 2-4, pp. 120-132.Africa, South AfricaTectonics
DS200812-0323
2008
Rigby, M.J.Eriksson, P.G., Banerjee, S., Nelson, D.R., Rigby, M.J., Catuneanu, O., Sarkar, S., Roberts, R.J., Ruban, Mtimkulu, RajuA Kaapvaal Craton debate: nucleus of an early small supercontinent or affected by an enhanced accretion event?Gondwana Research, In press available, 82p.Africa, South AfricaSupercontinents
DS200912-0204
2009
Rigby, M.J.Eriksson, P.G., Banerjee, S., Nelson, D.R., Rigby, M.J., Catuneau, O., Sarar, S., Roberts, R.J., Ruban, D., Mtimkulu, M.N., Sunder Raju, P.V.A Kaapvaal craton debate: nucleus of an early small supercontinent or affected by an enhanced accretion event?Gondwana Research, Vol. 15, 3-4, pp. 354-372.Africa, South AfricaAccretion
DS201112-0304
2011
Rigby, M.J.Eriksson, P.G., Rigby, M.J., Bandopadhyay, P.C., Steenkamp, N.C.The Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa: no evidence for a supercontinental affinity prior to 2.0 Ga?International Geology Review, Vol. 53, 11-12, pp. 1312-1330.Africa, southern AfricaGondwana
DS201112-0305
2011
Rigby, M.J.Eriksson, P.G., Rigby, M.J., Bandopadhyay, P.C., Steenkamp, N.C.The Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa: no evidence for a supercontinental affinity prior to 2.0 Ga?International Geology Review, Vol. 53, no. 11-12, pp. 1312-1330.Africa, South AfricaTectonics
DS201112-0865
2011
Rigby, M.J.Rigby, M.J., Basson, I.J., Kramers, J.D., Mavimbela, P.K.The structural, metamorphic and temporal evolution of the country rocks surrounding Venetia mine, Limpopo belt: evidence for a single paleoproterozoic eventPrecambrian Research, Vol. 186, 1-4, pp. 51-69.Africa, South AfricaTectonometamorphic - implications for a tectonic model
DS1991-1424
1991
Rigden, S.M.Rigden, S.M., Gwanmesia, G.D., Fitzgerald, J.D., Jackson, I.Spinel elasticity and seismic structure of the transition zone of themantleNature, Vol. 354, No. 6349, Nove. 14, pp. 143-145MantleSpinels, Geophysics -seismics
DS1999-0185
1999
Riggle, F.E.Duval, J.S., Riggle, F.E.Profiles of gamma ray and magnetic dat a from aerial surveys over the conterminous United States.United States Geological Survey (USGS) CD RoM., DDS 0031, 3 cd-roms, $ 52.00United StatesGeophysics - gamma, magnetics
DS1993-1309
1993
Righter, K.Righter, K., Carmichael, I.S.E.Mega xenocrysts in alkali olivine basalts: fragments of disrupted mantle assemblages.American Mineralogist, Vol. 78, pp. 120-45.United States, MexicoAlkaline rocks
DS1995-0273
1995
Righter, K.Carmichael, I.S.E., Righter, K.Experimental studies from western Mexico: phlogopite stability and P-Testimates for Phlog bearing igneous..Eos, Vol. 76, No. 46, Nov. 7. p.F697. Abstract.MexicoMinettes
DS1996-1188
1996
Righter, K.Righter, K., Carmichael, I.S.E.Phase equilibration temperatures of phlogopite lamprophyres from western Mexico: biotite liquid equilibration temperaturesP-T estimateContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 123, pp. 1-21.MexicoLamprophyres, minettes, Geochronology
DS1998-1237
1998
Righter, K.Righter, K., Hauri, E.H.Compatibility of rhenium in garnet during mantle melting and magmagenesis.Science, Vol. 280, No. 5370, June 12, pp. 1737-40.MantleMagma, Melting
DS2002-0403
2002
Righter, K.Drake, M.J., Righter, K.Determining the composition of the EarthNature, No. 6876, March 7, pp. 39-44.MantlePetrology
DS2002-1339
2002
Righter, K.Righter, K., Chesley, J.T., Ruiz, J.Genesis of primitive arc type basalt: constraints from Re Os and Cl on the depth of melting and role of fluids.Geology, Vol. 30, No. 7, July pp. 619-22.GlobalBasalt - experimental petrology, Crustal interaction
DS200612-1160
2005
Righter, K.Righter, K.Highly siderophile elements: constraints on Earth accretion and early differentiation.American Geophysical Union, Geophysical Monograph, ed. Van der Hilst, Earth's Deep mantle, structure ...., No. 160, pp. 201-218.MantleGeochemistry
DS200612-1161
2006
Righter, K.Righter, K., Leeman, W.P., Hervig, R.L.Partitioning of Ni, Co and V between spinel structured oxides and silicate melts: importance of spinel composition.Chemical Geology, in pressTechnologyMantle melting
DS201112-0866
2011
Righter, K.Righter, K.Prediction of metal-silicate partition coefficients for siderophile elements: an update and assessment of PT conditions for metal-silicate equilibrium during accretion of the Earth.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 304, 1-2, pp. 158-167.MantleAccretion
DS201312-0577
2013
Righter, K.Martin, A.M., Righter, K.Melting of clinopyroxene + magnesite in iron-bearing planetary mantles and implications for the Earth and Mars.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 166, 4, pp. 1067-1098.MantleCarbonatite, kamafugite
DS201702-0238
2017
Righter, K.Righter, K., Nickodem, K., Pando, K., Danielson, L., Boujibar, A., Righter, M., Lapen, T.J.Distribution of Sb, As, Ge and in between metal and silicate during acccretion and core formation in the Earth.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 198, pp. 1-16.MantleCore chemistry

Abstract: A large number of siderophile (iron-loving) elements are also volatile, thus offering constraints on the origin of volatile elements in differentiated bodies such as Earth, Moon, Mars and Vesta. Metal-silicate partitioning data for many of these elements is lacking, making their overall mantle concentrations in these bodies difficult to model and origin difficult to distinguish between core formation and volatile depletion. To address this gap in understanding, we have undertaken systematic studies of four volatile siderophile elements - Sb, As, Ge and In - at variable temperature and variable Si content of metal. Several series were carried out at 1 GPa, and between 1500 and 1900 °C, for both C saturated and C-free conditions. The results show that temperature causes a decrease in the metal/silicate partition coefficient for all four elements. In addition, activity coefficients for each element have been determined and show a very strong dependence on Si content of Fe alloy. Si dissolved in metal significantly decreases the metal/silicate partition coefficients, at both 1600 and 1800 °C. The combination of temperature and Si content of the metal causes reduction of the metal-silicate partition coefficient to values that are close to those required for an origin of mantle As, Sb, Ge, and In concentrations by metal-silicate equilibrium processes. Combining these new results with previous studies on As, Sb, Ge, and In, allowed derivation of predictive expressions for metal/silicate partition coefficients for these elements which can then be applied to Earth. The expressions are applied to two scenarios for continuous accretion of Earth; specifically for constant and increasing fO2 during accretion. The results indicate that mantle concentrations of As, Sb, Ge, and In can be explained by metal-silicate equilibrium during an accretion scenario. The modeling is not especially sensitive to either scenario, although all element concentrations are explained better by a model with variable fO2. The specific effect of Si is important and calculations that include only S and C (and no Si) cannot reproduce the mantle As, Sb, Ge, and In concentrations. The final core composition in the variable fO2 model is 10.2% Si, 2% S, and 1.1% C (or XSi = 0.18, XS = 0.03, and XC = 0.04. These results suggest that core formation (involving a Si, S, and C-bearing metallic liquid) and accretion were the most important processes establishing many of Earth’s mantle volatile elements (indigenous), while post-core formation addition or re-equilibration (exogenous) was of secondary or minor importance.
DS201702-0238
2017
Righter, M.Righter, K., Nickodem, K., Pando, K., Danielson, L., Boujibar, A., Righter, M., Lapen, T.J.Distribution of Sb, As, Ge and in between metal and silicate during acccretion and core formation in the Earth.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 198, pp. 1-16.MantleCore chemistry

Abstract: A large number of siderophile (iron-loving) elements are also volatile, thus offering constraints on the origin of volatile elements in differentiated bodies such as Earth, Moon, Mars and Vesta. Metal-silicate partitioning data for many of these elements is lacking, making their overall mantle concentrations in these bodies difficult to model and origin difficult to distinguish between core formation and volatile depletion. To address this gap in understanding, we have undertaken systematic studies of four volatile siderophile elements - Sb, As, Ge and In - at variable temperature and variable Si content of metal. Several series were carried out at 1 GPa, and between 1500 and 1900 °C, for both C saturated and C-free conditions. The results show that temperature causes a decrease in the metal/silicate partition coefficient for all four elements. In addition, activity coefficients for each element have been determined and show a very strong dependence on Si content of Fe alloy. Si dissolved in metal significantly decreases the metal/silicate partition coefficients, at both 1600 and 1800 °C. The combination of temperature and Si content of the metal causes reduction of the metal-silicate partition coefficient to values that are close to those required for an origin of mantle As, Sb, Ge, and In concentrations by metal-silicate equilibrium processes. Combining these new results with previous studies on As, Sb, Ge, and In, allowed derivation of predictive expressions for metal/silicate partition coefficients for these elements which can then be applied to Earth. The expressions are applied to two scenarios for continuous accretion of Earth; specifically for constant and increasing fO2 during accretion. The results indicate that mantle concentrations of As, Sb, Ge, and In can be explained by metal-silicate equilibrium during an accretion scenario. The modeling is not especially sensitive to either scenario, although all element concentrations are explained better by a model with variable fO2. The specific effect of Si is important and calculations that include only S and C (and no Si) cannot reproduce the mantle As, Sb, Ge, and In concentrations. The final core composition in the variable fO2 model is 10.2% Si, 2% S, and 1.1% C (or XSi = 0.18, XS = 0.03, and XC = 0.04. These results suggest that core formation (involving a Si, S, and C-bearing metallic liquid) and accretion were the most important processes establishing many of Earth’s mantle volatile elements (indigenous), while post-core formation addition or re-equilibration (exogenous) was of secondary or minor importance.
DS1995-1576
1995
Rigon, R.Rinaldo, A., Dietrich, W.E., Rigon, R., Vogel, G.K., et al.Geomorphological signatures of varying climateNature, Vol. 374, April 13, pp. 632-635.GlobalGeomorphology, Drainage patterns
DS1995-1577
1995
Rigon, R.Rinaldo, A., Dietrich, W.E., Rigon, R., Vogel, G.K., et al.Geomorphological signature of varying climateNature, Vol. 374, April 13, pp. 632-635GlobalGeomorphology, Fluvial channels, drainage density
DS201907-1571
2019
Rigterink, A.S.Rigterink, A.S.Diamonds, Rebel's and Farmer's Best Friend: impact of variation in the price of a lootable, labor-intensive natural resource on the intensity of violent conflict. (alluvials)Journal of Conflict Resolution, May 29, 37p. Pdf.Africa, Sierra Leone, Democratic Republic of Congo, Angolalegal

Abstract: This article investigates the impact of the world price of a “lootable,” labor-intensive natural resource on intensity of violent conflict. Results suggest that a price increase can have opposite effects at different geographical levels of analysis: a decrease in conflict intensity overall in resource-rich countries, but an increase in conflict intensity in resource-rich subnational regions. The article argues that intensity of violence decreases overall due to rising opportunity costs of rebellion but that violence concentrates in resource-rich areas as returns to looting rise. The article introduces a new measure of diamond propensity based on geological characteristics, which is arguably exogenous to conflict and can capture small-scale labor-intensive production better than existing measures. The stated effects are found for secondary diamonds, which are lootable and related to opportunity costs of fighting, but not for primary diamonds, which are neither.
DS1980-0272
1980
Rigueiredo, R.Parra, A.H.N., Rigueiredo, R.Application de la Methode Photogeologique a la Prospection De Roches Kimberlitiques.Proceedings of the 26th International Geological Congress French Geological Survey (BRGM) PARIS, Proceedings Vol. 2, P. 828. (abstract.).South AfricaPhotogeology, Kimberlite
DS201012-0628
2010
Riguzzi, F.Riguzzi, F., Panza, G., Varga, P., Doglioni, C.Can Earth's rotation and tidal despinning drive plate tectonics?Tectonophysics, Vol. 484, pp. 60-73.MantleTectonics
DS1996-1148
1996
Rihui, L.Qixin, T., Rihui, L.Provenances and concentrations contraints of littoral placer deposits inChinaJournal of Problems theory sed. rock Formation, Vol. 31, No. 6, Nov-Dec pp. 518-523ChinaAlluvials, placers, Gold
DS1996-1189
1996
Riis, F.Riis, F.Quantification of Cenozoic vertical movements of Scandinavia by correlation of morphological surfaces..Global and Plan. Change, Vol. 12, pp. 331-357.GlobalTectonics - uplift phase
DS2001-0978
2001
Riisage, P.Riisager, J., Perrin, M., Riisage, P., Vandamme, D.Paleomagnetic results and paleointensity of Late Cretaceous Madagascan basaltJournal of African Earth Science, Vol. 32, No. 3, Apr. pp. 503-18.MadagascarBasalts
DS2001-0978
2001
Riisager, J.Riisager, J., Perrin, M., Riisage, P., Vandamme, D.Paleomagnetic results and paleointensity of Late Cretaceous Madagascan basaltJournal of African Earth Science, Vol. 32, No. 3, Apr. pp. 503-18.MadagascarBasalts
DS2003-1163
2003
Riisager, J.Riisager, J., Riisager, P., Pedersen, A.K.Paleomagnetism of large igneous provinces: a case study from West Greenland, NorthEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 214, 3-4, pp. 409-425.GreenlandGeophysics - magnetics, alkaline
DS200412-1667
2003
Riisager, J.Riisager, J., Riisager, P., Pedersen, A.K.Paleomagnetism of large igneous provinces: a case study from West Greenland, North Atlantic igneous province.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 214, 3-4, pp. 409-425.Europe, GreenlandGeophysics - magnetics, alkaline
DS2003-1163
2003
Riisager, P.Riisager, J., Riisager, P., Pedersen, A.K.Paleomagnetism of large igneous provinces: a case study from West Greenland, NorthEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 214, 3-4, pp. 409-425.GreenlandGeophysics - magnetics, alkaline
DS200412-1667
2003
Riisager, P.Riisager, J., Riisager, P., Pedersen, A.K.Paleomagnetism of large igneous provinces: a case study from West Greenland, North Atlantic igneous province.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 214, 3-4, pp. 409-425.Europe, GreenlandGeophysics - magnetics, alkaline
DS1991-1425
1991
Rijks, E.J.H.Rijks, E.J.H., Jauffred, J.C.E.M.Attribute extraction: an important application in any detailed 3-Dinterpretation studyGeophysics: the Leading Edge of Exploration, September pp. 11-19GlobalGeophysics -seismics, Three dimensional
DS2003-1164
2003
Rikhotso, C.T.Rikhotso, C.T., Poniatowski, B.T., Hetman, C.M.Overview of the exploration, evaluation and geology of the Gahcho Kue kimberlites8th. International Kimberlite Conference Large Core Exhibit volume, 8p.Northwest TerritoriesGeology - description, Deposit - Gahcho Kue, 5034, Hearne, Tuzo, Tesla
DS200412-1668
2003
Rikhotso, C.T.Rikhotso, C.T., Poniatowski, B.T., Hetman, C.M.Overview of the exploration, evaluation and geology of the Gahcho Kue kimberlites, Northwest Territories.8th. International Kimberlite Conference Large Core Exhibit volume, 8p.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeology - description Deposit - Gahcho Kue, 5034, Hearne, Tuzo, Tesla
DS201609-1711
2010
Rikhotso, C.T.Chinn, I.L., Krug, M.A., Minnie, W.P., Rikhotso, C.T.Decoding the diamonds from the AK6 kimberlite.The 4th Colloquium on Diamonds - source to use held Gabarone March 1-3, 2010, 8p.Africa, BotswanaDeposit - AK6

