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SDLRC - Scientific Articles all years by Author - Mo+


The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation
The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation is compiled by Patricia Sheahan who publishes on a monthly basis a list of new scientific articles related to diamonds as well as media coverage and corporate announcementscalled the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service that is distributed as a free pdf to a list of followers. Pat has kindly agreed to allow her work to be made available as an online digital resource at Kaiser Research Online so that a broader community interested in diamonds and related geology can benefit. The references are for personal use information purposes only; when available a link is provided to an online location where the full article can be accessed or purchased directly. Reproduction of this compilation in part or in whole without permission from the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is strictly prohibited. Return to Diamond Resource Center
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Media/Corporate References by Name for all years
A B C D-Diam Diamonds Diamr+ E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Tips for Users
Posted/Published Reference CodesThe SDLRC provides 3 types of references identified in the reference code. DS for scientific article, DM for a media article, and DC for a corporate announcement. Consider DS0512-0001. The DS stands for "diamond scientific". 05 stands for 2005, the year the reference was posted. 12 represents the month the reference was posted. For all years prior to 2015 the default month is 12. -0001 is the reference's identifier and it does not mean anything. The number below the refence code, ie 2015, is the year the article was published. Note that the posted year may sometimes be later than the published year.
Sort OrderReferences are sorted by the "author" name and when the reference was posted to the compilation.
Most RecentIf the reference code is highlighted yellow, the reference was made available through the most recent monthly compilation of new literature. Use this to check out new references. When new references are posted, we make it our priority to track down an online link and obtain an abstract. With regard to older references, tracking down an abstract and an online link is a work in progress.
Link to external location of article: If the title has a link, it means we have found a location online where you can either retrieve the full article free, or purchase access to it. The Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is not a technical article procurement service; if you want a restricted article, you must deal directly with the vendor who controls the copyright to the article.
Searching this page for a specific term or authorIn your Firefox browser click Edit in the menu bar and then Find. In the Find box that shows up at the bottom of the web page enter your search term. Firefox will highlight all occurrences. This is particularly helpful when the author you are seeking was not the lead author by whom the compilation is sorted.
Sending or sharing a referenceThe left column (Posted/Published) has an embedded hyperlink for each reference. In Firefox, if you right click on it, you can obtain the link url for that reference's location within the page, which you can copy and paste into an email or any other document. You can also use the "share this link" option to tweet, facebook etc the link.
Author Index
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years - Mo+
Posted/
Published
AuthorTitleSourceRegionKeywords
DS200912-0347
2009
Mo, W.Jung, H., Mo, W., Green, H.W.Upper mantle seismic anisotropy resulting from pressure induced slip transition in olivine.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 2, 1, pp. 73-77.MantleAnisotropy
DS200512-1225
2003
Mo, X.Yu, X., Mo, X., Liao, Z., Zhao, X., Su, Q.The petrological and mineralogical characteristics of Cenozoic kamafugite and carbonatite association from west Qinling area ( China).Periodico di Mineralogia, (in english), Vol. LXX11, 1. April, pp. 161-179.China, GansuTectonics
DS200612-1601
2006
Mo, X.Zhao, Z., Gautheron, C., Farley, K., Zhang, H., Yu, X., Mo, X.Subcontinental lithospheric mantle origin of the Cenozoic kamafugite in western Qinling, China: evidence from helium isotopes in mantle derived xenoliths.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 16 abstract only.ChinaKamafugite, geochronology
DS200712-0736
2006
Mo, X.Mo, X., Zhao, Z., Deng, J., Flower, M., Yu, X., Luo, Z., Li, Y., Zhou, S., Deng, G., Zhu, D.Petrology and geochemistry of post collisional volcanic rocks from the Tibetan plateau: implications for lithosphere heterogeneity and collision induced mantleGeological Society of America, Special Paper, No. 409, pp. 507-530.AsiaSubduction
DS200812-1300
2008
Mo, X.Yu, X., Zhao, Z., Mo, X., Dong, G.Cenozoic alkaline and carbonatitic magmatism in northeastern Tibetan Plateau: implications for mantle plume.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A1065.Asia, TibetCarbonatite
DS200912-0844
2009
Mo, X.Yu, X., Mo, X., Zhao, Z.Two types of Cenozoic potassic volcanic rocks and carbonatite and their geodynamic implications in western Qinling, NW China.Goldschmidt Conference 2009, p. A1491 Abstract.ChinaCarbonatite
DS201312-0654
2013
Mo, X.Niu, Y.,Zhao, Z., Zhu, D., Mo, X.Continental collision zones are primary sites for net continental crust growth - a testable hypothesis.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 127, pp. 96-110.MantleMelting, magmatism
DS201412-0382
2014
Mo, X.Huang, M-X., Yang, J-J., Powell, R., Mo, X.High pressure metamorphism of serpentinzed chromitite at Luobusha ( southern Tibet).American Journal of Science, Vol. 314, pp. 400-433.Asia, TibetDiamond and coesite
DS201412-0517
2014
Mo, X.Liu, D., Zhao, Z., Zhu, D-C., DePaolo, D.J., Harrison, T.M., Mo, X., Dong, G., Zhou, S., Sun, C., Zhang, Z., Liu, J.Post collisional potassic and ultrapotassic rocks in southern Tibet: mantle and crustal origins in response to India-Asia collision and convergence.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 143, pp. 207-231.Asia, TibetAlkalic
DS200412-0441
2004
Mo, X.X.Deng, J.F., Mo, X.X., Zhao, H.L., Wu, Z.X., Luo, Z.H., Su, S.G.A new model for the dynamic evolution of Chinese lithosphere: continental roots - plume tectonics.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 65, 3-4, pp. 223-275.ChinaGeodynamics, Tarim, Erdos, Yangtze
DS200512-1249
2005
Mo, X.X.Zhang, S.Q., Mahoney, J.J., Mo, X.X., Ghazi, A.M., Milani, L., Crawford, A.J., Guo, T.Y., Zhao, Z.D.Evidence for a Wide spread Tethyan upper mantle with Indian - Ocean type isotopic characteristics.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 46, 4, pp. 829-858.Indian OceanGeochronology
DS1992-0354
1992
Mo XuanxueDeng Jinfu, Zhao Hailing, Lai Shaocong, Molan, E., Lou Zaohua, Mo XuanxueThe mantle plume beneath the northern part of Chin a continentInternational Symposium Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks Deep seated xenoliths China and its, Abstracts pp. 15ChinaMantle, Plume
DS2001-0784
2001
Moan, V.K.Miyazaki, T., Kagami, H., Moan, V.K., Shuto, MorikiyoEvolution of South Indian enriched lithospheric mantle: evidence from YelagAlkaline Magmatism -problems mantle source, pp. 189-203.India, South, Tamil NaduGeochronology
DS1940-0031
1941
Moari, C.Moari, C.Sud Africa Oro Diamanti Negri Viaggio Agli AntipodiTorino: Soc. Edit. International, 334P.South AfricaKimberley, Diamonds, Mining
DS1985-0238
1985
Moats, M.A.Gold, D.P., Deines, P., Ulmer, G.C., Moats, M.A., Weiss, D.Types and Tectonic Settings of Diamond Bearing LamprophyresGeological Association of Canada (GAC)., Vol. 10, P. A21, (abstract.).GlobalReview
DS1985-0459
1985
Moats, M.A.Moats, M.A., Weiss, D.A., Ulmer, G.C.Evaluating the Redox State of Ilmenite Bearing XenolithsEos, Vol. 66, No. 18, APRIL 30TH. P. 393. (abstract.).GlobalExperimental Petrology
DS1985-0689
1985
Moats, M.A.Ulmer, G.C., Moats, M.A., Weiss, D.A.Oxygen Fugacity, Carbon and the Mantle Redox StateEos, Vol. 66, No. 18, APRIL 30TH. P. 393. (abstract.).GlobalExperimental Petrology
DS1985-0718
1985
Moats, M.A.Weiss, D.A., Ulmer, G.C., Buntin, T., Moats, M.A.Fluid Inclusions and 10f Data: Group Ii Composite Nodules from San carlos, Arizona.Eos, Vol. 66, No. 18, APRIL 30TH. P. 392. (abstract.).United States, Arizona, Colorado PlateauBlank
DS1987-0758
1987
Moats, M.A.Ulmer, G.C., Grandstaff, D.E., Weiss, D., Moats, M.A., et al.The mantle redox state: an unfinished story?Mantle metasomatism and alkaline magmatism, edited E. Mullen Morris and, No. 215, pp. 5-24GlobalModel, IOF.
DS1987-0764
1987
Moats, M.A.Virgo, D., Luth, R.W., Moats, M.A., Ulmer, G.C.The redox state of the mantle: evidence from mantle derived ilmenitesGeological Society of America, Vol. 19, No. 7 annual meeting abstracts, p.877. abstracGlobalilmenites
DS1989-1042
1989
Moats, M.A.Moats, M.A., Ulmer, G.C.(CCO) and FMQ) oxygen buffer values for upper mantle conditions:Diamond Workshop, International Geological Congress, July 15-16th. editors, pp. 61-64. AbstractGlobalGeothermometry
DS200812-0758
2008
Moayyed, M.Moayyed, M., Moazzen, M., Calagari, A.A., Jahangiri, A., Modjarrad, M.Geochemistry and petrogenesis of lamprophyric dykes and the associated rocks from Eslamy Peninsula, NW Iran: implications for deep mantle metasomatism.Chemie der Erde, Vol. 68, 2, pp. 141-154.Europe, IranMetasomatism
DS200812-0758
2008
Moazzen, M.Moayyed, M., Moazzen, M., Calagari, A.A., Jahangiri, A., Modjarrad, M.Geochemistry and petrogenesis of lamprophyric dykes and the associated rocks from Eslamy Peninsula, NW Iran: implications for deep mantle metasomatism.Chemie der Erde, Vol. 68, 2, pp. 141-154.Europe, IranMetasomatism
DS201911-2562
2019
Mobley, R.Siegrist, M., Yogodzinski, G., Bizimis, M., Fournelle, J., Churikova, T., Dektor, C., Mobley, R.Fragments of metasomatized forearc: origin and implications of mafic and ultramafic xenoliths from Kharchinsky volcano, Kamchatka.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 20, 9, pp. 4426-4456.Russiaxenoliths

Abstract: This paper presents the results of a study of rare rock fragments (xenoliths) that were transported from the Earth's deep interior to the surface during an eruption of Kharchinsky volcano, Kamchatka. The chemical compositions, mineralogy, and textures of the samples were studied with the goal of understanding the processes that affected rocks, which may play a role in the formation of magmas in the Kamchatka subduction zone. The key process that affected the xenoliths involved the addition of fluids and dissolved elements to the samples at temperatures of 500-700 °C. These fluids are derived from seawater that was transported to 30- to 50-km depths by subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath Kamchatka. Subsequent to the addition of fluid, there was a shift in the position of the Kamchatka-Pacific Plate boundary that led to an increase in temperature and the formation of small quantities of melt that crystallized to a distinctive group of secondary minerals that are present in the samples and that postdate (overprint) the initial effects of fluid addition. The final step in the evolution of the samples was infiltration by an Fe- and Mg-rich magma that crystallized principally amphibole-group minerals.
DS200412-2042
2004
Moboeta, M.S.Van Rensburg, L., Moboeta, M.S., Morgenthal, T.L.Rehabilitation of Co-disposed diamond tailings: growth medium rectification procedures and indigenous grass establishment.Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, Vol. 154, 1-4, May, pp. 101-113. Kluwer Publishing//klTechnologyMining - environmental
DS201312-0725
2013
Mocanu, V.Quoc Cuong, N., Zuchiewicz, W., Hoang, N., Flower, M.F.J., Thong Chi, C., Mocanu, V.Plate assembly, tectonic responses, and magmatism in southeast Eurasia.Journal of Geodynamics, in press availableEurope, AsiaCraton
DS200612-0938
2006
Mocek, B.Mocek, B., Hellebrand, E.REE concentrations of cpx and grt of mantle peridotites: new distribution coefficients from South Africa lherzolites.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 424. abstract only.Africa, South AfricaGeochemistry - REE
DS200712-0737
2007
Mocek, B.Mocek, B., Hellebrand, E., Ionov, D.In situ measurements vs. lattice strain model calculations: distribution of REE between Grt and Cpx in garnet peridotites from Vitim ( Siberia).Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A677.Russia, SiberiaVitim
DS1995-1284
1995
Moch, D.D.Moch, D.D.Update on tax treatiesMining Tax Strategies, Held Feb. 1995, 32pCanadaTaxation, Economics -tax treaties
DS1991-0383
1991
Mochalov, A.G.Dmitrenko, G.G., Mochalov, A.G.The origin of inclusions of hydrous silicates in platinum minerals and chromian spinels from ultramafic rocksDoklady Academy of Sciences, Earth Sci. Section, Vol. 307, No. 1-6, pp. 172-175RussiaMineral chemistry, Silicate inclusions
DS201610-1889
2016
Mochalov, A.G.Mochalov, A.G., Yakubovich, O.V., Bortnikov, N.S.190Pt-4He age of PGE ores in the alkaline ultramafic Kondyor Massif ( Khabarovsk district) Russia.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 469, 2, pp. 846-850.RussiaAlkalic

Abstract: A new 190Pt-4He method for dating isoferroplatinum has been developed at the Institute of Precambrian Geology and Geochronology, Russian Academy of Sciences. Here we publish the first results of dating of isoferroplatinum from the main mineralogical and geochemical types of PGE mineralization in dunite. The obtained 190Pt-4He age of isoferroplatinum is 129 ± 6 Ma. The gained 190Pt-4He age of isoferroplatinum specimens of different genesis (magmatic, fluid-metamorphogenic, and metasomatic) from the Kondyor Massif indicates that the PGM mineralization took place synchronously and successively with evolution of primarily picrite, followed by subalkaline and alkaline melts of the Mesozoic tectonic-magmatic activation of the Aldan Shield.
DS1970-0438
1971
Mochalova, YU.Z.Ukhanov, A.V., Mochalova, YU.Z.High Temperature Emanation Study of Heat-induced Transformations in Enstatite from a Kimberlite Pipe.Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 198, No. 1-6, PP. 157-158.RussiaBlank
DS1990-1573
1990
Mochel, D.W.Wobus, R.A., Mochel, D.W., et al.Geochemistry of high pressureotassium rocks from the mid-Tertiary Guffey volcaniccenter, Thirtynine Mile volcanic field, central ColoradoGeology, Vol. 18, No. 7, July pp. 642-645ColoradoAlkaline rocks, Shoshonite
DS200812-1148
2008
Mochizuki, N.Takahashi, F., Tsunakawa, H., Matsushima, M., Mochizuki, N., Honkura, Y.Effects of thermally homogeneous structure in the lowermost mantle on the geomagnetic field strength.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 272, 3-4, pp. 738-746.MantleGeothermometry
DS200912-0218
2009
Mock, A.Field, M., Gernon, T.M., Mock, A., Walters, A., Sparks, R.S.J., Jerram, D.A.Variations of olivine abundance and grain size in the Snap lake kimberlite intrusion, Northwest Territories, Canada: a possible proxy for diamonds.Lithos, In press available 13p.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Snap Lake
DS200912-0337
2009
Mock, A.Jerram, D.A., Mock, A., Davis, G.R., Field, M., Brown, R.J.3D crystal size distributions: a case study quantifying olivine populations in kimberlites.Lithos, In press - available 30p.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Venetia, Dutoitspan
DS2003-1028
2003
Mock, T.Ohta, M., Mock, T., Ogasawara, Y., Rumble, D.Oxygen, carbon, and strontium isotope geochemistry of diamond bearing carbonateLithos, Vol. 70, 3-4, pp. 77-90.Russia, KazakhstanGeochemistry
DS200412-1460
2003
Mock, T.Ohta, M., Mock, T., Ogasawara, Y., Rumble, D.Oxygen, carbon, and strontium isotope geochemistry of diamond bearing carbonate rocks from Kumdy Kol, Kochetav Massif, KazakhstaLithos, Vol. 70, 3-4, pp. 77-90.Russia, KazakhstanGeochemistry
DS200512-0085
2005
Mock, T.D.Bickford, M.E., Mock, T.D., Collerson, K.D., Lewry, J.F., Steinhart III, W.E.Origin of the Archean Sask Craton and its extent within the Trans-Hudson orogen: evidence Pb Nd isotopic compositions basement rocks, post-orogenic intrusions.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 42, 4, April pp. 659-684.Canada, SaskatchewanGeochronology
DS201704-0653
2017
Mock, T.D.Xia, J., Qin, L., Shen, J., Carlson, R.W., Ionov, D.A., Mock, T.D.Chromium isotope heterogeneity in the mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 464, pp. 103-115.MantleGeochronology

Abstract: To better constrain the Cr isotopic composition of the silicate Earth and to investigate potential Cr isotopic fractionation during high temperature geological processes, we analyzed the Cr isotopic composition of different types of mantle xenoliths from diverse geologic settings: fertile to refractory off-craton spinel and garnet peridotites, pyroxenite veins, metasomatised spinel lherzolites and associated basalts from central Mongolia, spinel lherzolites and harzburgites from North China, as well as cratonic spinel and garnet peridotites from Siberia and southern Africa. The d53CrNIST 979 values of the peridotites range from -0.51±0.04‰-0.51±0.04‰ (2SD) to +0.75±0.05‰+0.75±0.05‰ (2SD). The results show a slight negative correlation between d53Cr and Al2O3 and CaO contents for most mantle peridotites, which may imply Cr isotopic fractionation during partial melting of mantle peridotites. However, highly variable Cr isotopic compositions measured in Mongolian peridotites cannot be caused by partial melting alone. Instead, the wide range in Cr isotopic composition of these samples most likely reflects kinetic fractionation during melt percolation. Chemical diffusion during melt percolation resulted in light Cr isotopes preferably entering into the melt. Two spinel websterite veins from Mongolia have extremely light d53Cr values of -1.36±0.04‰-1.36±0.04‰ and -0.77±0.06‰-0.77±0.06‰, respectively, which are the most negative Cr isotopic compositions yet reported for mantle-derived rocks. These two websterite veins may represent crystallization products from the isotopically light melt that may also metasomatize some peridotites in the area. The d53Cr values of highly altered garnet peridotites from southern Africa vary from -0.35±0.04‰-0.35±0.04‰ (2SD) to +0.12±0.04‰+0.12±0.04‰ (2SD) and increase with increasing LOI (Loss on Ignition), reflecting a shift of d53Cr to more positive values by secondary alteration.
DS201906-1334
2019
Mockel, R.Pereira, L., Birtel, S., Mockel, R., Michaux, B., Silva, A.C.Constraining the economic potential of by-product recovery by using a geometallurgical approach: the example of rare earth element recovery at Catalao 1, Brazil.Economic Geology, Apr. 15. abstractSouth America, Brazildeposit - Catalao 1

Abstract: Geometallurgy aims to develop and deploy predictive spatial models based on tangible and quantitative resource characteristics that are used to optimize the efficiency of minerals beneficiation and extractive metallurgy operations. Whilst most current applications of geometallurgy are focused on the major commodity to be recovered from a mineral deposit, this contribution delineates the opportunity to use a geometallurgical approach to provide an early assessment of the economic potential of by-product recovery from an ongoing mining operation. As a case study for this methodology possible REE-recovery as a by-product of Nb-production at the Catalão I carbonatite complex, the Chapadão mine is used. Catalão I is part of the Alto Paranaíba Igneous Province in the Goias Province of Brazil. Nowadays, niobium is produced in the complex as a by-product of the Chapadão phosphates mine. This production is performed on the Tailings plant, the focus of this study. Rare earth elements, albeit present in significant concentrations, are currently not recovered as by-products. Nine samples from different stages of the Nb beneficiation process in the Tailings plant were taken and characterized by Mineral Liberation Analyzer, X-ray powder diffraction, and bulk rock chemistry. The recovery of rare earth elements in each of the tailing streams was quantified by mass balance. The quantitative mineralogical and microstructural data are used to identify the most suitable approach to recover REE as a by-product-without placing limitations on niobium production. Monazite, the most common rare earth mineral identified in the feed, occurs as Ce-rich and La-rich varieties that can be easily distinguished by SEM-based image analysis. Quartz, FeTi-oxides and several phosphate minerals are the main gangue minerals. The highest rare earth oxide content concentrations (1.75 wt.% TREO) and the greatest potential for REE processing are reported for the final flotation tailings stream. To place tentative economic constraints on REE recovery from the tailings material, an analogy to the Browns Range deposit in Australia is drawn. Its technical flow sheet was used to estimate the cost for a hypothetical REE-production at Chapadão. Parameters derived from SEM-based image analysis were used to model possible monazite recovery and concentrate grades. This exercise illustrates that a marketable REE concentrate could be obtained at Chapadão if the process recovers at least 53 % of the particles with no less than 60% of monazite on their surface. Applying CAPEX and OPEX values similar to that of Browns Range suggest that such an operation would be profitable at current REE prices.
DS201312-0187
2013
Mocquet, A.Dauteuil, O., Deschamps, F., Bourgeois, O., Mocquet, A., Guillocheau, F.Post breakup evolution and paleotopography of the North Namibia margin during the Meso-Cenozoic.Tectonophysics, Vol. 589, pp. 103-115.Africa, NamibiaTectonics
DS1900-0067
1901
Modderman, R.S.T.Modderman, R.S.T.Onstaan Van de Diamanten in Zuid AfrikaAlb. Natuur., PP. 63-66.Africa, South AfricaDiamond Genesis
DS2000-0674
2000
Modeland, S.Modeland, S., Francis, D., Hynes, A.Geochemistry of mafic lavas from the Cape Smith foldbelt: as an eg. Paleoproterozoic Hawaiian hotspot?Geological Association of Canada (GAC)/Mineralogical Association of Canada (MAC) 2000 Conference, 1p. abstract.Quebec, Labrador, UngavaMagmatism, Mobile Belt
DS2002-1069
2002
Modeland, S.Modeland, S., Francis, D.Paleoproterozoic magmatism of central Baffin Island NunuvutGac/mac Annual Meeting, Saskatoon, Abstract Volume, P.76., p.76.Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Baffin IslandPicrites
DS2002-1070
2002
Modeland, S.Modeland, S., Francis, D.Paleoproterozoic magmatism of central Baffin Island NunuvutGac/mac Annual Meeting, Saskatoon, Abstract Volume, P.76., p.76.Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Baffin IslandPicrites
DS2003-0962
2003
Modeland, S.Modeland, S., Francis, D., Hynes, A.Enriched mantle components in Proterozoic continental flood basalts of the Cape SmithLithos, Vol. 71, 1, Nov. pp. 1-17.QuebecAlkaline rocks, Magmatism
DS200412-1342
2003
Modeland, S.Modeland, S., Francis, D., Hynes, A.Enriched mantle components in Proterozoic continental flood basalts of the Cape Smith foldbelt, northern Quebec.Lithos, Vol. 71, 1, Nov. pp. 1-17.Canada, QuebecAlkaline rocks, Magmatism
DS1996-0984
1996
Modenesi-Gauttieri, M.C.Modenesi-Gauttieri, M.C., Toledo, M.C., MottaWeathering and the formation of hill slope deposits in the tropical highlands of ItatiaiaCatena, Vol. 27, No. 2, Aug. 1, pp. 81-104BrazilLaterite, Weathering
DS201212-0645
2012
Moder, C.Shephard, G.E., Bunge, H-P., Schuberth, B.S.A., Muller, R.D., Talsma, A.S., Moder, C., Landgrebe, T.C.W.Testing absolute plate reference frames and the implications for the generation of geodynamic mantle heterogeneity stucture.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 317-318, pp. 204-217.MantleGeodynamics
DS2002-0102
2002
ModisiBarklage, M.E., Atekwana, Hogan, Kampunzu, ModisiInfluence of preexisting structures on the development of an embryonic rift: evidence from the Okavanago Rift16th. International Conference On Basement Tectonics '02, Abstracts, 1p., 1p.Botswana, northwestRift basins
DS2000-0675
2000
Modisi, M.P.Modisi, M.P., Atekwana, E.A., Kampunzu, NgwisanyiRift kinematics during the incipient stages of continental extension: evidence from nascent OkavangoGeology, Vol. 28, No. 10, Oct. pp. 939-42.BotswanaTectonics - Rift basin
DS2003-0687
2003
Modisi, M.P.Kampunzu, A.B., Tombale, A.R., Zhai, M., Bagai, Z., Majaule, T., Modisi, M.P.Major and trace element geochemistry of plutonic rocks from Francistown, NELithos, Vol. 71, 2-4, pp. 431-460.ZimbabweTectonics
DS200412-0949
2003
Modisi, M.P.Kampunzu, A.B., Tombale, A.R., Zhai, M., Bagai, Z., Majaule, T., Modisi, M.P.Major and trace element geochemistry of plutonic rocks from Francistown, NE Botswana: evidence for a Neoarchean continental actiLithos, Vol. 71, 2-4, pp. 431-460.Africa, ZimbabweTectonics
DS200612-1586
2006
Modisi, M.P.Zhai, M., Kampunzu, A.B., Modisi, M.P., Bagai, Z.Sr and Nd isotope systematics of Francistown plutonic rocks, Botswana: implications for Neoarchean crustal evolution of the Zimbabwe craton.International Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 95. 3. pp. 355-369.Africa, Botswana, ZimbabweGeochronology
DS200612-1587
2006
Modisi, M.P.Zhai, M., Kampunzu, A.B., Modisi, M.P., Bagai, Z.Sr and Nd isotope systematics of Francistown plutonic rocks, Botswana: implications for Neoarchean crustal evolution of the Zimbabwe craton.International Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 95, 3, June pp. 355-369.Africa, Botswana, ZimbabweGeochronology - craton
DS200812-0758
2008
Modjarrad, M.Moayyed, M., Moazzen, M., Calagari, A.A., Jahangiri, A., Modjarrad, M.Geochemistry and petrogenesis of lamprophyric dykes and the associated rocks from Eslamy Peninsula, NW Iran: implications for deep mantle metasomatism.Chemie der Erde, Vol. 68, 2, pp. 141-154.Europe, IranMetasomatism
DS1986-0578
1986
Modreski, P.J.Modreski, P.J.A comparison of the mineralogy of Point of Rocks Mesa, New Mexico with that of Mont. St. Hilaire Quebec and Ilimaussaq Greenland and the Kolapeninsula, USSNew Mexico Geology, Vol. 8, No. 2, May p. 42. extened abstractQuebec, New Mexico, RussiaAlkaline rocks
DS1987-0115
1987
Modreski, P.J.Collins, D.S., Modreski, P.J.Chrome pyrope from the Sloan diatreme, Colorado, showing colour change with thickness and type of illuminationGeological Society of America, Vol. 19, No. 3, p. abstractColoradoUSA, Mineralogy
DS1990-1017
1990
Modreski, P.J.McLemore, V.T., Modreski, P.J.Mineralogy and geochemistry of altered rocks associated with Lemitarcarbonatites, central New Mexico, United States (US)Lithos, Special Issue, Vol. 25, No. 4, pp. 99-114New MexicoGeochemistry, Carbonatite
DS1991-1112
1991
Modreski, P.J.McLemore, V.T., Modreski, P.J.Mineralogy and geochemistry of the Lemitar carbonatites and associated altered rocks Socorro County, New MexicoGeological Society of America Abstracts, Rocky Mtn Section, South-Central, Vol. 23, No. 4, April, p. 48. AbstractNew MexicoCarbonatite, Geochemistry
DS1991-1147
1991
Modreski, P.J.Michalski, C., Modreski, P.J.Descriptive model of diamond bearing kimberlite pipesUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open file, Some industrial mineral deposit models, descripive, United States Geological Survey (USGS) OF 91-0011A 73p. $ 11.75 Diamonds pp. 1-4GlobalDiamond -model, Very brief and general
DS1994-1223
1994
Modreski, P.J.Modreski, P.J., Armbrustmacher, T.J., Ryka, W.Mineralogy of magmatic and metasomatic rocks of the Elk Massif, northeastPoland.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstract Volume, Vol. 19, p.GlobalMineralogy, Elk Massif
DS201705-0858
2017
Moe, K.Moe, K., Yang, J-S., Johnson, P., Wang, W.Spectroscopic analysis of microdiamonds in ophiolitic chromitite and peridotite.Lithosphere, 9p.Asia, Tibet, Russia, UralsMicrodiamonds

Abstract: Microdiamonds ~200 µm in size, occurring in ophiolitic chromitites and peridotites, have been reported in recent years. Owing to their unusual geological formation, there are several debates about their origin. We studied 30 microdiamonds from 3 sources: (1) chromitite ore in Luobusa, Tibet; (2) peridotite in Luobusa, Tibet; and (3) chromitite ore in Ray-Iz, polar Ural Mountains, Russia. They are translucent, yellow to greenish-yellow diamonds with a cubo-octahedral polycrystalline or single crystal with partial cubo-octahedral form. Infrared (IR) spectra revealed that these diamonds are type Ib (i.e., diamonds containing neutrally charged single substitutional nitrogen atoms, Ns0, known as the C center) with unknown broad bands observed in the one-phonon region. They contain fluid inclusions, such as water, carbonates, silicates, hydrocarbons, and solid CO2. We also identified additional microinclusions, such as chromite, magnetite, feldspar (albite), moissanite, hematite, and magnesiochromite, using a Raman microscope. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra measured at liquid nitrogen temperature suggest that these diamonds contain nitrogen-vacancy, nickel, and H2 center defects. We compare them with high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) synthetic industrial diamond grits. Although there are similarities between microdiamonds and HPHT synthetic diamonds, major differences in the IR, Raman, and PL spectra confirm that these microdiamonds are of natural origin. Spectral characteristics suggest that their geological formation is different but unique compared to that of natural gem-quality diamonds. Although these microdiamonds are not commercially important, they are geologically important in that they provide an understanding of a new diamond genesis.
DS201809-2118
2018
Moe, K.Zaitsev, A.M., Moe, K., Wang, W.Defect transformations in nitrogen doped CVD diamond during irradiation and annealing.Diamond and Related Materials, doi:101016/j.diamond.2018.07.017Russiasynthetics

Abstract: Nitrogen-doped CVD diamond treated with electron irradiation and subsequent annealing at temperatures from 860 to 1900?°C was studied using fluorescence imaging, optical absorption and photoluminescence. It was found that nitrogen impurity produces many optical centers active throughout the infrared and visible spectral ranges. The most prominent of them active in IR spectral range are the centers related to nitrogen-hydrogen complexes. They produce absorption lines at 2827, 2874, 2906, 2949, 2990, 3031, 3107, 3123 and 3310?cm-1. Two characteristic absorptions at wavenumbers 1293?cm-1 and 1341?cm-1 were tentatively ascribed to a modified form of nitrogen A-aggregates. In the visible and near IR spectral ranges, characteristic nitrogen-related centers have zero-phonon lines (ZPLs) at 457, 462, 489, 498, 722.5, 852.5, 865.5, 868.5, 908, 921.5 and 924.5?nm. Some of them, e.g. 457, 462 and 498?nm centers, are unique of CVD diamond. It has been confirmed that the brightest pink color of electron-irradiated nitrogen-doped CVD diamond is produced by annealing at temperatures about 1000?°C. Annealing at temperatures over 1600?°C destroys the irradiation-induced pink color. It was found that the center 489?nm is a major absorption feature in the visible spectral range of electron-irradiated, nitrogen-doped CVD diamond. Green color of electron-irradiated, nitrogen-doped CVD diamond is caused by combined absorption of GR1 center and 489?nm center. It has been confirmed that NV defects produced in CVD diamond during growth are very temperature stable. They survive heating at temperatures at least 2000?°C. In contrast, NV defects produced by irradiation may anneal out at temperatures as low as 1600?°C. This much lower thermal stability of the radiation-induced NV defects is the result of their interaction with other radiation defects produced in their vicinity. A conclusion has been made that in nitrogen-doped CVD diamonds nitrogen atoms may form clusters. These clusters are probably the origin of the broad band luminescence at wavelengths 360, 390, 535 and 720?nm and a strong broadening of ZPLs of many optical centers.
DS202003-0372
2020
Moe, K.Yang, J., Simakov, S.K., Moe, K., Scribano, V., Lian, D., Wu, W.Comment on the Comparison of enigmatic diamonds from Tolbachik arc volcano ( Litasov 2019) also Litasov responseGondwana Research, in press availableRussiaKamchatka
DS200712-0738
2007
Moe, K.S.Moe, K.S., Johnson, P., Jang-Green, H.Translucent greenish yellow diamonds.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 43, 1, pp. 50-53.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201212-0761
2012
Moe, K.S.Wang, W., D'Haenens-Johansson, U.F.S., Johnson, P., Moe, K.S., Emerson, E., Newton, M., Moses, T.M.CVD synthetic diamonds from Gemesis Corp.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 48, 2, summer pp. 80-97.TechnologyGemesis
DS201510-1774
2015
Moe, K.S.Johnson, P., Moe, K.S., D'Haenens-Johansson, U., Rzhevskii, A.Discovery and distrbution of the [SI-V] defect in HPHT-grown gem quality diamonds.GSA Annual Meeting, Paper 300-12, 1p. Abstract only BoothTechnologySynthetic diamonds

Abstract: Defect of [Si-V]- is common in CVD synthetic diamonds, and its occurrence was also reported in some rare natural diamonds (Breeding and Wang, 2008). It is an important feature employed for gem diamond identification, and also has great potential for applications in industry. However little is known about how the silicon impurity gets into diamond lattice either in synthetic or natural diamonds. In this study, we discovered the occurrence of [Si-V]- in HPHT synthetic diamonds and the correlation between its precipitation and diamond growth sectors was successfully determined. Total 20 samples, HPHT grown diamond wafers from NDT (New Diamond Technology) were studied in addition to one type IIb HPHT synthetic diamond submitted to GIA Laboratory for grading. Distributions of defects in these samples were carefully mapped using infrared microscopy at room temperature and an imaging Raman microscope at liquid nitrogen temperature. Defect of [Si-V]- has doublet emissions at 736.6/736.9 nm (Clark et al., 1995), and can be effectively excited using 633 nm laser. Analyses were conducted at Liquid Nitrogen temperature as the detection of the Si related emissions peak is temperature dependent (Feng and Schwartz 1993). Additionally, the solvent catalysts used in the HPHT methods to grow synthetic diamond either intentionally or unintentionally contain nickel in varying quantities. Nickel impurity creates optical centers which emit a doublet peak at 882.6/884.3nm, and can be easily excited using 780 nm laser. The [SiV]- is clearly observed in only certain growth sectors of the synthetic crystal and the distribution is not homogeneous. By comparing the two acquired maps one acquired at 633nm excitation showing the [Si-V]- distribution and one acquired with 780nm excitation showing the nickel defect distribution, it was found that the [Si-V]- is confined to the same growth sector as Ni related defect with higher concentrations/intensity at the edges of these sectors. Since it is well known that the Ni defect is confined exclusively to the octahedral growth sectors {111} of diamond (Lawson et al., 1993), this study for the first time confirmed that [Si-V]- is confined to the {111} octahedral growth sectors. This new discovery leads to discussion as to the incorporation of silicon in diamond and the relationship to other impurities.
DS201510-1789
2015
Moe, K.S.Moe, K.S., Yang, J-S, Johnson, P., Xu, X., Wang, W.Microdiamonds in chromitite and peridotite. Type 1aB and 1bGSA Annual Meeting, Paper 300-5, 1p. Abstract only BoothRussiaSpectroscopy
DS201512-1910
2015
Moe, K.S.D'Haenens-Johansson, U.F.S., Katrusha, A., Moe, K.S., Johnson, P., Wang, W.Large colorless HPHT synthetic diamonds from new diamond technology. Using spectroscopic and gemological analysis.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 51, 3, pp. 260-79.TechnologySynthetics

Abstract: The Russian company New Diamond Technology is producing colorless and near-colorless HPHT-grown synthetic diamonds for the gem trade. Forty-four faceted samples synthesized using modified cubic presses were analyzed using a combination of spectroscopic and gemological techniques to characterize the quality of the material and determine the means of distinguishing them from natural, treated, and alternative laboratory-grown diamonds. These samples, with weights ranging from 0.20 to 5.11 ct, had color grades from D to K and clarity grades from IF to I2. Importantly, 89% were classified as colorless (D-F), demonstrating that HPHT growth methods can be used to routinely achieve these color grades. Infrared absorption analysis showed that all were either type IIa or weak type IIb, and photoluminescence spectroscopy revealed that they contained Ni-, Si-, or N-related defects. Their fluorescence and phosphorescence behavior was investigated using ultraviolet excitation from a long-wave/short-wave UV lamp, a DiamondView instrument, and a phosphorescence spectrometer. Key features that reveal the samples’ HPHT synthetic origin are described.
DS201603-0374
2016
Moe, K.S.Eaton-Magana, S.C., Moe, K.S.Temperature effects on radiation stains in natural diamonds.Diamond and Related Materials, in press available 29p.TechnologyGreen diamonds

Abstract: The green coloration of natural diamonds typically results from exposure to natural irradiation. This creates the GR1 optical center and in many diamonds, surficial damage, principally due to alpha radiation, which helps verify natural origin. In this study, 13 naturally irradiated diamonds with pronounced radiation stains were stepwise annealed from 200 °C to 1400 °C and the changes in color and defects were documented by photomicrography and spectroscopy. Additionally 3 diamonds were subjected to isothermal annealing at 550 °C. The radiation stains correlated with radiation-damage Raman peaks — a broad and shifted diamond Raman peak and radiation-related peaks at 1500 and 1640 cm- 1. The color transitioned from green to brown after heating to 550-600 °C and the stains were essentially decolorized at 1400 °C. Confocal Raman depth profiling showed that the depth penetration of the radiation stain was about 10-15 µm into the diamond and this depth profile was distinctly different from depth profiles of ion-irradiation stains generated in a laboratory.
DS201608-1414
2016
Moe, K.S.Johnson, P., Moe, K.S., Zaitsev, A.M.Treated hydrogen rich diamonds.GSA Annual Meeting, Abstract, Poster 1p.TechnologyBlack diamond

Abstract: Black diamonds with poor transparency due to an intensity of mineral inclusions and fractures are routinely traded in the gem market today. Although the inclusions and fractures are of natural origin this type of diamond is often heated to create a more uniform black color by further graphitizing these inclusions and fractures. Graphitization is often prominent at these fractures resulting in poor quality heavily fractured material. After nitrogen hydrogen is the most common impurity in natural diamond and is often responsible for a gem quality diamonds color. Color in diamond related or attributed to the hydrogen impurity can range from brown to green and gray. These colors are often undesirable to the gem trade and consumers. Recently GIA laboratories have seen a lot of faceted “Black” diamonds (graded as Fancy Black on GIA’s color scale) for identification. These diamonds are hydrogen rich and it is suspected that this material is treated (heated). Probably unattractive grayish green brown material that is virtually worthless in the gem trade before treatment. With such large quantities of this treated material available a serious threat and identification problem is posed to the Gem Diamond industry. Three faceted round cut hydrogen rich diamonds (0.30, 0.52 and 0.58 carats) colored by dense hydrogen clouds giving them a murky grayish appearance have been documented and systematically heated. A black color identical to that of the suspected treated black diamonds has been achieved, thus confirming this coloration treatment and new identification techniques to detect it. These treated black diamonds have a uniform color and lack the heavy fracturing and surface graphitization of typical treated black diamonds. Heating conditions and techniques will be discussed and we report on this new type of material and gem stone treatment.
DS201812-2829
2018
Moe, K.S.Kazuchits, N.M., Rusetsky, M.S., Kazuchits, V.N., Korolovic, O.V., Kumar, V., Moe, K.S., Wang, W., Zaitsev, A.M. Comparison of HPHT and LPHT annealing of Ib synthetic diamond.Diamond & Related Materials, doi.1016/j.diamond.2018.11.018 30p. Russiasynthetics

Abstract: Defect transformations in type Ib synthetic diamond annealed at a temperature of 1870?°C under stabilizing pressure (HPHT annealing) and in hydrogen atmosphere at normal pressure (LPHT annealing) are compared. Spectroscopic data obtained on the samples before and after annealing prove that the processes of nitrogen aggregation and formation of nitrogen-nickel complexes are similar in both cases. Essential differences between HPHT and LPHT annealing are stronger graphitization at macroscopic imperfections and enhanced lattice distortions around point defects in the latter case. The lattice distortion around point defects is revealed as a considerable broadening of zero-phonon lines of “soft” (vacancy-related) optical centers. It was found that LPHT annealing may enhance overall intensity of luminescence of HPHT-grown synthetic diamonds.
DS201901-0048
2018
Moe, K.S.Moe, K.S., Johnson, P.Type Ib- dominant mixed type diamond with cuboctahedral growth structure: a rare diamond formation.Gems & Gemology, Sixth International Gemological Symposium Vol. 54, 3, 1p. Abstract p. 307-8.Globaldiamond morphology

Abstract: Type Ib-dominant mixed-type diamonds (Ib-IaA) can be formed by multiple growth events (Titkov et al., 2015; Smit et al., 2018). In this study, we report on a 0.41 ct Fancy Dark brown gem - quality diamond that formed in a single growth event. It is a type Ib-IaA with a C defect (single-substitutional nitrogen atom) concentration up to 21 ppm. The Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) peaks of the H1a and H1b defects (figure 1, left) suggest that this diamond was irradiated and annealed to achieve a Fancy color grade. The cuboctahedral structure can be observed in the DiamondView images (figure 1, right), which show reddish orange submitted to GIA for screening, we found that more than 70% of them contained a typical mineral assemblage from the sublithosphere. Jeffbenite (TAPP), majorite garnet, enstatite, and ferropericlase have been observed, which could be retrograde products of former bridgmanite. CaSiO3-walstromite with larnite and titanite is the dominant phase present in approximately 40% of all diamond samples. Direct evidence from oxygen isotope ratios measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, or SIMS, (d18OVSMOWin the range +10.7 to +12.5‰) of CaSiO3-walstromite with coexisting larnite and titanite that retrograde from CaSiO3-perovskite suggest that hydrothermally altered oceanic basalt can subduct to depths of >410 km in the transition zone. Incorporation of materials from subducted altered oceanic crust into the deep mantle produced diamond inclusions that have both lower mantle and subduction signatures. Ca(Si,Al)O3-perovskite was observed with a high concentration of rare earth elements (>5 wt.%) that could be enriched under P-Tconditions in the lower mantle. Evidence from ringwoodite with a hydroxide bond, coexisting tuite and apatite, precipitates of an NH3phase, and cohenite with trace amounts of Cl imply that the subducted brines can potentially introduce hydrous fluid to the bottom of the transition zone. In the diamonds with subducted materials, the increasing carbon isotope ratio from the core to the rim region detected by SIMS (d13C from -5.5‰ to -4‰) suggests that an oxidized carbonate-dominated fluid was associated with recycling of the subducted hydrous material. The deep subduction played an important role in balancing redox exchange with the reduced lower mantle indicated by precipitated iron nanoparticles and coexisting hydrocarbons and carbonate phases.
DS201901-0094
2018
Moe, K.S.Zaitsev, A.M., Moe, K.S., Wang, W.Nitrogen in CVD-grown diamond.Gems & Gemology, Sixth International Gemological Symposium Vol. 54, 3, 1p. Abstract p. 304-5.Globalsynthetics

Abstract: In diamond grown by the CVD method, nitrogen behaves differently than it does in natural and HPHT-grown diamond. The most striking peculiarities are low efficiency of doping, formation of unique optical centers over a wide spectral range from the ultraviolet (UV) to the IR regions, and formation of unusual defects related to aggregated nitrogen. In order to gain a better insight into this problem, several nitrogen-doped specimens grown in GIA’s CVD diamond lab and a few commercial yellow CVD-grown diamonds have been studied in their as-grown (asreceived) state and after electron irradiation and annealing at temperatures up to 1900°C (low-pressure, high-temperature treatment). We found that the brightest pink color of electron-irradiated nitrogen-doped CVD-grown diamond is produced by the NV– center after annealing at temperatures of about 1000°C. Annealing at temperatures over 1600°C destroys the irradiation-induced pink color (figure 1). The most prominent optical centers in the IR spectral region (figure 2, left) produced absorptions at 2828, 2874, 2906, 2949, 3031, 3107, 3123, and 3310 cm–1 (latter two not shown). These are ascribed to nitrogen-hydrogen complexes. Two characteristic absorption features at 1293 and 1341 cm–1 (figure 2, right) are unique to CVD diamond. They are tentatively ascribed to a modified form of nitrogen A-aggregates. In the visible and NIR spectral ranges, characteristic nitrogenrelated centers have zero-phonon lines (ZPLs) at 457, 462, 489, 498, 647, 722.5, 852.5, 865.5, 868.5, 908, 921.5, and 924.5 nm. The 489 nm feature is a major color center of electron-irradiated, nitrogen-doped CVD-grown diamond. This center, together with the GR1 center, is responsible for the green color in this material. An assumption is made that N atoms may form clusters in highly nitrogen-doped CVD-grown diamonds. These clusters may result in broad-band luminescence at wavelengths of 360, 390, 535, and 720 nm and a strong broadening of the ZPLs of many optical centers
DS202006-0961
2020
Moe, K.S.Zaitsev, A.M., Kazuchits, N.M., Kazuchits, V.N., Moe, K.S., Rusetsky, M.S., Korolik, O.V., Kitajima, K., Butler, J.E., Wang, W.Nitrogen-doped CVD diamond: nitrogen concentration, color and internal stress.Diamonds & Related Materials, Vol. 105, 13p. pdfMantlenitrogen

Abstract: Single crystal CVD diamond has been grown on (100)-oriented CVD diamond seed in six layers to a total thickness of 4.3 mm, each layer being grown in gas with increasing concentration of nitrogen. The nitrogen doping efficiency, distribution of color and internal stress have been studied by SIMS, optical absorption, Raman spectroscopy and birefringence imaging. It is shown that nitrogen doping is very non-uniform. This non-uniformity is explained by the terraced growth of CVD diamond. The color of the nitrogen-doped diamond is grayish-brown with color intensity gradually increasing with nitrogen concentration. The absorption spectra are analyzed in terms of two continua representing brown and gray color components. The brown absorption continuum exponentially rises towards short wavelength. Its intensity correlates with the concentration of nitrogen C-defects. Small vacancy clusters are discussed as the defects responsible for the brown absorption continuum. The gray absorption continuum has weak and almost linear spectral dependence through the near infrared and visible spectral range. It is ascribed to carbon nanoclusters which may form in plasma and get trapped into growing diamond. It is suggested that Mie light scattering on the carbon nanoclusters substantially contributes to the gray absorption continuum and determines its weak spectral dependence. A Raman line at a wavenumber of 1550 cm-1 is described as a characteristic feature of the carbon nanoclusters. The striation pattern of brown/gray color follows the pattern of anomalous birefringence suggesting that the vacancy clusters and carbon inclusions are the main cause of internal stress in CVD diamond. A conclusion is made that high perfection of seed surface at microscale is not a required condition for growth of low-stress, low-inclusion single crystal CVD diamond. Crystallographic order at macroscale is more important requirement for the seed surface.
DS1994-1224
1994
Moecher, D.P.Moecher, D.P., Valley, J.W., Essene, E.J.Extraction and carbon isotope analysis of CO2 from scapolite in deep crustal granulites and xenoliths.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 58, No. 2, January pp. 1031-1042.GlobalGeochronology, Xenoliths
DS1997-0494
1997
Moecher, D.P.Haynes, E., Moecher, D.P.A calcite biotite serpentine perovskite xenolith from Elliott County, Kykimberlite: sample of primary melt.Geological Society of America (GSA) Abstracts, Vol. 29, No. 3, March 27-28, p. 22-3.KentuckyKimberlite, Deposit - Elliott County
DS1997-0806
1997
Moecher, D.P.Moecher, D.P., Anderson, E.D., Cook, C.A., Mezger, K.The petrogenesis of metamorphosed carbonatites in the Grenville Province, Ontario.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 34, No. 9, Sept. pp. 1185-1201.OntarioCarbonatite, Central Metasedimentary Belt zone
DS1997-0807
1997
Moecher, D.P.Moecher, D.P., Anderson, E.D., Cook, C.A., Mezger, K.Petrogenesis of Grenville carbonatitesGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstracts, OntarioCarbonatite, Petrology
DS1998-1026
1998
Moecher, D.P.Moecher, D.P., Haynes, E.A., Anderson, E.D., Cook, C.A.Petrogenesis of metamorphosed Grenville carbonatites, OntarioGeological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting, abstract. only, p.A26.OntarioPetrology, Carbonatite - genesis
DS200712-0018
2007
Moecher, D.P.Anderson, E.D., Moecher, D.P.Omphacite breakdown reactions and relation to eclogite exhumation rates.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 154, 3m pp. 253-277.MantleEclogite
DS201012-0319
2010
Moeen, S.Jafri, S.S.H., Moeen, S., Dayal, A.M., Narayana, B.L.High silica lamproite dykes from Schirmacher Oasis, Queen Maud Land, Antarctica.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractAntarcticaLamproite
DS1994-1225
1994
Moellenberg, D.L.Moellenberg, D.L.A comparison of reclamation requirements and costs under State and Federal hard rock mine reclamation lawsAmerican Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME) Preprint, Meeting held Albuquerque Feb. 14-17th, No. 94-219, 11pUnited StatesLegal environmental, Reclamation laws
DS1950-0188
1954
MoellerMoeller, DE LADDERSOUS, A.Le Diamant Au Congo BelgeBanque Centrale Du Congo Belge Bulletin., 3RD. ANNEE, No. 3, MARCH 22P.Democratic Republic of Congo, Central AfricaDiamond Mining
DS201612-2319
2016
Moemise, N.Mahlangu, T., Moemise, N., Ramakokovhu, M.M., Olubambi, P.A., Shongwe, M.B.Seperation of kimberlite from waste rocks using sensor-based sorting at Culli nan diamond mine.Journal of South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 116, Apr. pp. 343-348.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Cullinan

Abstract: Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy sorting technology is incorporated in an automated optical mineral sorter that can discriminate between materials using the differences in characteristics when exposed to near-infrared radiation. During September 2014 to April 2015, a pilot plant that utilized NIR technology to discriminate between kimberlite and waste materials was commissioned to determine the viability of including this technology in the diamond winning process flow sheet at Cullinan Diamond Mine. The plant was used to minimize the waste content in the size fraction -70+35 mm that reports to the crushing section and then to the dense media separation process. This paper describes the initial test work, conducted at Mintek, that led to the decision to conduct a pilot-scale study. The mineralogical characterization of the feed and product streams to establish the sorting criteria and the operational data obtained during the pilot plant campaign are described. The results indicated a good possibility of discriminating between the kimberlite and waste material using NIR technology. However, the consistency of discrimination was not good enough to avoid the risk of potential diamond loss. Furthermore, a lower than expected availability of the machine reduced the throughput capabilities.
DS201709-2028
2016
Moemise, N.Mahlangau, T., Moemise, N., Ramakokovhu, M.M., Olubambi, P.A., Shongwe, M.B.Separation of kimberlite from waste rocks using sensor based sorting at Culli nan diamond mine.South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 116, 4, pp. 343-350.Africa, South Africadeposit - Cullinan

Abstract: Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy sorting technology is incorporated in an automated optical mineral sorter that can discriminate between materials using the differences in characteristics when exposed to near-infrared radiation. During September 2014 to April 2015, a pilot plant that utilized NIR technology to discriminate between kimberlite and waste materials was commissioned to determine the viability of including this technology in the diamond winning process flow sheet at Cullinan Diamond Mine. The plant was used to minimize the waste content in the size fraction -70+35 mm that reports to the crushing section and then to the dense media separation process. This paper describes the initial test work, conducted at Mintek, that led to the decision to conduct a pilot-scale study. The mineralogical characterization of the feed and product streams to establish the sorting criteria and the operational data obtained during the pilot plant campaign are described. The results indicated a good possibility of discriminating between the kimberlite and waste material using NIR technology. However, the consistency of discrimination was not good enough to avoid the risk of potential diamond loss. Furthermore, a lower than expected availability of the machine reduced the throughput capabilities.
DS1989-1043
1989
Moen, H.F.G.Moen, H.F.G.A petrographical study of Bushveld type rocks from boreholes on the Moloto geophysical anomaly northeast of PretoriaSouth African Journal of Geology, Vol. 92, No. 2, pp. 84-94. Database # 18234South AfricaBushveld, Geophysics
DS1995-2019
1995
Moen, H.F.G.Walraven, F., Retief, E.A., Moen, H.F.G.Single zircon lead evaporation evidence for 2.77 Ga magmatism in northwesternTransvaal, South AfricaSouth Afri. Journal of Geology, Vol. 97, No. 2, pp. 107-113South AfricaGeochronology, Makoppa Dome
DS200512-1094
2005
Moens, L.Tomlinson, E., De Schrijver, I., De Corte, K., Jones, A.P., Moens, L., Vanhaecke, F.Trace element compositions of submicroscopic inclusions in coated diamond: a tool for understanding diamond petrogenesis.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 69, 19, Oct. 1, pp. 4719-4732.Africa, Democratic Republic of CongoSilicate melt inclusions, Group 1, diamond inclusions
DS200912-0280
2009
Moersch, J.Hardgrove, C., Moersch, J., Whisner, S.Thermal imaging of alluvial fans: a new technique for remote classification of sedimentary features.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 285, pp. 124-130.TechnologyGeothermometry - not specific to diamonds
DS202007-1163
2019
Moeshram, T.Meshram, R.R., Dora, M.L., Naik, R., Shareef, M., Gopalakrishna, G., Moeshram, T., Baswani, S.R., Randive, K.R.A new find of calc-alkaline lamprophyres in Thanewasna area, western Bastar craton, India.Journal of Earth System Science, Vol. 128, 1, 7p. PdfIndiaminette

Abstract: Lamprophyre dykes within the granitoid and charnockite are reported for the first time from the Western Bastar Craton, Chandrapur district, Maharashtra. It shows porphyritic-panidiomorphic texture under a microscope, characterised by the predominance of biotite phenocrysts with less abundance of amphibole and clinopyroxene microphenocryst. The groundmass is composed more of K-feldspars over plagioclase, amphiboles, clinopyroxene, biotite, chlorite, apatite, sphene and magnetite. The mineral chemistry of biotite and magnesio-hornblende is indicative of minette variety of calc-alkaline lamprophyre (CAL), which is further supported by preliminary major oxides and trace element geochemistry. This unique association of CAL with granitoid provides an opportunity to study the spatio-temporal evolution of the lamprophyric magma in relation to the geodynamic perspective of the Bastar Craton.
DS2002-0683
2002
Moetcher, D.P.Haynes, E.A., Moetcher, D.P., Spicuzza, M.J.Oxygen isotope contamination of carbonates, silicates and oxides in selected carbonatites: constraints on crystallization temperatures of carbonatitic magmas.Unknown, Vol. 193, 1-2, Jan 15, pp. 43-57.GlobalCarbonatite, Geochemistry
DS1996-0356
1996
Moeys, R.Delvaux, D., Moeys, R., Ermikov, V.Paleostress reconstructions and geodynamics of the Baikal region, CentralAsia. Part I pre-rift evolution.Tectonophysics, Vol. 252, No. 1-4, Dec. 30, pp. 61-GlobalPaleozoic, Mesozoic, Tectonics -rifting
DS1997-0265
1997
Moeys, R.Delvaux, D., Moeys, R., Sankov, V.Paleostress reconstructions and geodynamics of the Baikal region, centralAsia, part 2, Cenozoic rifting.Tectonophysics, Vol. 282, No. 1-4, Dec. 15, pp. 1-38.GlobalTectonics, Baikal region
DS1991-1176
1991
Moffat, A.S.Moffat, A.S.When diamonds met buckballsScience, Vol. 254, p. 800GlobalFullerenes, Synthetic diamond coatings
DS1900-0207
1903
Moffet, S.E.Moffet, S.E.Romances of the World's Great Mines: Pt. 4, KimberleyCosmopolitan Magazine, MAY, PP. 65-72.Africa, South AfricaHistory
DS1998-0102
1998
Mofokeng, S.W.Bell, D.R., Mofokeng, S.W.chromium poor megacrysts from the Frank Smith mine and source regions of transitional kimberlites.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 64-66.South AfricaKimberlites, Orangeites, Deposit - Frank Smith
DS1988-0480
1988
Mogarovskii, V.V.Mogarovskii, V.V., Davydova, Z.M., Ageeva, L.I.Tungsten in alkaline basaltic rocks of southern Tien-Shan andPamirs.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk Tadzh. SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 31, No. 8, pp. 542-544RussiaAlkaline rocks
DS1997-0808
1997
Mogarovskii, V.V.Mogarovskii, V.V., Lutkov, V.S.Trace elements in metasomatic minerals from the upper mantle beneath the southern Tien Shan.Geochemistry International, Vol. 35, No. 9, Sept. pp. 854-?ChinaMetasomatism
DS2002-0975
2002
Mogarovskii, V.V.Lutkov, V.S., Mogarovskii, V.V., Lutkova, V.Y.Geochemical model for the lower crust in the Pamir and Tien Shan folded areas: evidence from xenoliths...Geochemistry International, Vol.40,4,pp.342-54.Russia, TajikistanAlkaline rocks
DS2002-0976
2002
Mogarovskii, V.V.Lutkov, V.S., Mogarovskii, V.V., Lutkova, V.Y.Geochemical model for the lower crust in the Pamir and Tien Shan folded areas: evidence from studies of xenoliths in alkaline mafic rocks.Geochemistry International, Vol.40,2,pp.342-54.Tajikistan, RussiaGeochemistry - xenoliths
DS2003-0963
2003
Mogarovskii, V.V.Mogarovskii, V.V., Lutkov, V.S.Geochemistry of metasomatized upper mantle beneath the southern Tien Shan andGeochemistry International, Vol. 41, 7, pp. 637-46.Russia, TajikistanAlkaline rocks
DS200412-1343
2003
Mogarovskii, V.V.Mogarovskii, V.V., Lutkov, V.S.Geochemistry of metasomatized upper mantle beneath the southern Tien Shan and Pamirs, Tajikstan, Li and Sn in mantle xenoliths fGeochemistry International, Vol. 41, 7, pp. 637-46.Russia, TajikistanAlkalic
DS200712-0655
2007
Mogarovskii, V.V.Lutkov, V.S., Mogarovskii, V.V., Lutkova, V.Y.Geochemical anomalies in the mantle of the Pamirs and Tien Shan with applications to the deep seated sourcs of ore material.Geochemistry International, Vol. 45, 5, pp. 451-464.Asia, ChinaGeochemistry
DS200712-0656
2007
Mogarovskii, V.V.Lutkov, V.S., Mogarovskii, V.V., Lutkova, V.Y.Geochemical anomalies in the mantle of the Pamirs and Tien Shan with applications to the deep seated sourcs of ore material.Geochemistry International, Vol. 45, 5, pp. 451-464.Asia, ChinaGeochemistry
DS1988-0481
1988
Mogarovskiy, V.V.Mogarovskiy, V.V.Trace elements in alkalic basaltoid rocks and lamprophyres of the southern Tien Shan and PamirsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 291, No. 1-6, May pp. 170-172RussiaLamprophyres
DS1996-0985
1996
Mogarovskiy, V.V.Mogarovskiy, V.V.Maximal contents and content ranges for rare lithophile elements in Tian Shan and Pamir alkali basites.Geochemistry International, Vol. 33, No. 9, pp. 42-46.Russia, Tajikistan, MantleBasites
DS1990-1059
1990
Mogessie, A.Mogessie, A., Tessadri, R., Veltman, C.B.electromagnetic-AMPH - a hypercard program to determine the name of an amphibole from electron microprobe analysis accordto the international mineralogical association schemeComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 16, No. 3, pp. 309-330GlobalComputer, Program -EMP-AMPH
DS2001-0785
2001
Mogessie, A.Mogessie, A., Ettinger, K., Leake, B.E., Tessardi, R.AMPH-IMA97: a hypercard program to determine the name of an amphibole from electron microprobe...Comp. and Geosci., Vol. 27, No. 10, Dec. pp. 1169-78.GlobalMineralogy - amphiboles. wet chemical analyses, Computer - AMPH-IMA97
DS200612-0939
2005
Mogessie, A.Mogessie, A.Central Tanzanian tectonic map: a step forward to decipher Proterozoic structural events in the East African Orogen.Tectonics, Vol. 24, 6, TC 6013Africa, TanzaniaTectonics
DS202005-0717
2020
Mogessie, A.Abdel Halim, A.H., Helmy, H.H., Elhaddad, M.A., El-Mahallawi, M., Mogessie, A.Petrology of a Neoproteroxoic mantle peridotite-chromitite association from Abu Dahr area, eastern Egypt Desert, Egypt: infiltration of boninitic melt in highly depleted harzburgite.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 165, 18p. PdfAfrica, EgyptBoninite