Abstract: The AK6 kimberlite is situated 25 km south of the Debswana Orapa Mine in Botswana and was discovered by De Beers geologists in 1969 during the follow-up of geophysical targets in the Orapa area. The kimberlite was not extensively pursued at the time as the initial bulk sampling indicated it to be of limited size and low grade, factors largely contributed to by the basalt breccia capping. Completion of high resolution integrated geophysical techniques and drill bulk sampling to depth recovered 97 tons of kimberlite during 2003 and 2004, which led to the increased size and grade estimates. Bulk sampling by Large Diameter Drilling (LDD, 23 inch diameter) commenced in 2005; 13 holes were drilled to a cumulative depth of 3,699 m and 689 carats of diamonds were recovered. In July 2006 the De Beers Mineral Resource Classification Committee classified these Phase I LOO results at a High Inferred level with an average grade of 24 carats per hundred tonnes (cpht) at a bottom cut-off of +1 mm, and a modeled average diamond value of 150 dollars per carat. A second phase of LDO drilling was initiated in 2006, and bulk sampling by trenching commenced in 2007 in order to deliver a resource estimate at indicated level. An Indicated Resource of 11.1 million carats at an average grade of 22 cpht was declared for the deposit mining lease application lodged in 2007.
DS1996-1608
1996
Rikhter, A.V.Zinkevich, V.P., Rikhter, A.V., Fugzan, M.M.40 Ar-39 Ar dating of east Kamchatka metamorphic rocksDoklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 333, pp. 78-82.Russia, KamchatkaGeochronology, Argon, Metamorphic rocks
DS201502-0056
2015
Rikhvanov, L.Firsov, A., Ashchepkov, I., Rikhvanov, L.The alkali basaltic and picritic magmatism in Minusa and Kusnetsk basin - geochemical study.Economic Geology Research Institute 2015, Vol. 17,, # 2797, 1p. AbstractRussiaPicrite
DS200412-2066
2004
Rikhvanov, L.P.Vrublevskii, V.V., Zhuravlev, D.Z., Gertner, I.F., Krupchatnikov, V.I., Vladimirov, A.G., Rikhvanov, L.P.Sm Nd isotopic systematics of alkaline rocks and carbonatites from the Edelveis Complex, Northern Chuya Range, Gornyi Altai.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 397, 6, July-August pp. 870-874.RussiaGeochronology
DS201012-0386
2010
Riley, D.N.Kilby, W.E., Riley, D.N.Remote sensing in the search for rare metals.International Workshop Geology of Rare Metals, held Nov9-10, Victoria BC, Open file 2010-10, extended abstract pp.63-65.TechnologyRemote sensing - Alkaline and carbonatite
DS1960-0089
1960
Riley, G.C.Riley, G.C.Petrology of the gneisses of Cumberland Sound, Baffin Island, NorthwestTerritories.Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), Bulletin. 61, 68p.Northwest Territories, Baffin IslandPetrology - Not Specific To Diamonds
DS1991-1426
1991
Riley, G.N.Riley, G.N., Jr., Kohlstedt, D.L.Kinetics of melt migration in upper mantle type rocksEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 105, pp. 500-521CaliforniaMantle, San Carlos, Melt migration
DS1994-0127
1994
Riley, P.D.Beck, M.E., Burmester, R.R., Drake, R.E., Riley, P.D.A tale of two continents: some tectonic contrasts between the Central Andes and the North America Cordillera as illustrated by their paleomagneticsignaturesTectonics, Vol. 13, No. 1, February pp. 215-Cordillera, Andes, ChileTectonics, Geophysics -paleomagnetics
DS1996-0939
1996
Riley, S.J.McQuade, C.V., Riley, S.J.Water managementEnvironmental Management in Australia Minerals and Energy, UNSW Press, pp. 189-226AustraliaMineral processing, Environmental - mining
DS1994-1461
1994
Riley, T.R.Riley, T.R., Bailey, D.K., Lloyd, F.E.Variations in carbonatite melt parageneses: Rockeskyll Complex, West EifelGermany.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstract Volume, Vol. 19, p.GermanyCarbonatite, Roskeskyll Complex
DS1996-1190
1996
Riley, T.R.Riley, T.R., Bailey, D.K., Lloyd, F.E.Extrusive carbonatite from the Quaternary Rockeskyll Complex, West EifelGermany.Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 34, pt. 2, April pp. 389-402.GermanyCarbonatite
DS1998-1238
1998
Riley, T.R.Riley, T.R., Pankhurst, Leat, Storey, FanningTime relationships of pre-breakup Gondwana magmatismJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, 1A, p. 160. AbstractGondwanaMagmatism
DS2002-1340
2002
Riley, T.R.Riley, T.R., Leat, P.T.Ultramafic lamprophyres of the Ferrar large igneous province: evidence for a HIMU mantle component.18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.250,1.Antarctica, Pensacola MountainsLamprophyres
DS2003-1165
2003
Riley, T.R.Riley, T.R., Leat, P.T., Storey, B.C., Parkinson, H., Millar, H.Ultramafic lamprophyres of the Ferrar large igneous province: evidence for a HIMULithos, Vol. 66, 1-2, pp. 63-76.Mantle, AntarcticaUHP - ultrahigh pressure
DS2003-1166
2003
Riley, T.R.Riley, T.R., Leat, P.T., Storey, B.C., Parkinson, I.J., Millar, I.L.Ultramafic lamprophyres of the Ferrar large igneous province: evidence for a HIMULithos, Vol. 66, 1-2, Jan. pp.63-76.GreenlandBlank
DS2003-1167
2003
Riley, T.R.Riley, T.R., Leat, P.T., Storeym B.C., Parkinson, I.J., Millar, I.L.Ultramafic lamprohyres of the Ferrar large igneous province: evidence for HIMULithos, Vol. 66, 3-4, January, pp. 63-76.AntarcticaDykes, Geochronology
DS200412-1669
2003
Riley, T.R.Riley, T.R., Leat, P.T., Storey, B.C., Parkinson, I.J., Millar, I.L.Ultramafic lamprophyres of the Ferrar large igneous province: evidence for a HIMU mantle component.Lithos, Vol. 66, 1-2, Jan. pp.63-76.Europe, GreenlandLamprophyre
DS200412-1670
2003
Riley, T.R.Riley, T.R., Leat, P.T., Storey, B.C., Parkinson, I.J., Millar, I.L.Ultramafic lamprohyres of the Ferrar large igneous province: evidence for HIMU mantle component.Lithos, Vol. 66, 3-4, January, pp. 63-76.AntarcticaDykes Geochronology
DS201605-0880
2016
Riley, T.R.Neave, D.A., Black, M., Riley, T.R., Gibson, S.A., Ferrier, G., Wall, F., Broom-Fendley, S.On the feasibility of imaging carbonatite-hosted rare earth element deposits using remote sensing.Economic Geology, Vol. 111, pp. 641-665.China, United States, Europe, GreenlandDeposit - Bayan Obo, Mountain Pass, Motzfeldt, Ilimaussaq

Abstract: Rare earth elements (REEs) generate characteristic absorption features in visible to shortwave infrared (VNIR-SWIR) reflectance spectra. Neodymium (Nd) has among the most prominent absorption features of the REEs and thus represents a key pathfinder element for the REEs as a whole. Given that the world’s largest REE deposits are associated with carbonatites, we present spectral, petrographic, and geochemical data from a predominantly carbonatitic suite of rocks that we use to assess the feasibility of imaging REE deposits using remote sensing. Samples were selected to cover a wide range of extents and styles of REE mineralization, and encompass calcio-, ferro- and magnesio-carbonatites. REE ores from the Bayan Obo (China) and Mountain Pass (United States) mines, as well as REE-rich alkaline rocks from the Motzfeldt and Ilímaussaq intrusions in Greenland, were also included in the sample suite. The depth and area of Nd absorption features in spectra collected under laboratory conditions correlate positively with the Nd content of whole-rock samples. The wavelength of Nd absorption features is predominantly independent of sample lithology and mineralogy. Correlations are most reliable for the two absorption features centered at ~744 and ~802 nm that can be observed in samples containing as little as ~1,000 ppm Nd. By convolving laboratory spectra to the spectral response functions of a variety of remote sensing instruments we demonstrate that hyperspectral instruments with capabilities equivalent to the operational Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and planned Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program (EnMAP) systems have the spectral resolutions necessary to detect Nd absorption features, especially in high-grade samples with economically relevant REE accumulations (Nd > 30,000 ppm). Adding synthetic noise to convolved spectra indicates that correlations between Nd absorption area and whole-rock Nd content only remain robust when spectra have signal-to-noise ratios in excess of ~250:1. Although atmospheric interferences are modest across the wavelength intervals relevant for Nd detection, most REE-rich outcrops are too small to be detectable using satellite-based platforms with >30-m spatial resolutions. However, our results indicate that Nd absorption features should be identifiable in high-quality, airborne, hyperspectral datasets collected at meter-scale spatial resolutions. Future deployment of hyperspectral instruments on unmanned aerial vehicles could enable REE grade to be mapped at the centimeter scale across whole deposits.
DS1999-0599
1999
Riller, U.Riller, U., Schwerdtner, W.M., Halls, H.C., Card, K.D.Transpressive tectonism in the eastern Penokean orogen: consequences for Proterozoic crustal kinematics...Precambrian Research, Vol. 93, No. 1, Jan. pp. 27-50.GlobalTectonics - plate, Penokean Orogen
DS201606-1117
2016
Riman, R.E.Shivaramaiah, R., Anderko, A., Riman, R.E., Navrotsky, A.Thermodynamics of Bastnaesite: a major rare earth mineral.American Mineralogist, Vol. 101, 5, pp. 1129-1134.TechnologyBastanesite

Abstract: Bastnaesite, [RE-CO3-OH/F] (RE = rare earth) is one of the major sources of rare earth elements found in commercial deposits at Mountain Pass, California, Bayan Obo, China, and elsewhere. Synthetic forms of bastnaesite have been explored for applications including optical devices and phosphors. Determination of thermodynamic properties of these phases is critical for understanding their origin, mining, and processing. We report the first experimental determination of formation enthalpies of several OH and F bastnaesites based on high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry of well-characterized synthetic samples. The formation enthalpies from binary oxides and fluorides for all the bastnaesite samples are highly exothermic, consistent with their stability in the garnet zone of the Earth’s crust. Fluoride bastnaesite, which is more abundant in nature than its hydroxide counterpart, is thermodynamically more stable. For both OH and F bastnaesite, the enthalpy of formation becomes more negative with increasing ionic radius of the RE3+ cation. This periodic trend is also observed among rare earth phosphates and several other rare earth ternary oxides. For a given RE, the formation enthalpies from binary oxides are more negative for orthophosphates than for bastnaesites, supporting the argument that monazite could have formed by reaction of bastnaesite and apatite at high temperature. The difference in formation enthalpy of monazite and bastnaesite provides insight into energetics of such reactions along the rare earth series.
DS1910-0304
1912
Rimann, E.Rimann, E.Geologische und Wirtschafhiche Betrachtungen Ueber Deutsch Suedwestafrika.Dresden: Sitz. Berl. Isis, PP. 58-78.Southwest Africa, NamibiaGeology, Diamonds, Occurrences, Economics
DS1910-0374
1913
Rimann, E.Rimann, E.Der Geologische Bau von Deutsch SuedwestafrikaBerlin: Steinbruch, Vol. 8, PP. 282-284.Southwest Africa, NamibiaGeology Regional
DS200612-0894
2006
Rimbey, S.McKay, S., Funk, W., Rimbey, S., Butler, H.Computer simulation model for determining reclamation liability costs of the EKATI diamond mine in the Northwest Territories, Canada.Journal of Cleaner Production, Vol. 14, 12-13, pp. 1096-1100. Ingenta 1062062956Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining, reclamation
DS1999-0600
1999
Rimi, A.Rimi, A.Mantle heat flow and geotherms for the main geologic domains in MoroccoInternational Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 88, No. 3, Oct. pp. 458-66.MoroccoMantle - geat flow, Geothermometry
DS202001-0036
2019
Rimmer, A.Rimmer, A.When British based company Opsydia established to "disrupt a number of industries by its ability to create invisible structures inside transparent materials" the implications for diamond security and identification were a tantalising route to market.Gems & Jewellery, Vol. 28, 4, pp. 28-29.Europe, United KingdomOpsydia
DS200712-0019
2007
Rimsa, A.Andersson, U.B., Rutanen, HG., Johansson, A., Mansfeld, J., Rimsa, A.Characterization of the Paleoproterozoic mantle beneath the Fennoscandian shield: geochemistry and isotope geology (Nd, Sr) of ~1.8 Ga mafic plutonic rocks ...International Geology Review, Vol. 49, 7, pp. 587-625.Europe, SwedenGeochronology
DS1970-0395
1971
Rimsaite, J.Rimsaite, J.Distribution of Major and Minor Constituents between Mica And Host Ultrabasic Rocks, and between Zoned Mica and Zoned Spinel.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 33, PP. 259-272.South Africa, Canada, OntarioMineralogy
DS1995-1576
1995
Rinaldo, A.Rinaldo, A., Dietrich, W.E., Rigon, R., Vogel, G.K., et al.Geomorphological signatures of varying climateNature, Vol. 374, April 13, pp. 632-635.GlobalGeomorphology, Drainage patterns
DS1995-1577
1995
Rinaldo, A.Rinaldo, A., Dietrich, W.E., Rigon, R., Vogel, G.K., et al.Geomorphological signature of varying climateNature, Vol. 374, April 13, pp. 632-635GlobalGeomorphology, Fluvial channels, drainage density
DS1997-0966
1997
Rinaldo, A.Rodriquez-Iturbe, I., Rinaldo, A.Fractal river basins... chance and self-organizationCambridge University of Press, 563p. $ 100.00GlobalBook - ad, River Basins
DS200612-0503
2006
Rinaudo, C.Groppo, C., Rinaudo, C.,Cairo, S., Gastaldi, D., Compagnoni, R.Micro-raman spectroscopy for a quick and reliable identification of serpentine minerals from ultramafics.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 18, 3, May pp. 319-329.TechnologySpectroscopy - not specific to diamonds
DS1993-1310
1993
Rind, D.Rind, D.An uplifting experience -ice agesNature, Vol. 350, December 3, pp. 414-415GlobalGeomorphology, Ice ages
DS201801-0050
2017
Rindraharisaona, E.Pratt, M.J., Wysession, M.E., Aleqabi, G., Wiens, D.A., Nyblade, A., Shore, P., Rambolamanana, G., Andriampenomanana, F., Rakotondraibe, T., Tucker, R.D., Barruol, G., Rindraharisaona, E.Shear velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of Madagascar derived from surface wave tomography.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 458, 1, pp.405-417.Africa, Madagascargeophysics - seismics

Abstract: The crust and upper mantle of the Madagascar continental fragment remained largely unexplored until a series of recent broadband seismic experiments. An island-wide deployment of broadband seismic instruments has allowed the first study of phase velocity variations, derived from surface waves, across the entire island. Late Cenozoic alkaline intraplate volcanism has occurred in three separate regions of Madagascar (north, central and southwest), with the north and central volcanism active until <1 Ma, but the sources of which remains uncertain. Combined analysis of three complementary surface wave methods (ambient noise, Rayleigh wave cross-correlations, and two-plane-wave) illuminate the upper mantle down to depths of 150 km. The phase-velocity measurements from the three methods for periods of 8-182 s are combined at each node and interpolated to generate the first 3-D shear-velocity model for sub-Madagascar velocity structure. Shallow (upper 10 km) low-shear-velocity regions correlate well with sedimentary basins along the west coast. Upper mantle low-shear-velocity zones that extend to at least 150 km deep underlie the north and central regions of recent alkali magmatism. These anomalies appear distinct at depths <100 km, suggesting that any connection between the zones lies at depths greater than the resolution of surface-wave tomography. An additional low-shear velocity anomaly is also identified at depths 50-150 km beneath the southwest region of intraplate volcanism. We interpret these three low-velocity regions as upwelling asthenosphere beneath the island, producing high-elevation topography and relatively low-volume magmatism.
DS1992-1276
1992
Ring, U.Ring, U.Aspects of the kinematic and metamorphic evolution of the Precambrian basement of southeastern Central Africa ( Northern Malawi and southernTanzania)Eos Transactions, Vol. 73, No. 14, April 7, supplement abstracts p. 92TanzaniaBasement, metamorphism
DS1992-1277
1992
Ring, U.Ring, U., Betzler, C., Delvaux, D.Normal vs strike-slip faulting during rift development in East Africa: the Malawi rift.Geology, Vol. 20, No. 11, November pp. 1015-1018.Tanzania, Mozambique, East AfricaTectonics, Malawi Rift
DS1993-1311
1993
Ring, U.Ring, U.Aspects of the kinematic history and mechanisms of superposition of the Proterozoic mobile belts of eastern Central Africa (northern Malawi and sTanzania.Precambrian Research, Vol. 62, No. 3, June pp. 207-226.Tanzania, MalawiProterozoic belts, Structure
DS1994-1462
1994
Ring, U.Ring, U., Brandon, M.T.Kinematic dat a for the Coast Range fault and implications for exhumation Of the Franciscan complexGeology, Vol. 22, No. 8, August pp. 735-738California, CordilleraTectonics, Subduction -Franciscan complex
DS1995-0202
1995
Ring, U.Brandon, M.T., Ring, U.Exhumation processes: normal faulting, ductile flow, and erosionGsa Today, Vol. 5, No. 12, Dec. pp. 242-243GlobalStructure, Faults
DS1997-0123
1997
Ring, U.Brandon, M.T., Ring, U.Exhumation processes: normal faulting, ductile flow and erosionGsa Today, Vol. 7, No. 5, May pp. 17-20GlobalPenrose Conference report, Exhumation processes
DS2002-1341
2002
Ring, U.Ring, U., Kroner, A., Buchwaldt, R., Toulkeridis, T., Layer, P.W.Shear zone patterns and eclogite facies metamorphism in the Mozambique belt ofPrecambrian Research, Vol. 116, No.1-2, pp. 19-56.Malawi, East AfricaMetamorphism, Tectonics
DS200912-0627
2009
Ring, U.Ring, U., Wernicke, B.S.Extending a continent: architecture, rheology and heat budget.Geological Society of London Special Publication, GlobalBook
DS201412-0738
2014
Ringane, C.Ringane, C.The influence of stone recovery with the change in processing method.GSSA Kimberley Diamond Symposium and Trade Show provisional programme, Sept. 10-12, POSTERTechnologyMetallurgy
DS201801-0008
2018
Ringenbach, J-C.Clerc, C., Ringenbach, J-C., Jolivet, L., Ballard, J-F.Rifted margins: ductile deformation, boudinage, continentward-dipping normal faults and the role of the weak crust.Gondwana Research, Vol. 53, 1, pp. 20-40.Mantlerifting

Abstract: The stunningly increased resolution of the deep crustal levels in recent industrial seismic profiles acquired along most of the world's rifted margins leads to the unraveling of an unexpected variety of structures. It provides unprecedented access to the processes occurring in the middle and lower continental crust. We present a series of so far unreleased profiles that allows the identification of various rift-related geological processes such as crustal boudinage, ductile shear and low-angle detachment faulting, and a rifting history that differs from the classical models of oceanward-dipping normal faults. The lower crust in rifted margins appears much more intensely deformed than usually represented. At the foot of both magma-rich and magma-poor margins, we observe clear indications of ductile deformation of the deep continental crust along large-scale shallow dipping shear zones. These shear zones generally show a top-to-the-continent sense of shear consistent with the activity of Continentward Dipping Normal Faults (CDNF) observed in the upper crust. This pattern is responsible for a migration of the deformation and associated sedimentation and/or volcanic activity toward the ocean. We discuss the origin of these CDNF and investigate their implications and the effect of sediment thermal blanketing on crustal rheology. In some cases, low-angle shear zones define an anastomosed pattern that delineates boudin-like structures. The maximum deformation is localized in the inter-boudin areas. The upper crust is intensely boudinaged and the highly deformed lower crust fills the inter-boudins underneath. The boudinage pattern controls the position and dip of upper crustal normal faults. We present some of the most striking examples from the margins of Uruguay, West Africa, South China Sea and Barents Sea, and discuss their implications for the time-temperature history of the margins.
DS1986-0316
1986
Ringenbergs, W.H.Gunn, M.J., Edwards, A.C., Paterson, D.A., Ringenbergs, W.H.Origin of the Casurain a alluvial diamonds, western AustraliaProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 463-465AustraliaDiamond exploration
DS1983-0537
1983
Ringrose, S.Ringrose, S.Mineral Resource Developments in Sierra LeoneAgid News, Vol. 34, pp. 19-20GlobalMineral Resource Overview, Economics
DS1960-0477
1964
Ringwood, A.E.Macgregor, I.D., Ringwood, A.E.The Natural System Enstatite PyropeCarnegie Institute Yearbook, FOR 1963-1964, PP. 161-163.South AfricaBultfontein, Mineral Chemistry
DS1960-0735
1966
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E., Green, D.H.An Experimental Investigation of the Gabbro Eclogite Transformation and Some Geophysical Implications.Tectonophysics, Vol. 3, No. 5, PP. 383-427.South AfricaGeophysics, Eclogites
DS1960-0736
1966
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E., Major, A.Synthesis of DiamondsAust. Journal of Chem., Vol. 19, No. 10, PP. 1965-1969.AustraliaSynthetic Diamonds
DS1970-0185
1970
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E., Lovering, J.F.Significance of Pyroxene Ilmenite Intergrowths Among Kimberlite Xenoliths.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 7, PP. 371-375.South AfricaMonastery Mine, Mineralogy
DS1986-0383
1986
Ringwood, A.E.Irifune, T., Hibberson, W.O., Ringwood, A.E.Eclogite-garnetite transformations in basaltic and pyrolitic compositions at high pressure and high temperatureProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 259-261GlobalBlank
DS1986-0385
1986
Ringwood, A.E.Irifune, T., Selkine, T., Ringwood, A.E., Hibberson, W.O.The eclogite garnetite transformation at high pressure and some geophysicalimplicationsEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 77, pp. 245-256GlobalEclogite
DS1986-0596
1986
Ringwood, A.E.Nelson, D.R., McCulloch, M.T., Ringwood, A.E.Ultrapotassic magmas: end products of subduction and mantle recycling ofsediments?Proceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 196-198Australia, Wyoming, MacRobertson Land, Enderby LandLamproite
DS1986-0669
1986
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E.The constitution and evolution of the mantleProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 487-492GlobalReview paper
DS1986-0670
1986
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E., Hibberson, W.O.high pressure transformation of eclogite to garnetite in sub-ducted oceanic crustNature, Vol. 319, No. 6054, Feb. 13, pp. 584-585GlobalEclogite
DS1986-0718
1986
Ringwood, A.E.Sekine, T., Ringwood, A.E.A comparison of garnet ilmenite perovskite phase equilibration temperatures ingermanate and silicate systems at high pressuresPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 41, No. 4, January 31, pp. 240-248GlobalBlank
DS1987-0313
1987
Ringwood, A.E.Irifune, T., Ringwood, A.E.Phase transformations in a harzburgite composition to 26 GPa:implications for dynamical behaviour of the subducting slabEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 86, pp. 365-376GlobalBlank
DS1988-0572
1988
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E., Irifune, T.Nature of the 650Km seismic discontinuity: implications for mantle dynamics and differentiationNature, Vol. 331, January l4, pp. 131-136GlobalLherzolite
DS1989-0683
1989
Ringwood, A.E.Irifune, T., Hibberson, W.O., Ringwood, A.E.Eclogite-garnetite transformation at high pressure and its bearing on The occurrence of garnet inclusions indiamondGeological Society of Australia Inc. Blackwell Scientific Publishing, Special, No. 14, Vol. 2, pp. 877-882GlobalExperimental petrology, Garnet inclusions
DS1989-0763
1989
Ringwood, A.E.Kesson, S.E., Ringwood, A.E.Slab-mantle interactions 2. The formation of diamondsChemical Geology, Vol. 78, No. 2, December 5, pp. 97-118GlobalDiamond genesis, Diamond morphology
DS1989-0764
1989
Ringwood, A.E.Kesson, S.E., Ringwood, A.E.Slab-mantle interactions. 1. Sheared and refertilised garnet peridotite xenoliths- samples of Wadati-Benioff zones?Chemical Geology, Vol. 78, No. 2, December 5, pp. 83-96South AfricaKimberlite diatremes, Mantle
DS1989-1275
1989
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E.Constitution and evolution of the mantleGeological Society of Australia Inc. Blackwell Scientific Publishing, Special, No. 14, Vol. 1, pp. 457-485GlobalMantle petrology, Geodynamics
DS1989-1276
1989
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E.Significance of the terrestrial magnesium/Si ratioEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 95, No. 1, /2, October pp. 1-8GlobalMantle, Chemistry
DS1990-1230
1990
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E.Slab-mantle interactions 3. Petrogenesis of intraplate magmas and structure of the upper mantleChemical Geology, Vol. 82, No. 3-4, pp. 187-207GlobalMantle -structure, Magmas
DS1991-1427
1991
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E.Phase transformation and their bearing on the constitution and dynamics Of the mantleGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 53, pp. 2083-2110GlobalMantle, Geochemistry, Bulk composition
DS1991-1428
1991
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E., Hibberson, W.Solubilities of mantle oxides in molten iron at high pressures andtemperatures: implications for the composition and formation of earth's coreEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 102, No. 3/4, Marchpp. 235-251GlobalMantle, Geochemistry
DS1991-1429
1991
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E., Kesson, S.E.Origin of kimberlites and related magmas #1Eos Transactions, Vol. 72, No. 44, October 29, abstract p. 538MantleModel, Kimberlites
DS1992-0852
1992
Ringwood, A.E.Kesson, S.E., Ringwood, A.E.Origin of kimberlites and related magmas #2Eos Transactions, Vol. 73, No. 14, April 7, supplement abstracts p.325MantleMagma, Group 1 and II kimberlites
DS1992-0853
1992
Ringwood, A.E.Kesson, S.E., Ringwood, A.E.Accretion of the earth: homogeneous or inhomogeneous?Proceedings of the 29th International Geological Congress. Held Japan August 1992, Vol. 1, abstract p. 45MantleMagma, Nickel content
DS1992-1278
1992
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E., Kesson, S.E., Hibberson, W., Ware, N.Origin of kimberlites and related magmas #2Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 113, No. 4, November pp. 521-538.GlobalKimberlite genesis
DS1992-1279
1992
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E., Kesson, S.E., Hibberson, W., Ware, N.Transition zone source region for kimberlitesEos Transactions, Vol. 73, No. 14, April 7, supplement abstracts p.325MantleModel, Experimental petrology
DS1993-0719
1993
Ringwood, A.E.Irifune, T., Ringwood, A.E.Phase transformations in subducted oceanic crust and buoyancy relationships at depths of 600-800 km in the mantleEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 117, pp. 101-110MantleExperimental petrology, Geodynamics
DS1993-0720
1993
Ringwood, A.E.Irifune, T., Ringwood, A.E.Phase transformations in subducted oceanic crust and bouyancy relationships at depths of 600-800 km in the mantleEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 117, pp. 101-110MantleSubduction
DS1994-0900
1994
Ringwood, A.E.Kesson, S.E., Ringwood, A.E., Hibberson, W.O.Kimberlite melting relations revisitedEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 121, No. 3-4, February pp. 261-262.AustraliaMelt
DS1994-1463
1994
Ringwood, A.E.Ringwood, A.E.Role of the transition zone and 660 km discontinuity in mantle dynamicsPhysics Earth Plan. International, Vol. 86, pp. 5-24.MantleGeodynamics, Geophysics -seismics
DS1997-0594
1997
Ringwood, A.E.Kesson, S., Ringwood, A.E., Hibberson, W., Fit Gerald, J.Reaction between magnesiowustite of lower mantle composition and core-forming alloy at 1-40 GPa.American Mineralogist, Vol. 82, No. 5-6, May-June pp. 526-533.MantleCore, History of earth
DS201706-1080
2017
Rinne, M.L.Hodder, T.J., Kelley, S.E., Trommelen, M.S., Ross, M., Rinne, M.L.The Kaskattama highland: till composition and indications of a new Precambrian In lier in the Hudson Bay Lowland?GAC annual meeting, 1p. AbstractCanada, Manitobageochemistry
DS200412-1671
2004
Rino, S.Rino, S., Komiya, T., Windley, B.F., Katayama, I., Motoki, A., Hirata, T.Major episodic increase of continental crust growth determined from zircon ages river sands: implications for mantle overturns iPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 146, 1-2, pp. 369-394.MantleGeochronology
DS200912-0397
2009
Rino, S.Komabayashi, T., Maruyama, S., Rino, S.A speculation on the structure of the 'D' layer: the growth of anti-crust at the core mantle boundary through the subduction history of the Earth.Gondwana Research, Vol. 15, 3-4, pp. 342-353.MantleSubduction
DS201312-0744
2013
Rio, D.C.Rio, D.C., Davis, D., Conceicao, H., De Lourdes, M., Rosa, S., Moura, C.A.V.Carbonatitic magmas? A mineralogical and isotopic approach.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractSouth America, BrazilGeochronology
DS200812-0961
2008
Rio, S.Rio, S., Kon, Y., Sato, W., Maruyana, S., Santosh, M., Zhao, D.The Grenvillian and Pan African orogens: world's largest orogenies through geologic time, and their implications on the origin of superplume.Gondwana Research, Vol. 14, 1-2, August pp. 51-72.MantleOrogeny
DS2003-1168
2003
Rio Tinto LimitedRio Tinto LimitedDiamonds add sparkle to Rio TintoThis is London, April 28, 1/10p.Northwest TerritoriesNews item
DS200712-0187
2006
Rios, D.C.Cid, J.P., Rios, D.C., Conceicao, H.Petrogenesis of mica amphibole bearing lamprophyres associated with the Paleoproterozoic Morro do Afonso syenite intrusion, eastern Brazil.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, in press availableSouth America, BrazilLamprophyre - vogesites, metasomatism
DS200512-0627
2005
Riotzwoller, M.H.Levshin, A.L., Barmin, M.P., Riotzwoller, M.H., Trampert, J.Minor arc and major arc global surface wave diffraction tomography.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 149, 3-4, April 15, pp. 205-223.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS201012-0629
2010
Rioux, M.Rioux, M.,Bowring, S., Dudas, F., Hanson, R.Characterizing the U-Pb systematics of baddeleyite through chemical abrasion: application of multi-step digestion methods to baddelyite geochronology.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, in press available 25p.Africa, South AfricaCarbonatite, Phalaborwa
DS201112-0410
2011
Rioux, M.Hanson, R.E., Rioux, M., Gose, W.A., Blackburn, T.J., Bowring, S.A., Mukwakwami, J., Jones, D.L.Paleomagnetic and geochronological evidence for large scale post 1.88 Ga displacement between Zimbabwe and Kaapvaal Cratons along the Limpopo belt.Geology, Vol.39, 5, pp. 487-490.Africa, South Africa, ZimbabweGeochronology
DS1995-0371
1995
Ripley, E.A.Crowder, A.A., Ripley, E.A., Redmann, R.E.Environmental effects of mining #3St. Lucie Press, 300p. $ 60.00United StatesEnvironment- legal, mining, Table of contents
DS1995-1578
1995
Ripley, E.A.Ripley, E.A., et al.Environmental effects of mining #1St. Lucie Press, Canada, United StatesBook -ad, Environment
DS1999-0532
1999
Ripley, E.M.Park, Y.R., Ripley, E.M.Hydrothermal flow systems in the Midcontinent Rift: Oxygen and hydrogen studies of North Shore volcanicsGeochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 63, No. 11-12, June 1, pp. 1787-1804.MinnesotaSills - hypabyssal, Tectonics - rifting
DS2003-0807
2003
Ripley, E.M.Li, C., Ripley, E.M., Mathez, E.A.The effect of S on the partitioning of Ni between olivine and silicate melt in MORBChemical Geology, Vol. 201, 3-4, pp. 293-306.MantleGeochemistry - nickel
DS200412-1125
2003
Ripley, E.M.Li, C., Ripley, E.M., Mathez, E.A.The effect of S on the partitioning of Ni between olivine and silicate melt in MORB.Chemical Geology, Vol. 201, 3-4, pp. 293-306.MantleGeochemistry - nickel
DS200712-0742
2007
Ripley, E.M.Mondal, S.K., Frie, R., Ripley, E.M.Os isotope systematics of Mesoarchean chromitite PGE deposits in the Singhbhum Craton, India: implications for the evolution of lithospheric mantle.Chemical geology, Vol. 244, 3-4, pp. 391-408.Asia, IndiaGeochronology
DS1996-0310
1996
Ripley, et al.Crowley, Ripley, et al.Environmental effects of mining ... one page on diamondsSt. Lucie Press, p. 256 only.GlobalDiamond, Environment
DS200712-0268
2007
Ripp, G.Doroshkevich, A., Wall, F., Ripp, G.Magmatic graphite in dolomite carbonatite at Pogranichnoe North Transbaikalia, Russia.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 153, 3, pp. 339-353.RussiaCarbonatite
DS200912-0184
2009
Ripp, G.Doroshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G., Viladkar, S.Newania carbonatites, western India: example of mantle derived magnesium carbonatites.Mineralogy and Petrology, in press availableIndiaCarbonatite
DS201012-0165
2010
Ripp, G.Doroshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G., Vladkar, S.Newania carbonatites, western India:example of mantle derived magnesium carbonatites.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 98, 1-4, pp. 283-295.IndiaCarbonatite
DS201312-0225
2013
Ripp, G.Doroshkevich, A., Ripp, G., Vladykin, N., Savatenkov, V.Sources of the Late Riphean carbonatite magmatism of northern Transbaikalia.Geochemistry International, Vol. 49, 12, pp. 1195-1207.RussiaCarbonatite
DS1999-0601
1999
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S., Kobilkina, O.V.Genesis of rare earth and barium, strontium mineralization in West Transbaikalia carbonatites.Stanley, SGA Fifth Biennial Symposium, pp. 671-74.RussiaMineralogy, Carbonatite
DS2000-0820
2000
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S.Geochemical features of the late Mesozoic carbonatites in west TransbaikaliIgc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.Russia, BaikalGeochemistry, Carbonatite
DS2000-0821
2000
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S.Effusive carbonatites in West TransbaikaliaIgc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.Russia, BaikalGeochemistry, Phonolites, teshenites
DS2002-0392
2002
Ripp, G.S.Doroshkevich, A.G., Kobylkina, O.V., Ripp, G.S.Role of sulfates in the formation of carbonatites in the western Transbaikal regionDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 387A,9, pp. 131-4.RussiaCarbonatite
DS2002-1342
2002
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S.Mantle shaped carbonatite bodies of the Kholyuta depositLithology and Mineral Resources, Vol. 37,4,pp. 386-9.RussiaCarbonatite
DS2002-1343
2002
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S.Mantle shaped carbonatite bodies of the Khalyuta depositLithology and Mineral Resources, Vol. 37, 4, pp. 386-9.Russia, TransbaikalCarbonatite - morphology
DS2002-1344
2002
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S., Badmatsyrenov, M.V., Skulyberdin, A.A.A new carbonatite occurrence in northern TransbaikaliaPetrology, Vol.Russia, TransbaikalCarbonatite, Geochemistry - REE
DS200512-0244
2004
Ripp, G.S.Doroshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S.Estimation of the conditions of formations of REE carbonatites in western Transbaikalia.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 45, 4, pp. 456-463.RussiaCarbonatite, rare earths
DS200512-0904
2004
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S., Badmatsyrenov, M.V., Doroshkevich, A.G., Isbrodin, L.A.Mineral composition and geochemical characteristic of the Veseloe carbonatites ( Northern Transbaikalia, Russia).Deep seated magmatism, its sources and their relation to plume processes., pp. 257-272.RussiaCarbonatite, mineralogy
DS200612-0771
2006
Ripp, G.S.Lastochkin, E.I., Ripp, G.S., Doroshkevich, A.G., Badmatsirenov, M.V.Metamorphism of the Vesloe carbonatites, north Transbaikalia, Russia.Vladykin: VI International Workshop, held Mirny, Deep seated magmatism, its sources and plumes, pp. 207-RussiaCarbonatite
DS200612-1162
2005
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S., Badmatsyrenov, M.V., Doroshkevich, A.G., Izbrodin, I.A.New carbonatite bearing area in northern Transbaikalia. Muya and Pogranichnoe.Petrology, Vol. 13, 5, pp. 489-498.RussiaCarbonatite, metasomatism
DS200612-1163
2006
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S., Karmanov, N.S., Doroshkevich, A.G., Badmatsyrenov, M.V., Izbrodin, I.A.Chrome bearing mineral phases in the carbonatites of northern Transbaikalia.Geochemistry International, Vol. 44, 4, pp. 395-402.RussiaCarbonatite
DS200712-0269
2007
Ripp, G.S.Doroshkevich, A.G., Wall, A.G., Ripp, G.S.Magmatic graphite in dolomite carbonatite at Pogranichnoe, North Transbaikalia, Russia.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 153, 3, pp. 339-353.RussiaCarbonatite
DS200712-0270
2007
Ripp, G.S.Doroshkevich, A.G., Wall, F., Ripp, G.S.Calcite bearing dolomite carbonatite dykes from Veseloe, north Transbaikala, Russia, and possible Cr rich mantle xenoliths.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 90, 1-2, pp. 19-49.RussiaCarbonatite
DS200712-0271
2007
Ripp, G.S.Doroshkevich, A.G., Wall, F., Ripp, G.S.Calcite bearing dolomite carbonatite dykes from Veseloe, North Transbaikalia, Russia and possible Cr rich mantle xenoliths.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 90, 1-2, pp. 19-49.RussiaCarbonatite
DS200812-0295
2008
Ripp, G.S.Doroshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S., Viladkar, S.G., Vladykin, N.V.The Arshan REE carbonatites, southwestern Transbaiklia, Russia: mineralogy, parageneis, and evolution.Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 46, 4, August pp.RussiaCarbonatite
DS200912-0628
2009
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S., Doroshkevick, A.G., Posokhov, V.F.Age of carbonatite magmatism in Transbaikalia.Petrology, Vol. 17, 1, pp. 73-89.RussiaCarbonatite
DS201012-0166
2009
Ripp, G.S.Doroshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S.Isotopic systematics of the rocks of the Khalyuta carbonatite complex of western Transbaikalia.Geochemistry International, Vol. 47, 12, pp. 1198-1211.RussiaGeochronology
DS201012-0167
2010
Ripp, G.S.Doroshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S., Moore, K.R.Genesis of the Khaluta alkaline basic Ba Sr carbonatite complex (West Transbaikala) Russia.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 98, 1-4, pp. 245-268.RussiaCarbonatite
DS201012-0168
2009
Ripp, G.S.Doroshkevich, A.G., Viladar, S.G., Ripp, G.S., Burtseva, M.V.Hydrothermal REE mineralization in the Amba Dongar carbonatite complex, Gujarat, India.Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 47, 5, pp. 1105-1116.IndiaCarbonatite
DS201112-0276
2011
Ripp, G.S.Doboshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S., Savatenkov, V.M.Alkaline magmatism of Vitim Province West Transbaikalia, Russia: age, mineralogical, geochemical and isotope (O, C,D,Sr,Nd) data.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.35-38.RussiaIjolite
DS201112-0277
2011
Ripp, G.S.Doboshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S., Savatenkov, V.M.Alkaline magmatism of Vitim Province West Transbaikalia, Russia: age, mineralogical, geochemical and isotope (O, C,D,Sr,Nd) data.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.35-38.RussiaIjolite
DS201112-0284
2011
Ripp, G.S.Doroshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S., Savatenkov, V.M.Alkaline magmatism of Vitim province, West Transbaikalia, Russia: age, mineralogical, geochemical and isotope (O, C,D, Sr, Nd) data.Peralk-Carb 2011, workshop held Tubingen Germany June 16-18, PosterRussiaMagmatism
DS201112-0867
2011
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S., Doboshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S., Lastochkin, Izbrodin, RampilovA way of carbonatite formation from alkaline gabbros, Oshurkovo massif.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.39-41.RussiaOshurkovo
DS201112-0867
2011
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S., Doboshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S., Lastochkin, Izbrodin, RampilovA way of carbonatite formation from alkaline gabbros, Oshurkovo massif.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.39-41.RussiaOshurkovo
DS201112-0868
2011
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S., Doboshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S., Lastochkin, Izbrodin, RampilovA way of carbonatite formation from alkaline gabbros, Oshurkovo massif.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.39-41.RussiaOshurkovo
DS201112-0868
2011
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S., Doboshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S., Lastochkin, Izbrodin, RampilovA way of carbonatite formation from alkaline gabbros, Oshurkovo massif.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.39-41.RussiaOshurkovo
DS201112-0869
2011
Ripp, G.S.Ripp, G.S., Doroshkevich, A.G.A way of carbonatite formation from alkaline gabbros, Oshurkovo Massif (Transbaikalia, Russia).Peralk-Carb 2011, workshop held Tubingen Germany June 16-18, PosterRussiaCarbonatite
DS201212-0169
2012
Ripp, G.S.Doroshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S., Izbrodin, I.A., Savatenkov, V.M.Alkaline magmatism of the Vitim province, west Transbaikalia, Russia: age, mineralogical, geochemical and isotope (O,C,D,Sr and Nd) data.Lithos, Vol. 152, pp. 157-172.RussiaMagmatism
DS201312-0114
2013
Ripp, G.S.Burtseva, M.V., Ripp, G.S., Doroshkevich, A.G., Viladkar, S.G., Varadan, R.Features of mineral and chemical composition of the Khamambettu carbonatites, Tamil, Nadu.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 81, 5, pp. 655-664.IndiaCarbonatite
DS201412-0203
2014
Ripp, G.S.Doroshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S., Izbrodin, I.A., Sergeev, S.A., Travin, A.V.Geochronology of the Gulkhen Massif, Vitim alkali province, western Transbaikalia.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 457, 2, pp. 940-944.RussiaAlkalic
DS201504-0186
2015
Ripp, G.S.Burtseva, M.V., Ripp, G.S., Posokhov, V.F., Zyablitsev, A.Yu., Murzintseva, A.E.The sources of fluids for the formation of nephritic rocks of the southern folded belt of the Siberian craton.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 460, 1, pp. 82-86.Russia, SiberiaAlkaline rocks, nephrites
DS201412-0739
2013
Rippe, D.Rippe, D., Unsworth, M.J., Currie, C.A.Magnetotelluric constraints on the fluid content in the upper mantle beneath the southern Canadian Cordillera: implications for rheology.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 118, 10, pp. 5601-5624.Canada, British ColumbiaGeophysics - tellurics
DS1984-0213
1984
Ripper, I.D.Davies, H.L., Symonds, P.A., Ripper, I.D.Structure and Evolution of the Southern Solomon Sea RegionB.m.r. Journal of Aust., Vol. 9, No. 1, MARCH PP. 49-68.Papua New GuineaBlank
DS2003-1169
2003
Risold, A.C.Risold, A.C., Trommsdorff, V., Grobety, B.Morphology of oriented ilmenite inclusions in olivine from garnet peridotites ( CentralEuropean Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 15, 2, pp. 289-94.SwitzerlandPeridotites
DS200412-1672
2003
Risold, A.C.Risold, A.C., Trommsdorff, V., Grobety, B.Morphology of oriented ilmenite inclusions in olivine from garnet peridotites ( Central Alps, Switzerland).European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 15, 2, pp. 289-94.Europe, SwitzerlandPeridotite
DS1994-1914
1994
Rison, W.Wiens, R.C., Lai, D., Rison, W., Wacker, J.F.Helium isotope diffusion in natural diamondsGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 58, No. 7, April pp. 1747-1758.GlobalDiamond morphology, Natural diamonds
DS1995-0682
1995
Rissanen, J.Griffin, B.J., Rissanen, J., Pooley, G.D., Lee, DearnA new Diamondiferous eclogite bearing kimberlitic occurrence from FinlandProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 198-200.FinlandEclogite
DS201212-0835
2012
Rist, P.Zurba, M., Ross, H., Izurieta, A., Rist, P., Bock, E., Berkes, F.Melt inclusions in olivines from early Iceland plume picrites support high 3He/4He in both enriched and depleted mantle.Chemical Geology, Vol. 306-307, pp. 54-62.Europe, IcelandPicrite
DS200612-0615
2006
Ristau, J.Hyndman, R.D., Fluck, P., Mazzotti, S., Lewis, T.J., Ristau, J., Leonard, L.Current tectonics of the northern Canadian Cordillera.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 42, 6, pp. 1117-1136.Canada, British ColumbiaTectonics
DS200412-1938
2004
Ristein, J.Strobel, P., Reidel, M., Ristein, J., Ley, L.Surface transfer doping of diamond.Nature, No. 6998, July 22, pp. 439-441.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS1994-1464
1994
Ristorcelli, S.J.Ristorcelli, S.J., Prenn, N.B.The use and misuse of geology in computer generated resource estimations:some case historiesAmerican Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME) Preprint, Meeting held Albuquerque Feb. 14-17th, No. 94-135, 12pNevadaOre reserves, geostatistics, Gold, epithermal
DS200812-0962
2007
Ritcey, D.Ritcey, D., Moul, F., Clarke, D., Kirkley, M.Diamond exploration on Brodeur Project, northwest Baffin Island. Diamondex35th. Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, Abstracts only p. 51-52.Canada, NunavutExploration - overview
DS200912-0139
2009
Ritcey, D.Cross, J.D., Kopylova, M., Ritcey, D., Kirkley, M.The diamond potential of the Tuwawi kimberlite, Baffin Island, Nunavut.37th. Annual Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, Abstracts p. 70.Canada, Nunavut, Baffin IslandPetrology
DS1990-1231
1990
Ritcey, G.M.Ritcey, G.M.Tailings management -problems and solutions in the mining industryBiTech, 1000p. approx. $ 235.00 United StatesGlobalTailings management, Book -ad
DS1988-0573
1988
Ritchey, J.L.Ritchey, J.L.Economic reconnaissance of selected placer deposits of the U.S. exclusive economic zoneMarine Mining, Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 219-232. Database # 17366United StatesPlacers, Economics- legal
DS1999-0602
1999
Ritchie, B.D.Ritchie, B.D., Hardy, S., Gawthorpe, R.L.Three dimensional numerical modeling of coarse grained clastic deposition in sedimentary basins.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 104, No. 8, pp. 17, 759-80.AlbertaGeomorphology - fluvial environment
DS1860-0767
1892
Ritchie, J.E.Ritchie, J.E.Brighter South Africa or Life at the Cape and NatalLondon: Unwin., 232P.Africa. South AfricaTravelogue
DS1995-1780
1995
Riter, J.C.Smith, D., Riter, J.C.Xenoliths, mantle processes, and dynamics of the Colorado PlateauEos, Vol. 76, No. 46, Nov. 7. p.F605. Abstract.Colorado PlateauCrust, Geodynamics
DS1996-1328
1996
Riter, J.C.Smith, D., Riter, J.C.Genesis and evolution of low Aluminum orthopyroxene in spinel peridotitexenoliths, Grand Canyon Field.Geological Society of America, Abstracts, Vol. 28, No. 7, p. A-290.ArizonaXenoliths
DS1994-1633
1994
Riter, J.C.A.Smith, D., Riter, J.C.A.Mantle xenoliths and the Colorado PlateauGeological Society of America Abstracts, Vol. 26, No. 6, April p. 63. Abstract.ColoradoXenoliths
DS1996-1191
1996
Riter, J.C.A.Riter, J.C.A., Smith, D.Xenolith constraints on the thermal history of the mantle below the Colorado Plateau.Geology, Vol. 24, No. 3, March pp. 267-270.Colorado PlateauXenoliths, Mantle geothermometry
DS1999-0682
1999
Riter, J.C.A.Smith, D., Riter, J.C.A., Mertzman, S.A.Water rock interactions, orthopyroxene growth and Si enrichment in themantle: evidence in xenoliths...Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.165, No.1, Jan.15, pp.45-54.Colorado PlateauXenoliths
DS2000-0722
2000
RitsemaNyblade, A.A., Owens, T.J., Gurrola, Ritsema, LangstonSeismic evidence for a deep upper mantle thermal anomaly beneath east AfricGeology, Vol. 28, No. 7, July, pp. 599-602.Tanzania, Uganda, Kenya, East AfricaGeophysics - seismics, mantle, plume rift, Craton - Tanzanian
DS1998-1239
1998
Ritsema, J.Ritsema, J., NI, S., Crotwell, H.P.Evidence for strong shear velocity reductions and velocity gradients in the lower mantle beneath Africa.Geophs. Res. Lett., Vol. 25, No. 23, Dec. 1, pp. 4245-48.AfricaGeophysics, Lower mantle
DS1998-1240
1998
Ritsema, J.Ritsema, J., Nyblade, A.A., Van Decar, J.C.Upper mantle seismic velocity structure beneath Tanzania, implications For the stability of cratonic..Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 103, No. 9, Sept. 10, pp. 21, 201-14.Tanzania, East AfricaGeophysics - seismics, Craton, lithosphere
DS2000-0372
2000
Ritsema, J.Gurnis, M., Ritsema, J., Zhong, S.Tonga slab deformation: the influence of a lower mantle upwelling on a slab in a young subduction zone.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 27, No. 16, Aug. 15, pp.2373-6.MantleSubduction
DS2000-0404
2000
Ritsema, J.Helmberger, D., NI, S., Ritsema, J.Seismic evidence for ultralow velocity zones beneath Africa and eastern Atlantic.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 105, No.B 10, Oct.10, pp.23865-78.AfricaGeophysics - seismics
DS2001-0792
2001
Ritsema, J.Montagner, J.P., Ritsema, J.Interaction between ridge and plumesScience, Vol. 5546, Nov. 16, p.1472-3.GlobalHotspots, Plumes
DS2002-1345
2002
Ritsema, J.Ritsema, J., Rivera, L.A., Komatitsch, D., Tromp, J., Van Heijst, H.J.Effects of crust and mantle heterogeneity on PP/P and SS/S amplitude ratiosGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 29,10,May15,pp.72-MantleGeophysics
DS2003-1170
2003
Ritsema, J.Ritsema, J., Allen, R.M.The elusive mantle plumeEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 207, 1-4, Feb. 28, pp. 1-12.GlobalGeophysics - seismic tomography, Mantle upwelling
DS2003-1171
2003
Ritsema, J.Ritsema, J., Allen, R.M.The elusive mantle plumeEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 207, 1-4, pp. 1-12.MantleHot spots, plumes
DS200512-0905
2005
Ritsema, J.Ritsema, J.Global seismic structure maps.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, pp. 11-18. ( total book 861p. $ 144.00)GlobalGeophysics -seismics - overview
DS200512-1136
2004
Ritsema, J.Venkataraman, A., Nyblade, A.A., Ritsema, J.Upper mantle Q and thermal structure beneath Tanzania, East Africa from teleseismic P wave spectra.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 31, 15, L15611 DOI 10.1029/2004 GL020351Africa, TanzaniaGeothermometry
DS200712-0719
2007
Ritsema, J.Merrer, S., Cara, M., Rivera, L., Ritsema, J.Upper mantle structure beneath continents: new constraints from multi-mode Rayleigh wave dat a in western North America and southern Africa.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 34, 6, L06309.United States, Africa, South AfricaGeophysics - seismics
DS200712-0896
2007
Ritsema, J.Ritsema, J., McNamara, A.K., Bull, A.L.Tomographic filtering of geodynamic models: implications for model interpretation and large scale mantle structure.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 112, B 1, B01303.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200812-1281
2008
Ritsema, J.Xu, W., Lithgow Bertelloni, C., Stixrude, L., Ritsema, J.The effect of bulk composition and temperature on mantle seismic structure.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 275, 1-2, pp. 70-79.MantleGeophysics - seismics, geochemistry
DS200912-0085
2009
Ritsema, J.Bull, A.L., McNamara, A.K., Ritsema, J.Synthetic tomography of plume clusters and thermochemical piles.Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 278, 3-4, pp. 152-162.MantlePlume
DS200912-0328
2009
Ritsema, J.Hwang, Y-K., Ritsema, J., Goes, S.Spatial variations of P wave attenuation in the mantle beneath North America.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 114. B 6, B06312.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200912-0629
2009
Ritsema, J.Ritsema, J., Cupillard, P., Tauzin, B., Xu, W., Stixrude, L., Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.Joint mineral physics and seismic wave traveltime analysis of upper mantle temperature.Geology, Vol. 37, 4, April pp. 363-366.MantleGeophysics - seismics, thermodynamics
DS200912-0630
2009
Ritsema, J.Ritsema, J., Van Heijst, H.J., Woodhouse, J.H., deuss, A.Long period body wave traveltimes through the crust: implications for crustal corrections and seismic tomography.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 179, 2, Nov. pp. 1255-1261.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200912-0631
2009
Ritsema, J.Ritsema, J., Xu, W., Stixrude, L., Lithgow Bertelloni, C.Estimates of the transition zone temperature in mechanically mixed upper mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 277, 1-2, pp. 244-252.MantleGeothermometry
DS201112-1014
2011
Ritsema, J.Styles, E., Goes, S., Van Keken, P.E., Ritsema, J., Smith, H.Synthetic images of dynamically predicted plumes and comparison with a global tomographic model.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 311, 3-4, pp. 351-363.MantleTomography
DS201212-0492
2012
Ritsema, J.Mosca, I., Cobden, L., Deuss, A., Ritsema, J., Trampert, J.Seismic and mineralogical structures of the lower mantle from probabilistic tomography.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 117, B6,B06304MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS201412-0119
2014
Ritsema, J.Chang, S-J., Ferreira, A.M.G., Ritsema, J., van Heijst, H.J., Woodhouse, J.H.Global radially anisotropic mantle structure from multiple datasets: a review, current challenges, and outlook.Tectonophysics, Vol. 617, pp. 1-19.MantleTomography
DS201602-0212
2015
Ritsema, J.Hirsch, A.C., Dalton, C.A., Ritsema, J.Constraints on shear velocity in the cratonic upper mantle from Rayleigh wave phase velocity.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 16, 11, Nov. pp. 3982-4005.MantleGeophysics - seismic