Abstract: Peridotites of Abu Dahr represent the main litho-unit of a Neoproterozoic dismembered ophiolite sequence and are among the best-preserved and well-exposed mantle rocks in South Eastern Desert of Egypt. Here, we present new geochemical and mineral chemical data for peridotites and associated pyroxenites and for chromitites and their platinum-group minerals to constrain their petrogenesis and geotectonic setting. The Abu Dahr ophiolite mantle section consists mainly of harzburgites, cut by pyroxenite dykes and containing dunite-chromitite lenses. The harzburgites are composed of olivine, orthopyroxene, spinel and minor clinopyroxene (?1.0 vol %) and amphibole. Olivine from harzburgites is highly magnesian (Fo 91-93) and Cr-spinel shows a wide-range of Cr2O3 and Al2O3 contents. The enstatite component of orthopyroxene decreases from harzburgite (En = 90-91) to orthopyroxenite (En = 84-87). Amphiboles are represented by magnesiohornblende and tschermakite. The chromitites are massive to disseminated and composed of magnesiochromite with high Cr# (83-93) and Mg# (66-79), and low TiO2 (<0.1 wt%) content. Solid inclusions in chromite include olivine, orthopyroxene and hornblende. Laurite (RuS2) is the most common PGM detected in the investigated chromitite samples and forms micrometer-size inclusions in fresh chromite. Various Ni-sulfides are found both in fresh chromite and along serpentine veinlets. Harzburgites have a refractory composition with a very low Al2O3 (0.4-0.8 wt%) and CaO (0.2-1.6 wt%) contents and high bulk-rock Mg# (89-92). Geochemical data suggest that the Abu Dahr peridotites are highly depleted SSZ peridotites formed in a forearc mantle wedge setting by high degrees of hydrous partial melting and emplaced as a result of the collision of the intra-oceanic arc with the Beitan gneisses. The podiform chromitites and orthopyroxenites were formed due to impregnation of mantle wedge harzburgites by boninitic melt. The highly depleted nature of the harzburgite is responsible for the small reserves of chromite ore at Abu Dahr and in the South Eastern Desert in general.
DS2003-0719
2003
Mogg, T.Kirkley, M., Mogg, T., McBean, D.Snap Lake field trip guide8th. International Kimberlite Conference Large Core Exhibit volume, 12p.Northwest TerritoriesGeology - field trip guide, Deposit - Snap Lake
DS2003-0964
2003
Mogg, T.Mogg, T., Kopylova, M., Scott Smith, B., Kirkley, M.Petrology of the Snap Lake kimberlite, NWT Canada8th. International Kimberlite Conference Large Core Exhibit volume, 5p.Northwest TerritoriesGeology - description, Deposit - Snap Lake
DS200412-1008
2003
Mogg, T.Kirkley, M., Mogg, T., McBean, D.Snap Lake field trip guide.8th. International Kimberlite Conference Large Core Exhibit volume, 12p.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeology - field trip guide Deposit - Snap Lake
DS200412-1344
2003
Mogg, T.Mogg, T., Kopylova, M., Scott Smith, B., Kirkley, M.Petrology of the Snap Lake kimberlite, NWT Canada.8th. International Kimberlite Conference Large Core Exhibit volume, 5p.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeology - description Deposit - Snap Lake
DS201012-0404
2010
Mogg, T.Kopylova, M.G., Mogg, T., Scott Smith, B.Mineralogy of the Snap lake kimberlite, Northwest Territories, Canada, and compositions of phlogopite as records of its crystallization.The Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 48, 3, pp. 549-570.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Snap Lake
DS2003-0965
2003
Mogg, T.S.Mogg, T.S., Kopylova, M.G., Scott Smith, B.H., Kirkley, M.B.Petrology of the Snap Lake kimberlite, NWT, Canada8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 7, POSTER abstractNorthwest TerritoriesDeposit - Snap Lake
DS200412-1345
2003
Mogg, T.S.Mogg, T.S., Kopylova, M.G., Scott Smith, B.H., Kirkley, M.B.Petrology of the Snap Lake kimberlite, NWT, Canada.8 IKC Program, Session 7, POSTER abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesKimberlite petrogenesis Deposit - Snap Lake
DS200712-0739
2007
Mogg, T.S.Mogg, T.S.Kimberlite petrology of the Snap Lake NWT Canada.Geological Association of Canada, Gac-Mac Yellowknife 2007, May 23-25, Volume 32, 1 pg. abstract p.57.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesSnap Lake
DS201601-0001
2016
Moghazi, A.K.D.Ahmed, A.H., Moghazi, A.K.D., Moufti, M.R., Dawood, Y.H., Ali, K.A.Nature of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Arabian shield and genesis of Al-spinel micropods: evidence from the mantle xenoliths of Harrat Kishb, western Saudi Arabia.Lithos, Vol. 240-243, pp. 119-139.Africa, Saudi ArabiaPeridotite

Abstract: The Harrat Kishb area of western Saudi Arabia is part of the Cenozoic volcanic fields in the western margin of the Arabian Shield. Numerous fresh ultramafic xenoliths are entrained in the basanite lava of Harrat Kishb, providing an opportunity to study the nature and petrogenetic processes involved in the evolution of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Arabian Shield. Based on the petrological characteristics and mineralogical compositions, the majority of the mantle xenoliths (~ 92%) are peridotites (lherzolites and pyroxene-bearing harzburgites); the remaining xenoliths (~ 8%) are unusual spinel-rich wehrlites containing black Al-spinel micropods. The two types of mantle xenoliths display magmatic protogranular texture. The peridotite xenoliths have high bulk-rock Mg#, high forsterite (Fo90-Fo92) and NiO (0.24-0.46 wt.%) contents of olivine, high clinopyroxene Mg# (0.91-0.93), variable spinel Cr# (0.10-0.49, atomic ratio), and approximately flat chondrite-normalized REE patterns. These features indicate that the peridotite xenoliths represent residues after variable degrees of melt extraction from fertile mantle. The estimated P (9-16 kbar) and T (877-1227 °C) as well as the oxidation state (?logfO2 = - 3.38 to - 0.22) under which these peridotite xenoliths originated are consistent with formation conditions similar to most sub-arc abyssal-type peridotites worldwide. The spinel-rich wehrlite xenoliths have an unusual amount (~ 30 vol.%) of Al-spinel as peculiar micropods with very minor Cr2O3 content (< 1 wt.%). Olivines of the spinel-rich wehrlites have low-average Fo (Fo81) and NiO (0.18 wt.%) contents, low-average cpx Mg# (0.79), high average cpx Al2O3 content (8.46 wt.%), and very low-average spinel Cr# (0.01). These features characterize early mantle cumulates from a picritic melt fraction produced by low degrees of partial melting of a garnet-bearing mantle source. The relatively high Na2O and Al2O3 contents of cpx suggest that the spinel-rich wehrlites are formed under high P (11-14 kbar), T (1090-1130 °C), and oxidation state (?logfO2 FMQ = + 0.14 to + 0.37), which occurred slightly below the crust-mantle boundary. The REE patterns of spinel-rich wehrlites are almost similar to those of the associated peridotite xenoliths, which confirm at least a spatial genetic linkage between them. Regarding the formation of Al-spinel micropods in spinel-rich wehrlite cumulates, it is suggested that the melt-rock reaction mechanism is not the only process by which podiform chromitite is formed. Early fractionation of picritic melts produced by partial melting of a mantle source under high P-T conditions could be another mechanism. The cpx composition, not opx, as it was assumed, seems to be the main control of the size and composition of spinel concentrations.
DS2002-1104
2002
MogkMueller, P.A., Heatherington, Kelly, Wooden, MogkPaleoproterozoic crust within the Great Falls tectonic zone: implications for assembly of southern Laurentia.Geology, Vol. 30, No. 2, Feb. pp. 127-30.MontanaTectonics, Archean Hearne, Wyoming
DS200512-0752
2004
Mogk, D.Mueller, P., Foster, D., Mogk, D., Wooden, J.New insights into the Proterozoic evolution of the western margin of Laurentia and their tectonic implications.Geological Society of America Annual Meeting ABSTRACTS, Nov. 7-10, Paper 173-6, Vol. 36, 5, p. 404.United States, WyomingGeothermometry
DS1995-1285
1995
Mogk, D.W.Mogk, D.W., McCourt, S.Archean high grade gneiss belts Central Zone Limpopo Belt and northern Wyoming Province -chips off same block?Centennial Geocongress (1995) Extended abstracts, Vol. 1, p. 193-196. abstractSouth Africa, Wyoming, United StatesTectonics
DS1998-1051
1998
Mogk, D.W.Mueller, P.A., Wooden, J.L., Mogk, D.W.Early Archean crust in the northern Wyoming Province. Evidence from uranium-lead (U-Pb)ages of detrital zircons.Precambrian Research, Vol. 91, No. 3-4, Aug. pp. 295-308.Wyoming, Colorado PlateauGeochronology
DS200712-0321
2006
Mogk, D.W.Foster, D.A., Mueller, P.A.,Mogk, D.W., Wooden, J.L., Vogl, J.J.Proterozoic evolution of the western margin of the Wyoming Craton: implications for the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the northern Rocky Mountains.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 43, 10, pp. 1601-1619,United States, Wyoming, Colorado PlateauMagmatism
DS201412-0291
2014
Mogk, D.W.Gifford, J.N., Mueller, P.A., Foster, D.A., Mogk, D.W.Precambrian crustal evolution in the Great Falls Tectonic Zone: insights from xenoliths from the Montana alkali province.Journal of Geology, Vol. 122, 5, pp. 531-548.United States, MontanaAlkalic
DS201412-0601
2013
Mogk, D.W.Mueller, P.A., Mogk, D.W., Henry, D.J., Wooden, J.L., Foster, D.A.The plume to plate transition: Hadean and Archean crustal evolution in the northern Wyoming province, USA.Dilek & Furnes eds. Evolution of Archean crust and early life. Springer Publication, pp. 23-54.United StatesMantle plume
DS201502-0057
2014
Mogk, D.W.Gifford, J.N., Mueller, P.A., Foster, D.A, Mogk, D.W.Precambrian crustal evolution in the Great Falls Tectonic Zone: insights from xenoliths from the Montana Alkali province.Journal of Geology, Vol. 122, Sept. pp. 531-548.United States, MontanaAlkalic
DS201809-2027
2018
Mogk, D.W.Gifford, J.N., Mueller, P.A., Foster, D.A., Mogk, D.W.Extending the realm of Archean crust in the Great Falls tectonic zone: evidence from the Little Rocky Mountains, Montana.Precambrian Research, Vol. 315, pp. 264-281.United States, Montanacraton

Abstract: Two prominent features separate the Archean Wyoming and Hearne cratons: the Paleoproterozoic Great Falls tectonic zone (GFTZ) and the Medicine Hat block (MHB), neither of which is well defined spatially because of Phanerozoic sedimentary cover. Based on limited data, the MHB is thought to be a structurally complex mix of Archean (2.6-3.1?Ga) and Proterozoic (1.75?Ga) crust, but is recognized primarily by its geophysical signature, and its influence on the geochemistry of younger igneous rocks. Similarly, the GFTZ was recognized on the basis of broad differences in geophysical patterns, isopachs of Paleozoic sedimentary sections, and lineaments; however, juvenile arc rocks in the Little Belt Mountains (LBM) and strongly overprinted Archean rocks in southwestern Montana show it to be a dominantly Paleoproterozoic feature. The Little Rocky Mountains (LRM) of Montana provide access to exposures of the northeastern-most Precambrian crust in the MHB-GFTZ region. U/Pb ages of zircons from Precambrian rocks of the LRM range from 2.4 to 3.3?Ga, with most ages between 2.6 and 2.8?Ga. Whole-rock analyses yield Sm-Nd TDM from 3.1 to 4.0?Ga and initial eNd(T) values calculated at U-Pb zircon crystallization ages range from -0.9 to -10.5, indicating significant contributions from older Archean crust. The high proportion of 2.6-2.8?Ga U/Pb ages differentiates LRM crust from arc-related Paleoproterozoic magmatic rocks exposed in the LBM to the southwest. The age and isotopic composition of the LRM gneisses are similar to crust in the northern Wyoming Province (2.8-2.9?Ga), but Paleoproterozoic K-Ar cooling ages suggest crust in the LRM experienced the Paleoproterozoic metamorphism and deformation that characterizes the GFTZ. Consequently, its history differs markedly from the adjacent Beartooth-Bighorn magmatic zone of the northern Wyoming Province, which does not record Paleoproterozoic tectonism, but has a strong correlation with the Montana metasedimentary terrane that was strongly overprinted during the Paleoproterozoic Great Falls orogeny that defines the GFTZ. The LRM, therefore, likely provides a unique, and perhaps the only, opportunity to characterize Archean crust of the MHB.
DS1992-1079
1992
Mogk, D.W.et al.Mogk, D.W.et al.The northern Wyoming province: contrasts in Archaen crustal evolutionBasement Tectonics, 8th. Proceedings, editor, Bartholemew, M.J., pp. 283-298.WyomingTectonics, Craton
DS201712-2681
2018
Mogorosi, O.Creus, P.K., Basson, I.J., Stoch, B., Mogorosi, O., Gabanakgosi, K., Ramsden, F., Gaegopolwe, P.Structural analysis and implicit 3D modelling of Jwaneng mine: insights into deformation of the Transvaal Supergroup in SE Botswana.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 137, pp. 9-21.Africa, Botswanadeposit - Jwaneng

Abstract: Country rock at Jwaneng Diamond Mine provides a rare insight into the deformational history of the Transvaal Supergroup in southern Botswana. The ca. 235 Ma kimberlite diatremes intruded into late Archaean to Early Proterozoic, mixed, siliciclastic-carbonate sediments, that were subjected to at least three deformational events. The first deformational event (D1), caused by NW-SE directed compression, is responsible for NE-trending, open folds (F1) with associated diverging, fanning, axial planar cleavage. The second deformational event (D2) is probably progressive, involving a clockwise rotation of the principal stress to NE-SW trends. Early D2, which was N-S directed, involved left-lateral, oblique shearing along cleavage planes that developed around F1 folds, along with the development of antithetic structures. Progressive clockwise rotation of far-field forces saw the development of NW-trending folds (F2) and its associated, weak, axial planar cleavage. D3 is an extensional event in which normal faulting, along pre-existing cleavage planes, created a series of rhomboid-shaped, fault-bounded blocks. Normal faults, which bound these blocks, are the dominant structures at Jwaneng Mine. Combined with block rotation and NW-dipping bedding, a horst-like structure on the northwestern limb of a broad, gentle, NE-trending anticline is indicated. The early compressional and subsequent extensional events are consistent throughout the Jwaneng-Ramotswa-Lobatse-Thabazimbi area, suggesting that a large area records the same fault geometry and, consequently, deformational history. It is proposed that Jwaneng Mine is at or near the northernmost limit of the initial, northwards-directed compressional event.
DS201811-2563
2018
Mogorosi, O.Creus, P.K., Basson, I.J., Stoch, B., Mogorosi, O., Gabanakgosi, K., Ramsden, F., Gaegopolwe, P.Structural analysis and implicit 3D modelling of Jwaneng mine: insights into deformation of the Transvaal Supergroup in SE Botswana.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 137, pp. 9-21.Africa, Botswanadeposit - Jwaneng

Abstract: Country rock at Jwaneng Diamond Mine provides a rare insight into the deformational history of the Transvaal Supergroup in southern Botswana. The ca. 235 Ma kimberlite diatremes intruded into late Archaean to Early Proterozoic, mixed, siliciclastic-carbonate sediments, that were subjected to at least three deformational events. The first deformational event (D1), caused by NW-SE directed compression, is responsible for NE-trending, open folds (F1) with associated diverging, fanning, axial planar cleavage. The second deformational event (D2) is probably progressive, involving a clockwise rotation of the principal stress to NE-SW trends. Early D2, which was N-S directed, involved left-lateral, oblique shearing along cleavage planes that developed around F1 folds, along with the development of antithetic structures. Progressive clockwise rotation of far-field forces saw the development of NW-trending folds (F2) and its associated, weak, axial planar cleavage. D3 is an extensional event in which normal faulting, along pre-existing cleavage planes, created a series of rhomboid-shaped, fault-bounded blocks. Normal faults, which bound these blocks, are the dominant structures at Jwaneng Mine. Combined with block rotation and NW-dipping bedding, a horst-like structure on the northwestern limb of a broad, gentle, NE-trending anticline is indicated. The early compressional and subsequent extensional events are consistent throughout the Jwaneng-Ramotswa-Lobatse-Thabazimbi area, suggesting that a large area records the same fault geometry and, consequently, deformational history. It is proposed that Jwaneng Mine is at or near the northernmost limit of the initial, northwards-directed compressional event.
DS201212-0484
2012
Mogotsi, I.Mogotsi, I.Botswana's diamond boom: was there a dutch disease.South African Journal of Economics, Vol. 70, 1, pp. 128-155.Africa, BotswanaEconomics
DS200612-1393
2005
Moh, L.H.Sun, T.T., Wathanakul,P., Atichat, W., Moh, L.H., Kem, L.K., Hermanto, R.Kalimantan diamond: morphology, surface features and some spectroscopic approaches.Australian Gemmologist, Vol. 22, 5, pp. 186-195.Asia, Indonesia, KalimantanDiamond morphology
DS201412-0592
2014
Mohale, P.Mohale, P.The influence of gravel sources on grade and diamond quality - a case study: Saxen drift Hill complex, northern Cape.GSSA Kimberley Diamond Symposium and Trade Show provisional programme, Sept. 10-12, POSTERAfrica, South AfricaDeposit - Saxendrift
DS201412-0593
2014
Mohale, P.Mohale, P.The impact of mining methods on grade control at Niewejaarskraal mine, northern Cape.GSSA Kimberley Diamond Symposium and Trade Show provisional programme, Sept. 10-12, POSTERAfrica, South AfricaMetallurgy
DS200412-0020
2004
Mohamad, R.Al-Lazki, A.I., Sandvol, E., Seber, D., Barazangi, M., Turkelli, N., Mohamad, R.Pn tomographic imaging of mantle lid velocity and anisotropy at the junction of the Arabian, Eurasian and African plates.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 158, 3, pp. 1024-1040.AfricaGeophysics - seismics, tomography
DS1992-1722
1992
Mohamed, A.M.O.Yong, R.N., Mohamed, A.M.O., Warkentin, B.P.Principles of contaminant transport in soilsElsevier, 327p. approx. $ 150.00 United StatesGlobalBook -ad, Landfill, environment
DS201312-0087
2013
Mohamed, F.H.Boskabadi, A., Pitcairn, I.K., Stern, R.J., Azer, M.K., Broman, C., Mohamed, F.H., Majka, J.Carbonatite crystallization and alteration in the Tarr carbonatite-albitite complex, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. ( Arabian-Nubian shield)Precambrian Research, Vol. 239, pp. 24-41.Africa, EgyptCarbonatite
DS1982-0148
1982
Mohammed, K.Collins, A.T., Mohammed, K.Optical Studies of Vibronic Bands in Yellow Luminescing Natural Diamonds.Journal of PHYSICS, PT. C SOLID STATE PHYSICS, Vol. 15, No. 1, PP. 147-158.GlobalDiamond Research
DS200612-0940
2006
Mohan, A.Mohan, A., Osanai, Y.Art of petrography: an amazing tool for snap-shots of the journey of UHT rocks.International Mineralogical Association 19th. General Meeting, held Kobe, Japan July 23-28 2006, Abstract p.205.MantleUHP
DS1980-0241
1980
Mohan, C.Mohan, C.Investigation for Diamonds by Exploration Mining at Wajrakarur.Transcript of Paper From Diamond Seminar, Bombay, 5P.India, Andhra PradeshProspecting
DS200512-0587
2005
Mohan, G.Kumar, M.R., Mohan, G.Mantle discontinuities beneath the Deccan volcanic province.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 237, pp. 252-263.IndiaGeophysics - seismics
DS200712-1085
2006
Mohan, G.Tiwari, P.K., Surve, G., Mohan, G.Crustal complaints on the uplift mechanism of the western Gnats of India.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 167, 3, Dec. 1, pp. 1309-1316.IndiaGeophysics - seismics
DS1975-0363
1976
Mohan, M.R.Mohan, M.R.Delineation of Diamondiferous Banganapalle Conglomerates In parts of Kurnool District, A.p.India Geological Survey Program Report, FOR 1974-1975India, Andhra PradeshDiamond Prospecting
DS200812-0536
2008
Mohan, M.R.Kamber, B.S., Mohan, M.R., Piercey, S.Fluid mobile elements in evolved Archean magmas: implications for Archean subduction processes.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A446.MantleSubduction
DS200512-0738
2001
Mohan, V.R.Miyazaki, T., Kagami, H., Mohan, V.R., Shuto, K., Morikiyo, T.Evolution of South Indian enriched lithospheric mantle: evidence from the Yelagiri and Evattur alkaline plutonism Tamil Nadu, south India.Alkaline Magmatism and the problems of mantle sources, pp. 189-203.IndiaAlkalic
DS200812-1220
2008
Mohan, V.R.Vladykin, N.V., Vladkar, S.G., Miyazaki, T., Mohan, V.R.Geochemistry of bentonite and associated carbonatites of Sevathur, Jogipatti and Samalpatti, Tamil Nadu, South India and Murun Massif, Siberia.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 72, 3, pp. 312-324.India, RussiaCarbonatite
DS2002-1402
2002
Mohanty, A.K.Sashdharan, K., Mohanty, A.K., Gupta, A.A note on the diamond incidence in Wairagargh area, Garchiroli district MaharashtraJournal of Geological Society of India, Vol. 59,No.3,pp. 265-8.IndiaMineralogy
DS2002-1404
2002
Mohanty, A.K.Sashidharan, K., Mohanty, A.K., Gupta, A.A note on the diamond incidence in Wairagargh area, Garchiroli district Maharashtra.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 59, March, pp. 265-268.IndiaDiamond morphology
DS2002-1405
2002
Mohanty, A.K.Sashidharan, K., Mohanty, A.K., Gupta, A.A note on the diamond incidence in Wairagarh area, Garhchiroli district, MaharashtraJournal Geological Society of India, Vol. 59, pp. 265-8.IndiaDiamond occurrence
DS2002-1406
2002
Mohanty, A.K.Sashidharan, K., Mohanty, A.K., Gupta, A.A note on diamond incidence in Wairagarh area, Garchiroli district, MaharashtraJournal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 59, March pp. 265-268.India, MaharashtraConglomerates
DS200412-1733
2002
Mohanty, A.K.Sashidharan, K., Mohanty, A.K., Gupta, A.A note on diamond incidence in Wairagarh area, Garchiroli district, Maharashtra.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 59, March pp. 265-268.India, MaharashtraConglomerates
DS200612-1225
2001
Mohanty, A.K.Sashidharan, K., Ganvir, D.V., Mohanty, A.K.Search for kimberlites and lamproites in the western part of the Bastar Craton, Maharashtra.National Seminar on Exploration Survey, Geological Society of India Special Publication, No. 58, pp. 629-634.India, MaharashtraDiamond exploration - geochemistry comparison Monastery
DS1999-0439
1999
Mohanty, K.K.Majumdar, T.J., Mohanty, K.K.Regional relief and structural pattern identification over the Indian subcontinent using INSAT VHRRR data.Journal of Geological Society IndiaM., Vol. 53, No. 2, Feb. 1, pp. 205-10.IndiaStructure - landsat imagery
DS1999-0487
1999
Mohanty, M.Mohanty, M., Rath, P.C., Mishra, A.P.Preliminary survey and assessment for locating source rocks and to find out potential area for diamond occurrence in Mahanadi, Ong, Tel and Suktel basins...Geological Society of India Records, Vol. 131,3, pp.229-31.India, OrissaDiamond occurrences, Districts - Jharsuguda, Samalpur, Sundergarh
DS2001-0786
2001
Mohanty, M.Mohanty, M., Sahoo, H.K.Detailed survey to locate kimberlite/lamproite pipes in already identified blocks, Bolangir Baragarh and Kalahandi districts, Orissa.Records of the Geological Survey of India, Vol. 132, 3, eastern 1997-1998, pp.212-213.India, OrissaGeochemistry
DS200412-1346
2001
Mohanty, M.Mohanty, M., Sahoo, H.K.Detailed survey to locate kimberlite/lamproite pipes in already identified blocks, Bolangir Baragarh and Kalahandi districts, OrRecords of the Geological Survey of India, Vol. 132, 3, eastern 1997-1998, pp.212-213.India, OrissaGeochemistry
DS200612-0941
2001
Mohanty, M.Mohanty, M., Sahoo, K.C., Rath, S.C.Ong River basin in Orissa: a possible target for diamond investigation.National Seminar on Exploration Survey, Geological Society of India Special Publication, No. 58, pp. 635-646.India, OrissaDiamond exploration
DS201908-1793
2019
Mohanty, N.Mohanty, N., Singh, S.P., Satyanarayanan, M., Jayananda, M., Korakoppa, M.M., Hiloidari, S.Chromianspinel compositions from Madawara ultramafics, Bundelkhand craton: implications on petrogenesis and tectonic evolution of the southern part of the Bundelkhand craton, central India.Geological Journal, Vol. 54, 4, pp. 2099-2123.Indiacraton

Abstract: Madawara ultramafic complex (MUC) in the southern part of Bundelkhand Craton, Central India comprises peridotite, olivine pyroxenite, pyroxenite, gabbro, and diorite. Coarse-grained olivine, clinopyroxene (Cpx), amphibole (Amp), Al-chromite, Fe-chromite, and magnetite with rare orthopyroxene (Opx) are common minerals in peridotite. Chromites are usually coarse-grained euhedral found as disseminated crystals in the olivine matrix showing both homogeneous and zoned texture. Al-chromite, primarily characterizes Cr-spinels and its subsequent fluid activity and alteration can result in the formation of Fe-chromite, chrome magnetite, and magnetite. Mineral chemistry data suggest that Al-chromite is characterized by moderately high Cr2O3 (38.16-51.52 wt.%) and Fe2O3 (3.22-14.51 wt.%) and low Al2O3 (10.63-21.87 wt.%), MgO (1.71-4.92 wt.%), and TiO2 (0.22-0.67 wt.%), whereas the homogeneous Fe-chromite type is characterized by high Fe2O3 (25.54-47.60 wt.%), moderately low Cr2O3 (19.56-37.90 wt.%), and very low Al2O3 (0.06-1.53 wt.%). Subsequent alteration of Al-chromite and Fe-chromite leads to formation of Cr-magnetite and magnetite. The Cr# of Al-chromite varies from 55.12 to 76.48 and ?Fe3+# from 8 to 19, whereas the ferrian chromite has high Cr# varying from 94.27 to 99.53 while its ?Fe3+# varies from 38 to 70. As a whole, the primary Al-chromite shows low Al2O3, TiO2 contents, and high Fe#, Cr# values. Olivines have forsterite ranging from 75.96% to 77.59%. The bulk-rock geochemistry shows continental arc geochemical affinities indicated by the high concentration of large-ion lithophile elements and U, Th relative to the low concentration of high-field strength elements. These petrological and mineralogical as well as primary Al-chromite compositions plotted in different discrimination diagrams suggest an arc environment that is similar to Alaskan-type intrusion.
DS201112-0694
2011
Mohanty, S.Mohanty, S.Crustal stress and strain patterns in the Indian plate interior: implications for the deformation behaviour of a stable continent and its seismicity.Terra Nova, Vol. 23, 6, pp. 407-415.IndiaGeophysics - seismics
DS2001-0787
2001
Mohanty, S.N.Mohanty, S.N., Srinivasan, P.Regional survey to identify potential blocks for occurrence of kimberlite/lamproite pipesRecords of the Geological Survey of India, Vol. 132, 3, eastern 1997-1998, pp.209-11.India, OrissaGeochemistry
DS2002-1071
2002
Mohanty, S.N.Mohanty, S.N., Srinivasan, P.Regional survey to identify potential blocks for occurrence of kimberlite/lamproite pipes in Indravati River Basin, Koraput and Nabarangapur Districts, OrissaRecords of the Geological Survey of India, Vol. 133, 3, eastern 1998-1999, pp.191-3.India, OrissaGeochemistry
DS200412-1347
2001
Mohanty, S.N.Mohanty, S.N., Srinivasan, P.Regional survey to identify potential blocks for occurrence of kimberlite/lamproite pipes in Indravati Basin, Koraput and Nawarangpur district, Orissa.Records of the Geological Survey of India, Vol. 132, 3, eastern 1997-1998, pp.209-11.India, OrissaGeochemistry
DS200412-1348
2002
Mohanty, S.N.Mohanty, S.N., Srinivasan, P.Regional survey to identify potential blocks for occurrence of kimberlite/lamproite pipes in Indravati River Basin, Koraput andRecords of the Geological Survey of India, Vol. 133, 3, eastern 1998-1999, pp.191-3.India, OrissaGeochemistry
DS200612-0942
2001
Mohanty, S.N.Mohanty, S.N., Srinivasan, P.Regional exploration scenario and primary diamond source rock targeting in Ib, Tel and Indravati river basins of Orissa.National Seminar on Exploration Survey, Geological Society of India Special Publication, No. 58, pp. 623-627.India, OrissaDiamond exploration
DS2002-1072
2002
Mohapatra, R.K.Mohapatra, R.K., Murty, S.V.S.Nitrogen and noble gas isotopes in mafic and ultramafic inclusions in the alkali basalts from Kutch and Reunion implications for their mantle sources.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 20, 7, pp. 867-77.IndiaGeochronology, Alkaline rocks
DS200512-0739
2004
Mohapatra, R.K.Mohapatra, R.K., Murty, S.V.S.Nitrogen isotopes in mantle derived diamonds: indications of a multi component structure.Current Science, Vol.87, 11, Dec. 10, pp. 1577-1580.IndiaGeochronology
DS201810-2381
2018
Mohapi, T.Stamm, N., Schmidt. M.W., Szymanowski, D., von Quadt, A., Mohapi, T., Fourie, A.Primary petrology, mineralogy and age of the Letseng-la-Terae kimberlite ( Lesotho), southern Africa) and parental magmas of Group 1 kimberlites.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 173, pp. 76- doi.org/10.1007/ s00410-018-1502-1Africa, Lesothodeposit - Letseng

Abstract: The Letšeng-la-Terae kimberlite (Lesotho), famous for its large high-value diamonds, has five distinct phases that are mined in a Main and a Satellite pipe. These diatreme phases are heavily altered but parts of a directly adjacent kimberlite blow are exceptionally fresh. The blow groundmass consists of preserved primary olivine with Fo86-88, chromite, magnesio-ulvöspinel and magnetite, perovskite, monticellite, occasional Sr-rich carbonate, phlogopite, apatite, calcite and serpentine. The bulk composition of the groundmass, extracted by micro-drilling, yields 24-26 wt% SiO2, 20-21 wt% MgO, 16-19 wt% CaO and 1.9-2.1 wt% K2O, the latter being retained in phlogopite. Without a proper mineral host, groundmass Na2O is only 0.09-0.16 wt%. However, Na-rich K-richterite observed in orthopyroxene coronae allows to reconstruct a parent melt Na2O content of 3.5-5 wt%, an amount similar to that of highly undersaturated primitive ocean island basanites. The groundmass contains 10-12 wt% CO2, H2O is estimated to 4-5 wt%, but volatiles and alkalis were considerably reduced by degassing. Mg# of 77.9 and 530 ppm Ni are in equilibrium with olivine phenocrysts, characterize the parent melt and are not due to olivine fractionation. 87Sr/86Sr(i)?=?0.703602-0.703656, 143Nd/144Nd(i)?=?0.512660 and 176Hf/177Hf(i)?=?0.282677-0.282679 indicate that the Letšeng kimberlite originates from the convective upper mantle. U-Pb dating of groundmass perovskite reveals an emplacement age of 85.5?±?0.3 (2s) Ma, which is significantly younger than previously proposed for the Letšeng kimberlite.
DS201708-1718
2017
Mohapi. M.Mohapi. M.Letseng diamond mine, Lesotho: recent advances in open pit geology and the Main kimberlite pipe.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, PosterAfrica, Lesothodeposit - Letseng
DS2001-0627
2001
Mohaptra, R.K.Kosheev, A.P., Gromov, M.D., Mohaptra, R.K.History of trace gases in presolar diamonds inferred from ion-implanted experiments.Nature, No. 6847, Aug. 9, pp. 615-6.GlobalDiamond - experimental
DS201806-1239
2018
Moher, D.Patwardhan, B., Nagarkar, S., Gadre, S.R., Lakhotia, S.C., Katoch, V.M., Moher, D.A critical analysis of the 'UGC' approved list of journals.Current Science, Vol. 114, 6, Mar. 25, pp. 1299-1303.Indialegal

Abstract: Scholarly journals play an important role in maintaining the quality and integrity of research by what they publish. Unethical practices in publishing are leading to an increased number of predatory, dubious and low-quality journals worldwide. It has been reported that the percentage of research articles published in predatory journals is high in India. The University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi has published an 'approved list of journals', which has been criticized due to inclusion of many substandard journals. We have developed a protocol with objective criteria for identifying journals that do not follow good publication practices. We studied 1336 journals randomly selected from 5699 in the university source component of the 'UGC-approved list'. We analysed 1009 journals after excluding 327 indexed in Scopus/Web of Science. About 34.5% of the 1009 journals were disqualified under the basic criteria because of incorrect or non-availability of essential information such as address, website details and names of editors; another 52.3% of them provided false information such as incorrect ISSN, false claims about impact factor, claimed indexing in dubious indexing databases or had poor credentials of editors. Our results suggest that over 88% of the non-indexed journals in the university source component of the UGC-approved list, included on the basis of suggestions from different universities, could be of low quality. In view of these results, the current UGC-approved list of journals needs serious reconsideration. New regulations to curtail unethical practices in scientific publishing along with organization of awareness programmes about publication ethics at Indian universities and research institutes are urgently needed.
DS200612-0943
2006
Mohideen, H.M.Mohideen, H.M.India - old sources and new finds.GIA Gemological Research Conference abstract volume, Held August 26-27, p. 30. 1/2p.IndiaHistory
DS201602-0205
2015
Mohiuddin, A.Girard, J., Amulele, G., Farla, R., Mohiuddin, A., Karato, S-i.Shear deformation of bridgmanite and magnesiowustite aggregates at lower mantle conditions.Science, Vol. 351, 6269, pp. 144-147.MantleRheology