Abstract: Seismic models provide constraints on the thermal and chemical properties of the cratonic upper mantle. Depth profiles of shear velocity from global and regional studies contain positive velocity gradients in the uppermost mantle and often lack a low-velocity zone, features that are difficult to reconcile with the temperature structures inferred from surface heat flow data and mantle-xenolith thermobarometry. Furthermore, the magnitude and shape of the velocity profiles vary between different studies, impacting the inferences drawn about mantle temperature and composition. In this study, forward modeling is used to identify the suite of one-dimensional shear-velocity profiles that are consistent with phase-velocity observations made for Rayleigh waves traversing Precambrian cratons. Two approaches to the generation of 1-D models are considered. First, depth profiles of shear velocity are predicted from thermal models of the cratonic upper mantle that correspond to a range of assumed values of mantle potential temperature, surface heat flow, and radiogenic heat production in the lithosphere. Second, shear velocity-depth profiles are randomly generated. In both cases, Rayleigh wave phase velocity is calculated from the Earth models, and acceptable models are identified on the basis of comparison to observed phase velocity. The results show that it is difficult but not impossible to find acceptable Earth models that contain a low-velocity zone in the upper mantle and that temperature structures that are consistent with constraints from mantle xenoliths yield phase-velocity predictions lower than observed. For most acceptable randomly generated Earth models, shear velocity merges with the global average at approximately 300 km.
DS201603-0385
2016
Ritsema, J.Hirsch, A.C., Dalton, C.A., Ritsema, J.Constraints on shear velocity in the cratonic upper mantle from Rayleigh wave phase velocity.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 16, 11, pp.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS201612-2287
2016
Ritsema, J.Chaves, C., Ussami, N., Ritsema, J.Density and P-wave velocity structure beneath the Parana magmatic province: refertilization of an ancient lithospheric mantle.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 17, 10, 1002/ 2016GC006369.South AmericaMagmatism

Abstract: We estimate density and P-wave velocity perturbations in the mantle beneath the southeastern South America plate from geoid anomalies and P-wave traveltime residuals to constrain the structure of the lithosphere underneath the Paraná Magmatic Province (PMP) and conterminous geological provinces. Our analysis shows a consistent correlation between density and velocity anomalies. The P-wave speed and density are 1% and 15 kg/m3 lower, respectively, in the upper mantle under the Late Cretaceous to Cenozoic alkaline provinces, except beneath the Goiás Alkaline Province (GAP), where density (+20 kg/m3) and velocity (+0.5%) are relatively high. Underneath the PMP, the density is higher by about 50 kg/m3 in the north and 25 kg/m3 in the south, to a depth of 250?-?300 km. These values correlate with high-velocity perturbations of +0.5% and +0.3%, respectively. Profiles of density perturbation versus depth in the upper mantle are different for the PMP and the adjacent Archean São Francisco (SFC) and Amazonian (AC) cratons. The Paleoproterozoic PMP basement has a high-density root. The density is relatively low in the SFC and AC lithospheres. A reduction of density is a typical characteristic of chemically depleted Archean cratons. A more fertile Proterozoic and Phanerozoic subcontinental lithospheric mantle has a higher density, as deduced from density estimates of mantle xenoliths of different ages and composition. In conjunction with Re-Os isotopic studies of the PMP basalts, chemical and isotopic analyses of peridodite xenoliths from the GAP in the northern PMP, and electromagnetic induction experiments of the PMP lithosphere, our density and P-wave speed models suggest that the densification of the PMP lithosphere and flood basalt generation are related to mantle refertilization. Metasomatic refertilization resulted from the introduction of asthenospheric components from the mantle wedge above Proterozoic subduction zones, which surrounded the Paraná lithosphere. The high-density PMP lithosphere is presently gravitationally unstable and prone to delamination.
DS201806-1231
2018
Ritsema, J.Koelemeijer, P., Schuberth, B.S.A., Davies, D.R., Deuss, A., Ritsema, J.Constraints on the presence of post-perovskite in Earth's lowermost mantle from tomographic geodynamic model comparisons.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 494, pp. 226-238.Mantleperovskite

Abstract: Lower mantle tomography models consistently feature an increase in the ratio of shear-wave velocity () to compressional-wave velocity () variations and a negative correlation between shear-wave and bulk-sound velocity () variations. These seismic characteristics, also observed in the recent SP12RTS model, have been interpreted to be indicative of large-scale chemical variations. Other explanations, such as the lower mantle post-perovskite (pPv) phase, which would not require chemical heterogeneity, have been explored less. Constraining the origin of these seismic features is important, as geodynamic simulations predict a fundamentally different style of mantle convection under both scenarios. Here, we investigate to what extent the presence of pPv explains the observed high ratios and negative - correlation globally. We compare the statistical properties of SP12RTS with the statistics of synthetic tomography models, derived from both thermal and thermochemical models of 3-D global mantle convection. We convert the temperature fields of these models into seismic velocity structures using mineral physics lookup tables with and without pPv. We account for the limited tomographic resolution of SP12RTS using its resolution operator for both and structures. This allows for direct comparisons of the resulting velocity ratios and correlations. Although the tomographic filtering significantly affects the synthetic tomography images, we demonstrate that the effect of pPv remains evident in the ratios and correlations of seismic velocities. We find that lateral variations in the presence of pPv have a dominant influence on the / ratio and - correlation, which are thus unsuitable measures to constrain the presence of large-scale chemical variations in the lowermost mantle. To explain the decrease in the / ratio of SP12RTS close to the CMB, our results favour a pPv-bearing CMB region, which has implications for the stability field of pPv in the Earth's mantle.
DS201806-1234
2018
Ritsema, J.Maquire, R., Ritsema, J., Bonnin, M., van Keken, P.E., Goes, S.Evaluating the resolution of deep mantle plumes in teleseismic traveltime tomography.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 123, 1. pp. 384-400.Mantlegeophysics - seismic

Abstract: The strongest evidence to support the classical plume hypothesis comes from seismic imaging of the mantle beneath hot spots. However, imaging results are often ambiguous and it is questionable whether narrow plume tails can be detected by present-day seismological techniques. Here we carry out synthetic tomography experiments based on spectral element method simulations of seismic waves with period T > 10 s propagating through geodynamically derived plume structures. We vary the source-receiver geometry in order to explore the conditions under which lower mantle plume tails may be detected seismically. We determine that wide-aperture (4,000-6,000 km) networks with dense station coverage (<100-200 km station spacing) are necessary to image narrow (<500 km wide) thermal plume tails. We find that if uncertainties on traveltime measurements exceed delay times imparted by plume tails (typically <1 s), the plume tails are concealed in seismic images. Vertically propagating SKS waves enhance plume tail recovery but lack vertical resolution in regions that are not independently constrained by direct S paths. We demonstrate how vertical smearing of an upper mantle low-velocity anomaly can appear as a plume originating in the deep mantle. Our results are useful for interpreting previous plume imaging experiments and guide the design of future experiments.
DS202005-0758
2020
Ritsema, J.Ritsema, J., Lekic, V.Heterogeneity of seismic wave velocity in Earth's mantle.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol.48, 25p. PdfMantlegeophysics - seismics

Abstract: Seismology provides important constraints on the structure and dynamics of the deep mantle. Computational and methodological advances in the past two decades improved tomographic imaging of the mantle and revealed the fine-scale structure of plumes ascending from the core-mantle boundary region and slabs of oceanic lithosphere sinking into the lower mantle. We discuss the modeling aspects of global tomography including theoretical approximations, data selection, and model fidelity and resolution. Using spectral, principal component, and cluster analyses, we highlight the robust patterns of seismic heterogeneity, which inform us of flow in the mantle, the history of plate motions, and potential compositionally distinct reservoirs. In closing, we emphasize that data mining of vast collections of seismic waveforms and new data from distributed acoustic sensing, autonomous hydrophones, ocean-bottom seismometers, and correlation-based techniques will boost the development of the next generation of global models of density, seismic velocity, and attenuation. Seismic tomography reveals the 100-km to 1,000-km scale variation of seismic velocity heterogeneity in the mantle. Tomographic images are the most important geophysical constraints on mantle circulation and evolution.
DS202006-0924
2020
Ritsema, J.Jones, T.D., Maguire, R.R., van Keken, P.E., Ritsema, J., Koelemeijer, P.Subducted oceanic crust as the origin of seismically slow lower-mantle structures.Progress in Earth and Planetary Science , Vol. 7, 16p. PdfMantlegeophysics - seismics

Abstract: Mantle tomography reveals the existence of two large low-shear-velocity provinces (LLSVPs) at the base of the mantle. We examine here the hypothesis that they are piles of oceanic crust that have steadily accumulated and warmed over billions of years. We use existing global geodynamic models in which dense oceanic crust forms at divergent plate boundaries and subducts at convergent ones. The model suite covers the predicted density range for oceanic crust over lower mantle conditions. To meaningfully compare our geodynamic models to tomographic structures, we convert them into models of seismic wavespeed and explicitly account for the limited resolving power of tomography. Our results demonstrate that long-term recycling of dense oceanic crust naturally leads to the formation of thermochemical piles with seismic characteristics similar to the LLSVPs. The extent to which oceanic crust contributes to the LLSVPs depends upon its density in the lower mantle for which accurate data is lacking. We find that the LLSVPs are not composed solely of oceanic crust. Rather, they are basalt rich at their base (bottom 100-200 km) and grade into peridotite toward their sides and top with the strength of their seismic signature arising from the dominant role of temperature. We conclude that recycling of oceanic crust, if sufficiently dense, has a strong influence on the thermal and chemical evolution of Earth’s mantle.
DS202007-1173
2020
Ritsema, J.Ritsema, J., Lekic, V.Heterogeneity of seismic wave velocity in Earth's mantle.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 48, 1, pp. w77-401.Mantlegeophysics - seismics

Abstract: Seismology provides important constraints on the structure and dynamics of the deep mantle. Computational and methodological advances in the past two decades improved tomographic imaging of the mantle and revealed the fine-scale structure of plumes ascending from the core-mantle boundary region and slabs of oceanic lithosphere sinking into the lower mantle. We discuss the modeling aspects of global tomography including theoretical approximations, data selection, and model fidelity and resolution. Using spectral, principal component, and cluster analyses, we highlight the robust patterns of seismic heterogeneity, which inform us of flow in the mantle, the history of plate motions, and potential compositionally distinct reservoirs. In closing, we emphasize that datamining of vast collections of seismic waveforms and new data from distributed acoustic sensing, autonomous hydrophones, ocean-bottom seismometers, and correlation-based techniques will boost the development of the next generation of global models of density, seismic velocity, and attenuation.
DS1900-0269
1904
Ritso, B.W.Ritso, B.W.Mineral Exploration in Cape ColonySouth Africa Architect., Vol. 1, PP. 106-110.Africa, South AfricaDiamonds, Prospecting
DS1859-0054
1836
Ritter, C.Ritter, C.Minen von IndienUnknown, Vol. 4, PT. 2, PP. 343-IndiaDiamond Occurrence
DS1989-1277
1989
Ritter, D.M.Ritter, D.M.Details released on Texaco's midcontinent rift test.United States Geological Survey (USGS) Open file 88-22June 1988 Kansas Geological Survey Texaco Poersch# 1, Kansas Prelim.Geol.pre-PhanerozoicGaea Association For Women Geoscientists, Vol. XII, No. 5, October pp. 1, 3 United States Geological Survey (USGS) 88-22 $20.00MidcontinentNews item, Rifting
DS1990-0846
1990
Ritter, E.H.Knipe, R.J., Ritter, E.H., Agar, S.M., Prior, D.J., Law, R.D.Deformation mechanisms, rheology and tectonicsGeological Society of London Special Publication, No. 54, 520pGlobalRock deformation, fracture, faulting, flow mechanisms, Flow laws, rock fabrics, tectonics
DS1995-0006
1995
Ritter, J.R.R.Achauer, U., Ritter, J.R.R.Upper mantle structure of the Kenya Rift based on joint interpretation of delay time tomography - bouguer dataGeological Society Africa 10th. Conference Oct. Nairobi, pp. 137-8. Abstract.KenyaTectonics, Geophysics -gravity
DS1995-1579
1995
Ritter, J.R.R.Ritter, J.R.R., Fuchs, K., Kaspar, T., et al.Seismic images illustrate the deep roots of the Chyulu Hills volcanic @Kenya.Eos, Vol. 76, No. 28, July 11, pp. 273, 278.KenyaGeophysics -seismics, Mantle
DS2001-0979
2001
Ritter, J.R.R.Ritter, J.R.R., Jordan, M., Christensen, U.R., AchauerA mantle plume below the Eifel volcanic fields, GermanyEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 186, No. 1, pp. 7-14.GlobalTomography, Hot spot
DS200512-0906
2005
Ritter, J.R.R.Ritter, J.R.R.Small scale mantle plumes: imaging and geodynamic aspects.Lecture Notes in Earth Sciences, March p. 69-MantlePlume, geodynamics, geothermometry
DS2003-1172
2003
Ritter, O.Ritter, O., Weckmann, U., Victor, T., Haak, V.A magnetotelluric study of the Damara belt in Namibia: 1. regional scale conductivityPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 138, 2, July 16, pp. 71-90.NamibiaGeophysics - magnetics
DS2003-1463
2003
Ritter, O.Weckmann, U., Ritter, O., Haak, V.A magnetotelluric study of the Damara belt in Namibia: 2. MT phases over 90 revealPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 138, 2, July 16, pp. 91-112.NamibiaGeophysics - magnetics
DS200412-1673
2003
Ritter, O.Ritter, O., Weckmann, U., Victor, T., Haak, V.A magnetotelluric study of the Damara belt in Namibia: 1. regional scale conductivity anomalies.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 138, 2, July 16, pp. 71-90.Africa, NamibiaGeophysics - magnetics
DS200412-2094
2003
Ritter, O.Weckmann, U., Ritter, O., Haak, V.A magnetotelluric study of the Damara belt in Namibia: 2. MT phases over 90 reveal the internal structure of the Waterberg FaultPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 138, 2, July 16, pp. 91-112.Africa, NamibiaGeophysics - magnetics
DS201212-0766
2012
Ritter, O.Weckmann, U., Ritter, O., Chen, X., Tietze, K., de Wit, M.Magnetotelluric image linked to surface geology across the Cape Fold Belt, South Africa.Terra Nova, Vol. 24, 3, pp. 207-212.Africa, South AfricaGeophysics
DS202002-0215
2020
Ritter, X.Ritter, X., Sanchez-Valle, C., Sator, N., Desmaele, E., Guignot, N., King, A., Kupenko, I., Berndt, J., Guillot, B.Density of hydrous carbonate melts under pressure, compressability of volatiles and implications for carbonate melt mobility in the upper mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 533, 11p. PdfMantlecarbon