Abstract: Rheological properties of the lower mantle have strong influence on the dynamics and evolution of Earth. By using the improved methods of quantitative deformation experiments at high pressures and temperatures, we deformed a mixture of bridgmanite and magnesiowüstite under the shallow lower mantle conditions. We conducted experiments up to about 100% strain at a strain rate of about 3 × 10(-5) second(-1). We found that bridgmanite is substantially stronger than magnesiowüstite and that magnesiowüstite largely accommodates the strain. Our results suggest that strain weakening and resultant shear localization likely occur in the lower mantle. This would explain the preservation of long-lived geochemical reservoirs and the lack of seismic anisotropy in the majority of the lower mantle except the boundary layers.
DS202002-0208
2020
Mohiuddin, A.Mohiuddin, A., Karto, S-i., Girard, J.Slab weakening during the olivine to ringwoodite transition in the mantle.Nature Geoscience, doi: 10.1038/s41561-019-0523Mantlesubduction

Abstract: The strength of subducted slabs in the mantle transition zone influences the style of mantle convection. Intense deformation is observed particularly in relatively old subducted slabs in the deep mantle transition zone. Understanding the cause of this regional and depth variation in slab deformation requires constraint of the rheological properties of deep mantle materials. Here, we report results of in situ deformation experiments during the olivine to ringwoodite phase transformation, from which we infer the deformation process under the conditions of cold slabs deep in the mantle transition zone. We find that newly transformed fine-grained ringwoodite deforms by diffusion creep and that its strength is substantially smaller than that of coarser-grained minerals but increases with time. Scaling analysis, based on a model of transformation kinetics and grain-size evolution during a phase transformation, suggests that a cold slab will be made of a mixture of weak, fine-grained and strong, coarse-grained materials in the deep transition zone, whereas a warm slab remains strong because of its large grain size. We propose that this temperature dependence of grain size may explain extensive deformation of cold slabs in the deep transition zone but limited deformation of relatively warm slabs.
DS202003-0351
2020
Mohiuddin, A.Mohiuddin, A., Karato, S., Girard, J.Slab weakening during olivine to ringwoodite transition in the mantle.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 13, pp. 170-174.Mantleolivine

Abstract: The strength of subducted slabs in the mantle transition zone influences the style of mantle convection. Intense deformation is observed particularly in relatively old subducted slabs in the deep mantle transition zone. Understanding the cause of this regional and depth variation in slab deformation requires constraint of the rheological properties of deep mantle materials. Here, we report results of in situ deformation experiments during the olivine to ringwoodite phase transformation, from which we infer the deformation process under the conditions of cold slabs deep in the mantle transition zone. We find that newly transformed fine-grained ringwoodite deforms by diffusion creep and that its strength is substantially smaller than that of coarser-grained minerals but increases with time. Scaling analysis, based on a model of transformation kinetics and grain-size evolution during a phase transformation, suggests that a cold slab will be made of a mixture of weak, fine-grained and strong, coarse-grained materials in the deep transition zone, whereas a warm slab remains strong because of its large grain size. We propose that this temperature dependence of grain size may explain extensive deformation of cold slabs in the deep transition zone but limited deformation of relatively warm slabs.
DS1991-1177
1991
Mohnen, V.A.Mohnen, V.A., Goldstein, W., Wei-Chyung WangThe conflict over global warming -the application of scientific research to policy choicesGlobal Environmental Change, March pp. 109-123United StatesGlobal warming, Climate
DS1991-1178
1991
Mohnen, V.A.Mohnen, V.A., Goldstein, W., Wei-Chyung WangThe conflict over global warming -the application of scientific research topolicy choicesGlobal Environmental Change, March pp. 109-123United StatesGlobal warming, Climate
DS1989-0191
1989
Mohr, M.Burgath, K.P., Mohr, M., Simandjuntak, W.Aspects of diamond origin in southeast Kalimantan, Indonesia79th. Annual Meeting Of The Geologische Vereinigung, Mineral, p. 51-52. (abstract.)Indonesia, KalimantanDiamond genesis
DS1985-0598
1985
Mohr, P.Senterfit, R.M., Mohr, P., Horton, R.Geophysical studies of breccia pipe locations on the HualapaiIndianreservation, ArizonaUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 85-0400, 30pColorado Plateau, ArizonaGeophysics
DS1985-0308
1985
Mohrherr, J.Jockush, C.G.JR., Mohrherr, J.Embedding the Diamond Lattice in the Recursively Enumerable truth Table Degrees.Proceedings American MATH. SOCIETY, Vol. 94, No. 1, MAY PP. 123-128.GlobalExperimental Research
DS1998-1027
1998
Mohriak, W.U.Mohriak, W.U., Bassetto, M., Viera, I.S.Crustal architecture and tectonic evolution of the Sergipe Alagoas and Jacuipe basins, offshore northeast BrasilTectonophysics, Vol. 288, No. 1-4, Mar. pp. 199-220BrazilTectonics, Basins - offshore
DS1998-1575
1998
Mohrig, D.Whipple, K.X., Parker, G., Paola, C., Mohrig, D.Channel dynamics, sediment transport and the slope of alluvial fans:experimental study.Journal of Geology, Vol. 106, No.6, Nov. pp. 677-94.GlobalAlluvials, Fans - drainage - not specific to diamonds
DS201503-0179
2015
Mohseni, H.Stagno, V., Frost, D.J., McCammon, C.A., Mohseni, H., Fei, Y.The oxygen fugacity at which graphite or diamond forms from carbonate bearing melts in eclogitic rocks.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 169, 18p.TechnologyRedox, carbonatite, geobarometry
DS201312-0293
2013
MoidakiGao, S.S., Liu, Reed, Yu, Massinque, Mdala, Moidaki, Mutamina, Atekwana, Ingate, ReuschSeismic arrays to study African Rift initiation.EOS Transaction of AGU, Vol. 94, 24, June 11, pp. 213-214.Africa, southern AfricaGeophysics - seismics
DS201512-1997
2015
Moidaki, M.Yu, Y., Liu, K.H., Reed, C.A., Moidaki, M., Mickus, K., Atekwana, E.A., Gao, S.S.A joint receiver function and gravity study of crustal structure beneath the incipient Okavango Rift, Botswana.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 42, 20, pp. 8398-8405.Africa, BotswanaGeophysics - gravity

Abstract: Rifting incorporates the fundamental processes concerning the breakup of continental lithosphere and plays a significant role in the formation and evolution of sedimentary basins. In order to decipher the characteristics of rifting at its earliest stage, we conduct the first teleseismic crustal study of one of the world's youngest continental rifts, the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ), where the magma has not yet breached the surface. Results from receiver function stacking and gravity modeling indicate that the crust/mantle boundary beneath the ORZ is uplifted by 4-5 km, and the initiation of the ORZ is closely related to lithospheric stretching. Possible decompression melting of the subcrustal lithosphere occurs beneath the ORZ, as evidenced by a relatively low upper mantle density based on the gravity modeling.
DS201112-0174
2009
Moiera, L.A.Chaves, M.L.D.C., Andrade, K.W., Moiera, L.A.The diamond bearing Abel Regis intrusion (Carmo do Paranaiba, MG) : kimberlite or lamproite?REM Revista Escola de Minas, Vol. 62, 4, pp. 431-438.South America, Brazil, Minas GeraisDeposit - Abel Regis
DS201212-0131
2012
Moila, A.V.Coney, L., Moila, A.V.Gem-quality diamonds: source determination.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 115, 1, pp. 33-46.TechnologySpectroscopy/spectrometry
DS201808-1757
2018
Moilanen, J.Kertsman, V., Moilanen, J., Podmogov, Y.Special place of airborne electromagnetic survey in detailed exploration of kimberlites in the conditions of the Angolan shield. CatocaAEM2018/7th International Workshop on Airborne electromagnetics, Held June 17-20, 3p.Africa, Angolageophysics - EM
DS202001-0028
2019
Moilanen, J.Moilanen, J., Pavlov, B., Karshakov, E., Volovitsky, A., Garakoev. A.Airborne geophysical technologies as a basis for diamond field prognoses in regional and state scale.2019 Twelth International Conference Oct 1-3. Moscow, IEEE DOI 11.09/MLSD .2019.8911014Africa, Angola, Russia, Yakutiageophysics

Abstract: We show how to increase the effectiveness of the prognoses of kimberlite bodies by using airborne geophysical technologies. We show the advantages of electromagnetic and magnetic methods for predicting kimberlite pipes. You will see examples of a regional diamond survey in Angola and Siberia.
DS2001-0788
2001
Moine, B.Moine, B., Gregoire, Cottin, Sheppard, O'Reilly, GiretVolatile bearing ultramafic to mafic xenoliths from the Kerugelen Archipelago: evidence for carbonatites...Journal of South African Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 1, p. A 25. (abs)Indian Ocean, mantleCarbonatite, Kerugelen Archipelago
DS200412-0437
2004
Moine, B.Delpech, G., Gregoire, M., O'Reilly, S.Y., Cottin, J.Y., Moine, B., Michon, G., Giret, A.Feldspar from carbonate rich silicate metasomatism in the shallow oceanic mantle under Kerguelen Islands ( South Indian Ocean).Lithos, Vol. 75, 1-2, July pp. 209-237.Kerguelen IslandsMetasomatism, trace element fingerprinting, petrogeneti
DS200412-1173
2004
Moine, B.Lorand, J.P., Delpech, G., Gregoire, M., Moine, B., O'Reilly, S.Y., Cottin, J.Y.Platinum group elements and the multistage metasomatic history of Kerguelen lithospheric mantle ( South Indian Ocean).Chemical Geology, Vol. 208, 1-4, pp. 195-215.Indian OceanMetasomatism, carbonatite
DS201412-0594
2014
Moine, B.Moine, B., Nedelec, A., Ortega, E.Geology and metallogeny of the Precambrian basement of Madagascar.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 94, pp. 1-176.Africa, MadagascarMetallogeny
DS201412-0724
2013
Moine, B.Rasoamalala, V., Salvi, S., Bexiat, D., Ursule, J-Ph., Cuney, M., De Parseval, Ph., Guillaume, D., Moine, B., Andriamampihantona, J.Geology of bastnaesite and monazite deposits in the Ambatofinandrahana area, central part of Madagascar: an overview.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 94, 14p.Africa, MadagascarBastanesite
DS201412-0934
2014
Moine, B.Tucker, R.D., Roig, J.Y., Moine, B., Delor, C., Peters, S.G.A geological synthesis of the Precambrian shield in Madagascar.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 94, pp. 9-30.Africa, MadagascarGeology
DS201709-2046
2017
Moine, B.Radu, I.B., Harris, C., Moine, B., Costin, G., Cottin, J-Y.Subduction relics in the cratonic root - evidence from delta O18O variations in eclogite xenoliths.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Africa, South Africadeposit, Roberts Victor, Jagersfontein
DS201710-2259
2017
Moine, B.Radu, I-B., Moine, B., Ionov, D., Korsakov, A., Golovin, A., Mikhailenko, D., Cottin, J-Y.Kyanite-bearing eclogite xenoliths from the Udachnaya kimberlite, Siberian craton, Russia.Bulletin de la Societe Geologique de France *eng, Vol. 188, 1-2, 14p.Russia, Siberiadeposit - Udachnaya

Abstract: Xenoliths brought up by kimberlite magmas are rare samples of otherwise inaccessible lithospheric mantle. Eclogite xenoliths are found in most cratons and commonly show a range of mineral and chemical compositions that can be used to better understand craton formation. This study focuses on five new kyanite-bearing eclogites from the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe (367±5 Ma). They are fine-to coarse-grained and consist mainly of “cloudy” clinopyroxene (cpx) and garnet (grt). The clinopyroxene is Al,Na-rich omphacite while the garnet is Ca-rich, by contrast to typical bi-mineral (cpx+grt) eclogites that contain Fe- and Mg-rich garnets. The Udachnaya kyanite eclogites are similar in modal and major element composition to those from other cratons (Dharwar, Kaapvaal, Slave, West African). The kyanite eclogites have lower REE concentrations than bi-mineral eclogites and typically contain omphacites with positive Eu and Sr anomalies, i.e. a “ghost plagioclase signature”. Because such a signature can only be preserved in non-metasomatised samples, we infer that they were present in the protoliths of the eclogites. It follows that subducted oceanic crust is present at the base of the Siberian craton. Similar compositions and textures are also seen in kyanite eclogites from other cratons, which we view as evidence for an Archean, subduction-like formation mechanism related to craton accretion. Thus, contrary to previous work that classifies all kyanite eclogites as type I (IK), metasomatized by carbonatite/kimberlitic fluids, we argue that some of them, both from this work and those from other cratons, belong to the non-metasomatized type II (IIB). The pristine type IIB is the nearest in composition to protoliths of mantle eclogites because it contains no metasomatic enrichments.
DS201910-2295
2019
Moine, B.Rizo, H., Abdrault, D., Bennett, N.R., Humayun, M., Brandon, A., Vlastelic, I., Moine, B., Poirier, A., Bouhifd, M.A., Murphy, D.T.182W evidence for core-mantle interaction in the source of mantle plumes.Geochemical Perspectives Letters, Vol. 11, pp. 6-11.Mantlemantle plumes, hotspots

Abstract: Tungsten isotopes are the ideal tracers of core-mantle chemical interaction. Given that W is moderately siderophile, it preferentially partitioned into the Earth’s core during its segregation, leaving the mantle depleted in this element. In contrast, Hf is lithophile, and its short-lived radioactive isotope 182Hf decayed entirely to 182W in the mantle after metal-silicate segregation. Therefore, the 182W isotopic composition of the Earth’s mantle and its core are expected to differ by about 200 ppm. Here, we report new high precision W isotope data for mantle-derived rock samples from the Paleoarchean Pilbara Craton, and the Réunion Island and the Kerguelen Archipelago hotspots. Together with other available data, they reveal a temporal shift in the 182W isotopic composition of the mantle that is best explained by core-mantle chemical interaction. Core-mantle exchange might be facilitated by diffusive isotope exchange at the core-mantle boundary, or the exsolution of W-rich, Si-Mg-Fe oxides from the core into the mantle. Tungsten-182 isotope compositions of mantle-derived magmas are similar from 4.3 to 2.7 Ga and decrease afterwards. This change could be related to the onset of the crystallisation of the inner core or to the initiation of post-Archean deep slab subduction that more efficiently mixed the mantle.
DS200412-1349
2004
Moine, B.N.Moine, B.N., Gregoire, M., O'Reilly, S.Y., Delpech, G., Sheppard, S.M.F., Lorand, J.P., Renac, Giret, CottinCarbonatite melt in oceanic upper mantle beneath the Kerguelen Archipelago.Lithos, Vol. 75, pp. 239-252.Kerguelen IslandsCarbonatite, harzburgite, metasomatism
DS200712-0849
2007
Moine, B.N.Poitrasson, F., Delpech, G., Grgeoire, M., Moine, B.N.Significance of the mantle Fe isotope variations.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A799.Africa, South AfricaXenoliths
DS201709-2036
2017
Moine, B.N.Moyen, J-F., Paquette, J-L., Ionov, D.A., Korsakova, A.V., Golovina, A.V., Moine, B.N.Archean lithosphere: evidence from U-Pb zircon dating in crustal xenoliths at Udachanay, Siberian craton.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Russiadeposit, Udachnaya

Abstract: Cratons represent the oldest preserved lithospheric domains. Their lithosphere (lithospheric mantle welded to overlying Precambrian crystalline basement) is considered to be particularly robust and long living due to the protecting presence of buoyant and rigid “keels” made up of residual harzburgites. In this study, we report new U—Pb zircon ages on crustal xenoliths from the Udachnaya kimberlite in the Siberian craton; this dataset includes samples from both the upper and lower portions of the crust. The zircon ages agree well with model melt-extraction Re-Os ages on refractory peridotite xenoliths from the same pipe; taken together they allow an integrated view of lithosphere formation. Our data reveal that the present day upper crust is Archaean, whereas both the lower crust and the lithospheric mantle yield Palaeoproterozoic ages. Consequently, the deep lithosphere beneath the Siberian craton was not formed in a single time, but grew in two distinct events, one in the late Archean and the other in the Palaeoproterozoic. We propose a two-stage scenario for the formation of the Siberian craton involving delamination and rejuvenation of the Archean lower lithosphere (lower crust and lithospheric mantle) in the Palaeoproterozoic. This demonstrates that craton formation can be a protracted, multi-stage process, and that the present day crust and mantle do not represent complementary reservoirs formed through the same episode.
DS201709-2037
2017
Moine, B.N.Moyen, J-F., Paquette, J-L., Ionov, D.A., Korsakova, A.V., Golovina, A.V., Moine, B.N.Paleoproterozoic rejuvenation of an Archean lithosphere: evidence from U-Pb zircon dating in crustal xenoliths at Udachanaya, Siberian craton.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Russia, Siberiadeposit, Udachnaya

Abstract: Cratons represent the oldest preserved lithospheric domains. Their lithosphere (lithospheric mantle welded to overlying Precambrian crystalline basement) is considered to be particularly robust and long-lived due to the protecting presence of buoyant and rigid “keels” made up of residual harzburgites. Although the cratons are mostly assumed to form in the Archaean, the timing of their formation remains poorly constrained. In particular, there are very few datasets describing concurrently the age of both the crustal and mantle portions of the lithosphere. In this study, we report new U–Pb ages and Hf isotope compositions for zircons in crustal xenoliths from the Udachnaya kimberlite in the central Siberian craton; this dataset includes samples from both the upper and lower portions of the crust. The zircon ages agree well with model melt-extraction Re–Os ages on refractory peridotite xenoliths from the same pipe; taken together they allow an integrated view of lithosphere formation. Our data reveal that the present day upper crust is Archaean, whereas both the lower crust and the lithospheric mantle yield Paleoproterozoic ages. We infer that the deep lithosphere beneath the Siberian craton was not formed in a single Archaean event, but grew in at least two distinct events, one in the late Archaean and the other in the Paleoproterozoic. Importantly, a complete or large-scale delamination and rejuvenation of the Archaean lower lithosphere (lower crust and lithospheric mantle) took place in the Paleoproterozoic. This further demonstrates that craton formation can be a protracted, multi-stage process, and that the present day crust and mantle may not represent complementary reservoirs formed through the same tectono-magmatic event. Further, deep cratonic lithosphere may be less robust and long living than often assumed, with rejuvenation and replacement events throughout its history.
DS201801-0039
2017
Moine, B.N.Moyen, J-F., Paquette, J.L., Ionov, D.A., Gannoun, A., Korsakov, A.V., Golovin, A.V., Moine, B.N.Paleoproterozoic rejuvenation and replacement of Archean lithosphere: evidence from zircon U-Pb dating and Hf isotopes in crustal xenoliths at Udachnaya, Siberian craton.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 458, 1, pp. 149-159.Russiadeposit - Udachnaya

Abstract: Cratons represent the oldest preserved lithospheric domains. Their lithosphere (lithospheric mantle welded to overlying Precambrian crystalline basement) is considered to be particularly robust and long-lived due to the protecting presence of buoyant and rigid “keels” made up of residual harzburgites. Although the cratons are mostly assumed to form in the Archaean, the timing of their formation remains poorly constrained. In particular, there are very few datasets describing concurrently the age of both the crustal and mantle portions of the lithosphere. In this study, we report new U-Pb ages and Hf isotope compositions for zircons in crustal xenoliths from the Udachnaya kimberlite in the central Siberian craton; this dataset includes samples from both the upper and lower portions of the crust. The zircon ages agree well with model melt-extraction Re-Os ages on refractory peridotite xenoliths from the same pipe; taken together they allow an integrated view of lithosphere formation. Our data reveal that the present day upper crust is Archaean, whereas both the lower crust and the lithospheric mantle yield Paleoproterozoic ages. We infer that the deep lithosphere beneath the Siberian craton was not formed in a single Archaean event, but grew in at least two distinct events, one in the late Archaean and the other in the Paleoproterozoic. Importantly, a complete or large-scale delamination and rejuvenation of the Archaean lower lithosphere (lower crust and lithospheric mantle) took place in the Paleoproterozoic. This further demonstrates that craton formation can be a protracted, multi-stage process, and that the present day crust and mantle may not represent complementary reservoirs formed through the same tectono-magmatic event. Further, deep cratonic lithosphere may be less robust and long living than often assumed, with rejuvenation and replacement events throughout its history.
DS201904-0717
2019
Moine, B.N.Bogdana-Radu, I., Harris, C., Moine, B.N., Costin, G., Cottin, J-Y.Subduction relics in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle evidence from variation in the delta 180 value of eclogite xenolths from the Kaapvaal craton.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol 174, https://doi.org/ 10.1007/s00410-019-1552-zAfrica, South Africadeposit - Roberts Victor, Jagersfontein

Abstract: Mantle eclogites are commonly accepted as evidence for ancient altered subducted oceanic crust preserved in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), yet the mechanism and extent of crustal recycling in the Archaean remains poorly constrained. In this study, we focus on the petrological and geochemical characteristics of 58 eclogite xenoliths from the Roberts Victor and Jagersfontein kimberlites, South Africa. Non-metasomatized samples preserved in the cratonic root have variable textures and comprise bimineralic (garnet (gt)-omphacite (cpx)), as well as kyanite (ky)- and corundum (cor)-bearing eclogites. The bimineralic samples were derived from a high-Mg variety, corresponding to depths of ~ 100-180 km, and a low-Mg variety corresponding to depths of ~ 180-250 km. The high-Al (ky-, cor-bearing) eclogites originated from the lowermost part of the cratonic root, and have the lowest REE abundances, and the most pronounced positive Eu and Sr anomalies. On the basis of the strong positive correlation between gt and cpx d18O values (r2 = 0.98), we argue that d18O values are unaffected by mantle processes or exhumation. The cpx and gt are in oxygen isotope equilibrium over a wide range in d18O values (e.g., 1.1-7.6‰ in garnet) with a bi-modal distribution (peaks at ~ 3.6 and ~ 6.4‰) with respect to mantle garnet values (5.1 ± 0.3‰). Reconstructed whole-rock major and trace element compositions (e.g., MgO variation with respect to Mg#, Al2O3, LREE/HREE) of bimineralic eclogites are consistent with their protolith being oceanic crust that crystallized from a picritic liquid, marked by variable degrees of partial melt extraction. Kyanite and corundum-bearing eclogites, however, have compositions consistent with a gabbroic and pyroxene-dominated protolith, respectively. The wide range in reconstructed whole-rock d18O values is consistent with a broadly picritic to pyroxene-rich cumulative sequence of depleted oceanic crust, which underwent hydrothermal alteration at variable temperatures. The range in d18O values extends significantly lower than that of present-day oceanic crust and Cretaceous ophiolites, and this might be due to a combination of lower d18O values of seawater in the Archaean or a higher temperature of seawater-oceanic crust interaction.
DS202009-1641
2020
Moine, B.N.Moine, B.N., Bolfan-Casanova, N., Radu, I.B., Ionov, D.A., Costin, G., Korsakov, A.V., Golovin, A.V., Oleinikov, O.B., Deloule, E., Cottin, J.Y.Molecular hydrogen in minerals as a clue to interpret deltaD variations in the mantle. ( Omphacites from eclogites from Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons.)Nature Communications, doi:.org/10.1038/ s41467-020-17442 -8 11p. PdfAfrica, South Africa, Russia, Siberiawater

Abstract: Trace amounts of water dissolved in minerals affect density, viscosity and melting behaviour of the Earth’s mantle and play an important role in global tectonics, magmatism and volatile cycle. Water concentrations and the ratios of hydrogen isotopes in the mantle give insight into these processes, as well as into the origin of terrestrial water. Here we show the presence of molecular H2 in minerals (omphacites) from eclogites from the Kaapvaal and Siberian cratons. These omphacites contain both high amounts of H2 (70 to 460 wt. ppm) and OH. Furthermore, their ?D values increase with dehydration, suggesting a positive H isotope fractionation factor between minerals and H2-bearing fluid, contrary to what is expected in case of isotopic exchange between minerals and H2O-fluids. The possibility of incorporation of large quantities of H as H2 in nominally anhydrous minerals implies that the storage capacity of H in the mantle may have been underestimated, and sheds new light on H isotope variations in mantle magmas and minerals.
DS2001-0789
2001
Moine, B.N. GregorieMoine, B.N. Gregorie, O'Reilly, Sheppard, CottinHigh field strength element fractionation in upper mantle: evidence from amphibole rich composite...Jour. Petrol., Vol. 42, No. 11, pp. 2145-68.Indian Ocean, Kerguelen IslandsMantle xenoliths, Geochemistry
DS2001-0721
2001
Moiseenko, V.G.Maksimov, S.O., Moiseenko, V.G., Sakho, V.G.High Potassium basalts of eruptive pipes from the eastern part of the Bureya Massif, Russian far east.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 379A, No. 6, July-August pp. 640-3.Russia, SiberiaPetrology, Bureya Massif
DS2001-1003
2001
Moiseenko, V.G.Sakhno, V.G., Matyunin, A.P., Moiseenko, V.G.Isotopic signatures of kimberlites in the Kurkhan Diamondiferous diatreme, Primore region.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 380, No. 7, Sept-Oct. pp.833-6.RussiaGeochronology
DS2002-1384
2002
Moiseenko, V.G.Sakhno, V.G., Moiseenko, V.G.Plume volcanism of East Asia craton11th. Quadrennial Iagod Symposium And Geocongress 2002 Held Windhoek, Abstract p. 39.AsiaLamproites, kamafugites
DS2002-1385
2002
Moiseenko, V.G.Sakhno, V.G., Moiseenko, V.G.High K mafic rocks of the northern Omolon CratonDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 387, 8, pp. 899=903.RussiaPotassic rocks, alkaline
DS2002-1386
2002
Moiseenko, V.G.Sakhno, V.G., Moiseenko, V.G., Zhuravlev, D.Z., Matyunin, A.P.Sm Nd ages of Diamondiferous kimberlites of the Kurkhan diatreme in the Khanka Massif, Primor'e region.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 387A, 9, pp. 1110-1112.RussiaGeochronology
DS2002-1387
2002
Moiseenko, V.G.Sakhno, V.G., Moiseenko, V.G., Zhuravlev, D.Z., Matyunin, A.P.Sm Nd age of Diamondiferous kimberlites of the Kurkhan diatreme in the Khanka Massif Primore region.Geochemistry International, Vol. 40, 12, pp. 110-2.RussiaGeochronology
DS200912-0259
2009
Moiseev, E.I.Gorbatikov, A.V., Larin, N.V., Moiseev, E.I., Belyashov, A.V.The microseismic sounding method: application for the study of the buried diatreme structure.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 428, 1, pp. 1222-1226.TechnologyGeophysics - seismics
DS2000-0461
2000
Moisio, K.Kaikkonen, P., Moisio, K., Heeremans, M.Thermomechanical lithospheric structure of the Central Fennoscandian ShieldPhysical Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 119, No.3-4, May. pp.209-35.Finland, Baltic Shield, FennoscandiaGeothermometry, Tectonics, seismicity
DS2000-0676
2000
Moisio, K.Moisio, K., Kaikkonen, P., Beekman, F.Rheological structure and dynamic response of the DSS profile Baltic in the southeast Fennoscandian Shield.Tectonophysics, Vol. 320, No. 3-4, May pp. 175-94.Finland, ScandinaviaGeodynamics, tectonics, Geophysics - seismics
DS2001-0790
2001
Moisio, K.Moisio, K., Kaikkonen, P.Geodynamics and rheology of the lithosphere along the DSS profile SVEKA in theTectonophysics, Vol. 340, No. 1-2, pp. 61-77.Finland, Scandinavia, BalticaTectonics, Geophysics
DS200712-0740
2006
Moisio, K.Moisio, K., Kaikkonen, P.Three dimensional numerical thermal and rheological modelling in the central Fennoscandian Shield.Journal of Geodynamics, Vol. 42, 4-5, Nov-Dec. pp. 95-210.Europe, Finland, SwedenGeothermometry
DS1992-1080
1992
Moison, D.L.Moison, D.L., Sperry, D.R.Influence of production costs and inventories on mineral pricesNatural Resources forum, November pp. 271-276GlobalEconomics, Industrial minerals
DS1860-0807
1893
Moissan, F.F.H.Moissan, F.F.H.Sur la Presence du Graphite du Carbonado et Les Diamants Microscopiques dans la Terre Bleue du Cap. De Beers mineAcademy of Science (PARIS) C.R., Vol. 116, PP. 292-295. ALSO: SOC. CHIM. (PARIS) Bulletin., Vol.Africa, South Africa, Griqualand WestCarbonado
DS1860-0947
1896
Moissan, F.F.H.Moissan, F.F.H.Recherches sur les Differentes Varietes de CarboneParis:, 152P.GlobalCarbon
DS1900-0345
1905
Moissan, F.F.H.Moissan, F.F.H.Nouvelles Recherches sur la Reproduction the du DiamantParis: Extrait Des Annual De Chem. Phys. 8th. Ser., Vol. 5, JUNE, 34P.GlobalDiamond Synthesis, Kimberley
DS1860-0853
1894
Moissan, H.Moissan, H.Nouvelles Experiences sur la Reproduction du DiamantAcademy of Science (PARIS), C.R., Vol. 117, PP. 320-326.GlobalSynthetics
DS1860-0999
1897
Moissan, H.Moissan, H.Le Four ElectriqueParis: Steinheil, 385P.GlobalMineralogy
DS1900-0068
1901
Moissan, H.Moissan, H.Sur Quelques Experiences Nouvelles Relatives a la Preparation du Diamant.Academy of Science (PARIS) C.R., Vol. 133, PP. 206-210.GlobalCrystallography, Synthesis
DS1900-0265
1904
Moissan, H.Moissan, H.Diamant, 1904In: Traite De Chimie Minerale., PP. 188-218.GlobalMineralogy, Kimberley, Janlib
DS200612-0098
2005
Moitra, M.Basu, A., Das, L.K., Moitra, M., Bhattacharya, D., Lahiri, A.K.On the occurrence of rocks of lamproitic affinity in Singhbhum granite, near Rajnaga Tiring area, district of Singhbhum, Jharkland.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 65, pp. 15-16.IndiaLamproite
DS200512-0740
2004
Mojzsis, S.J.Mojzsis, S.J.The first billion years: new insights from geochemistry.Precambrian Research, Vol. 135, 4, Dec. 15, pp. 245-250.MantleGeochemistry
DS200612-0540
2005
Mojzsis, S.J.Harrison, T.M., Blichert-Toft, J., Muller, W., Albarede, F., Holden, P., Mojzsis, S.J.Heterogeneous Hadean hafnium: evidence of continental crust 4.4 to 4.5 Ga.Science, Vol. 310, 5736 Dec. 23, pp. 1947-1949.MantleGeochronology
DS200612-0541
2006
Mojzsis, S.J.Harrison, T.M., McCulloch, M.T., Blichert-Toft, J., Albarede, F., Holden, P., Mojzsis, S.J.Further Hf isotope evidence for Hadean continental crust.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, 1, p. 14, abstract only.MantleGeochronology
DS200812-0182
2008
Mojzsis, S.J.Caro, G., Bennett, V.C., Bourdon, B., Harrison, T.M., Von Quadt, A., Mojzsis, S.J., Harris, J.W.Application of precise 142 Nd 144 Nd analysis of small samples to inclusions in diamonds ( Finsch SA ) and Hadean zircons ( Jack Hills, Western Australia).Chemical Geology, Vol. 247, 1-2, pp. 253-265.Africa, South Africa, AustraliaGeochronology
DS201212-0429
2012
Mojzsis, S.J.Maier, A.C., Cates, N.L., Trail, D., Mojzsis, S.J.Geology, age and field relations of Hadean zircon bearing supracrustal rocks from Quad Creek, eastern Beartooth Mountains ( Montana and Wyoming) USA.Chemical Geology, Vol. 312-313, pp. 47-57.United States, MontanaWyoming Craton, geochronology
DS201905-1018
2019
Mojzsis, S.J.Bohm, C.O., Hartlaub, R.P., Heaman, L.M., Cates, N., Guitreau, M., Bourdon, B., Roth, A.S.G., Mojzsis, S.J., Blichert-Toft, J.The Assean Lake Complex: ancient crust at the northwestern margin of the Superior Craton, Manitoba, Canada.Earths Oldest Rocks, researchgate.com Chapter 28, 20p. Pdf availableCanada, Manitobacraton