Abstract: Knowledge of the effect of water on the density of carbonate melts is fundamental to constrain their mobility in the Earth's interior and the exchanges of carbon between deep and surficial reservoirs. Here we determine the density of hydrous MgCO3 and CaMg(CO3)2 melts (10 wt% H2O) from 1.09 to 2.98 GPa and 1111 to 1763 K by the X-ray absorption method in a Paris-Edinburgh press and report the first equations of state for hydrous carbonate melts at high pressure. Densities range from 2.26(3) to 2.50(3) g/cm3 and from 2.34(3) to 2.48(3) g/cm3 for hydrous MgCO3 and CaMg(CO3)2 melts, respectively. Combining the results with density data for the dry counterparts from classical Molecular Dynamic (MD) simulations, we derive the partial molar volume (, ) and compressibility of H2O and CO2 components at crustal and upper mantle conditions. Our results show that in alkaline carbonate melts is larger and less compressible than at the investigated conditions. Neither the compressibility nor depend on carbonate melt composition within uncertainties, but they are larger than those in silicate melts at crustal conditions. in alkaline earth carbonate melts decreases from 25(1) to 16.5(5) cm3/mol between 0.5 and 4 GPa at 1500 K. Contrastingly, comparison of our results with literature data suggests strong compositional effects on , that is also less compressible than in transitional melts (e.g., kimberlites) and carbonated basalts. We further quantify the effect of hydration on the mobility of carbonate melts in the upper mantle and demonstrate that 10 wt% H2O increases the mobility of MgCO3 melts from 37 to 67 g.cm-3.Pa-1s-1 at 120 km depth. These results suggest efficient carbonate melt extraction during partial melting and fast migration of incipient melts in the shallow upper mantle.
DS1983-0538
1983
Ritter von maravic, H.C.Ritter von maravic, H.C.Geochemical and petrographic investigation of the genesis of the cancrinite-syenite niobium bearing carbonatite complex of Lueske Kivu Northeastern Zaire.*GPh.D. Thesis University of Berlin (in German), 330pDemocratic Republic of CongoPetrology, Rare Earths, Geochemistry
DS201902-0313
2018
Ritterbex, S.Ritterbex, S., Harada, T., Tsuchiya, T.Vacancies in MgO at ultrahigh pressure: about mantle rheology of super-Earths.Icarus, Vol. 305, 1, pp. 350-357.MantleUHP

Abstract: First-principles calculations are performed to investigate vacancy formation and migration in the B2 phase of MgO. Defect energetics suggest the importance of intrinsic non-interacting vacancy pairs, even though the extrinsic vacancy concentration might govern atomic diffusion in the B2 phase of MgO. The enthalpies of ionic vacancy migration are generally found to decrease across the B1-B2 phase transition around a pressure of 500?GPa. It is shown that this enthalpy change induces a substantial increase in the rate of vacancy diffusion in MgO of almost four orders of magnitude (~104) when the B1 phase transforms into the B2 phase with increasing pressure. If plastic deformation is controlled by vacancy diffusion, mantle viscosity is expected to decrease in relation to this enhanced diffusion rate in MgO across the B1-B2 transition in the interior of Earth-like large exoplanets. Our results of atomic relaxations near the defects suggest that diffusion controlled creep viscosity may generally decrease across high-pressure phase transitions with increasing coordination number. Plastic flow and resulting mantle convection in the interior of these super-Earths may be therefore less sluggish than previously thought.
DS202005-0767
2020
Ritterbex, S.Tscuchiya, T., Tsuchiya, J., Dekura, H., Ritterbex, S.Ab initio study on the lower mantle minerals.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 48, 21p. pdfMantlemineralogy

Abstract: Recent progress in theoretical mineral physics based on the ab initio quantum mechanical computation method has been dramatic in conjunction with the rapid advancement of computer technologies. It is now possible to predict stability, elasticity, and transport properties of complex minerals quantitatively with uncertainties that are comparable to or even smaller than those attached in experimental data. These calculations under in situ high-pressure (P) and high-temperature conditions are of particular interest because they allow us to construct a priori mineralogical models of the deep Earth. In this article, we briefly review recent progress in studying high-P phase relations, elasticity, thermal conductivity, and rheological properties of lower mantle minerals including silicates, oxides, and some hydrous phases. Our analyses indicate that the pyrolitic composition can describe Earth's properties quite well in terms of density and P- and S-wave velocity. Computations also suggest some new hydrous compounds that could persist up to the deepest mantle and that the postperovskite phase boundary is the boundary of not only the mineralogy but also the thermal conductivity. 1) The ab initio method is a strong tool to investigate physical properties of minerals under high pressure and high temperature. 2) Calculated thermoelasticity indicates that the pyrolytic composition is representative to the chemistry of Earth's lower mantle. 3) Simulations predict new dense hydrous phases stable in the whole lower mantle pressure and temperature condition. 4) Calculated lattice thermal conductivity suggests a heat flow across the core mantle boundary no greater than 10 TW.
DS202007-1183
2020
Ritterbex, S.Tscuchiya, T., Tsuchiya, J., Dekura, H., Ritterbex, S.Ab initio study on the lower mantle minerals.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 48, 1, pp. 99-119.Mantlemineralogy

Abstract: Recent progress in theoretical mineral physics based on the ab initio quantummechanical computation method has been dramatic in conjunction with the rapid advancement of computer technologies. It is now possible to predict stability, elasticity, and transport properties of complex minerals quantitatively with uncertainties that are comparable to or even smaller than those attached in experimental data. These calculations under in situ high-pressure (P) and high-temperature conditions are of particular interest because they allow us to construct a priori mineralogical models of the deep Earth. In this article, we briefly review recent progress in studying high-P phase relations, elasticity, thermal conductivity, and rheological properties of lower mantle minerals including silicates, oxides, and some hydrous phases. Our analyses indicate that the pyrolitic composition can describe Earth’s properties quite well in terms of density and P- and S-wave velocity. Computations also suggest some new hydrous compounds that could persist up to the deepestmantle and that the postperovskite phase boundary is the boundary of not only the mineralogy but also the thermal conductivity.
DS202009-1654
2020
Ritterbex, S.Ritterbex, S., Carrez, P., Cordier, P.Deformation across the mantle transition zone: a theoretical mineral physics view.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 547, 10p. PdfMantleWadsleyite, ringwoodite, majorite garnet

Abstract: The dynamics of the Earth's mantle is still poorly constrained due to the lack of understanding the transfer of matter between the upper and the lower mantle and their convective vigor. The transition zone (TZ) might play a crucial role as the interface connecting the upper to the lower mantle. Here, we examine the rheology of the main TZ minerals, wadsleyite, ringwoodite and majorite garnet based on a mineral physics approach. Using the results of lattice friction modeling and dislocation glide mobilities together with the available data on self-diffusion in the TZ minerals, we quantify their plastic deformation by diffusion and dislocation creep from theoretical plasticity models. We show that pure climb creep is expected to contribute to the plasticity of the TZ without the need of significant diffusion-related hydrolytic weakening, matching well the geophysical observations. Our model results predict that crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) might only develop along with stress concentrations as present around cold subducting slabs which can be locally weaker than the surrounding TZ despite their lower temperatures.
DS202012-2245
2020
Ritterbex, S.Ritterbex, S., Carrez, P., Cordier, P.Deformation across the mantle transition zone: a theoretical mineral physics view.Earth and Planetary Letters, Vol. 547, 116438, 10p. PdfMantlewadsleyite

Abstract: The dynamics of the Earth's mantle is still poorly constrained due to the lack of understanding the transfer of matter between the upper and the lower mantle and their convective vigor. The transition zone (TZ) might play a crucial role as the interface connecting the upper to the lower mantle. Here, we examine the rheology of the main TZ minerals, wadsleyite, ringwoodite and majorite garnet based on a mineral physics approach. Using the results of lattice friction modeling and dislocation glide mobilities together with the available data on self-diffusion in the TZ minerals, we quantify their plastic deformation by diffusion and dislocation creep from theoretical plasticity models. We show that pure climb creep is expected to contribute to the plasticity of the TZ without the need of significant diffusion-related hydrolytic weakening, matching well the geophysical observations. Our model results predict that crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) might only develop along with stress concentrations as present around cold subducting slabs which can be locally weaker than the surrounding TZ despite their lower temperatures.
DS201802-0238
2018
Rittner, M.Garzanti, E., Dinis, P., Vermeesch, P., Ando, S., Hahn, A., Huvi, J., Limonta, M., Padoan, M., Resentini, A., Rittner, M., Vezzoli, G.Sedimentary processes controlling ultralong cells of littoral transport: placer formation and termination of the Orange sand highway in southern Angola.Sedimentology, Vol. 65, 2, pp. 431-460.Africa, Angolaplacers, alluvials

Abstract: This study focuses on the causes, modalities and obstacles of sediment transfer in the longest cell of littoral sand drift documented on Earth so far. Sand derived from the Orange River is dragged by swell waves and persistent southerly winds to accumulate in four successive dunefields in coastal Namibia to Angola. All four dunefields are terminated by river valleys, where aeolian sand is flushed back to the ocean; and yet sediment transport continues at sea, tracing an 1800 km long submarine sand highway. Sand drift would extend northward to beyond the Congo if the shelf did not become progressively narrower in southern Angola, where drifting sand is funnelled towards oceanic depths via canyon heads connected to river mouths. Garnet-magnetite placers are widespread along this coastal stretch, indicating systematic loss of the low-density feldspatho-quartzose fraction to the deep ocean. More than half of Moçamedes Desert sand is derived from the Orange River, and the rest in similar proportions from the Cunene River and from the Swakop and other rivers draining the Damara Orogen in Namibia. The Orange fingerprint, characterized by basaltic rock fragments, clinopyroxene grains and bimodal zircon-age spectra with peaks at ca 0•5 Ga and ca 1•0 Ga, is lost abruptly at Namibe, and beach sands further north have abundant feldspar, amphibole-epidote suites and unimodal zircon-age spectra with a peak at ca 2•0 Ga, documenting local provenance from Palaeoproterozoic basement. Along with this oblique-rifted continental margin, beach placers are dominated by Fe-Ti-Cr oxides with more monazite than garnet and thus have a geochemical signature sharply different from beach placers found all the way along the Orange littoral cell. High-resolution mineralogical studies allow us to trace sediment dispersal over distances of thousands of kilometres, providing essential information for the correct reconstruction of ‘source to sink’ relationships in hydrocarbon exploration and to predict the long-term impact of man-made infrastructures on coastal sediment budgets.
DS2002-0351
2002
Ritts, B.D.Darby, B.J., Ritts, B.D.Mesozoic contractional deformation in the middle of the Asian tectonic collage: the intraplate Western Ordos fold thrust belt, China.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 205, 1-2, pp. 13-24.ChinaTectonics
DS1986-0671
1986
Ritz, M.Ritz, M., Robineau, B.Crustal and upper mantle electrical conductivity structures inWestAfrica: geodynamic implicationsTectonophysics, Vol. 124, pp. 115-126West AfricaTectonics, Structure
DS1988-0574
1988
Ritz, M.Ritz, M., Bellion, Y.Structure of the Senegalo-Mauritanian basin West Africa, from geoelectrical studiesTectonophysics, Vol. 148, No. 3/4, May 1, pp. 235-240West AfricaTectonics
DS1990-1238
1990
Ritz, M.Robineau, B., Ritz, M.Geoelectrical signature of the Central Mauritanides deep structure, Mauritania, West AfricaTectonics, Vol. 9, No. 6, December pp. 1649-1662West AfricaTectonics, Geophysics -seismics
DS1991-1430
1991
Ritz, M.Ritz, M., et al.A magnetotelluric survey in the Northern Bolivian AltiplanoGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 18, No.3, Mar. pp. 475-8.Bolivia, AndesGeophysics - tellurics, Tectonics, structure
DS1970-0980
1974
Ritzma, H.R.Ritzma, H.R.Dating of Igneous Dike, Eastern Uinta MountainsUtah Geology, Vol. 1, No. 1, FALL, P. 95.United States, Utah, Rocky MountainsGeochronology, Related Rocks
DS1995-1580
1995
Ritzwoller, M.H.Ritzwoller, M.H.Three dimensional seismic models of the earth's mantleReviews of Geophysics, Vol. 33, No. 1, Feb. pp. 1-66.MantleGeophysics -seismics, Seismic velocity
DS2001-0980
2001
Ritzwoller, M.H.Ritzwoller, M.H., Shapiro, N.M., Levshin, LeahyCrustal and upper mantle structure beneath Antarctica and surrounding oceansJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 106, No. 12, pp. 30,645-70.AntarcticaTectonics
DS2002-1449
2002
Ritzwoller, M.H.Shapiro, N.M., Ritzwoller, M.H.Monte Carlo inversion for a global shear velocity model of the crust and upper mantleGeophysical Journal International, Vol. 151, 1, pp. 88-105.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200512-0628
2005
Ritzwoller, M.H.Levshin, A.L., Ritzwoller, M.H., Shapiro, N.M.The use of crustal higher modes to constrain crustal structure across Central Asia.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 160, 3, pp. 961-972.Asia, ChinaTectonics
DS200812-1295
2008
Ritzwoller, M.H.Yang, Y., Li, A., Ritzwoller, M.H.Crustal and uppermost mantle structure in southern Africa revealed from ambient noise and teleseismic tomography.Geophysical Journal International, In Press available.Africa, South AfricaGeophysics - seismics
DS200812-1296
2008
Ritzwoller, M.H.Yang, Y., Li, A., Ritzwoller, M.H.Crustal and uppermost mantle structure in southern Africa revealed from ambient noise and teleseismic tomography.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 174, 1, pp. 235-248.Africa, South AfricaGeophysics - seismics
DS200812-1297
2008
Ritzwoller, M.H.Yang, Y., Li, A., Ritzwoller, M.H.Crustal and uppermost mantle structure in southern Africa revealed from ambient noise and teleseismic tomography.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 174, pp. 235-248.Africa, South AfricaTomography
DS200912-0050
2009
Ritzwoller, M.H.Bensen, G.D., Ritzwoller, M.H., Yang, Y.A 3 D shear velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the United States from ambient seismic noise.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 177, 3, pp. 1177-1196.United StatesGeophysics - seismics
DS200912-0835
2008
Ritzwoller, M.H.Yang, Y., Ritzwoller, M.H., Lin, F.C., Moshetti, M.P., Shapiro, N.M.Structure of the upper crust and uppermost mantle beneath the western United States revealed by ambient noise and earthquake tomography.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 113, B12, B12310.United StatesGeophysics - seismics
DS201112-0603
2011
Ritzwoller, M.H.Lin, F-C., Ritzwoller, M.H., Yang, Y., Moschetti, M.P., Fouch, M.J.Complex and variable crustal and uppermost mantle seismic anisotropy in the western United States.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 4, pp. 55-71.MantleTomography
DS201412-0804
2013
Ritzwoller, M.H.Shen, W., Ritzwoller, M.H., Schulte-Pelkum, V.Crustal and uppermost mantle structure in the central U.S. encompassing the Midcontinent Rift.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 118, 8, pp. 4325-4344.MantleGeophysics
DS1997-1285
1997
Riumble, C.H.Yui, T.F., Riumble, C.H., Chen, C.H., Lo, C.H.Stable isotope characteristics of eclogites from the ultra-high pressure metamorphic terrain, China.Chemical Geology, Vol. 137, No. 1-2, May 1, pp. 135-148.China, east centralGeochronology, Eclogites
DS1986-0292
1986
Rivalent, G.Girardi, V.A.V., Rivalent, G., Sinigoli, S.The petrogenesis of the Niquelandia layered basic ultrabasiccomplex, central Goias, BrasilJournal of Petrology, Vol. 27, No. 3, June pp. 715-744BrazilBlank
DS1989-1278
1989
Rivalenti, G.Rivalenti, G., Girardi, V.A.V., Coltorti, M., Correira, C.T.Geochemical models for the petrogenesis of komatiites from the Hidrolina greenstone belt, Central Goias, BrasilJournal of Petrology, Vol. 30, No. 1, pp. 175-197BrazilGreenstone belt, Komatiite
DS1992-1015
1992
Rivalenti, G.Mazzucchelli, M., Rivalenti, G., Vannucci, R., Bottazzi, P.Trace element distribution between clinopyroxene and garnet in gabbroicGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 56, pp. 2371-2385ItalyCrust, Mafic-ultramafic, Garnet, clinopyroxene
DS1995-1183
1995
Rivalenti, G.Mazzucchelli, M., Rivalenti, G.Petrology of the Proterozoic mafic dyke swarms of Uruguay and constraints on their mantle source...Precambrian Research, Vol. 74, No. 3, Aug. 15, pp. 177-UruguayDyke swarms, Magmatism
DS1996-1192
1996
Rivalenti, G.Rivalenti, G., Vannucci, R., Ottolinim L.Peridotite clinopyroxene chemistry reflects mantle processes rather continental versus oceanic settingEarth And Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 139, No. 3-4, April 1, pp. 423-438.MantleGeochemistry, Peridotite
DS1998-1241
1998
Rivalenti, G.Rivalenti, G., Mazzucchelli, M., Teixeira, W.Petrogenesis of the Paleoproterozoic basalt andesite rhyolite dyke association in Carajas regionLithos, Vol. 43, No. 4, Sept. 1, pp. 235-266Peru, ArgentinaAmazonia Craton, Dyke swarm
DS200412-1674
2004
Rivalenti, G.Rivalenti, G., Zanetti, A., Mazzucchelli, M., Vanucci, R., Congolani, C.A.Equivocal carbonatite markers in the mantle xenoliths of the Patagonia backarc: the Gobernador Gregores case ( Santa Cruz ProvinContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 147, 6, pp. 647-670.South America, ArgentinaCarbonatite
DS200512-0907
2004
Rivalenti, G.Rivalenti, G., Mazzucchelli, M., Laurora, A., Ciuffi, S.I.A., Zanetti, A., Vannucci, R., Cingolani, C.A.The backarc mantle lithosphere in Patagonia, South America.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 17, 2, Oct. 30, pp. 121-152.South America, PatagoniaXenoliths, geothermometry, melting, slab, subduction
DS200612-1164
2006
Rivalenti, G.Rivalenti, G., Zanetti, A., Giradri, V.A.V., Mazzucchelli, M., Tassinari, C.G., Bertotto, G.W.The effect of the Fernando de Noronha plume on the mantle lithosphere in north eastern Brazil.Lithos, in press available,South America, BrazilXenoliths, alkali basalts, geochemistry
DS200712-0897
2006
Rivalenti, G.Rivalenti, G., Zanetti, A., Girardi, V.A.V., Mazzucchelli, M., Colombo, C.G., Bertotto, G.W.The effect of the Fernando de Noronha plume on the mantle lithosphere in north eastern Brazil.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, In press availableSouth America, BrazilXenolith - alkali basalt
DS201904-0718
1991
Rivalenti, G.Bossi, J., Campal, N., Civetta, L., Demarchi, G., Girardi, V.V., Mazzucchelli, M., Piccirillo, E.M., Rivalenti, G., Sinigol, S., Teixeira, W., Fragoso-Cesar, A.R.Petrological and geochronological aspects of the Precambrian mafic dyke swarm of Uruguay. IN: Eng. Note Date****BOL.IG-USP, Publ.Esp., Vol. 10, pp. 35-42.South America, Uruguaydykes