Abstract: This chapter describes the Assean Lake Complex (ALC) at ancient crust at the Northwestern margin of the Superior Craton, Manitoba, and Canada. An initial tectonic model for the Assean Lake area indicated that a regionally extensive high-strain zone running through the lake marks the suture between Archean high-grade crustal terranes of the Superior Craton to the southeast and Paleoproterozoic rocks of the Trans-Hudson Orogen to the northwest. Detailed geologic remapping combined with isotopic and geochemical studies led to a re-interpretation of the crust immediately north of the Assean Lake high-strain zone as Mesoarchean. The study area straddles the boundary between the Archean Superior Craton and the ca.1.90-1.84 Ga arc and marginal basin rocks of the Trans-Hudson Orogen, which represent the remains of ca. 1.83-1.76 Ga ocean closure and orogeny. It is indicated that the gneisses of the Split Lake Block consist primarily of meta-igneous protoliths of gabbroic to granitic composition. Tonalite and granodiorite are the most volumetrically dominant, but an anorthosite dome is also present in the northeast. Mapping, isotopic, and age data combined with high-resolution aero-magnetic data indicate that the Mesoarchean ALC is a crustal slice up to 10 km wide, and has a strike length of at least 50 km.
DS202002-0167
2019
Mojzsis, S.J.Bohm, C.O., Hartlaub, R.P., Heaman, L.M., Cates, N., Guitreau, M., Bourdon, B., Roth, A.S.G., Mojzsis, S.J., Blichert-Toft, J.The Assean Lake Complex: ancient crust at the northwestern margin of the Superior craton, Manitoba, Canada. ( not specific to diamonds)Earth's Oldest Rocks, Chapter 28, 20p. Pdf.Canada, Manitobacraton
DS201605-0872
2016
Mokgalaka, L.Mokgalaka, L., Langenhoven, J., du Toit, R.Progress update on the Petra Diamonds' MTS 3D SpatialDB integration and reporting project.Diamonds Still Sparkling SAIMM 2016 Conference, Mar. 14-17, pp. 239-250.Africa, South AfricaMining - applied
DS201605-0871
2016
Mokgalaka, L. .Mokgalaka, L. .Petra Diamonds group projects: horizontal tunnel boring at Culli nan 717 undercut level tunnel 54 north.Diamonds Still Sparkling SAIMM 2016 Conference, Mar. 14-17, pp. 333-357.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Cullinan
DS201605-0873
2016
Mokgaotsane, M.T.Mokgaotsane, M.T., Hough, T., Rogers, A., Davidson, J.Resource evaluation of the KKX36 kimberlite, central Botswana.Diamonds Still Sparkling SAIMM 2016 Conference, Mar. 14-17, pp. 27-36.Africa, BotswanaDeposit - KKX36
DS1970-0998
1974
Mokhanti, R.Turgarinov, A.L., Ilin, N.P., Mokhanti, R.Distribution of Magnesium and Mn in Coexisting Titanomagnetites And Ilmenites and Their Significance As a Geothermometer.Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), No. 7, RussiaKimberlite
DS2003-1361
2003
Mokhawa, G.Taylor, I., Mokhawa, G.Not forever: Botswana, conflict diamonds and the BushmenAfrican Affairs, ( Oxford University Press), No. 407, pp. 261-84.BotswanaHistory
DS200412-1970
2003
Mokhawa, G.Taylor, I., Mokhawa, G.Not forever: Botswana, conflict diamonds and the Bushmen.African Affairs, No. 407, pp. 261-84.Africa, BotswanaHistory
DS1987-0536
1987
Mokhov, A.V.Novgorodova, M.I., Galushkin, E.V., Boyarskaya, R.V., Mokhov, A.V.Accessory minerals of lamproite like rocks of central Asia.(Russian)Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. Geol, No. 4, pp. 15-27RussiaBlank
DS1987-0537
1987
Mokhov, A.V.Novgorodova, M.I., Galuskin, Ye.V., Boyzarsdaya, R., Mokhov, A.V.Accessory minerals in lamprophyres of central Asia.(Russian)Izves.Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. Geol. (Russian), No. 4, pp. 15-27RussiaLamproite, Petrology
DS1998-0724
1998
Mokhov, A.V.Kartashov, P.M., Mokhov, A.V., Kovalenko, V.I.Rare earth Strontium pyrochlore from western Mongolia: the first find in association with alkalic granites.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 359A, No. 3, Mar-Apr. pp. 348-51.GlobalAlkaline rocks
DS2003-1256
2003
Mokhov, A.V.Sharkov, E.V., Trubkin, N.V., Krasivskaya, I.S., Bogatikov, O.A., Mokhov, A.V.The oldest volcanic glass in the Early Paleoproterozoic boninite type lavas, KarelianDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 390, 4, May-June pp. 580-4.Russia, KareliaBoninite
DS200412-1794
2003
Mokhov, A.V.Sharkov, E.V., Trubkin, N.V., Krasivskaya, I.S., Bogatikov, O.A., Mokhov, A.V.The oldest volcanic glass in the Early Paleoproterozoic boninite type lavas, Karelian craton: results of instrumental investigatDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 390, 4, May-June pp. 580-4.Russia, KareliaBoninites
DS200412-1795
2004
Mokhov, A.V.Sharkov, E.V., Trubkin, N.V., Krassivskaya, I.S., Bogatikov, O.A., Mokhov, A.V., Chistyakov, EvseevaStructural and compositional characteristics of the oldest volcanic glass in the early paleoproterozoic boninite like lavas of sPetrology, Vol.12, 3, pp. 227-244.Russia, KareliaBoninites
DS1987-0486
1987
Mokhtari, A.Mokhtari, A., Velde, D.Sector zoned kaesutite in camptonites from MoroccoMineralogical Magazine, Vol. 51, No. 359, pp. 151-156MoroccoMineralogy
DS1987-0774
1987
Mokhtari, A.Wagner, C., Velde, D., Mokhtari, A.Sector zones phlogopites in igneous rocksContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 96, pp. 186-191UtahShonkinite, Melilitite
DS1987-0775
1987
Mokhtari, A.Wagner, C., Velde, D., Mokhtari, A.Sector zoned phlogopites in igneous rocksContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 96, No.2, pp. 186-191UtahSmith Morehouse Canyon, Melilitite
DS1988-0482
1988
Mokhtari, A.Mokhtari, A., Velde, D.Xenocrysts in eocene camptonites from Taourirt, Northern MoroccoMineralogical Magazine, Vol. 52, No. 368, December pp. 587-601MoroccoCamptonite
DS1993-1686
1993
Mokhtari, A.Wagner, C., Mokhtari, A., Velde, D.Xenocrystic richterite in an olivine nephelinite -destabilization and diffusion phenomena.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 57, No. 388, September pp. 515-525.GlobalMineralogy, Nephelinite
DS1996-0986
1996
Mokhtari, A.Mokhtari, A., Wagner, C., Velde, D.Decouverte d'une enclave de carbonatite dans une camptonite de la region deTaourirt, northeast Maroc.C.r. Academy Of Science Paris, Vol. 323, 11a pp. 467-474.MoroccoCarbonatite, Camptonite
DS2003-1436
2003
Mokhtari, A.Wagner, C., Mokhtari, A., Deloule, E., Chabaux, F.Carbonatite and alkaline magmatism in Taourirt: petrological, geochemical and Sr NdJournal of Petrology, Vol. 44, 5, pp. 937-65.MoroccoCarbonatite
DS200412-2068
2003
Mokhtari, A.Wagner, C., Mokhtari, A., Deloule, E., Chabaux, F.Carbonatite and alkaline magmatism in Taourirt: petrological, geochemical and Sr Nd isotope characteristics.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 44, 5, pp. 937-65.Africa, MoroccoCarbonatite
DS1975-0364
1976
Mokshantsev, K.B.Mokshantsev, K.B., et al.Structural-tectonic Conditions and Geophysical Criteria For the Location of Kimberlite Magmatism of the Eastern Portion of the Siberian PlatformIn: Application of Geophysical Methods In Prospecting For Ki, Russia, YakutiaKimberlite, Geophysics
DS201412-0127
2014
Molaison, J.J.Chheda, T.D., Mookherjee, M., Mainprice, D., Dos Santos, A.M., Molaison, J.J., Chantel, J., Manthilake, G., Bassett, W.A.Structure and elasticity of phlogopite under compression: geophysical implications.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 233, pp. 1-12.MantleGeophysics
DS1992-0354
1992
Molan, E.Deng Jinfu, Zhao Hailing, Lai Shaocong, Molan, E., Lou Zaohua, Mo XuanxueThe mantle plume beneath the northern part of Chin a continentInternational Symposium Cenozoic Volcanic Rocks Deep seated xenoliths China and its, Abstracts pp. 15ChinaMantle, Plume
DS1984-0424
1984
Molchanov, I.D.Kostrovitskii, S.I., Molchanov, I.D., Savroasov, D.I.A Linear Zoning and Tectonic Control of Kimberlite FieldsDoklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 277, No. 5, PP. 1200-1204.RussiaTectonics
DS1984-0425
1984
Molchanov, Y.D.Kostrovitskiy, S.I., Molchanov, Y.D., Savasov, D.I.Linear Zoning and Structural Controls in Kimberlite Deposits.(russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR (Russian), Vol. 277, No. 5, pp. 1200-1203RussiaPetrology, Kimberlite
DS1986-0457
1986
Molchanov, Yu.D.Kostrovitskiy, S.I., Molchanov, Yu.D., Savrasov, D.I.Linear zoning and tectonic control of kimberlite fieldsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 277, March, No. 1-6, pp. 115-119RussiaDaldyn, Malaya Botuobaya, Distribution, Tectonics, Structure
DS200612-0628
2005
Molchanova, G.B.Ivanov, V.V., Kolesova, L.G., Khanchuk, A.I., Akatkin, V.N., Molchanova, G.B., Nechaev, V.P.Find of diamond crystals in Jurassic rocks of the Meymechite picrite complex in the Sikhote Alin Orogenic belt.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 404, 7, pp. 975-978.RussiaPicrite
DS2003-0306
2003
Moldowan, J.M.Dahl, J.E.P., Moldowan, J.M.Diamond in the rough.. collection of diamondlike compounds in oilScience News, Vol. 163, No. 20, May 17, p. 310.GlobalTechnology
DS2003-0307
2003
Moldowan, J.M.Dahl, J.E.P., Moldowan, J.M., Peakman, T.M., Clardy, J.C., Lobkovsky, E.Isolation and structural proof of the large diamond molecule, cycloheamantane (Angewandte Chemie, Vol. 42, 18, pp. 2040-44.GlobalMineral chemistry
DS200412-0397
2003
Moldowan, J.M.Dahl, J.E.P., Moldowan, J.M.Diamond in the rough.. collection of diamondlike compounds in oil.Science News, Vol. 163, no. 20, May 17, p. 310.TechnologyTechnology
DS200412-0398
2003
Moldowan, J.M.Dahl, J.E.P., Moldowan, J.M., Peakman, T.M., Clardy, J.C., Lobkovsky, E., Olmstead, M.M., May, P.W., Davis, T.Isolation and structural proof of the large diamond molecule, cycloheamantane ( C26H30).Angewandte Chemie, Vol. 42, 18, pp. 2040-44.TechnologyMineral chemistry
DS200712-1139
2006
Moldowan, J.M.Wei, Z., Moldowan, J.M., Jarvie, D.M., Hill, R.The fate of diamondoids in coals and sedimentary rocks.Geology, Vol. 34, 12, pp. 1013-1016.TechnologyDiamondoids
DS201707-1331
2017
Mole, D.R.Gorczyk, W., Mole, D.R., Barnes, S.J.Plume lithosphere interaction at craton margins throughout Earth history.Tectonophysics, in press availableMantlecraton - plumes

Abstract: Intraplate continental magmatism represents a fundamental mechanism in Earth's magmatic, thermal, chemical and environmental evolution. It is a process intimately linked with crustal development, large-igneous provinces, metallogeny and major global environmental catastrophes. As a result, understanding the interactions of continental magmas through time is vital in understanding their effect on the planet. The interaction of mantle plumes with the lithosphere has been shown to significantly affect the location and form of continental magmatism, but only at modern mantle conditions. In this study, we perform numerical modelling for Late Archean (1600 °C), Paleoproterozoic (1550 °C), Meso-Neoproteroic (1500 °C) and Phanerozoic (1450 °C) mantle potential temperatures (Tp) to assess the time-space magmatic effects of ambient-mantle- and plume- lithosphere interaction over Earth's thermal history. Within these experiments, we impinge a mantle plume, with a time-appropriate Tp, onto a ‘step-like’ lithosphere, to evaluate the effect of craton margins on continental magmatism through time. The results of this modelling demonstrate that lithospheric architecture controls the volume and location of continental magmatism throughout Earth history, irrespective of ambient mantle or plume Tp. In all plume models, mantle starting plumes (diameter 300 km) impinge on the base of the lithosphere, and spread laterally over > 1600 km, flowing into the shallowest mantle, and producing the highest volume magmas. In ambient-mantle only models, Archean and Paleoproterozoic Tp values yield significant sub-lithospheric melt volumes, resulting in ‘passive’ geodynamic emplacement of basaltic magmatic provinces, whereas no melts are extracted at > 100 km for Meso-Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic Tp. This indicates a major transition in non-subduction related continental magmatism from plume and ambient mantle to a plume-dominated source around the Mesoproterozoic. While the experiments presented here show the variation in plume-lithosphere interaction through time, the consistency in melt localisation indicates the lithosphere has been a first-order control on continental magmatism since its establishment in the Mesoarchean.
DS201801-0019
2017
Mole, D.R.Gorczyk, W., Mole, D.R., Barnes, S.J.Plume lithosphere interaction at craton margins throughout Earth history.Tectonophysics, in press available, 17p.Mantleplume

Abstract: Intraplate continental magmatism represents a fundamental mechanism in Earth's magmatic, thermal, chemical and environmental evolution. It is a process intimately linked with crustal development, large-igneous provinces, metallogeny and major global environmental catastrophes. As a result, understanding the interactions of continental magmas through time is vital in understanding their effect on the planet. The interaction of mantle plumes with the lithosphere has been shown to significantly affect the location and form of continental magmatism, but only at modern mantle conditions. In this study, we perform numerical modelling for Late Archean (1600 °C), Paleoproterozoic (1550 °C), Meso-Neoproteroic (1500 °C) and Phanerozoic (1450 °C) mantle potential temperatures (Tp) to assess the time-space magmatic effects of ambient-mantle- and plume- lithosphere interaction over Earth's thermal history. Within these experiments, we impinge a mantle plume, with a time-appropriate Tp, onto a ‘step-like’ lithosphere, to evaluate the effect of craton margins on continental magmatism through time. The results of this modelling demonstrate that lithospheric architecture controls the volume and location of continental magmatism throughout Earth history, irrespective of ambient mantle or plume Tp. In all plume models, mantle starting plumes (diameter 300 km) impinge on the base of the lithosphere, and spread laterally over > 1600 km, flowing into the shallowest mantle, and producing the highest volume magmas. In ambient-mantle only models, Archean and Paleoproterozoic Tp values yield significant sub-lithospheric melt volumes, resulting in ‘passive’ geodynamic emplacement of basaltic magmatic provinces, whereas no melts are extracted at > 100 km for Meso-Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic Tp. This indicates a major transition in non-subduction related continental magmatism from plume and ambient mantle to a plume-dominated source around the Mesoproterozoic. While the experiments presented here show the variation in plume-lithosphere interaction through time, the consistency in melt localisation indicates the lithosphere has been a first-order control on continental magmatism since its establishment in the Mesoarchean.
DS201901-0036
2018
Mole, D.R.Gorczyk, W., Mole, D.R., Barnes, S.J.Plume lithosphere interaction at craton margins throughout Earth history.Tectonophysics, Vol. 746, pp. 678-694.Mantlecraton

Abstract: Intraplate continental magmatism represents a fundamental mechanism in Earth's magmatic, thermal, chemical and environmental evolution. It is a process intimately linked with crustal development, large-igneous provinces, metallogeny and major global environmental catastrophes. As a result, understanding the interactions of continental magmas through time is vital in understanding their effect on the planet. The interaction of mantle plumes with the lithosphere has been shown to significantly affect the location and form of continental magmatism, but only at modern mantle conditions. In this study, we perform numerical modelling for Late Archean (1600 °C), Paleoproterozoic (1550 °C), Meso-Neoproteroic (1500 °C) and Phanerozoic (1450 °C) mantle potential temperatures (Tp) to assess the time-space magmatic effects of ambient-mantle- and plume- lithosphere interaction over Earth's thermal history. Within these experiments, we impinge a mantle plume, with a time-appropriate Tp, onto a ‘step-like’ lithosphere, to evaluate the effect of craton margins on continental magmatism through time. The results of this modelling demonstrate that lithospheric architecture controls the volume and location of continental magmatism throughout Earth history, irrespective of ambient mantle or plume Tp. In all plume models, mantle starting plumes (diameter 300 km) impinge on the base of the lithosphere, and spread laterally over > 1600 km, flowing into the shallowest mantle, and producing the highest volume magmas. In ambient-mantle only models, Archean and Paleoproterozoic Tp values yield significant sub-lithospheric melt volumes, resulting in ‘passive’ geodynamic emplacement of basaltic magmatic provinces, whereas no melts are extracted at > 100 km for Meso-Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic Tp. This indicates a major transition in non-subduction related continental magmatism from plume and ambient mantle to a plume-dominated source around the Mesoproterozoic. While the experiments presented here show the variation in plume-lithosphere interaction through time, the consistency in melt localisation indicates the lithosphere has been a first-order control on continental magmatism since its establishment in the Mesoarchean.
DS201906-1325
2019
Mole, D.R.Mole, D.R., Kirkland, C.L., Fiorentinim M.L., Barnes, S.J., Cassidy, K.F., Isaac, C., Belousova, E.A., Hartnady, M., Thebaud, N.Time space evolution of an Archean craton: a Hf-isotope window into continent formation. YilgarnEarth Science Reviews, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earscrev.2019.05.03Australiacraton

Abstract: The Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia represents one of the largest pieces of Precambrian crust on Earth, and a key repository of information on the Meso-Neoarchean period. Understanding the crustal, tectonic, thermal, and chemical evolution of the craton is critical in placing these events into an accurate geological context, as well as developing holistic tectonic models for the Archean Earth. Here, we present a large U-Pb (420 collated samples) and Hf isotopic (2163 analyses) dataset on zircon, and apply it to constrain the evolution of the craton. These data provide strong evidence for a Hadean-Eoarchean origin for the Yilgarn Craton from mafic crust at ca. 4000?Ma, in a proto-craton consisting of the Narryer and north-central Southern Cross Domain. This ancient cratonic nucleus was subsequently rifted, expanded and reworked by successive crustal growth events at ca. 3700?Ma, ca. 3300?Ma, 3000-2900?Ma, 2825-2800?Ma, and ca. 2730-2620?Ma. The <3050?Ma crustal growth events correlate broadly with known komatiite events, and patterns of craton evolution, revealed by Hf isotope time-slice mapping, image the periodic break-up of the Yilgarn proto-continent and the formation of rift-zones between the older crustal blocks. Crustal growth and new magmatic pulses were focused into these zones and at craton margins, resulting in continent growth via internal (rift-enabled) expansion, and peripheral (crustal extraction at craton margins) magmatism. Consequently, we interpret these major geodynamic processes to be analogous to plume-lid tectonics, where the majority of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) felsic crust, and later granitic crust, was formed by reworking of hydrated mafic rocks and TTGs, respectively, via a combination of infracrustal and/or drip-tectonic settings. We argue that subduction-like processes formed a minor tectonic component, re-docking the Narryer Terrane to the craton at ca. 2740?Ma. Overall, these processes led to an intra-cratonic architecture of younger, juvenile terranes located internal and external to older, long-lived, reworked crustal blocks. This framework provided pathways that localized later magmas and fluids, driving the exceptional mineral endowment of the Yilgarn Craton.
DS202001-0040
2019
Mole, D.R.Smithies, R.H., Lu, Y., Johnson, T.E., Kirkland, C.L., Cassidy, K.F., Champion, D.C., Mole, D.R., Zibra, I., Gessner, K., Sapkota, J., De Paoli, M.C., Poujol, M.No evidence for high pressure melting of Earth's crust in the Archean.Nature Communicatons, Vol. 10, 555912p. PdfAustraliamelting

Abstract: Much of the present-day volume of Earth’s continental crust had formed by the end of the Archean Eon, 2.5 billion years ago, through the conversion of basaltic (mafic) crust into sodic granite of tonalite, trondhjemite and granodiorite (TTG) composition. Distinctive chemical signatures in a small proportion of these rocks, the so-called high-pressure TTG, are interpreted to indicate partial melting of hydrated crust at pressures above 1.5?GPa (>50?km depth), pressures typically not reached in post-Archean continental crust. These interpretations significantly influence views on early crustal evolution and the onset of plate tectonics. Here we show that high-pressure TTG did not form through melting of crust, but through fractionation of melts derived from metasomatically enriched lithospheric mantle. Although the remaining, and dominant, group of Archean TTG did form through melting of hydrated mafic crust, there is no evidence that this occurred at depths significantly greater than the ~40?km average thickness of modern continental crust.
DS1860-0672
1890
Molengraaff, G.A.F.Molengraaff, G.A.F.Het Voorkomen Van Diamant Op AardeDe Diamant ( Amsterdam), PP. 318-322.Africa, South Africa, GlobalDiamond recovery
DS1860-0673
1890
Molengraaff, G.A.F.Molengraaff, G.A.F.Schets Van de Bodemgesteldheid Van de Zuid-afrikaansche Republiek in Verband Met die Van Zuid Afrika Bewerkt Zaar de Voornaamste Bronnen Tot 1890.Nederl. Aardr. Gen. Tydschr., Vol. 2, No. 7, PP. 579-630.Africa, South Africa, TransvaalRegional Geology
DS1860-0904
1895
Molengraaff, G.A.F.Molengraaff, G.A.F.Ueber Ein Vorkommen von Diamanten in Dem Gebiete der Kohlenfuehrenden Formation Bei Driekop im Oranje-freistaat. KoonstadNeues Jahrbuch fnr Mineralogie, BD. 1894/1895, PP. 277-283.Africa, South Africa, Orange Free StateGeology
DS1860-1000
1897
Molengraaff, G.A.F.Molengraaff, G.A.F.Diamonds at Rietfontein. #1 Premier mineGeological Society of South Africa Transactions, Vol. 2, PP. 122-123.Africa, South Africa, TransvaalAlluvial Placers
DS1860-1040
1898
Molengraaff, G.A.F.Molengraaff, G.A.F.Diamonds at Rietfontein. #2 PremierGeological Society of South Africa Transactions, Vol. 3, PT. 2, P. 150. ALSO: Geological Society of SouthAfrica, South Africa, TransvaalAlluvial Placers
DS1900-0069
1901
Molengraaff, G.A.F.Molengraaff, G.A.F.Bericht Ueber die de Kroon Diamant Mine. Geol. Aufn. der S.a. Rep.Jahrb. U D. Jahr. 1898, Pretoria In 1900, 348P. ALSO: Neues Jahrbuch fnr Mineralogie 1903 BD. 2, PP. 93-94.Africa, South AfricaDiamond Mining
DS1900-0070
1901
Molengraaff, G.A.F.Molengraaff, G.A.F.Geologie de la Republic Sud Africaine du TransvaalGeological Society FRANCE (PARIS) Bulletin., PP. 13-92. ALSO: Annual GEOGR. (PARIS), Vol. 10, 1901 PP. 450-Africa, South AfricaGeology, Regional
DS1900-0071
1901
Molengraaff, G.A.F.Molengraaff, G.A.F.La Geologie de la Republique Sued AfricaineParis:, 100P.Africa, South AfricaKimberley, Geology, Diamond
DS1900-0266
1904
Molengraaff, G.A.F.Molengraaff, G.A.F.Geology of the TransvaalEdinburgh: Constable., 90P.Africa, South AfricaRegional Geology, Kimberley
DS1900-0346
1905
Molengraaff, G.A.F.Molengraaff, G.A.F.The Cullinan StoneSouth Africa Mines Commerce and Industry, Vol. 2, Feb. 4TH. P. 1050.Africa, South AfricaDiamonds Notable, Premier
DS1910-0298
1912
Molengraaff, G.A.F.Molengraaff, G.A.F.Story of the Culli nan DiamondSouth African Mining Journal 21ST. ANNIVERSARY VOLUME., Vol. 21A, P. 97.South Africa, TransvaalPremier Mine, Diamonds Notable
DS1984-0228
1984
Molin, G.M.Del negro, A., Carbonin, S., Domeneghetti, C., Molin, G.M.Crystal Chemistry and Evolution of the Clinopyroxene in a SuContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 86, No. 3, PP. 221-229.AustraliaRelated Rocks
DS201802-0228
2018
Molin, P.Corti, G., Molin, P., Sembroni, A., Bastow, I.D., Keir, D.Control of pre-rift lithospheric structure on the architecture and evolution of continental rifts: insights from the Main Ethiopian Rift, East Africa.Tectonics, Africa, Ethiopiatectonics

Abstract: We investigate the along-axis variations in architecture, segmentation and evolution of the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER), East Africa, and relate these characteristics to the regional geology, lithospheric structure and surface processes. We first illustrate significant along-axis variations in basin architecture through analysis of simplified geological cross-sections in different rift sectors. We then integrate this information with a new analysis of Ethiopian topography and hydrography to illustrate how rift architecture (basin symmetry/asymmetry) is reflected in the margin topography and has been likely amplified by a positive feedback between tectonics (flexural uplift) and surface processes (fluvial erosion, unloading). This analysis shows that ~70% of the 500 km-long MER is asymmetric, with most of the asymmetric rift sectors being characterized by a master fault system on the eastern margin. We finally relate rift architecture and segmentation to the regional geology and geophysical constraints on the lithosphere. We provide strong evidence that rift architecture is controlled by the contrasting nature of the lithosphere beneath the homogeneous, strong Somalian Plateau and the weaker, more heterogeneous Ethiopian Plateau, differences originating from the presence of pre-rift zones of weakness on the Ethiopian Plateau and likely amplified by surface processes. The data provided by this integrated analysis suggest that asymmetric rifts may directly progress to focused axial tectonic-magmatic activity, without transitioning into a symmetric rifting stage. These observations have important implications for the asymmetry of continental rifts and conjugate passive margins worldwide.
DS2002-0582
2002
MolinaGloday, J., Bingen, B., Austrheim, Molina, RusinPrecise eclogitization ages deduced from Rb Sr mineral systematics: the Maksyutov complex, southern Urals.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 66,7,pp. 1221-35.Russia, southern UralsSubduction related high pressure metamorphism
DS1993-1116
1993
Molina, E.Neisi Cogo de Sa, Ussami, N., Cassola, Molina, E.Gravity map of Brasil:. 1. representation of free air and bougueranomalies.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 98, No. B2, February 10, pp. 2187-2198.BrazilGravity, Map
DS2002-1073
2002
Molina, J.F.Molina, J.F., Austrheim, H., Glodny, J., Rusin, A.The eclogites of the Marun Keu complex: fluid control on reaction kinetics and metasomatism during high P metamorphismLithos, Vol.61, 1-2, March, pp. 55-78.Russia, Polar UralsMetamorphism - metasomatism, Eclogites
DS2002-1074
2002
Molina, J.F.Molina, J.F., Austrheim, H., Glodny, J., Rusin, A.The eclogites of the Marun-Keu complex, Polar Urals: fluid control on reaction kinetics and metasomatism UHPLithos, Vol. 61, No.1-2,pp. 55-78.Russia, UralsEclogites, Metamorphism - high P
DS200412-1350
2004
Molina, J.F.Molina, J.F., Poli, S., Austrheim, J., Glodny, J., Rusin, A.Eclogite facies vein systems in the Marun-Keu complex ( Polar Urals, Russia): textural, chemical, thermal constraints for patterContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 147, 4, pp. 484-504.Russia, UralsEclogite
DS201603-0401
2016
Molina, J.F.Montero, P., Haissen, F., Mouttaqi, A., Molina, J.F., Errami, A., Sadki, O., Cambeses, A., Bea, F.Contrasting SHRIMP U-Pb zircon ages of two carbonatite complexes from the peri-cratonic terranes of the Reguibat shield: implications for the lateral extension of the West African Craton.Gondwana Research, in press available 13p.Africa, West AfricaCarbonatite