Abstract: The subparallel maflc dykes of the Aorida-Durazno-S.José region (SW Uruguay) trend N60-80W and vary in thickness from 0.6 to 50 m. They are part of the mafic dyke swarms intrudlng granitic-gnelssic basement that were mappecl by BOSSI et ai. (1989), In an ares approximately 200 km In length and 100 km in bresdth. Plagioclass, augite, subcalclc augite (plgeonite) and opaques are the maln components of the dykes. Orthopyroxene and oIlvine are very rare. Blotite and homblende are secondary minerais. Quartz-feldspar Intergrowths occur In the coarser gralnecl dykes. The characterlstlc textures are subophitic and intersertal.
DS200812-0963
2008
Rivalta, E.Rivalta, E., Segali, P.Magma compressability and the missing source for some dike intrusions.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 35, 4, pp. L04306.MantleMagmatism
DS201112-0628
2011
Rivalta, E.Maccaferri, F., Bonafede, M., Rivalta, E.A quantitative study of the mechanisms governing dike propogation, dike arrest and sill formation.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, Vol. 208, 1-2, Nov. pp. 39-50.TechnologyGeodynamics of dikes and sills
DS1999-0529
1999
Rivard, B.Pagnelli, F., Rivard, B.Tracking geological structures in the central Alberta foothills, Canada using Radarsat imagery.Thematic Conference Remotes Sensing, 13, 1, p. 109. abstract.AlbertaStructure - fold belt, Brazeau, Ancona
DS200512-0303
2004
Rivard, B.French, J.E., Heaman, L.M., Chacko, T., Rivard, B.Global mafic magmatism and continental breakup at 2.2 Ga: evidence from the Dharwar Craton, India.Geological Society of America Annual Meeting ABSTRACTS, Nov. 7-10, Paper 142-10, Vol. 36, 5, p. 340.IndiaMagmatism
DS201412-0918
2014
Rivard, B.Tappert, M.C., Rivard, B., Layton-Matthews, D., Tappert, R.High-spatial resolution hyper spectral imagery: a new analytical technique for obtaining compositional information from kimberlites ( Snap Lake, NT) and kimberlite indicator minerals.2014 Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 75, abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Snap Lake
DS201508-0377
2015
Rivard, B.Tappert, M.C., Rivard, B., Fulop, A., Rogge, D., Feng, J., Tappert, R., Stalder, R.Characterizing kimberlite dilution by crustal rocks at the Snap Lake diamond mine ( Northwest Territories, Canada) using SWIR ( 1.90-2.36 um) and LWIR ( 8.1-11.1um) hypersprectal imagery collected from drill core.Economic Geology, Vol. 110, 6, Sept-Oct. pp. 1375-1387.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Snap Lake
DS201512-1980
2015
Rivard, B.Turner, D., Rivard, B., Groat, L.Visible to shortwave infrared reflectance spectroscopy of rare earth element minerals.Symposium on critical and strategic materials, British Columbia Geological Survey Paper 2015-3, held Nov. 13-14, pp. 219-230.TechnologyRare earths
DS201605-0889
2016
Rivard, B.Rivard, B.Imaging spectroscopy for kimberlite core characterisation.DCO Edmonton Diamond Workshop, June 8-10TechnologySpectroscopy
DS201512-1918
2015
Rivard, B.A.Feng, J., Tappert, M.C., Rivard, B.A., Fulop, A., Rogge, D., Tappert, R.Acquiring crustal dilution dat a and kimberlite compositional information from drill core using SWIR hyper spectral imagery from the Tango extension kimberlite.43rd Annual Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts, abstract p. 39.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Tango

Abstract: Short-wave infrared (SWIR, 1.90-2.36 µm) hyperspectral imagery collected from 171 meters of drill core from the diamondiferous Tango Extension kimberlite using a high spatial resolution imaging system (pixel size: 1.43 x 1.43 µm) was analyzed to create compositional maps that show the distribution of different crustal (dilution) components and different kimberlite types along the drill core. Three types of crustal dilution components were identified in the compositional maps: carbonate, a carbonate-mudstone mixture, and mudstone. Five spectrally distinct types of kimberlite were identified, which differ mainly in their level of hydration and the amount of crustal micro-dilution they contain. Accompanying the compositional maps are depth profiles that provide quantitative abundance information for each compositional component (dilution and kimberlite). These profiles show the abundance of macro-dilution relative to kimberlite and the spatial distribution of the different kimberlite types. Using depth profiles, compositional boundaries along the length of the drill core were identified and compared to the unit boundaries from the visual lithological log. The boundaries identified using the hyperspectral imagery correlate well with the boundaries recorded during visual logging. This study demonstrates that hyperspectral imagery is well suited to the task of mapping the distribution of spectrally distinct kimberlite types, and quantifying kimberlite micro- and macro-dilution by crustal rocks.
DS201812-2779
2018
Rivard, C.Benard, A., Klimm, K., Woodland, A.B., Arculus, R.J., Wilke, M., Botcharnikov, R.E., Shimizu, N., Nebel, O., Rivard, C., Ionov, D.A.Oxidising agents in sub-arc mantle melts link slab devolatillisation and arc magmas.Nature Communications, Vol. 9, 1, doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-05804-2 11p.Mantlemelting

Abstract: Subduction zone magmas are more oxidised on eruption than those at mid-ocean ridges. This is attributed either to oxidising components, derived from subducted lithosphere (slab) and added to the mantle wedge, or to oxidation processes occurring during magma ascent via differentiation. Here we provide direct evidence for contributions of oxidising slab agents to melts trapped in the sub-arc mantle. Measurements of sulfur (S) valence state in sub-arc mantle peridotites identify sulfate, both as crystalline anhydrite (CaSO4) and dissolved SO42- in spinel-hosted glass (formerly melt) inclusions. Copper-rich sulfide precipitates in the inclusions and increased Fe3+/?Fe in spinel record a S6+Fe2+ redox coupling during melt percolation through the sub-arc mantle. Sulfate-rich glass inclusions exhibit high U/Th, Pb/Ce, Sr/Nd and d34S (+?7 to +?11‰), indicating the involvement of dehydration products of serpentinised slab rocks in their parental melt sources. These observations provide a link between liberated slab components and oxidised arc magmas.
DS1990-1232
1990
Rivard, L.Rivard, L., Turner, A.M., Ryerson, R.A., Vincent, P.Land use mapping with thematic mapper imagery: a Canadian perspectiveGeocarto International, No. 1, 1990, pp. 33-50CanadaRemote Sensing, Thematic mapper -overview
DS1993-0875
1993
Rivard, P.Lamothe, D., Dion, D-J., Choiniere, J., Rivard, P.Localisation d'anomalies magnetiques circulaires entre le 56 et 58 parallel Territoire du Nouveau Quebec.(in French)Quebec Department of Mines, MB 93-62, 23p.QuebecGeophysics -magnetics, Diatremes
DS1994-0124
1994
Rivard, P.Beaumier, M., Rivard, P., Lefebrve, D.Contribution de la geochimie et geophysique a la recherche de diamants longdu rift lac Temiscamingue.Quebec Min. Mines, MB 94-63, 19p.QuebecGeochemistry, geophysics, Guigues kimberlite
DS1994-0975
1994
Rivard, P.Lamothe, D., Dion, D.J., Choiniere, J., Rivard, P.Localisation d'anomalies magnetiques circulaires entre le 56eme et le 58emeparralele-Territoire du Nouveau Quebec. (in French)Quebec Department of Mines, No. MB 93-62, 24p. $ paper copy 6.00QuebecGeophysics -magnetics, Circular anomalies
DS1985-0130
1985
Rivas, P.Cozar, J.S., Rivas, P., Fernandez, M.Hydrothermal alteration characteristics of the kimberlite of the Du toitspan volcanic chimney.(Russian)Bol. del Instituto Gemoloico Espanol *SPA., Vol. 26, pp. 5-24South AfricaPetrology, Analyses
DS1994-0887
1994
Rive, M.Kellett, R.I., Barnes, A.E., Rive, M.The deep structure of the Grenville Front: a new perspective from westernQuebec.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 31, No. 2, Feb. pp. 282-292.QuebecLithoprobe -Grenville, Geophysics -seismics
DS200912-0632
2009
River RanchRiver RanchMujuru's diamond mine stake questioned. Bubye Minerals judegement.River Ranch article, March 14, 2p.Africa, ZimbabweNews item - Bubye Minerals
DS2000-0945
2000
Rivera, L.Taboada, A., Rivera, L., Fuenzalida, A., et al.Geodynamics of the northern Andes: subductions and intracontinental deformation (Colombia).Tectonics, Vol. 19, No. 3, Oct. pp. 787-813.ColombiaTectonics, Subduction - not specific to diamonds
DS200712-0719
2007
Rivera, L.Merrer, S., Cara, M., Rivera, L., Ritsema, J.Upper mantle structure beneath continents: new constraints from multi-mode Rayleigh wave dat a in western North America and southern Africa.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 34, 6, L06309.United States, Africa, South AfricaGeophysics - seismics
DS2002-1345
2002
Rivera, L.A.Ritsema, J., Rivera, L.A., Komatitsch, D., Tromp, J., Van Heijst, H.J.Effects of crust and mantle heterogeneity on PP/P and SS/S amplitude ratiosGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 29,10,May15,pp.72-MantleGeophysics
DS201908-1825
2019
Rivers, M.Wenz, M.D., Jacobsen, S.D., Zhang, D., Regier, M., Bausch, H.J., Dera, P.K., Rivers, M., Eng, P., Shirey, S.B., Pearson, D.G.Fast identification of mineral inclusions in diamond at GSECARS using synchrotron X-ray microtomography, radiography and diffraction.Journal of Synchrotron Radiation, Vol. 26, doi.org/10.1107 /S1600577519006854 6p. PdfMantlediamond inclusions