Abstract: The Oulad Dlim Massif of the Western Reguibat Shield contains several carbonatite complexes of previously unknown age. The largest and best studied are Gleibat Lafhouda, composed of magnesiocarbonatites, and Twihinate, composed of calciocarbonatites. Gleibat Lafhouda is hosted by Archean gneisses and schists. It has a SHRIMP U-Th-Pb zircon crystallization age of 1.85 ± 0.03 Ga, a Nd model age of TCR = 1.89 ± 0.03 Ga, and a Sm-Nd age of 1.85 ± 0.39 Ga. It forms part of the West Reguibat Alkaline province. Twihinate, on the other hand, is much younger. It is hosted by Late Silurian to Early Devonian deformed granites and has a zircon crystallization age of 104 ± 4 Ma, which is within error of the age of the carbonatites of the famous Richat Structure in the southwest Reguibat Shield. Like these, the Twihinate carbonatites are part of the Mid-Cretaceous Peri-Atlantic Alkaline Pulse. The Twihinate carbonatites contain abundant inherited zircons with ages that peak at ca. 420 Ma, 620 Ma, 2050 Ma, 2466 Ma, and 2830 Ma. This indicates that their substratum has West African rather than, as previously suggested, Avalonian affinities. It has, however, a Paleoproterozoic component that is not found in the neighboring western Reguibat Shield. The 421 Ma to 410 Ma gneissic granites hosting Twihinate are epidote + biotite + Ca-rich garnet deformed I-type to A-type granites derived from magmas of deep origin compatible, therefore, with being generated in a subduction environment. These granites form a body of unknown dimensions and petrogenesis, the study of which will be of key importance for understanding the geology and crustal architecture of this region.
DS200612-1100
2006
Molina, J-F.Poli, S., Molina, J-F., Franzolin, E.Fe Mg Ca partitioning between carbonates, garnet and clinopyroxene at high pressure: experimental constraints in mafic systems up to 6 GPa.International Mineralogical Association 19th. General Meeting, held Kobe, Japan July 23-28 2006, Abstract p.TechnologyEclogite, carbonatite
DS1993-1064
1993
Molina-Garza, R.Molina-Garza, R., Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.Deep crustal structure of central Mexico derived from interpretation of Bouguer gravity anomaly dataJournal of Geodynamics, Vol. 17, No. 4, August, pp. 181-203MexicoGeophysics -gravity, Tectonics
DS1989-0089
1989
Molinaro, E.Basu, A., Molinaro, E.Provenance characteristics of detrital opaque iron-Ti oxide mineralsJournal of Sed. Petrology, Vol. 59, No. 6, November pp. 922-934GlobalSedimentology, Opaque minerals -general
DS1993-1065
1993
Molinarolit, E.Molinarolit, E., Basu, A.Toward quantitative provenance analysis: a brief review and case studyGeol.Soc. American Special Paper, No. 284, pp. 323-333.MontanaGarnets, Geochemistry, bulk chemistry, petrography
DS2001-0722
2001
MolkentinMalevsky-Malevich, S.P., Molkentin, NadyozhinaNumerical simulation of permafrost parameters distribution in RussiaCold Regions Science and Tech., Vol. 32, No. 1, pp. 1-11.RussiaPermafrost, climate change - not specific to diamonds
DS1982-0445
1982
Moll, S.H.Moll, S.H.Reconnaissance Geologic Mapping in North Central Colorado United State sing Multispectral Gamma Ray Data.International/ Symposium REMOTE SENSING of THE ENVIRONMENT, SECOND THEM, PP. 86-87. (abstract.).United States, State Line, ColoradoRemote Sensing
DS1950-0340
1957
Mollard, J.R.Mollard, J.R.Aerial Mosaics Reveal Fracture Patterns on Surface Materials in Southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba.Oil In Canada., Vol. AUGUST 5TH. PP. 27-50.Canada, Saskatchewan, ManitobaGeotectonics, Lineaments
DS1995-1286
1995
Moller, A.Moller, A., Appel, P., Mezgerm K., Schenk, V.Evidence for a 2 Ga subduction zone: eclogites in the Usagaran belt ofTanzaniaGeology, Vol. 23, No. 12, Dec. pp. 1067-1070TanzaniaGeochronology, Subduction, eclogites
DS1998-1028
1998
Moller, A.Moller, A., Mezger, K., Schenk, V.Crustal age domains and the evolution of the continental crust in the Mozambique Belt of Tanzania.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 39, No. 4, Apr. pp. 749-784.TanzaniaGeochronology, Pan African Belt, mantle
DS2001-0538
2001
Moller, C.Johannsen, L., Moller, C., Soderlund, U.Geochronology of eclogite facies metamorphism in the Sveconorwegian Province of southwest Sweden.Precambrian Research, Vol. 106, No. 3-4, Mar. 1, pp. 261-76.SwedenEclogites
DS2002-0042
2002
Moller, C.Andersson, J., Moller, C., Johansson, L.Zircon geochronology of migmatite gneisses along the mylonite zone: a major sveconorwegian terrane boundaryPrecambrian Research, Vol. 114, No. 1-2, pp. 121-47.Norway, Baltic ShieldGeochronology, Craton
DS201702-0245
2016
Moller, C.Tual, L., Pitra, P., Moller, C.P-T evolution of Precambrian eclogite in the Sveconorwegian orogen, SW Sweden.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, In press availableEurope, SwedenEclogite

Abstract: Conditions of the prograde, peak-pressure and part of the decompressional P-T path of two Precambrian eclogites in the eastern Sveconorwegian orogen have been determined using the pseudosection approach. Cores of garnet from a Fe-Ti-rich eclogite sample record a first prograde and syn-deformational stage along a Barrovian geothermal gradient from ~670 °C and 7 kbar to 710 °C and 8.5 kbar. Garnet rims grew during further burial to 16.5-19 kbar at ~850-900 °C, along a steep dP/dT gradient. The pseudosection model of a kyanite-bearing eclogite sample of more magnesian bulk composition confirms the peak conditions. Matrix reequilibration associated with subsequent near-isothermal decompression and partial exhumation produced plagioclase-bearing symplectites replacing kyanite and clinopyroxene and is estimated at 850-870 °C and 10-11 kbar. The validity of the pseudosections is discussed in detail. It is shown that in pseudosection modelling the fractionation of FeO in accessory sulphides may cause a significant shift of field boundaries (here displaced by up to 1.5 kbar and 70 °C) and must not be neglected. Fast burial, exhumation and subsequent cooling are supported by the steepness of both the prograde and the decompressional P-T paths as well as the preservation of garnet growth zoning and the symplectitic reaction textures. These features are compatible with deep tectonic burial of the eclogite-bearing continental crust as part of the underthrusting plate (Eastern Segment, continent Baltica) in a collisional setting that led to an effectively doubled crustal thickness and subsequent exhumation of the eclogites through tectonic extrusion. Our results are in accordance with regional structural and petrologic relationships, which demonstrate foreland-vergent partial exhumation of the eclogite-bearing nappe along a basal thrust zone and support a major collisional stage at c. 1 Ga. We argue that the similarities between Sveconorwegian and Himalayan eclogite occurrences emphasize the modern style of Grenvillian-aged tectonics.
DS2003-0966
2003
Moller, L.E.Moller, L.E.Jurisdiction over offshore diamond miningJournal of Energy and Natural Resources Law, Vol. 21, 2, pp. 168-185. Ingenta 1032377923NamibiaMining - legal
DS200412-1351
2003
Moller, L.E.Moller, L.E.Jurisdiction over offshore diamond mining.Journal of Energy and Natural Resources Law, Vol. 21, 2, pp. 168-185. Ingenta 1032377923Africa, NamibiaMining - legal
DS1999-0011
1999
Moller, P.Andrade, F.R.D., Moller, P., Gilg, H.A.Hydrothermal rare earth elements mineralization in the Barra do Itapirapuacarbonatite, trace elements and C, OChemical Geology, Vol. 155, No. 1-2, Mar. 1, pp. 91-114.Brazilrare earth elements (REE), inclusions, Carbonatite
DS1999-0012
1999
Moller, P.Andrade, F.R.D., Moller, P., Hohndorf, A.The effect of hydrothermal alteration Strontium neodymium isotopic signatures of the Barra do Itapirapua carbonatiteJournal of Geology, Vol. 107, No. 2, Mar. pp. 177-92.BrazilGeochronology, Carbonatite
DS201804-0721
2018
Moller, V.Moller, V., Williams-Jones, A.E.A hyper spectral study ( V-NIR-SWIR) of the Nechalacho REE-Nb_Zr deposit Canada. Thor lakeJournal of Geochemical Exploration, Vol. 188, pp. 194-215.Canada, Northwest Territoriesrare earths

Abstract: The Canadian Nechalacho rare metal deposit (Thor Lake, Northwest Territories) contains one of the of the world's largest high-grade resources of rare earth elements (REE) and a large niobium (Nb) resource (Avalon Rare Metals Inc., 2013). The deposit formed mainly by magmatic accumulation of eudialyte (a complex REE-Nb-zirconosilicate) at the top of a > 1.1 km deep and ~2 km diameter layered nepheline-sodalite syenite intrusion, the Nechalacho Layered Suite. The strongest enrichment of REE and Nb is contained in the eudialyte cumulates of the Basal Zone layer. However, a strong hydrothermal overprint modified the eudialyte cumulate layers and their host rocks to produce a variety of hydrothermal silicates and REE-Nb minerals. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the spatial distribution of the alteration minerals and identify possible mineral zoning.
DS201709-1985
2017
Mollex, G.France, L., Boulanger, M., Mollex, G., Devidal, J-L. .Oldoinyo Lengai natrocarbonatite derives from calciocarbonatite.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Africa, Tanzaniadeposit, Oldoinyo

Abstract: Carbonatites are rare magmas containing almost no silica; the corresponding crystallized rocks represent the main rare earth elements (REE) deposits in production. Oldoinyo Lengai (Tanzania) is the only active carbonatite volcano on Earth, and may be used as a natural laboratory to identify the parameters responsible for the genesis of the >500 reported fossil occurrences of carbonatite magmas. Nevertheless the carbonatites emitted at Oldoinyo Lengai are unique as alkalirich (natrocarbonatites), and their origin may not be representative of the fossil carbonatites (calcio-, ferro-, magnesio-carbonatites). Here we use three-phases melt inclusions trapped in clinopyroxenes and nephelines from cognate cumulates – that sample the active magma chamber of Oldoinyo Lengai – emitted during the 2007-08 sub-plinian explosive eruption to track the carbonatite presence within the plumbing system, and to eventually quantify its composition at depth. We show that although natrocarbonatites are emitted at Oldoinyo Lengai summit, more classical calciocarbonatites are present at magma chamber depth, consistent with rare natrocarbonatites being derived from more classical calciocarbonatites by further magma differentiation. Those unique cognate samples allows us to provide the first direct measurements of partition coefficients for major and trace elements of natural coexisting in equilibrium carbonatite and silicate melts. Partition coefficients suggests that natrocarbonatites derive from calciocarbonatites by fractionating Ca-rich, and Na-poor phases. The Oldoinyo Lengai can therefore be used as a perfect analogue of fossil igneous systems that are now exhumed, commonly lacking any relation with the initial geodynamic setting, and form REE mineral deposits.
DS201709-2034
2017
Mollex, G.Mollex, G., France, L., Furi, E., Bonnet, R., Botcharnikov, R.E., Zimmermann, L., Wilke, S., Deloule, E., Chazot, G., Kazimoto. E.O., Marty, B., Burnard, P.The Oldoinyo Lengai volcano plumbing system architecture, and composition from source to surface.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Africa, Tanzaniadeposit, Oldoinyo

Abstract: Cognate xenoliths that have been emitted during the last sub-plinian eruption in 2007-08 at Oldoinyo Lengai (OL) represent a unique opportunity to document the igneous processes occuring within the active magma chamber. Detailed petrographic descriptions coupled to a thermobarometric approach, and to the determination of volatile solubility models, allow us to identify the melt evolution at magma chamber conditions, and the storage parameters (P, T). Results indicate that a fresh phonolite melt (~1060°C) was injected into a crustal magma chamber at 11.5 ±3.5 km depth, in agreement with geophysical surveys performed during the eruption. The phonolite contains high volatile contents: 3.2 wt.% H2O and 1.4 wt.% CO2. The liquid line of descent highlights an evolution to nephelinite compositions by cooling down to 880°C. Our results support previous results related to this eruption, and are similar to the historical products emitted during the whole volcano history, allowing us to suggest that no major modification in the plumbing system has occured during the OL evolution. New noble gas results show that: i. fumaroles display constant He isotopic signature since 1988; ii. Cognate xenoliths documenting the active magma chamber and fumaroles display similar He isotopic values (6.58±0.46RA, and 7.31±0.40RA, respectively); iii. OL He isotopic composition is similar to that of other silicate volcanoes of the Arusha region, and comparable to the typical subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) range (5.2 to 7.0 RA); iv. Ne isotopic ratio of OL is following the MORB signature. Those results are interpreted as showing that 1/ no major modification in the hydrothermal system architecture has occured since 1988 despite major modification of the summit crater morphology, 2/ no contamination by either the atmospheric gases, or crustal material assimilation has occured between the magma chamber and the surface, and 3/ the source of OL and of the other silicate volcanoes in the Arusha region is a SCLM metasomatized by asthenospheric fluids.
DS201909-2063
2019
Mollex, G.Mollex, G., France, L., Boulanger, M., Devidal, J-L.Oldoinyo Lengai natrocarbonatites derive from classical calciocarbonatites: a melt inclusion approach.Goldschmidt2019, 1p. AbstractAfrica, Tanzaniadeposit - Oldoinyo Lengai

Abstract: Carbonatites are rare magmas containing almost no silica; their igneous counterparts represent the main rare earth element deposits inoperation. No consensus exists on their origin, genesis and evolution. Oldoinyo Lengai (Tanzania) is the only active carbonatite volcano, but the alkali-rich natrocarbonatites it erupts are unique among the >500 reported fossil carbonatite occurrences. Here, we use threephase melt inclusions hosted in minerals from cognate cumulates (clinopyroxene, nepheline, Ti-garnet, interstitial melt)— which sampled the active Oldoinyo Lengai magma chamber during the 2007-08 sub-Plinian explosive eruption—to track the carbonatite presence within the plumbing system, and to eventually quantify its composition at depth. We show that although natrocarbonatites are emitted at the Oldoinyo Lengai summit, more classical calciocarbonatites are present at magma chamber depth (~3.5 kbar, 1050 to 900°C), which is consistent with the model of rare natrocarbonatites deriving from calciocarbonatites by further magma differentiation. We also show that those calciocarbonatites are not isolated but rather conjugated with alkali-rich silica melt suggesting a joint evolution. We eventually present the first direct measurements of major and trace element partition coefficients between natural coexisting carbonate and silicate melts. Partitioning behaviour and recent experiments support our conclusion that natrocarbonatites derive from calciocarbonatites by fractionating Ca-rich, Na-poor phases. As natrocarbonatites are highly unstable at surface conditions, they were likely erupted but not preserved in association with fossil calciocarbonatites worldwide. Oldoinyo Lengai can then be considered as representative of other carbonatite systems, and provide us with the unique opportunity to observe the plumbing system architecture, and to constrain the protracted differentiation path of a carbonatite system.
DS202101-0037
2020
Molli, G.Vannucchi, P., Morgan, J.P., Polonia, A., Molli, G.The life cycle of subcontinental peridotites: from rifted continental margins to mountains via subduction processes.Geology, Vol. 48, pp. 1154-1158. pdfMantlesubduction

Abstract: Serpentinization greatly affects the physical and chemical properties of lithospheric mantle. Here we address the fate of serpentinized peridotites and their influence over an entire Wilson cycle. We document the near-surface journey of serpentinized subcontinental peridotites exhumed during rifting and continental breakup, reactivated as buoyant material during subduction, and ultimately emplaced as "ophiolite-like" fragments within orogenic belts. This life cycle is particularly well documented in former Tethys margins, where recent studies describe the ongoing incorporation of Mesozoic serpentinized subcontinental peridotites that diapirically rise from a subducting lower plate’s mantle to be emplaced into the accretionary prism in front of a continental arc. This newly recognized mode of subduction-linked serpentine diapirism from the downgoing lithospheric slab is consistent with the origin of some exhumed serpentinized subcontinental peridotites in the Apennines (Italy), these assemblages reaching their present locations during Alpine orogenesis. Transfer of serpentinized subcontinental peridotites from the downgoing to the overriding plate motivates the concept of a potentially "leaky" subduction channel. Weak serpentine bodies may in fact rise into, preferentially migrate within, and eventually leave the intraplate shear zone, leading to strong lateral heterogeneities in its composition and mechanical strength.
DS201112-0695
2011
Mollo, S.Mollo, S., Vinciguerra, S., Lezzi, G., Iarocci, A., Scarlato, P., Heap, M.J., Dingwell, D.B.Volcanic edifice weakening via devolatization reactions.Geophysical Journal International, In press, availableMantleVolcanism - not specific to diamonds
DS201312-0583
2013
Mollo, S.Masotta, M., Mollo, S., Freda, C., Gaeta, M., Moore, G.Clinopyroxene liquid thermometers and barometers specific to alkaline differentiated magmas.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 166, 6, pp. 1545-1561.Europe, ItalyCurrent volcanic eruptions
DS201904-0790
2019
Mollo, S.Ubide, T., Mollo, S., Zhao, J-x., Nazzari, M., Scarlato, P.Sector zoned clinopyroxene as a recorder of magma history, eruption triggers, and ascent rates.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, dor:10.1016/j.gca.2019.02.021Mantlemagmatism

Abstract: Sector-zoned clinopyroxene is common in igneous rocks, but has been overlooked in the study of magmatic processes. Whilst concentric zoning is commonly used as a record of physicochemical changes in the melt feeding crystal growth, clinopyroxene is also highly sensitive to crystallisation kinetics. In sector-zoned crystals, the fidelity of compositional changes as recorders of magma history is dubious and the interplay between thermodynamic and kinetic controls remains poorly understood. Here we combine electron probe and laser ablation micro-chemical maps of titanaugite crystals from Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy) to explore the origin of sector zoning at the major and trace element levels, and its implications for the interpretation of magmatic histories. Elemental maps afford the possibility to revisit sector zoning from a spatially controlled perspective. The most striking observation is a clear decoupling of elements into sectors vs. concentric zones within single crystals. Most notably, Al-Ti enrichments and Si-Mg depletions in the prism sectors {1?0?0}, {1?1?0} and {0?1?0} relative to the hourglass (or basal) sectors {-1?1?1} correlate with enrichments in rare earth elements and highly charged high field strength elements due to cation exchanges driven by kinetic effects. In contrast, transition metals (Cr, Ni, Sc) show little partitioning into sectors and strong enrichments in concentric zones following resorbed surfaces, interpreted as evidence of mafic recharge and magma mixing. Our results document that kinetic partitioning has minor effects on the compositional variations of cations with low charge relative to the ideal charge/radius of the structural site they occupy in the clinopyroxene lattice. We suggest that this may be due to a lower efficiency in charge balance mechanisms compared to highly charged cations. It follows that compatible metals such as Cr can be considered trustworthy recorders of mafic intrusions and eruption triggers even in sector-zoned crystals. We also observe that in alkaline systems where clinopyroxene crystallisation takes place at near-equilibrium conditions, sector zoning should have little effect on Na-Ca partitioning and in turn, on the application of experimentally calibrated thermobarometers. Our data show that whilst non-sector-zoned crystals form under relatively stagnant conditions, sector zoning develops in response to low degrees of undercooling, such as during slow magma ascent. Thus, we propose that the chemistry of sector-zoned crystals can provide information on magma history, eruption triggers, and possibly ascent rates.
DS1998-1029
1998
Mollre, C.Mollre, C.Decompressed eclogites in Sveconorwegian ( Grenvillian) orogen of southwestSweden: petrology and tectonic implicationJournal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 16, No. 5, Sept. 1, pp. 641-656.SwedenEclogites, Tectonics
DS1997-0015
1997
Moll-StalcupAkinin, V.V., Roden, M., Francis, D., Apt, J., Moll-StalcupCompositional and thermal state of the upper mantle beneath the Bering Seabasalt Province: evidence....Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 34, No. 6, June pp. 789-800.RussiaChukchi Peninsula, Basalts
DS1999-0488
1999
Molnar, F.Molnar, F., Lexa, J., Hedenquist, J.W.Eoithermal mineralization of the Western CarpathiansSociety of Economic Geologists Guidebook, Vol. 31, 260p.Hungary, SlovakiaBook - table of contents, Gold, metallogeny
DS201806-1236
2018
Molnar, N.E.Molnar, N.E., Cruden, a.R., Betts, P.G.Unzipping continents and the birth of microcontinents.Geology, Vol. 46, 5, pp. 451-454.Mantlegeodynamics

Abstract: Microcontinents occur outboard of passive margins and stranded in ocean basins. Three-dimensional analogue laboratory experiments of continental rifting demonstrate that microcontinent formation at passive margins requires a combination of preexisting linear weaknesses in the lithosphere and rotational extension. Our results suggest that separation of microcontinents from passive margins occurs during the latest stages of continental breakup, before the onset of seafloor spreading, and that preexisting lithospheric weaknesses are a first-order control on where they form. These findings suggest that microcontinent formation may be restricted to localized regions along passive margins associated with zones of lithospheric weakness, providing a new structural and tectonic framework for the interpretation of microcontinents in the geological record.
DS1989-1044
1989
Molnar, P.Molnar, P.The geologic evolution of the Tibetan Plateau. What processes have builtsuch a high region with so little topographical relief?Phil. Transactions Royal Soc. London, Vol. 328, No. 1599, July 4, pp. 350-360TibetTectonics, Plateau
DS1990-1060
1990
Molnar, P.Molnar, P., England, P.Late Cenozoic uplift of mountain ranges and global climate change: chickenor egg?Nature, Vol. 346, No. 6279, July 5, pp. 29-34GlobalMontain ranges, Tectonics
DS1993-0413
1993
Molnar, P.England, P., Molnar, P.The interpretation of inverted metamorphic isograds using simple physicalcalculationsTectonics, Vol. 12, No. 1, February pp. 145-157GlobalGeophysics -isograds, Metamorphism, faults
DS1995-0635
1995
Molnar, P.Gillespie, A., Molnar, P.Asynchronous maximum advances of mountain and continental glaciersReviews of Geophysics, Vol. 33, No. 3, August pp. 311-364.GlobalGeomorphology, Glaciation patterns
DS1995-1287
1995
Molnar, P.Molnar, P., England, P.Temperatures in zones of steady state underthrusting of young oceaniclithospheres.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 131, No. 1-2, March pp. 57-70.MantleTectonics, Subduction
DS2002-1417
2002
Molnar, P.Scherwath, M., Stern, T., Melhuish, A., Molnar, P.Pn anisotropy and distributed upper mantle deformation associated with a continential transform fault.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 89, No. 8, April 15, pp. 16-MantleTectonics, Geophysics - seismics
DS2003-0465
2003
Molnar, P.Gilbert, H.J., Sheehan, A.F., Dueker, K.G., Molnar, P.Receiver functions in the western United States with implications for upper mantleJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B5, May 1, 10.1029/2002JB001194.Colorado, WyomingGeophysics - seismics
DS2003-0466
2003
Molnar, P.Gilbert, H.J., Sheehan, A.F., Dueker, K.G., Molnar, P.Receiver functions in the western United States, with implications for upper mantleJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, 5, ETG3 DOI 10.1029/2002JB001194.United States, Colorado, WyomingGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-0664
2003
Molnar, P.Gilbert, H.J., Sheehan, A.F., Dueker, K.G., Molnar, P.Receiver functions in the western United States, with implications for upper mantle structure and dynamics.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, 5, ETG3 DOI 10.1029/2002 JB001194.United States, Colorado PlateauGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-1352
2004
Molnar, P.Molnar, P.,Jones, C.H.A test laboratory based rheological parameters of olivine from an analysis of late Cenozoic convective removal of mantle lithospGeophysical Journal International, Vol. 156, 3, pp. 555-564.United States, CaliforniaMantle - slab
DS200412-1353
2004
Molnar, P.Molnar, P., Houseman, G.A.The effects of bouyant crust on the gravitational instability of thickened mantle lithosphere at zones of intracontinental conveGeophysical Journal International, Vol. 158, 3, pp. 1134-1150.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200512-0195
2004
Molnar, P.Cottrell, E., Jaupart, C., Molnar, P.Marginal stability of thick continental lithosphere.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 31, 18, Sept. 28, 10.1029/2004 GLO20332MantleGeophsyics - seismics
DS200712-0741
2007
Molnar, P.Molnar, P., Garzione, C.N.Bounds on the viscosity coefficient of continental lithosphere from removal of mantle lithosphere beneath the Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera.Tectonics, Vol. 26, 2, TC2013South AmericaTectonics
DS200912-0509
2009
Molnar, P.Molnar, P., Stock, J.M.Slowing of India's convergence with Eurasia since 20 Ma and its implications for Tibetan mantle dynamics.Tectonics, Vol. 28, 3, TC3001India, AsiaGeodynamics
DS201506-0285
2015
Molnar, P.Molnar, P.Gravitational instability of mantle lithosphere and core complexes.Tectonics, Vol. 34, 3, pp. 478-487.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS202002-0209
2019
Molnar, P.Molnar, P.Lower mantle dynamics perceived with 50 years of hindsight from plate tectonics.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 20, 12, pp. 5619-5649.( open access)Mantleplate tectonics

Abstract: Fifty years ago, plate tectonics united many aspects of the surface geology of the Earth, but little connection to the lower mantle was seen. Today, most view plate tectonics as the relative movements of cold, top, stiff boundary layers of a convecting system that reaches to the core-mantle boundary and with aspects of the deep structure not foreseen decades ago. Large provinces in the deepest ~1,000 km, in which P and S wave speeds are relatively low, not only seem to be chemically different from the neighboring mantle and from that at shallower depths, but their distribution also correlates with some aspects of the overlying surface geology, including the positions of major plumes rising from deep in the mantle and the positions of continents 100 to 200 Ma. These correlations imply a geodynamic connection between the lower mantle and the crust. Scaling laws derived from experiments in geophysical fluid mechanics suggest that the chemically distinct provinces may be relics from the earliest formation of the earth, but if not, they nevertheless have evolved slowly on the timescales of geologic eras. A concurrent emerging view of the lower mantle, however, also places increased emphasis on a boundary at ~1,000 (±100) km depth, and this boundary might define a barrier to cold sinking slabs of lithosphere. A few isolated plumes of hot material that are also chemically different from most of the mantle penetrate this interface at 1,000 km, but it seems possible that this boundary may separate mantle convection into two separate layers, as was thought 50 years ago in the early plate tectonics era, when the 660-km discontinuity was thought to separate two independently convecting layers. If convection is better described as layered than involving the entire mantle as one layer, the old view of the driving mechanism of plate tectonics—that high lithostatic pressures at ridges push plates apart, cold, dense sinking slabs pull them down and drag over the asthenosphere resists plate motions—seems to be revalidated, and the relative motions of plates do not require a role for the lower mantle.
DS1970-0566
1972
Molochnov, G.V.Molochnov, G.V., Radionov, M.N., Genin, B.L.Use of Dipole Electric-magnetic Sounding in Determining The thickness of Alluvium During Exploration for Beach Diamond Placers in the Region of Anabar Bay.Geofiz. Metody Razved. Arkt., No. 7, PP. 68-73.Russia, YakutiaKimberlite, Geophysics
DS2002-1075
2002
Molodensky, S.M.Molodensky, S.M., Groten, E.On the models of the lower mantle viscosity consistent with the modern dat a of core - mantle boundary flattening.Studia Geophisca et Geodaetica, Ingenta 1023463147, Vol. 46, 3,pp.411-33.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS1995-0211
1995
Moloi, N.Bristow, J., Moloi, N., Solomon, M., Rocha, J.Minerals and mining in South Africa: past, present and futureProspectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC) Reprint, 8pSouth AfricaEconomics, Mining industry, legal
DS1991-1179
1991
MolopoMolopoDiamond exploration in Botswana.poor reproduction from poor origin al in a database of company activities... brief reviewMolopo Farms Complex, 1pBotswanaNews item, Brief overview of prospect
DS2002-0890
2002
Moloshag, V.P.Korobeinikov, A.F., Grabezhev, A.I., Moloshag, V.P.The behaviour of Pt, Pd and au during the formation of porphyry gold copper systems: evidence from ...Doklady, Vol.383A.March-April pp. 314-7.RussiaGold, copper, platinum, palladium, Deposit - Tominsk Michurinsk
DS201212-0670
2012
Molotkov, A.E.Smelov, A.P., Shatsky, V.S., Ragozin, A.L., Reutskii, V.N., Molotkov, A.E.Diamondiferous Archean rocks of the Olondo greenstone belt ( western Aldan-Stanovoy shield).Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 53, pp. 1012-1022.RussiaDiamond - genesis
DS201312-0834
2012
Molotkov, A.E.Smelov, A.P., Shatsky, V.S., Ragozin, A.L., Reutskii, V.N., Molotkov, A.E.Diamondiferous Archean rocks of the Olondo greenstone belt ( western Aldan-Stanovoy shield).Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 53, pp. 1012-1022.RussiaDiamond morphology
DS200812-0759
2008
Moloto Akenguemba, G.R.Moloto Akenguemba, G.R., Trinddade, R.I., Monie, P., Nedelec, A., Siqueira, R.A late Neoproterozoic paleomagnetic pole for the Congo Craton: tectonic setting, paleomagnetism and geochronology of the Nola Dike swarm ( CAR).Precambrian Research, Vol. 164, 3-4, pp. 214-226.Africa, Central African RepublicGeochronology
DS1900-0034
1900
Molteno, P.A.Molteno, P.A.The Life and Times of Sir John Charles MoltenoLondon: Smith, Elder And Co., 2 VOLS.Africa, South AfricaKimberley, Biography
DS1860-0602
1888
Molyneux, J.A.Molyneux, J.A.With the Diamond DiggersMonth, Vol. 64, SEPT. PP. 92-103.Africa, South AfricaHistory
DS1995-1288
1995
Molzer, P.C.Molzer, P.C., Erslev, E.A.Oblique convergence during northeast-southwest Laramide compression along e-w Owl Creek and Casper Mtn arches.American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin., Vol. 79, No. 9, Sept. pp. 1377-1394.WyomingTectonics
DS1997-0809
1997
Mombeshora, S.T.Mombeshora, S.T.Opportunities for investment in the mining industry of ZimbabweMiga Conference Held Denver June 3-5, 12pZimbabweMining, Economics - investment
DS201604-0636
2016
Momburi, P.Thomas, R.J, Spencer, C., Bushi, A.M., Baglow, N., Gerrit de Kock, B., Hortswood, M.S.A., Hollick, L., Jacobs, J., Kajara, S., Kaminhanda, G., Key, R.M., Magana, Z., McCourt, M.W., Momburi, P., Moses, F., Mruma, A., Myamilwa, Y., Roberts, N.M.W., HamisiGeochronology of the centra Tanzania craton and its southern and eastern orogenic margins.Precambrian Research, in press available 57p.Africa, TanzaniaGeochronology

Abstract: Geological mapping and zircon U-Pb/Hf isotope data from 35 samples from the central Tanzania Craton and surrounding orogenic belts to the south and east allow a revised model of Precambrian crustal evolution of this part of East Africa. The geochronology of two studied segments of the craton shows them to be essentially the same, suggesting that they form a contiguous crustal section dominated by granitoid plutons. The oldest orthogneisses are dated at ca. 2820 Ma (Dodoma Suite) and the youngest alkaline syenite plutons at ca. 2610 Ma (Singida Suite). Plutonism was interrupted by a period of deposition of volcano-sedimentary rocks metamorphosed to greenschist facies, directly dated by a pyroclastic metavolcanic rock which gave an age of ca. 2725 Ma. This is supported by detrital zircons from psammitic metasedimentary rocks, which indicate a maximum depositional age of ca. 2740 Ma, with additional detrital sources 2820 and 2940 Ma. Thus, 200 Ma of episodic magmatism in this part of the Tanzania Craton was punctuated by a period of uplift, exhumation, erosion and clastic sedimentation/volcanism, followed by burial and renewed granitic to syenitic magmatism. In eastern Tanzania (Handeni block), in the heart of the East African Orogen, all the dated orthogneisses and charnockites (apart from those of the overthrust Neoproterozoic granulite nappes), have Neoarchaean protolith ages within a narrow range between 2710 and 2630 Ma, identical to (but more restricted than) the ages of the Singida Suite. They show evidence of Ediacaran "Pan-African" isotopic disturbance, but this is poorly defined. In contrast, granulite samples from the Wami Complex nappe were dated at ca. 605 and ca. 675 Ma, coeval with previous dates of the "Eastern Granulites" of eastern Tanzania and granulite nappes of adjacent NE Mozambique. To the south of the Tanzania Craton, samples of orthogneiss from the northern part of the Lupa area were dated at ca. 2730 Ma and clearly belong to the Tanzania Craton. However, granitoid samples from the southern part of the Lupa "block" have Palaeoproterozoic (Ubendian) intrusive ages of ca. 1920 Ma. Outcrops further south, at the northern tip of Lake Malawi, mark the SE continuation of the Ubendian belt, albeit with slightly younger ages of igneous rocks (ca. 1870-1900 Ma) which provide a link with the Ponte Messuli Complex, along strike to the SE in northern Mozambique. In SW Tanzania, rocks from the Mgazini area gave Ubendian protolith ages of ca. 1980-1800 Ma, but these rocks underwent Late Mesoproterozoic high-grade metamorphism between 1015 and 1040 Ma. One granitoid gave a crystallisation age of ca. 1080 Ma correlating with known Mesoproterozoic crust to the east in SE Tanzania and NE Mozambique. However, while the crust in the Mgazini area was clearly one of original Ubendian age, reworked and intruded by granitoids at ca. 1 Ga, the crust of SE Tanzania is a mixed Mesoproterozoic terrane and a continuation from NE Mozambique. Hence the Mgazini area lies at the edge of the Ubendian belt which was re-worked during the Mesoproterozoic orogen (South Irumide belt), providing a further constraint on the distribution of ca. 1 Ga crust in SE Africa. Hf data from near-concordant analyses of detrital zircons from a sample from the Tanzania Craton lie along a Pb-loss trajectory (Lu/Hf = 0), extending back to ~3.9 Ga. This probably represents the initial depleted mantle extraction event of the cratonic core. Furthermore, the Hf data from all igneous samples, regardless of age, from the entire study area (including the Neoproterozoic granulite nappes) show a shallow evolution trend (Lu/Hf = 0.028) extending back to the same mantle extraction age. This implies the entire Tanzanian crust sampled in this study represents over 3.5 billion years of crustal reworking from a single crustal reservoir and that the innermost core of the Tanzanian Craton that was subsequently reworked was composed of a very depleted, mafic source with a very high Lu/Hf ratio. Our study helps to define the architecture of the Tanzanian Craton and its evolution from a single age-source in the early Eoarchaean.
DS2003-0967
2003
Momme, P.Momme, P., Oskarsson, N., Keays, R.R.Platinum group elements in the Icelandic rift system: melting processes and mantleChemical Geology, Vol. 196, 1-4, pp. 209-34.IcelandPGE, Tectonics
DS200412-1354
2003
Momme, P.Momme, P., Oskarsson, N.,Keays, R.R.Platinum group elements in the Icelandic rift system: melting processes and mantle sources beneath Iceland.Chemical Geology, Vol. 196, 1-4, pp. 209-34.Europe, IcelandPGE Tectonics
DS200712-1073
2007
Momme, P.Tegner, C., Keays, R., Momme, P., Bernstein, S., Nielsen, T.F.D., Brooks, C.K.Platinum group element enrichment in the North Atlantic Igneous Province testifies to a peridotite Iceland plume.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p.225.Europe, IcelandPicrite
DS200712-1074
2007
Momme, P.Tegner, C., Keays, R., Momme, P., Bernstein, S., Nielsen, T.F.D., Brooks, C.K.Platinum group element enrichment in the North Atlantic Igneous Province testifies to a peridotite Iceland plume.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p.225.Europe, IcelandPicrite
DS1991-1180
1991
Mon, R.Mon, R., Hongin, F.The structure of the Precambrian and Lower Paleozoic basement of the central Andes between 22 and 22 latsGeologische Rundschau, Vol. 80, No. 3, pp. 745-758AndesStructure, Tectonics
DS1996-0648
1996
Mon, R.Hongn, F., Mon, R., Cuevas, J., Tubia, J-M.Zones of cisaillement caledonieenes a haut temperature dans la QuebradaBarranquilla: donnees structurales..C.r. Academy Of Science Paris, Vol. 323, 11a, pp. 809-815Argentina, Eastern PunaTectonics, high temperature overthrust, Metamorphism, evolution
DS1900-0152
1903
Mon. IndustryMon. IndustryLes Mines de Diamant dans L'afrique du SudMon. Industr. (brux.), PP. 444-445.Africa, South AfricaGeology, Mining Engineering
DS201812-2790
2018
Monaco, B.Cimen, O., Kuebler, C., Monaco, B., Simonetti, S.S., Corcoran, L., Chen, W., Simonatti, A.Boron, carbon, oxygen and radiogenic isotope investigation of carbonatite from the Miaoya complex, central China: evidences for late stage REE hydrothermal event and mantle source heterogeneity.Lithos, Vol. 322, pp. 225-237.Chinadeposit - Miaoya

Abstract: The Miaoya carbonatite complex (MCC) is located within the southern edge of the Qinling orogenic belt in central China, and is associated with significant rare earth element (REE) and Nb mineralization. The MCC consists of syenite and carbonatite that were emplaced within Neo- to Mesoproterozoic-aged supracrustal units. The carbonatite intruded the associated syenite as stocks and dikes, and is mainly composed of medium- to fine-grained calcite and abundant REE-bearing minerals. Carbonatite melt generation and emplacement within the MCC occurred during the Silurian (at ~440?Ma), and was subsequently impacted by a late-stage hydrothermal event (~232?Ma) involving REE-rich fluids/melt. This study reports trace element and stable (B, C, and O) and radiogenic (Nd, Pb, and Sr) isotope data for the MCC carbonatite, and these have been subdivided into three groups that represent different REE contents, interpreted as varying degrees of hydrothermal interaction. Overall, the group of carbonatites with the lowest enrichment in LREEs (i.e., least affected by hydrothermal event) is characterized by d11B values that vary between -7 (typical asthenospheric mantle) and?+?4‰; d11B values and B abundances (~0.2 to ~1?ppm) do not correlate with LREE contents. The Sm-Nd and Pb-Pb isotope systems have both been perturbed by the late-stage, REE-rich hydrothermal activity and corroborate open-system behavior. Contrarily, initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (vary between ~0.70355 and 0.70385) do not correlate significantly with both LREEs and Sr abundances, nor with initial 143Nd/144Nd ratios. The late-stage hydrothermal event overprinted the Nd and Pb isotope compositions for most of the carbonatite samples examined here, whereas a majority of the samples preserve their variable B and Sr isotope values inherited from their mantle source. The B and Sr isotope data for carbonatites exhibiting the least LREE enrichment correlate positively and suggest carbonatite melt generation from a heterogenous upper mantle source that records the input of recycled crustal material. This finding is consistent with those previously reported for young (<300?Ma old) carbonatites worldwide.
DS2003-0062
2003
Monaco, G.Badro, J., Fiquet, G., Guyot, F., Rueff, J.P., Stuzhkin, V.V., Vanko, G., Monaco, G.Iron partitioning in Earth's mantle: toward a deep mantle discontinuityScience, Vol. 300, 5620, May 2, p. 789.MantleMineralogy
DS200412-0084
2003
Monaco, G.Badro, J., Fiquet, G., Guyot, F., Rueff, J.P., Stuzhkin, V.V., Vanko, G., Monaco, G.Iron partitioning in Earth's mantle: toward a deep mantle discontinuity.Science, Vol. 300, 5620, May 2, p. 789.MantleMineralogy
DS200412-0085
2004
Monaco, G.Badro, J., Rueff, J.P., Vanko, G., Monaco, G., Fiquet, G., Guyot, F.Electronic transitions in perovskite: possible nonconvecting layers in the lower mantle.Science, Vol. 305, No. 5682, July 16, pp. 383-385.MantleMineral chemistry
DS1999-0489
1999
Monaco, J.Monaco, J.Diamonds in the rough.. excitement at the Crater of DiamondsRock and GeM., April pp. 32-34.ArkansasNews, History - layman
DS1998-0768
1998
Monaldi, C.R.Kley, J., Monaldi, C.R.Tectonic shortening and crustal thickness in the Central Andes: how good is the correlation?Geology, Vol. 26, No. 8, Aug. pp. 723-6Andes, Bolivia, Argentina, PeruTectonics, Backarc
DS1992-1265
1992
Monceau, P.Regueiro, M.N., Monceau, P., Hodeau, J-L.Crushing C60 to diamond at room temperatureNature, Vol. 355, No. 6357, January 16, pp. 237-238GlobalExperimental petrology, Carbon
DS1994-0376
1994
Moncrieff, R.E.Dardis, K.A., Moncrieff, R.E.HMS diamond plantsSignet Preprint The Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) Diamond Recovery session, May 2, 1994, 29p.GlobalDiamond recovery, HMS DMS Mineral processing overview
DS200712-0084
2006
Moncur, M.Blowes, D.,Moncur, M., Smith, L., Sego, D., Klassen, Neuner, Gravie, Gould, ReinsonMining in the continuous permafrost: construction and instrumentation of two large scale waste rock piles.34th Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 6. abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - Diavik
DS201312-0852
2013
Moncur, M.C.Smith, L.J.D., Moncur, M.C., Neuner, M., Gupton, M., Blowes, D.W., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.The Diavik waste rock project: particle size distribution and sulfur characteristics of low- sulfide waste rock.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 187-199.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - Diavik
DS201510-1804
2015
Moncur, M.C.Smith, L.j.D., Ptacek, C.J., Blowes, D.W., Groza, L.G., Moncur, M.C.Perchlorate in lake water from an operating mine. DiavikEnvironmental Science and Technology, Vol. 49, 13, pp. 7589-7596.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik

Abstract: Mining-related perchlorate [ClO4(-)] in the receiving environment was investigated at the operating open-pit and underground Diavik diamond mine, Northwest Territories, Canada. Samples were collected over four years and ClO4(-) was measured in various mine waters, the 560 km(2) ultraoligotrophic receiving lake, background lake water and snow distal from the mine. Groundwaters from the underground mine had variable ClO4(-) concentrations, up to 157 µg L(-1), and were typically an order of magnitude higher than concentrations in combined mine waters prior to treatment and discharge to the lake. Snow core samples had a mean ClO4(-) concentration of 0.021 µg L(-1) (n=16). Snow and lake water Cl(-)/ClO4(-) ratios suggest evapoconcentration was not an important process affecting lake ClO4(-) concentrations. The multiyear mean ClO4(-) concentrations in the lake were 0.30 µg L(-1) (n = 114) in open water and 0.24 µg L(-1) (n = 107) under ice, much below the Canadian drinking water guideline of 6 µg L(-1). Receiving lake concentrations of ClO4(-) generally decreased year over year and ClO4(-) was not likely [biogeo]chemically attenuated within the receiving lake. The discharge of treated mine water was shown to contribute mining-related ClO4(-) to the lake and the low concentrations after 12 years of mining were attributed to the large volume of the receiving lake.
DS200412-0861
2004
MondalHussein, M.F., Mondal, MEA, Ahmad, T.Petrological and geochemical characteristics of Archean gneisses and granitoids from Bastar Craton, central India - implicationGondwana Research, Vol. 7, 2, pp. 531-538.IndiaSubduction
DS201908-1806
2019
MondalRamiz, M.M., Mondal, M,E.A., Farooq, S.H.Geochemistry of ultramafic-mafic rocks of the Madawara ultramafic complex in the southern part of the Bundelkhand craton, Central Indian Shield: implications for mantle sources and geodynamic setting.Geological Journal, Vol. 54, 4, pp. 2185-2207.Indiacraton

Abstract: Detailed field, petrography and whole-rock geochemical study was carried out in order to constrain the mantle sources and geodynamic setting of the Madawara Ultramafic Complex (MUC) of the Bundelkhand Craton. Studies reveal that there are two types of ultramafic rocks: (a) high-Mg ultrabasic/basic rocks and (b) undeformed ultramafic-mafic plutonic rocks. The high-Mg ultrabasic/basic rocks have undergone severe low-grade (greenschist) metamorphism and are characterized by stringer and veinlet structures of talc-tremolite-actinolite schists with alternate layers of serpentinites showing comparatively higher SiO2 (46.1-49.4 wt%), lower MgO (24.6-26.2 wt%), and higher Al2O3 (4.58-7.06 wt%) and CaO (2.72-6.77 wt%) compared to the undeformed ultramafic rocks. The undeformed ultramafic rocks (mainly harzburgite, lherzolite, and olivine websterite) are characterized by globular structures and have lower SiO2 (40-44.1 wt%), higher MgO (30.4-38 wt%) and lower Al2O3 (1.84-4.03 wt%) and CaO (0.16-3.14 wt%). The undeformed mafic rocks (mainly gabbro) occur as small pockets within the undeformed ultramafic rocks as well as independent outcrops. Limited variation in Nb/Th against Nb/Yb along with negative Nb-Ti anomalies of all the rock types in the multi-element diagram reveals the significant role of the metasomatized mantle in their genesis. All the rocks show enrichment in light rare earth element and large-ion lithophile elements compared to heavy rare earth elements and high-field strength elements. The geochemical characteristics coupled with Ce/Yb versus Ce variation of the rocks of MUC point towards two different sources for their genesis. The high-Mg ultrabasic/basic rocks are derived from partial melting of metasomatized mantle at shallow depth, while the undeformed ultramafic rocks were formed as a result of asthenospheric upwelling from a greater depth that induced the melting in the overlying lithosphere. Gabbro rocks represent the last and most evolved phase of the complex. Geochemical signatures suggest that the rocks of MUC were formed in a continental arc setting.
DS201212-0572
2012
Mondal, E.F.A.Pradham, V.R., Meert, J.G., Pandit, M.K., Kamenov, G., Mondal, E.F.A.Paleomagnetic and geochronological studies of the mafic dyke swarms of Bundelk hand craton, central India: implications for the tectonic evolution and paleogeographic reconstructions.Precambrian Research, in press available, 80p.IndiaDeposit - Bunder
DS200812-0760
2008
Mondal, M.E.A.Mondal, M.E.A., Chandra, R., Ahmad, T.Precambrian mafic magmatism in Bundelk hand Craton.Journal of Geological Society of India, Vol. 72, 1, pp. 113-122.IndiaMagmatism
DS201012-0512
2010
Mondal, M.E.A.Mondal, M.E.A., Hussain, M.F., Ahmad, T.Mafic dyke swarms of central Indian shield: implications for a pre-Rodinia supercontinent assembly.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractIndiaDeposit - Bunder
DS201012-0836
2010
Mondal, M.E.A.Wani, H., Mondal, M.E.A.Petrological and geochemical evidence of the Paleoproterozoic and the Meso-neoproterozic sedimentary rocks of the Bastar Craton, Indian Peninsula:Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 38, 5, pp. 220-232.IndiaPaleoweathering and Proterozoic crustal evolution
DS200712-0742
2007
Mondal, S.K.Mondal, S.K., Frie, R., Ripley, E.M.Os isotope systematics of Mesoarchean chromitite PGE deposits in the Singhbhum Craton, India: implications for the evolution of lithospheric mantle.Chemical geology, Vol. 244, 3-4, pp. 391-408.Asia, IndiaGeochronology
DS200912-0510
2009
Mondal, S.K.Mondal, S.K.Chromite and PGE deposits of Mesoarchean ultramafic mafic suites within the greenstone belts of the Singhbhum Craton, India: implications for mantle heterogeneity and tectonic setting.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 73, 1, pp. 36-51.IndiaTectonics
DS201012-0747
2010
Mondal, S.K.Srivastava, R.K., Mondal, S.K., Balaram, V., Gautam, G.C.PGE geochemistry of low Ti high Mg siliceous mafic rocks within the Archean Central Indian Bastar Craton: implications for magma fractionation.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 98, 1-4, pp. 329-345.IndiaMagmatism - not specific to diamonds
DS201112-0696
2011
Mondal, S.K.Mondal, S.K.Platinum group element (PGE) geochemistry to understand the chemical evolution of the Earth's mantle.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 77, pp. 295-302.Europe, GreenlandMelting
DS201112-0697
2011
Mondal, S.K.Mondal, S.K., Bernstein, S., Rosing, M.T.Sulfide mineralogy of West Greenland kimberlitic mantle xenoliths.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1489.Europe, GreenlandSarfartoq
DS201312-0613
2013
Mondal, S.K.Mondal, S.K., Maier, W-G., Griffin, W.L.Ore deposits and the role of the lithospheric mantle.Lithos, One page introduction to forthcoming issue…. Does not appear to include diamonds.MantleMetasomatism
DS201912-2828
2019
Mondal, S.K.Srivastava, R.K., Soderlund, U., Ernst, R.E., Mondal, S.K., Samal, A.K.Precambrian mafic dyke swarms in the Singhbhum craton ( eastern India) and their links with syke swarms of the eastern Dhwar craton ( southern India).Precambrian Research, Vol. 329, pp. 5-17.Indiacraton

Abstract: Based on trend, cross-cutting relationships and U-Pb dating, Precambrian mafic dykes in the Singhbhum craton, earlier collectively identified as ‘Newer Dolerite Swarm’ have been separated into seven distinct swarms, which are thought to be the plumbing systems for Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs). These Singhbhum swarms range in age from ~2.80 Ga to ~1.76 Ga, and include the ~2.80 Ga NE-SW trending Keshargaria swarm, ~2.75-2.76 Ga NNE-SSW to NE-SW trending Ghatgaon swarm, the ~2.26 Ga NE-SW to ENE-WSW trending Kaptipada swarm (based on a new U-Pb ID-TIMS age 2256 ± 6 Ma), the ~1.77 Ga WNW-ESE trending Pipilia swarm, the early-Paleoproterozoic E-W to ENE-WSW trending Keonjhar swarm, the middle-Paleoproterozoic NW-SE to NNW-SSE trending Bhagamunda swarm, and the late-Paleoproterozoic N-S to NNE-SSW trending Barigaon swarm. Two of the Singhbhum swarms, the ~2.26 Ga Kaptipada and ~1.77 Ga Pipilia, are closely matched with the ~2.26-2.25 Ga Ippaguda-Dhiburahalli and ~1.79 Ga Pebbair swarms, respectively, of the eastern Dharwar craton. The correlations suggest that the Singhbhum and Dharwar cratons were close enough at these times to share two reconstructed LIPs, a 2.26-2.25 Ga Kaptipada- Ippaguda-Dhiburahalli LIP and a 1.79-1.77 Ga Pipilia-Pebbair LIP, and if so, both swarms must be present in the intervening Bastar craton (candidates are proposed). Also, the 2.76-2.75 Ga Ghatgaon swarm of the Singhbhum craton can be provisionally correlated with ~2.7 Ga Keshkal swarm of the Bastar craton. The 2.26-2.25 Ga Kaptipada-Ippaguda-Dhiburahalli LIP of the Singhbhum-Bastar-Dharwar reconstruction has age matches in the Vestfold Hills of Antarctica (~2.24 Ga dykes), the Kaapvaal craton (the ~2.25-2.23 Ga Hekpoort lavas) and perhaps the Zimbabwe craton (2.26 Ga Chimbadzi troctolite intrusions). The 1.76-1.79 Ga Pipilia-Pebbair LIP of the Singhbhum-Bastar-Dharwar reconstruction has age matches in the North China, Australian Shield, Amazonian, Rio de Plata and Sarmatia cratons. The relevance of these matches for reconstructions will require future testing using paleomagnetic studies. While there are ~2.7-2.8 Ga LIP-type greenstone belts in many crustal blocks, there are no precise matches with the 2.76-2.75 Ga Ghatgaon swarm of the Singhbhum craton. Howe
DS201904-0780
2019
Mondal, T.Sinha, S.T., Saha, S., Longacre, M., Basu, S., Jha, R., Mondal, T.Crustal architecture and nature of continental breakup along a transform margin: new insights from Tanzania-Mozambique margin.Tectonics, in press availableAfrica, Tanzania, Mozambiquerifting

Abstract: The Tanzania-North Mozambique continental margin is a transform segment associated with Davie Fracture Zone (DFZ). The DFZ is described as an elongated linear oceanic fracture zone, commonly linked with the breakup between Eastern and Western Gondwana. We conducted a synthesized study using gravity, magnetic and seismic data presenting the crustal architecture, geometry and the kinematic nature of continental breakup along a transform margin. The Crustal nature of DFZ, its role in forming kinematic linkage between two extensional margins during continental breakup processes is focus of our study. The two extensional margins, Somalia-Majunga and North Mozambique-Antarctica were linked via a 2600 km long dextral transform segment, partially overlapping with DFZ. Absence of classical rift indicators, weak signs of hyperextension, abrupt ocean-continent boundary (OCB) suggests transform margin architecture. We redefined this feature as the Davie Transform System (DTS). The nature of deformation varies form transtensional pull-apart in Tanzania to almost pure strike-slip in North Mozambique. The southern transform segment exhibits abrupt change in ocean continent transition with a narrow zone of continental extension. This variation is recognized through the newly interpreted OCB along this entire transform segment. Notably, within large pull-apart systems in the north, presence of fossilized incipient spreading center suggest that the extension had reached at quite advanced stages, characterized by significant thermal weakening as a consequence of strong magmatic activity. Through a series of reconstruction snapshots, we show the geodynamic evolution along the Tanzania-North Mozambique margin explaining the role of DTS in the southward movement of Madagascar.
DS1989-1499
1989
Mondeguer, A.Tiercelin, J-J., Mondeguer, A., Scholz, C.A.Seismic and sedimentary discontinuities in the Lake Tanganyika Rift, EastAfricaEos, Vol. 70, No. 43, October 24, p. 1362. AbstractEast AfricaGeophysics, Rift
DS201312-0029
2012
Monero, P.Arzamastsev, A.A., Bea, F., Arzmastseva, L.V., Monero, P., Elizarova, I.R.Trace elements in minerals as indicators of mineral evolution: the results of L ICP MS study.Vladykin, N.V. ed. Deep seated magmatism, its sources and plumes, Russian Academy of Sciences, pp. 110-132.TechnologyMineralogy - indicators
DS1984-0528
1984
Moneteiro, M.D.Moneteiro, M.D., De carvalho, M.P., Filho, V.M.C.Caracterizacao faciologica e sistemas deposcionais do grupo ChapadaDiamantina.Anais Do XXXIII Brasileiro de Geologia, pp. 1090-1105.Brazil, BahiaChapada Diamantia, Sedimentology
DS1920-0189
1924
Monett, V.E.Monett, V.E.The Finger Lakes of Central New YorkAmerican Journal of Science, N.S. 5, Vol. 8, No. 43, PP. 33-53.United States, Appalachia, New YorkRegional Geology
DS1970-0150
1970
Monforte, A.Monforte, A.A Tectonica Lineamentar E a Reparticao Espacial E Genetica Dos Fontes Primarias de Diamantes.Geol. Serv. Min. (portugal) Bol., No. 22, PP. 17-22.Angola, Central AfricaTectonics, Diamonds
DS1970-0567
1972
Monforte, A.Monforte, A.Tectonic Lineaments and the Spatial and Genetic Distribution of Primary Diamond Deposits.Geological Survey MINAS (ANGOLA) BOL., No. 22, PP. 17-22.AngolaTectonics, Kimberlite
DS1981-0346
1981
Monforte, A.Reis, B., Monforte, A.Preliminary note on the western massif of Camuttue, Lunda, SOURCE[ Bol. da Soc. Geol. de Portugal, (in Portugese).Bol. da Soc. Geol. de Portugal, (in Portugese)., Vol. 22, pp. 327-336Angola, Central AfricaAlluvial Placers
DS2002-0760
2002
Monfret, T.Jaillard, E., Herail, G., Monfret, T., Worner, G.Andean geodynamics: main issues and contributions from the 4th. ISAGTectonophysics, Vol.345, 1-4, Feb.15, pp. 1-15.AndesGeodynamics - brief review
DS2002-1213
2002
Monfret, T.Pardo, M., Comte, D., Monfret, T.Seismotectonic and stress distribution in the central Chile subduction zoneJournal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol.15,1,Apr.pp.11-22.Chile, AndesSubduction, Geophysics - seismics, tectonics
DS200512-0241
2005
Mongelli, F.Doglioni, C., Green, D.H., Mongelli, F.On the shallow origin of hotspots and the westward drift of the lithosphere.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, pp. 735-750. ( total book 861p. $ 144.00)MantleGeophysics
DS1993-0949
1993
Monger, H.C.Mack, G.H., James, W.C., Monger, H.C.Classification of paleosolsGeological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin, Vol. 105, No. 2, February pp. 129-136GlobalLaterites, Paleosols
DS1992-1404
1992
Monger, J.W.Silberling, N.J., Jones, D.L., Monger, J.W., Coney, P.J.Lithotectonic terrane map of the North American CordilleraUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Map, No. I 2176 1- 80 miles $ 6.25GlobalLithotectonic map, Cordillera, Terranes
DS1991-0592
1991
Monger, J.W.H.Gotze, H.J., Monger, J.W.H.Global geoscience transects project: achievements and future goalsEpisodes, Vol. 14, No. 2, June pp. 131-138GlobalTectonics -General transects, Crust
DS1993-1066
1993
Monger, J.W.H.Monger, J.W.H.Canadian Cordillera tectonics: from geosynclines to crustal collageCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 30, No. 2, February pp. 209-231Cordillera, British ColumbiaTectonics, Crust
DS1996-0987
1996
Monger, J.W.H.Monger, J.W.H., Nokleberg, W.J.Evolution of the northern North American Cordillera: generation, fragmentation, displacement and accretionGsn Proceedings Geol. Ore Dep. American Cordillera, Vol. 3, pp. 1133-52British Columbia, AlaskaPlate margin arcs, Tectonics
DS1997-0810
1997
Monger, J.W.H.Monger, J.W.H.Plate tectonics and northern Cordilleran geology: an unfinishedrevolutionGeoscience Canada, Vol. 24, No. 4, Dec. pp. 189-198Cordillera, British ColumbiaTectonics
DS2000-0677
2000
Monger, J.W.H.Monger, J.W.H.Some identifiable global tectonic controls on Canadian Cordillera evolutionGeological Association of Canada (GAC)/Mineralogical Association of Canada (MAC) 2000, 3p. abstractBritish Columbia, CordilleraTectonics, Evolution - margin
DS1988-0040
1988
MongetBardinet, C., Gabert, G., Monget, J-M, Zheng YuApplication of multisatellite dat a to thematic mapping #2Geol. Jahrb, Vol. 67, Sect. B., 74p. coloured mapsTanzaniaRemote Sensing, Tectonics
DS1988-0041
1988
Monget, J-M.Bardinet, C., Gabert, G., Monget, J-M., Zheng YuApplication of multisatellite dat a to thematic mapping #1Geol. Jahrb, Heft 67, sect. B., 74p. maps approx. 25.00 Database # 1TanzaniaRemote sensing, Structure
DS1997-0811
1997
Monie, P.Monie, P., Caby, R., Arthaud, M.H.The Neoproterozoic Brasiliano Orogeny in northeast Brasil: 40 Ar/39Ar and petrostructural dat a CearaPrecambrian Research, Vol. 81. No. 3-4, Feb. 1, pp. 241-264BrazilTectonics, Argon, Proterozoic
DS1997-0870
1997
Monie, P.Okay, A.I., Monie, P.Early Mesozoic subduction in the Eastern Mediterranean: evidence from Triassic eclogite in northwest Turkey.Geology, Vol. 25, No. 7, July pp. 595-598.TurkeyEclogite, Subduction zone, Subduction
DS2001-0525
2001
Monie, P.Jahn, B-M., Caby, R., Monie, P.The oldest ultra high pressure (UHP) eclogites of the world: age of ultra high pressure (UHP) metamorphism, nature of protoliths and tectonic implic.Chemical Geology, Vol. 178, No. 1-4, pp. 143-58.GlobalEclogites, ultra high pressure (UHP), Geochronology
DS2003-0394
2003
Monie, P.Faure, M., Lin, W., Monie, P., Le Breton, N., Pouissineau, S., Panis, D., Deloule, E.Exhumation tectonics of the ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks in the Qinling orogenTectonics, Vol. 22, 3, 10.1029/2002TC001450ChinaTectonics - subduction
DS2003-0395
2003
Monie, P.Faure, M., Lin, W., Monie, P., Le Breton, N., Pouissineau, S., Panis, D., Deloule, E.Exhumation tectonics of the ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks in the Qinling orogenTectonics, Vol. 22, 3, 10.1029/2002TC001450China, ShandongUHP
DS200412-0537
2003
Monie, P.Faure, M., Lin, W., Monie, P., Le Breton, N., Pouissineau, S., Panis, D., Deloule, E.Exhumation tectonics of the ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks in the Qinling orogen in east China: new petrological structuraTectonics, Vol. 22, 3, 10.1029/2002TC001450China, ShandongUHP
DS200812-0759
2008
Monie, P.Moloto Akenguemba, G.R., Trinddade, R.I., Monie, P., Nedelec, A., Siqueira, R.A late Neoproterozoic paleomagnetic pole for the Congo Craton: tectonic setting, paleomagnetism and geochronology of the Nola Dike swarm ( CAR).Precambrian Research, Vol. 164, 3-4, pp. 214-226.Africa, Central African RepublicGeochronology
DS200812-1183
2008
Monie, P.Trap, P., Faure, P., Lin, M., Bruguier, O., Monie, P.Contrasted tectonic styles for the Paleoproterozoic evolution of the North Chin a Craton: evidence for a 2.1 Ga thermal and tectonic event in the Fuping Massif.Journal of Structural Geology, Vol. 30, 9, pp. 1109-1125.ChinaCraton, not specific to diamonds
DS200912-0213
2009
Monie, P.Faure, M., Shu, L., Wang, B., Charvet, J., Choulet, F., Monie, P.Intracontinental subduction: a possible mechanism for the early Paleozoic orogen of SE China.Terra Nova, Vol. 21, pp. 360368.ChinaSubduction
DS200912-0772
2009
Monie, P.Travassos da Rosa Costa, L., Monie, P., Lafon, J-M., Arnaud, N.C.40 Ar 39 Ar geochronology across Archean and Paleoproterozoic terranes from southeastern Guiana Shield: evidence for contrasting cooling histories.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, 2-3, pp. 113-128.South America, BrazilGeochronology
DS201212-0485
2012
Monie, P.Monie, P., Bosch, D., Bruguier, O., Vauchez, A., Rolland, Y., Nsungani, P., Buta Neto, A.The Late Neoporterozoic/Early Paleozoic evolution of the West Congo Belt of NW Angola: geochronological (U Pb Ar Ar) and petrostructual constraints.Terra Nova, Vol. 24, 3, pp. 238-247.Africa, AngolaGeochronology
DS201212-0486
2012
Monie, P.Monie, P., Bosch, D., Bruguier, O., Vauchez, A., Rolland, Y., Nsungani, P., Buta Nto, A.The Late Neoproterozoic/Early Palezoic evolution of the West Congo belt of NW Angola: geochronological (U-Pb and Ar-Ar) and petrostructural constraints.Terra Nova, in press availableAfrica, AngolaGeochronology
DS200712-0534
2007
Moniz, A.Key, R.M., Bingen, B., Barton, E., Daudi, E.X.E., Manuel, S., Moniz, A.Kimberlites in a Karoo graben of northern Mozambique: tectonic setting, mineralogy and RbSr geochronology.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 110, 1, pp. 111-124.Africa, MozambiqueGeochronology
DS201612-2279
2016
Monkhorov, R.V.Bardukhinov, L.D., Spetsius, Z.V., Monkhorov, R.V.Coesite inclusions in diamonds of Yakutia. Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 470, 2, pp. 1042-1045.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Zapolyarnaya, Maiskaya, Komsomolskaya-Magnitnaya