Abstract: Mineral inclusions in natural diamond are widely studied for the insight that they provide into the geochemistry and dynamics of the Earth's interior. A major challenge in achieving thorough yet high rates of analysis of mineral inclusions in diamond derives from the micrometre-scale of most inclusions, often requiring synchrotron radiation sources for diffraction. Centering microinclusions for diffraction with a highly focused synchrotron beam cannot be achieved optically because of the very high index of refraction of diamond. A fast, high-throughput method for identification of micromineral inclusions in diamond has been developed at the GeoSoilEnviro Center for Advanced Radiation Sources (GSECARS), Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, USA. Diamonds and their inclusions are imaged using synchrotron 3D computed X-ray microtomography on beamline 13-BM-D of GSECARS. The location of every inclusion is then pinpointed onto the coordinate system of the six-circle goniometer of the single-crystal diffractometer on beamline 13-BM-C. Because the bending magnet branch 13-BM is divided and delivered into 13-BM-C and 13-BM-D stations simultaneously, numerous diamonds can be examined during coordinated runs. The fast, high-throughput capability of the methodology is demonstrated by collecting 3D diffraction data on 53 diamond inclusions from Juína, Brazil, within a total of about 72 h of beam time.
DS1990-1233
1990
Rivers, M.L.Rivers, M.L., Dawson, J.B., Smith, J.V.Trace element studies of sulfides from the upper mantleEos, Vol. 71, No. 17, April 24, p. 524 Poster Abstract onlySouth AfricaMonastery, Roberts Victor, Bultfontein, Sulphides
DS1993-1558
1993
Rivers, M.L.Sutton, S.R., Bajt, S., Rivers, M.L., Smith, J.V., Blanchard, D.X-ray microprobe determination of chromium oxidation state in olivine from lunar basalt and kimberlitic diamonds.Proceedings of the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, Vol. 24, pp. 1383-1384.GlobalGeochemistry, Microprobe
DS1996-0346
1996
Rivers, M.L.Dawson, J.B., Steele, I.M., Smith, J.V., Rivers, M.L.Minor and trace element chemistry of carbonates, apatites and magnetites insome African carbonatites.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 60, pp. 415-425.South Africa, AfricaCarbonatite, Geochemistry
DS1989-1279
1989
Rivers, T.Rivers, T., Martignole, J., Gower, C.F., Davidson, A.New tectonic divisions of the Grenville Province southeastCanadianshieldTectonics, Vol. 8, No. 1, February pp. 63-84OntarioOrogeny -Grenville, Tectonics
DS1991-1127
1991
Rivers, T.Mengel, F., Rivers, T.Decompressiong reactions and P=T conditions in high grade rocks, northernLabrador; P-T paths individual samples and implications for early Prot. tectonicevolJournal of Petrology, Vol. 32, No. 1, February pp. 139-168Quebec, Labrador, UngavaMetamorphism, Proterozoic tectonics
DS1991-1128
1991
Rivers, T.Mengel, F., Rivers, T., reynolds, P.Lithotectonic elements and tectonic evolution of Torngat Orogen, SaglekFiord, northern Labrador.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 28, pp. 1407-23.Labrador, Ungava, QuebecCraton, Tectonics
DS1992-0174
1992
Rivers, T.Brown, D., Rivers, T., Calon, T.A structural analysis of a metamorphic fold and thrust belt, northeast Gagnon terrane, Grenville Province.Can, Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 29, pp. 1915-27.Quebec, Labrador, UngavaKnob Lake area, Tectonics - structure
DS1993-1312
1993
Rivers, T.Rivers, T., Van Gool, J.A.M., Connelly, J.N.Contrasting tectonic styles in the northern Grenville province:implications for the dynamics of orogenic frontsGeology, Vol. 21, No. 12, December pp. 1127-1130Labrador, Quebec, Ungava, OntarioTectonics, Geodynamics
DS1995-0345
1995
Rivers, T.Connelly, J.N., Rivers, T., James, D.T.Thermotectonic evolution of the Grenville Province of western LabradorTectonics, Vol. 14, No. 1, February pp. 202-217Labrador, QuebecTectonics, Terranes
DS1995-0346
1995
Rivers, T.Connelly, J.N., Rivers, T., James, D.T.Thermotectonic evolution of the Grenville Province of western LabradorTectonics, Vol; . 14, No. 1, Feb. pp. 202-217.Labrador, Ungava, QuebecTectonics
DS1995-0472
1995
Rivers, T.Eaton, D.W., Hynes, A., Indares, A., Rivers, T.Seismic images of eclogites, crustal scale extension and MOHO relief in the eastern Grenville Province.Geology, Vol. 23, No. 9, Sept. pp. 855-858.OntarioEclogites, Geophysics -seismics
DS1995-0844
1995
Rivers, T.Indares, A., Rivers, T.Textures, metamorphic reactions and thermobarometry of eclogitizedmetagabbros: a Proterozoic example.Eur. Journal of Mineralogy, No. 1, pp. 43-56.GlobalEclogites, metamorphism
DS1998-1621
1998
Rivers, T.Zack, T., Foley, S., Rivers, T.Trace element partitioning between hydrous minerals ( phengite, zoisite, amphibole) and omphacite: hydrationMineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 1679-80.GlobalSubduction, Eclogites
DS2000-0429
2000
Rivers, T.Hynes, A., Indares, A., Rivers, T., Gobeil, A.Lithoprobe line 55: integration of out of plane seismic results with surface structure, metamorphism....Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol.37, No.2-3, Feb.Mar, pp.341-58.QuebecGeochronology, Tectonics - Grenville
DS2000-0822
2000
Rivers, T.Rivers, T., Corrigan, D.Convergent margin on southeastern Laurentia during the Mesoproterozoic: tectonics implications.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol.37, No.2-3, Feb.Mar, pp.359-83.Quebec, OntarioTectonics - Laurentia, Proterozoic
DS2002-1246
2002
Rivers, T.Percival, J.A., Brown, M., Heaman, L., Hynes, A., Rivers, T., Skulski, T.Tectonic and magmatic processes in crustal growth: a pan lithospheric perspectiveGeoscience Canada, Vol. 29, 7, Sept. pp. 121-5.MantleMafic magmatism, accretionary tectonics, collision
DS2002-1247
2002
Rivers, T.Percival, J.A., Brown, M., Heaman, L., Rivers, T., Skulski, T.Tectonic and magmatic processes in crustal growth: a pan-lithoprobe perspectiveGeoscience Canada, Vo. 29, No. 3, September pp. 121-5.Canada, MantleGeophysics - seismics, lithoprobe, rifting, arc, Accretion, collision
DS2002-1346
2002
Rivers, T.Rivers, T., Ketchum, J., Indares, A., Hynes, A.The high pressure belt in the Grenville Province: architecture, timing and exhumationCanadian Journal of Earth Science, Vol.39,5, May, pp.867-93.Quebec, LabradorUHP - eclogite
DS2002-1765
2002
Rivers, T.Zack, T., Foley, S.F., Rivers, T.Equilibrium and disequilibrium trace element partitioning in hydrous eclogites, Trescolmen, Central Alps.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 43, No. 10, Oct.pp. 1947-74.EuropeEclogites - not specific to diamonds
DS2002-1766
2002
Rivers, T.Zack, T., Kronz, A., Foley, S.F., Rivers, T.Trace element abundances in rutiles from eclogites and associated garnet mica schistsChemical Geology, Vol. 184, 1-2, pp. 97-122.AlpsSubduction, Heavy minerals - not specific to diamonds
DS2003-0098
2003
Rivers, T.Bennett, V., Jackson, V., Rivers, T., Tubrett, M., Relf, C.Mapping lower crustal age domains utilizing LAM ICP MS U-Pb dating of inherited31st Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 5. (abst.NunavutGeochronology, Tectonics, SRT
DS200412-0133
2003
Rivers, T.Bennett, V., Jackson, V., Rivers, T., Tubrett, M., Relf, C.Mapping lower crustal age domains utilizing LAM ICP MS U-Pb dating of inherited zircons: a new diamond exploration tool?31st Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 5. (abst.Canada, NunavutGeochronology, Tectonics, SRT
DS200412-1524
2004
Rivers, T.Percival, J.A., Bleeker, W., Cook, E.A., Rivers, T., Ross, G., Van Staal, C.PanLithoprobe Workshop IV: intra orogen correlations and comparative orogenic anatomy.Geoscience Canada, Vol. 31, 1, pp. 23-39.Canada, United StatesTectonics, Precambrian, geochronology, orogens
DS200512-0483
2005
Rivers, T.Johnson, S.P., Rivers, T., De Waele, B.A review of Mesoproterozoic to early Paleozooic magmatic and tectonothermal history of south central Africa: implications for Rodinia and Gondwana.Journal of the Geological Society, Vol. 162, 3, pp. 433-450.Africa, GondwanaMagmatism, geothermometry
DS200612-0121
2006
Rivers, T.Bennett, V., Jackson, V.A., Rivers, T., Relf, C., Horan, P., Tubrett, M.Geology and U Pb geochronology of the Neoarchean Snare River terrane: tracking evolving tectonic regimes and crustal growth mechanisms.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 42, 6, pp. 895-934.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology
DS1990-1234
1990
Rivoirard, J.Rivoirard, J.A review of log normal estimators for in situ reservesMathematical Geology, Vol. 22, No. 2, pp. 213-221GlobalGeostatistics, Lognormal estimators
DS1994-1465
1994
Rivoirard, J.Rivoirard, J.Introduction to disjunctive kriging and non-linear geostatisticsOxford University of Press, 180p. $ 45.00 United StatesGlobalBook -ad, Geostatistics
DS200912-0795
2009
Rivoldini, A.Verhoeven, O., MacQuet, A., Vacher, P., Rivoldini, A., Menvielle, M., Arrial, P.A., Chiblet, G., Tarits,P.Constraints on thermal state and composition of the Earth's lower mantle from electromagnetic impedances and seismic data.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 114, B3, B03302.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS1990-1294
1990
Rix, G.M.Salter, J.D., Downing, B.J., Rix, G.M., Marais, M.G.Development of rock pass level monitors for Finsch diamond mine, SouthAfrica14th. Cmmi Congress Held Edinburgh, Scotland July 2-6, 1990 Institute Of Mining And Metallurgy (imm) Proceedings, pp. 107-111South AfricaMining, Finsch mine
DS1995-1581
1995
Rix, S.Rix, S., Henley, R.Thinking discovery - is your mind trained for successful explorationAustralian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (AusIMM) Bulletin, No. 1, Feb, pp. 76-80AustraliaEconomics, Exploration philosophy -brain power
DS200812-0601
2008
Riznichenko, O.Kozlovskaya, E., Kosarev, G., Aleshin, I., Riznichenko, O., Sanina, I.Structure and composition of the crust and upper mantle of the Archean Proterozoic boundary in the Fennoscandian Shield obtained by joint inversion.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 175, 1, pp. 135-152.Europe, Scandinavia, Sweden, NorwayGeophysics - seismics
DS201312-0746
2013
Rizo, H.Rizo, H., Touboul, M., Carlson, R.W., Boyet, M., Puchtel, I.S., Walker, R.J.Early mantle composition and evolution inferred from 142 ND and 182 W variations in Isua samples.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractMantleMineralogy
DS201606-1110
2016
Rizo, H.Rizo, H., Walker, R.J., Carlson, R.W., Horan, M.F., Mukhopadhyay, S., Manthos, V., Francis, D., Jackson, M.G.Preservation of Earth forming events in the tungsten isotopic composition of modern flood basalts…… ancient rocksScience, Vol. 352, no. 6287, May 13, pp. 809-812.Canada, Nunavut, Baffin IslandGeochronology

Abstract: How much of Earth's compositional variation dates to processes that occurred during planet formation remains an unanswered question. High-precision tungsten isotopic data from rocks from two large igneous provinces, the North Atlantic Igneous Province and the Ontong Java Plateau, reveal preservation to the Phanerozoic of tungsten isotopic heterogeneities in the mantle. These heterogeneities, caused by the decay of hafnium-182 in mantle domains with high hafnium/tungsten ratios, were created during the first ~50 million years of solar system history, indicating that portions of the mantle that formed during Earth’s primary accretionary period have survived to the present
DS201910-2295
2019
Rizo, H.Rizo, H., Abdrault, D., Bennett, N.R., Humayun, M., Brandon, A., Vlastelic, I., Moine, B., Poirier, A., Bouhifd, M.A., Murphy, D.T.182W evidence for core-mantle interaction in the source of mantle plumes.Geochemical Perspectives Letters, Vol. 11, pp. 6-11.Mantlemantle plumes, hotspots

Abstract: Tungsten isotopes are the ideal tracers of core-mantle chemical interaction. Given that W is moderately siderophile, it preferentially partitioned into the Earth’s core during its segregation, leaving the mantle depleted in this element. In contrast, Hf is lithophile, and its short-lived radioactive isotope 182Hf decayed entirely to 182W in the mantle after metal-silicate segregation. Therefore, the 182W isotopic composition of the Earth’s mantle and its core are expected to differ by about 200 ppm. Here, we report new high precision W isotope data for mantle-derived rock samples from the Paleoarchean Pilbara Craton, and the Réunion Island and the Kerguelen Archipelago hotspots. Together with other available data, they reveal a temporal shift in the 182W isotopic composition of the mantle that is best explained by core-mantle chemical interaction. Core-mantle exchange might be facilitated by diffusive isotope exchange at the core-mantle boundary, or the exsolution of W-rich, Si-Mg-Fe oxides from the core into the mantle. Tungsten-182 isotope compositions of mantle-derived magmas are similar from 4.3 to 2.7 Ga and decrease afterwards. This change could be related to the onset of the crystallisation of the inner core or to the initiation of post-Archean deep slab subduction that more efficiently mixed the mantle.
DS202003-0334
2019
Rizo, H.Carlson, R.W., Garcon, M., O'Neil, J., Reimink, J.,Rizo, H.The nature of the Earth's crust.Chemical Geology, Vol. 530, 25p. Available pdfMantleArchean geology

Abstract: Recycling of crust into the mantle has left only small remnants at Earth’s surface of crust produced within a billion years of Earth formation. Few, if any, of these ancient crustal rocks represent the first crust that existed on Earth. Understanding the nature of the source materials of these ancient rocks and the mechanism of their formation has been the target of decades of geological and geochemical study. This traditional approach has been expanded recently through the ability to simultaneously obtain U-Pb age and initial Hf isotope data for zircons from many of these ancient, generally polymetamorphic, rocks. The addition of information from the short-lived radiometric systems 146Sm-142Nd and 182Hf-182W allows resolution of some of the ambiguities that have clouded the conclusions derived from the long-lived systems. The most apparent of these is clear documentation that Earth experienced major chemical differentiation events within the first tens to hundreds of millions of years of its formation, and that Earth’s most ancient crustal rocks were derived from these differentiated sources, not from primitive undifferentiated mantle. Eoarchean rocks from the North Atlantic Craton and the Anshan Complex of the North China Craton have sources in an incompatible-element-depleted mantle that dates to 4.44.5 Ga. Hadean/Eoarchean rocks from two localities in Canada show the importance of remelting of Hadean mafic crust to produce Eoarchean felsic crust. The mafic supracrustal rocks of the Nuvvuagittuq Greenstone Belt are a possible example of the Hadean mafic basement that is often called upon to serve as the source for the high-silica rocks that define continental crust. Many, but not all, ancient terranes show a shift in the nature of the sources for crustal rocks, and possibly the physical mechanism of crust production, between 3.03.6 Ga. This transition may reflect the initiation of modern plate tectonics. Eoarchean/Hadean rocks from some terranes, however, also display compositional characteristics expected for convergent margin volcanism suggesting that at least some convergent margin related magmatism began in the Hadean. The persistence of isotopic variability in 142Nd/144Nd into the mid-Archean, and the eventual reduction in that variability by the end of the Archean, provides new information on the efficiency by which mantle convection recombined the products of Hadean silicate-Earth differentiation. The rate of crust production and recycling in the Hadean/Archean, however, is not resolved by these data beyond the observation that extreme isotopic compositions, such as expected for Hadean evolved, continent-like, crust are not observed in the preserved Eoarchean rock record. The lack of correlation between 142Nd/144Nd and 182W/184W variation in Archean rocks suggests that these two systems track different processes; the Sm-Nd system mantle-crust differentiation while Hf-W is dominated by core formation. The major silicate differentiation controlling Sm/Nd fractionation occurred at ~4.4 Ga, possibly as a result of the Moon-forming impact, after the extinction of 182Hf.
DS200512-0625
2005
RizvanovaLevchenkov, O.A., Gaidamako, I.M., Levskii, L.K., Komarov, Yakovleva, Rizvanova, MakeevU Pb age of zircon from the Mir and 325 Let Yakutii pipes.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 400, 1, pp. 99-101.Russia, YakutiaGeochronology
DS2003-1383
2003
Rizzoto, G.Tohver, E., Mezger, K., Rizzoto, G.Implications of a two stage tectonic history of the SW Amazon Craton, the NovaGeological Society of America, Annual Meeting Nov. 2-5, Abstracts p.301.BrazilTectonics
DS200412-2001
2003
Rizzoto, G.Tohver, E., Mezger, K., Rizzoto, G.Implications of a two stage tectonic history of the SW Amazon Craton, the Nova Brasilandia metamorphic belt as a late MesoproterGeological Society of America, Annual Meeting Nov. 2-5, Abstracts p.301.South America, BrazilTectonics
DS2002-1603
2002
RizzottoTohver, E., Vander Pluijm, Vander Voo, RizzottoPaleogeography of the Amazon Craton at 1.2 Ga: early Grenvillian collision with Llano segment of Laurentia.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.199,1-2,pp.185-200., Vol.199,1-2,pp.185-200.BrazilTectonics, Laurentia
DS2002-1604
2002
RizzottoTohver, E., Vander Pluijm, Vander Voo, RizzottoPaleogeography of the Amazon Craton at 1.2 Ga: early Grenvillian collision with Llano segment of Laurentia.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.199,1-2,pp.185-200., Vol.199,1-2,pp.185-200.BrazilTectonics, Laurentia
DS200512-1092
2004
Rizzotto, G.Tohver, E., Van der Pluijm, B., Mezger, B., Essene, E., Scandolara, J., Rizzotto, G.Significance of the Nova Brasilandia metasedimentary belt in western Brazil: redefining the Mesoproterozoic boundary of the Amazon Craton.Tectonics, Vol. 23, 6, TC 6004 1029/2003 TC001563South America, BrazilCraton - Amazon
DS200612-1432
2006
Rizzotto, G.Tohver, E., Teixeira, W., Van der Pluijum, B., Geraldes, M.C., Bettencourt, J.S., Rizzotto, G.Restored transect across the exhumed Grenville Orogen of Laurentia and Amazonia, with implications for crustal architecture.Geology, Vol. 34, 8, pp. 669-672.South America, BrazilGeochronology, Amazon Craton, tectonics
DS202005-0730
2020
Rjan, S.Fareeduddin., Pant, N.C., Gupta, S., Chakraborty, P., Sensarma, S., Jain, A.K., Prasad, G.V.R., Srivastava, P., Rjan, S., Tiwari, V.M.The geodynamic evolution of the Indian subcontinent - an introduction.Episodes ( IUGS), Vol. 43, 1, pp. 1-18.Indiacarbonatite
DS201312-0511
2013
Rkha, C.Kouyate, D., Soderlund, U., Youbi, N., Ernst, R., Hafid, A., Ikeene, M., Soulaimani, A., Betrand, H., El Janati, M., Rkha, C.U Pb baddeleyite and zircon ages of 2040 Ma, 1650 Ma and 885 Ma on dolerites in the West African Craton ( Anti-Atlas inliers) : possible links to break up of Precambrian supercontinents.Lithos, Vol. 174, pp. 71-84.AfricaGeochronology
Author Index
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
 
 

You can return to the Top of this page


Copyright © 2021 Kaiser Research Online, All Rights Reserved