Abstract: The results of the study of diamonds with inclusions of high-pressure modification of SiO2 (coesite) by Raman spectroscopy are reported. It is established that the octahedral crystal from the Zapolyarnaya pipe is characterized by the highest residual pressure (2.7 ± 0.07 GPa). An intermediate value of this parameter (2.1 ± 0.07 GPa) was obtained for a crystal of transitional habit from the Maiskaya pipe. The minimal Raman shift was registered for coesite in diamond from the Komsomol’skaya-Magnitnaya pipe and provided a calculated residual pressure of 1.8 ± 0.03 GPa. The residual pressures for crystals from the placer deposits of the Kuoika and Bol’shaya Kuonamka rivers are 2.7 ± 0.07 and 3.1 ± 0.1 GPa, respectively. Octahedral crystals were formed in the mantle at a higher pressure than rhombododecahedral diamonds.
DS202003-0330
2019
Monkhorov, R.V.Badukhinov, L.D., Spetius, Z.V.. Kislov, E.V., Ivanov, A.S., Monkhorov, R.V.Parageneses of garnet inclusions in diamonds from Yakutia kimberlites based on Raman and IR spectroscopy data. Udachnaya, Zapolyarnaya, Komolskaya, Yuibeyana, Aikhal, Mir, Mayskaya.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 61, 7, pp. 606-612. pdfRussia, Yakutiadiamond inclusions
DS1950-0417
1958
Monkman, L.J.Monkman, L.J.The Maose-malibangwe Area (the Nuanetsi Igneous Axis)Leeds University Research Institute of African Geology Annual Report, APP. C, Vol. 1D, PP. 9-10.Tanzania, East AfricaGeology, Related Rocks, Tectonics
DS1960-0028
1960
Monkman, L.J.Cox, K.G., Johnson, R.L., Monkman, L.J., Vail, J.R.Progress of Investigations in Southeast Southern RhodesiaLeeds University Research Institute of African Geology Annual Report, APP. C, Vol. 4, PP. 26-28.ZimbabweGeology, Related Rocks
DS1960-0135
1961
Monkman, L.J.Cox, K.G., Vail, J.R., Monkman, L.J., Johnson, R.L.Karroo Igneous Activity and Tectonics in Southeast Southern Rhodesia.Nature., Vol. 190, No. 4770, P. 40.; P. 77.ZimbabweGeology, Related Rocks, Tectonics
DS1960-0173
1961
Monkman, L.J.Monkman, L.J.The Geology of the Maose and Malibangwe River Basins, with Special Reference to the Stormberg Rhyolitic Volcanicity of Southern Rhodesia.Leeds University Research Institute of African Geology Annual Report, ALSO: Annual Report RES. Institute AFR. GEOL. 5TH., APP. D, Vol.ZimbabweGeology, Related Rocks
DS1960-0532
1965
Monkman, L.J.Cox, K.G., Johnson, R.L., Monkman, L.J.The Geology of the Nuanetsi Igneous ProvinceRoyal Society. PHIL. Transactions, SERIES A Vol. 257, PP. 71-218.ZimbabweGeology, Related Rocks
DS1995-1289
1995
Monmonier, M.Monmonier, M.Drawing the line: tales of maps and cartocontroversyHenry Holt Publ, 368p. approx. $ 30.00 United StatesGlobalBook -ad, Cartography
DS1988-0483
1988
Monnereau, M.Monnereau, M., Cazenave, A.Variation of the apparent compensation depth of hotspot swells with age ofplateEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 91, No.1-2, December pp. 179-197GlobalHot spots, Tectonics
DS1993-0230
1993
Monnereau, M.Ceuleneer, G., Monnereau, M., Rabinowicz, M., Rosemberg, C.Thermal and petrological consequences of melt migration within mantleplumesPhilosophical Transactions Royal Society of London, Section A, Vol. 342, pp. 53-64MantleGeochemistry, plume model, Alkaline rocks
DS1996-0988
1996
Monnereau, M.Monnereau, M., Rabonowicz, M.Is the 670 km phase transition able to layer Earth's convection in a mantle with depth dependent viscosity?Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 23, No. 9, May 1, pp. 1001-1004.MantleStratigraphy, Transition phase
DS2000-0246
2000
Monnereau, M.Dubuffet, F., Rabinowicz, M., Monnereau, M.Multiple scales in mantle convectionEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 178, No. 3-4, May 30, pp. 351-66.MantleSubduction, Convection
DS2001-0791
2001
Monnereau, M.Monnereau, M., Quere, S.Spherical shell models of mantle convection with tectonic platesEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 184, No.3-4, Jan.30, pp.575-88.MantleConvection, Tectonics
DS2002-1076
2002
Monnereau, M.Monnereau, M., Yuen, D.A.How flat is the lower mantle temperature gradient?Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 202, 1, pp.171-183.MantleGeothermometry
DS2002-1336
2002
Monnereau, M.Richard, G., Monnereau, M., Ingrin, J.Is the transition zone an empty water reservoir? Influences from numerical model of mantle dynamics.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 205, 1-2, pp. 37-51.MantleWater
DS200712-0743
2007
Monnereau, M.Monnereau, M., Yuen, D.A.Topology of the post perovskite phase transition and mantle dynamics.Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences USA, Vol. 104, 22, pp. 9156-9161. IngentaMantlePerovskite
DS200712-0894
2007
Monnereau, M.Richard, G., Monnereau, M., Rabinowicz, M.Slab dehydration and fluid migration at the base of the upper mantle: implications for deep earthquake mechanisms.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 168, 3, pp. 1291-1304.MantleSlab melting
DS201312-0612
2013
Monnereau, M.Mizzon, H., Monnereau, M.Implications of the lopsided growth for the viscosity of Earth's inner core.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 361, pp. 391-401.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS201705-0860
2017
Monnereau, M.Nedelec, A., Monnereau, M., Toplis, M.J.The Hadean-Archean transition at 4Ga: from magma trapping in the mantle to volcanic resurfacing of the Earth.Terra Nova, in press availableMantleMagmatism

Abstract: The Hadean-Archaean transition is poorly known because of the dearth of Hadean rocks. A new conceptual model is presented based on variations in mantle potential temperature (Tp) with time. The critical issue is the depth of melting with respect to a negatively buoyant magma sink between 410 and 330 km (14-11 GPa). Hadean plume magmatism begins below the magma sink, leading to generation of a refractory upper mantle reservoir and the minor production of boninite-like magmas near the surface. With cooling, the onset of melting migrates above the magma sink, a situation likely occurring since 3.9 Ga and corresponding to Tps of ~1870°C or less. Therefore, a burst of mafic to ultramafic volcanism was produced at 3.9-3.8 Ga. This extensive volcanism may have triggered gravitational instabilities and favoured the recycling of the Hadean crust into the mantle. Results of this model are discussed in the light of existing isotopic data.
DS1940-0032
1941
Monnickendam, A.Monnickendam, A.The Secret of DiamondsLondon: Fred Muller., GlobalKimberlite, Kimberley, Janlib, History, Fiction
DS1950-0231
1955
Monnickendam, A.Monnickendam, A.The Magic of DiamondsLondon: Hammond, Hammond And Co., 191P.South AfricaHistory, Kimberley
DS1960-1179
1969
Montadert, L.Montadert, L.New Information on the Geological Structure of the Gulf of Guinea.Annual FAC. SCI. University CLERMONT., Vol. 19, No. 41, PP. 71-72.West Africa, GuineaSeismology, Structure, Tectonics
DS200612-0623
2006
Montagnac, G.Ionov, D.A., Hofmann, A.W., Merlet, C., Gurenko, A.A., Hellebrand, E., Montagnac, G., Gillet, P., PrikhodkoDiscovery of whitlockite in mantle xenoliths: inferences for water and halogen poor fluid and trace element residence in the terrestrial upper mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 244, 1-2, Apr. 15, pp. 201-207.MantleXenolith - mineralogy
DS1996-0813
1996
Montagner, J.P.Lave, J., Avouac, J.P., Montagner, J.P.Seismic anisotropy beneath Tibet: evidence for eastward extrusion of the Tibetan lithosphere.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 140, No. 1-4, May 1, pp. 83-96.China, TibetGeophysics -seismics, Lithosphere
DS1998-0066
1998
Montagner, J.P.Babuska, V., Montagner, J.P., Girardin, N.Age dependent large scale fabric of the mantle lithosphere as derived from surface wave velocity...Pure and Applied Geophys., Vol. 151, No. 2-4, Mar. 1, pp. 257-280.MantleGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics
DS1998-0699
1998
Montagner, J.P.Jinnick, L., Chevrot, S., Montagner, J.P.Seismic evidence of flow at base of the upper mantleGeophysical Research. Letters, Vol. 25, No. 11, June 1, pp. 1995-98.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS1998-1030
1998
Montagner, J.P.Montagner, J.P.Where can seismic anisotropy be detected in the earth's mantle? in boundarylayers.Pure and Applied Geophys., Vol. 151, No. 2-4, Mar. 1, pp. 223-256.MantleGeophysics - seismics, Layers - boundary
DS2001-0792
2001
Montagner, J.P.Montagner, J.P., Ritsema, J.Interaction between ridge and plumesScience, Vol. 5546, Nov. 16, p.1472-3.GlobalHotspots, Plumes
DS2002-1077
2002
Montagner, J.P.Montagner, J.P.Upper mantle low anistropy channels below the Pacific PlateEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 202, 2, pp. 263-74.Pacific OceanGeophysics - seismics
DS2003-0433
2003
Montagner, J.P.Gaboret, C., Forte, A.M., Montagner, J.P.The unique dynamics of the Pacific hemisphere mantle and its signature on seismicEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 208, 3-4, pp. 219-233.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-0596
2003
Montagner, J.P.Gaboret, C., Forte, A.M., Montagner, J.P.The unique dynamics of the Pacific hemisphere mantle and its signature on seismic anisotropy.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 208, 3-4, pp. 219-233.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200812-0761
2007
Montagner, J.P.Montagner, J.P., Marty, B., Stutzmann, E., Sicilia, D., Cara, M., Pik, R., Leveque, Roult, Beucier, DeBayleMantle upwellings and convective instabilities revealed by seismic tomography and helium isotope geochemistry beneath eastern Africa.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 34, 21, Nov. 16, ppp. L21303.AfricaConvection
DS200912-0605
2009
Montagner, J.P.Qin, Y., Capdeville, Y., Montagner, J.P., Boschi, L., Becker, T.W.Reliability of mantle tomography models assessed by spectral element simulation.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 177, 1, pp. 125-144.MantleTomography
DS1991-1181
1991
Montagner, J-P.Montagner, J-P., Tanimoto, T.Global upper mantle tomography of seismic velocities and anisotropiesJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 96, No. B12, November 10, pp. 20, 337-20, 351MantleMantle tomography, Geophysics -seismics
DS1994-1226
1994
Montagner, J-P.Montagner, J-P.Can seismology tell us anything about convection in the mantle?Reviews in Geophysics, Vol. 32, No. 2, May pp. 115-133.MantleGeophysics -seismology, Convection
DS200612-1256
2006
Montagner, J-P.Sebai, A., Stutzmann, E., Montagner, J-P., Sicilia, D., Beucler, E.Anistropic structure of the African upper mantle from Rayleigh and Love wave tomography.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 155, 1-2, pp. 48-62.Mantle, AfricaGeodynamics, cratons, West Africa, Congo, Kalahari
DS201807-1491
2018
Montagner, J-P.Garber, J.M., Maurya, S., Hernandez, J-A., Duncan, M.S., Zeng, Li., Zhang, H.L., Faul, U., McCammon, C., Montagner, J-P., Moresi, L., Romanowicz, B.A., Rudnick, R.L., Stixrude, L.Multidisciplinary constraints on the abundance of diamond and eclogite in the cratonic lithosphere. Mentions Jericho and Roberts VictorGeochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, https://doi.org/10.1029/2018GCC007534Globalthermobarometry

Abstract: Some seismic models derived from tomographic studies indicate elevated shear-wave velocities (=4.7 km/s) around 120-150 km depth in cratonic lithospheric mantle. These velocities are higher than those of cratonic peridotites, even assuming a cold cratonic geotherm (i.e., 35 mW/m2 surface heat flux) and accounting for compositional heterogeneity in cratonic peridotite xenoliths and the effects of anelasticity. We reviewed various geophysical and petrologic constraints on the nature of cratonic roots (seismic velocities, lithology/mineralogy, electrical conductivity, and gravity) and explored a range of permissible rock and mineral assemblages that can explain the high seismic velocities. These constraints suggest that diamond and eclogite are the most likely high-Vs candidates to explain the observed velocities, but matching the high shear-wave velocities requires either a large proportion of eclogite (>50 vol.%) or the presence of up to 3 vol.% diamond, with the exact values depending on peridotite and eclogite compositions and the geotherm. Both of these estimates are higher than predicted by observations made on natural samples from kimberlites. However, a combination of =20 vol.% eclogite and ~2 vol.% diamond may account for high shear-wave velocities, in proportions consistent with multiple geophysical observables, data from natural samples, and within mass balance constraints for global carbon. Our results further show that cratonic thermal structure need not be significantly cooler than determined from xenolith thermobarometry.
DS201808-1745
2018
Montagner, J-P.Garber, J.M., Maurya, S., Hernandez, J-A., Duncan, M.S., Zeng, L., Zhang, H.L., Faul, U., McCammon, C., Montagner, J-P., Moresi, L., Romanowicz, B.A., Rudnick, R.L., Stixrude, L.Multidisciplinary constraints on the abundance of diamond and eclogite in the cratonic lithosphere.G3 Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, http:/orchid.org/0000-0001-5313-0982Mantleeclogite
DS1910-0370
1913
Montalvo, B. DE.Montalvo, B. DE.The Diamond Lady/ a Quest for DiamondsLondon: Dranes Danegeld House., 146P.South AfricaVaal River, Adventure, Kimberley
DS1995-1092
1995
Montana, A.Leventhal, J.A., Reid, M.R., Montana, A., Holden, P.Mesozoic invasion of crust by Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) source asthenopheric magmas. U.S.Cordilleran interiorGeology, Vol. 23, No. 5, May pp. 399-402California, Basin and Range, CordilleraMantle lithosphere, Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB).
DS2001-0251
2001
MontaniniDi Battistini, G., Montanini, Vernia, VenturelleiPetrology of melilite bearing rocks from Montefiascone volcanic complex: new insights ultrapotassic volcanicsLithos, Vol. 59, No.1-2, Oct. pp. 109-25.ItalyUltrapotassic
DS2001-0253
2001
MontaniniDiBattistini, G., Montanini, Vernia, Venturelli, TonariPetrology of melilite bearing rocks from the Montefiascone volcanic complex Roman magmatic provinceLithos, Vol. 59, No. 1-2, Oct. pp. 1-24.ItalyUltrapotassic volcanism
DS201509-0399
2015
Monteiller, V.Hongsresawat, S., Panning, M.P., Russo, R.M., Foster, D.A., Monteiller, V., Chevrot, S.USArray shear wave splitting shows seismic anisotropy from both lithosphere and asthenosphere.Geology, Vol. 43, 8, pp. 667-670.United StatesSeismic -anisotropy

Abstract: North America provides an important test for assessing the coupling of large continents with heterogeneous Archean- to Cenozoic-aged lithospheric provinces to the mantle flow. We use the unprecedented spatial coverage of the USArray seismic network to obtain an extensive and consistent data set of shear wave splitting intensity measurements at 1436 stations. Overall, the measurements are consistent with simple shear deformation in the asthenosphere due to viscous coupling to the overriding lithosphere. The fast directions agree with the absolute plate motion direction with a mean difference of 2° with 27° standard deviation. There are, however, deviations from this simple pattern, including a band along the Rocky Mountain front, indicative of flow complication due to gradients in lithospheric thickness, and variations in amplitude through the central United States, which can be explained through varying contributions of lithospheric anisotropy. Thus, seismic anisotropy may be sourced in both the asthenosphere and lithosphere, and variations in splitting intensity are due to lithospheric anisotropy developed during deformation over long time scales.
DS201903-0500
2019
Monteiro, L.V.S.Carneiro, C.de C., Juliani, C., Carreiro-Araujo, S.A., Monteiro, L.V.S., Crosta, A.P., Fernandes, C.M.D.New crustal framework in the Amazon craton based on geophysical data: evidence of deep east-west trending suture zones.IEEE.org , Vol. 16, 1, pp. 20-24.South America, Brazilcraton

Abstract: The Tapajós mineral province (TMP), in the Brazilian Amazon Craton, comprises NW-SE Paleoproterozoic insular magmatic arcs accreted to the Carajás Archean Province (CAP). We present new geological and geophysical data pointing toward a different evolutionary model for the TMP. Results obtained from magnetic data indicate that NNW-SSE trending structures occur at shallow crustal levels. Furthermore, an E-W structural framework shows up at 15.4 km depth, in disagreement with the accreted island arc orientation. These E-W structures are associated with north-dipping blocks, reflecting ductile compressive tectonics, similar to the tectonic setting found in the CAP. We interpret these E-W structures of the TMP as the continuity westwards of similar structures from the CAP, under the Paleoproterozoic volcanic rocks of the Uatumã Supergroup. Based on this evidence, we propose that Paleoproterozoic arcs have been formed in an Archean active continental margin, instead of in island arcs. This novel tectonic setting for the TMP has significant implications for the tectonic evolution and the metallogenic potential of the southern portion of the Amazon craton, particularly for Paleoproterozoic magmatic-hydrothermal (epithermal and porphyry) precious and base metal systems.
DS202010-1868
2020
Monteiro, M.Presser, J.L.B., Monteiro, M., Maldonado, A.Impact diamonds in an extravagant metal piece found in Paraguay. *** PORTHistoria Natural *** english abstract, Vol. 10, 2, 12p. PdfSouth America, Paraguaymeteorite

Abstract: Around 70 km SSE of Chovoreca Hill (Paraguay), a pitcher-like metal piece weighing approximately 303 kg was found. Several studies have been carried out on this piece. Metallographic examination resembles cast iron that presents eutectoid microtextures, but the metal showed Neumann lines. Small fragments of the piece were diluted in concentrated HCl and with this it was possible to obtain colorless crystals, with size ranging from 10 µm to 1 mm, approximately; SEM/EDS studies showed that major element present is carbon which suggests the presence of diamonds. Raman spectroscopy proved that crystals are diamonds, that showing bands in the “lonsdaleite/diamond zone”, further, the results also showed bands that accuse that the carbon of the diamonds are of meteoritic origin. From the calculus of the FWHM with values around to 42-373 cm-1 centered on 1282 cm-1 peak could be an indication of a very powerful impact that would have formed the diamonds.
DS1991-1333
1991
Monteiro, T.Pereira, E., Monteiro, T.Delayed luminescence of the H-3 center in diamondJournal of Luminesence, Vol. 48-9, Jan.-Feb., pp. 814-818GlobalLuminesence, Diamond -H-3 center
DS2003-0393
2003
Montel, J.M.Faure, F., Trolliard, G., Nicollet, C., Montel, J.M.A developmental model of olivine morphology as a function of the cooling rate and theContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 145, 2, pp. 251-63.MantleBlank
DS200412-0536
2003
Montel, J.M.Faure, F., Trolliard, G., Nicollet, C., Montel, J.M.A developmental model of olivine morphology as a function of the cooling rate and the degree of undercooling.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 145, 2, pp. 251-63.MantleMineral chemistry
DS201711-2518
2017
Montel, J-M.Jebrak, M., Montel, J-M.Educating the resource geologist of the future: between observation and imagination.Elements, Vol. 13, pp. 331-336.Globalresources

Abstract: Training geologists for a career in the mining industry has changed over the years. It has become at the same time more specialized and with a broader approach. The modern resource geologist needs to understand new styles of ore deposits, the impact of energy transition on the types of deposits and to implement mining processes, the increasing number of mining regulations, and the shift toward educating populations in countries that are new to mining. Based on observation and imagination, rooted in fundamental science, the education of a resource geologist has been transformed by the digital revolution and the integration of the principles of sustainable development. Training future resource geologists means changing the role of teachers to better develop the imaginations of their students and to increasing what students know about the social impact of mining.
DS201412-0258
2014
Monteleone, B.Gaetani, G., O'Leary, J., Koga, K., Hauri, E., Rose-Koga, E., Monteleone, B.Hydration of mantle olivine under variable water and oxygen fugacity conditions.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 167, 2, pp. 1-14.MantleOlivine
DS201610-1883
2016
Monteleone, B.Li, Y., Dasgupta, R., Tsuno, K., Monteleone, B., Shimizu, N.Carbon and sulfur budget of the silicate Earth explained by accretion of differentiated planetary embryos.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 9, pp. 781-785.MantleSulfur budgets

Abstract: The abundances of volatile elements in the Earth’s mantle have been attributed to the delivery of volatile-rich material after the main phase of accretion1, 2, 3. However, no known meteorites could deliver the volatile elements, such as carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and sulfur, at the relative abundances observed for the silicate Earth4. Alternatively, Earth could have acquired its volatile inventory during accretion and differentiation, but the fate of volatile elements during core formation is known only for a limited set of conditions4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Here we present constraints from laboratory experiments on the partitioning of carbon and sulfur between metallic cores and silicate mantles under conditions relevant for rocky planetary bodies. We find that carbon remains more siderophile than sulfur over a range of oxygen fugacities; however, our experiments suggest that in reduced or sulfur-rich bodies, carbon is expelled from the segregating core. Combined with previous constraints9, we propose that the ratio of carbon to sulfur in the silicate Earth could have been established by differentiation of a planetary embryo that was then accreted to the proto-Earth. We suggest that the accretion of a Mercury-like (reduced) or a sulfur-rich (oxidized) differentiated body—in which carbon has been preferentially partitioned into the mantle—may explain the Earth’s carbon and sulfur budgets.
DS200412-1355
2004
Montelli, R.Montelli, R., Nolet, G., Dahlen, F.A., Masters, G., Engdahl, E.R., Hung, S.H.Finite frequency tomography reveals a variety of plumes in the mantle.Science, No. 5656 Jan. 16, pp. 338-42.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200512-0791
2005
Montelli, R.Nolet, G.,Montelli, R.The role of mantle plumes in the Earth's heat budget.Chapman Conference held in Scotland August 28-Sept. 1 2005, 1p. abstractMantleMantle plume, geothermometry
DS200612-0984
2006
Montelli, R.Nolet, G., Karato, S-I., Montelli, R.Plume fluxes from seismic tomography.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 248, 3-4, Aug. 30, pp. 685-699.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200712-0744
2006
Montelli, R.Montelli, R., Nolet, G., Dahlen, F.A., Masters, G.A catalogue of deep mantle plumes: new results from finite-frequency tomography.Geochemical, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 7 Q11007Global, mantleGeophysics - seismics, Frechet derivatives
DS2002-1530
2002
Montenegro, J.L.Spencer, R.M., Montenegro, J.L., Gaibor,Perez,MantillaThe Portovelo Zaruma mining camp: southwest Ecuador: porphyry and epithermal environments.Seg Newsletter, No. 49, April, pp. 1,8-14.EcuadorCopper, gold, Deposit - Portovelo Zaruma, R-Nivel, Muluncay
DS2002-0125
2002
MonteroBea, F., Fershtater,Montero, Whitehouse, Levin, ScarrowRecycling of continental crust into the mantle as revealed by Kytlym dunite zircons, Ural Mountains.Terra Nova, Vol. 13, No. 6, pp. 407-12.RussiaSubduction
DS1998-0424
1998
Montero, M.P.Fershtater, G.B., Bea, F., Montero, M.P.Anatexis of basites in a Paleosubduction Zone and the origin of anorthosite-plagiogranite series Urals....Geochemistry International, Vol. 36, No. 8, Aug. 1, pp. 684-97.Russia, UralsBasites, Platinum, belt, platinum group elements (PGE), Alkaline rocks
DS2000-0862
2000
Montero, P.Scarrow, J.H., Bea, F., Montero, P., Fershtater, G.Preservation of atypical arc rocks in suturesIgc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.GlobalSubduction, Tectonics - adakitic
DS2001-0051
2001
Montero, P.Arzamastsevm A.A., Bea, F., Glaznev, V.N., Arzamasteva, L.V., Montero, P.Kola alkaline province in the Paleozoic: evaluation of primary mantle magma composition and magma generation conditions.Russian Journal of Earth Science, Vol. 3, 1, March, pp.Russia, Kola PeninsulaMagmatism
DS2002-0067
2002
Montero, P.Arzamastsev, A.A., Bea, F., Arzamasteva, L.V., Montero, P.Rare earth elements in rocks and minerals from alkaline plutons of the Kola Peninsula, NW Russia, as indicators of alkaline magma evolution.Russian Journal of Earth Science, Vol. 4, 3, JuneRussia, Kola PeninsulaREE
DS200512-0029
2002
Montero, P.Arzamastsev, A.A., Bea, F., Arzamastseva, L.V., Montero, P.Devonian plume magmatism in the NE Baltic Shield: rare earth elements in rocks and minerals of ultrabasic alkaline series as indicators of magma evolution.Deep Seated Magmatism, magmatism sources and the problem of plumes., pp. 42-68.Baltic Shield, Kola Peninsula, RussiaMagmatism
DS200612-0041
2006
Montero, P.Arzamastev, A.A., Bea, F., Arzamastseva, L.V., Montero, P.Proterozoic Gremyakha-Vyrmes polyphase massif, Kola Peninsula: an example of mixing basic and alkaline mantle melts.Petrology, Vol. 14, 4, pp. 361-389.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkalic
DS200612-0042
2006
Montero, P.Arzamastsev, A.A., Bea, F., Arzamasteva, L.V., Montero, P.Proterozoic Gremyakha Vyrmes polyphase massif, Kola Peninsula: an example of mixing basic and alkaline melts.Petrology, Vol. 14, 4, pp. 361-389.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkalic
DS201312-0061
2012
Montero, P.Bea, F., Montero, P., Haissen, F., El Archi, A.2.46 Ga kasilite and nepheline syenites from the Awsard plution, Reguibat Rise of the West African Craton, Morocco. Generation of extremely K-rich magmas at the Archean-Proterozoic transition.Precambrian Research, Vol. 224, pp. 242-254.Africa, MoroccoUltrapotassic rocks
DS201603-0401
2016
Montero, P.Montero, P., Haissen, F., Mouttaqi, A., Molina, J.F., Errami, A., Sadki, O., Cambeses, A., Bea, F.Contrasting SHRIMP U-Pb zircon ages of two carbonatite complexes from the peri-cratonic terranes of the Reguibat shield: implications for the lateral extension of the West African Craton.Gondwana Research, in press available 13p.Africa, West AfricaCarbonatite

Abstract: The Oulad Dlim Massif of the Western Reguibat Shield contains several carbonatite complexes of previously unknown age. The largest and best studied are Gleibat Lafhouda, composed of magnesiocarbonatites, and Twihinate, composed of calciocarbonatites. Gleibat Lafhouda is hosted by Archean gneisses and schists. It has a SHRIMP U-Th-Pb zircon crystallization age of 1.85 ± 0.03 Ga, a Nd model age of TCR = 1.89 ± 0.03 Ga, and a Sm-Nd age of 1.85 ± 0.39 Ga. It forms part of the West Reguibat Alkaline province. Twihinate, on the other hand, is much younger. It is hosted by Late Silurian to Early Devonian deformed granites and has a zircon crystallization age of 104 ± 4 Ma, which is within error of the age of the carbonatites of the famous Richat Structure in the southwest Reguibat Shield. Like these, the Twihinate carbonatites are part of the Mid-Cretaceous Peri-Atlantic Alkaline Pulse. The Twihinate carbonatites contain abundant inherited zircons with ages that peak at ca. 420 Ma, 620 Ma, 2050 Ma, 2466 Ma, and 2830 Ma. This indicates that their substratum has West African rather than, as previously suggested, Avalonian affinities. It has, however, a Paleoproterozoic component that is not found in the neighboring western Reguibat Shield. The 421 Ma to 410 Ma gneissic granites hosting Twihinate are epidote + biotite + Ca-rich garnet deformed I-type to A-type granites derived from magmas of deep origin compatible, therefore, with being generated in a subduction environment. These granites form a body of unknown dimensions and petrogenesis, the study of which will be of key importance for understanding the geology and crustal architecture of this region.
DS201612-2283
2016
Montero, P.Cambeses, A., Garcia-Casco, A., Scarrow, J.H., Montero, P., Perez-Valera, L.A., Bea, F.Mineralogical evidence for lamproite magma mixing and storage at mantle depths: Socovos fault lamproites, SE Spain.Lithos, Vol. 266-267, pp. 182-201.Europe, SpainLamproite

Abstract: Detailed textural and mineral chemistry characterisation of lamproites from the Socovos fault zone, SE Spain Neogene Volcanic Province (NVP) combining X-ray element maps and LA-ICP-MS spot analyses has provided valuable information about mantle depth ultrapotassic magma mixing processes. Despite having similar whole-rock compositions, rocks emplaced in the Socovos fault are mineralogically varied: including type-A olivine-phlogopite lamproites; and type-B clinopyroxene-phlogopite lamproites. The Ol-lacking type-B predates Ol-bearing type-A by c. 2 million years. We propose that the mineralogical variations, which are representative of lamproites in the NVP as a whole, indicate mantle source heterogeneities. Major and trace element compositions of mineral phases suggest both metasomatised harzburgite and veined pyroxenite sources that were most likely closely spatially related. Thin section scale textural and compositional variations in mineral phases reveal heterogeneous mantle- and primitive magma-derived crystals. The variety of crystals points to interaction and mingling-mixing of ultrapotassic magma batches at mantle depths prior crustal emplacement. The mixing apparently occurred in a mantle melting zone with a channelised flow regime and localised magma chambers-reservoirs. Magma interaction was interrupted when the Socovos and other lithosphere-scale faults tore down to the mantle source region, triggering rapid ascent of the heterogeneous lamproite magma.
DS201703-0405
2017
Montero, P.Haissen, F., Cambeses, A., Montero, P., Bea, F., Dilek, Y., Mouttaqi, A.The Archean kaisilite nepheline syenites of the Awsard intrusive massif ( Reguibat Shield, West African craton, Morocco) and its relationship to alkaline magmatism of Africa.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 127, pp. 16-50.Africa, MoroccoCraton - magmatism
DS202001-0030
2019
Montero, P.Najih, A., Montero, P., Verati, C., Chabou, M.C., Fekkak, A., Baidder, L., Ezzouhairi, H., Bea, F., Michard, A.Initial Pangean rifting north of the West African craton: insights from late Permian U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar dating of alkaline magmatism from the eastern Anti-Atlas ( Morocco).Journal of Geodynamics, Vol. 132, 17p.Africa, Moroccocamptonites

Abstract: Numerous mafic dykes, sills and laccoliths crop out in the southern part of the Tafilalt basin (Eastern Anti-Atlas, Morocco). These rocks intrude the mildly folded Ordovician to Early Carboniferous formations, consisting mainly of lamprophyric dolerites and camptonites with minor gabbros and syenodiorites. Previous geochemical studies have shown that the Tafilalt magmatism of sodic-alkaline affinity has been produced by low degrees of partial melting from an enriched deep mantle source within the garnet stability field. However, the age and the geodynamic context of these rocks were presently unknown since no isotopic dating had so far been made of the Tafilalt dolerites. To resolve this issue, we present here the first 40Ar/39Ar biotite and U-Pb zircon dating from the Tafilalt alkaline magmatism. Three samples (biotite separates) yielded well-defined 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages of 264.2?±?2.7 Ma, 259.0?±?6.3 Ma and 262.6?±?4.5 Ma whereas 206Pb/238U dating of zircon from one of these samples yielded an age of 255?±?3 Ma. These ages coincide within the dating error, and indicate that this magmatism occurred in the late Permian. Considering geochronological and geochemical data, we propose that the Tafilalt magmatism reflects an early-rift magmatic activity that preceded the Triassic rifting heralded by the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. This magmatic activity is recorded in both sides of the future Atlantic Ocean by small-volume alkaline magmatism that started in the late Permian and extends into the Triassic. The alkaline magmas are probably generated in response to an increase in the mantle potential temperature underneath the Pangea supercontinent.
DS1992-1180
1992
Montero, R.L.B.P.Pedrosa-Soares, A.C., Noce, C.M., Vidal, Ph., Montero, R.L.B.P.Toward a new tectonic model for the Late Proterozoic Aracuai southeast Brasil-west Congolian southwest Africa beltJournal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 6, No. 1-2, pp. 33-47Brazil, Southwest AfricaTectonics, Proterozoic
DS2002-1078
2002
Montesi, L.G.J.Montesi, L.G.J., Zuber, M.T.A unified description of localization for application to large scale tectonicsJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 107, No. 3, pp. ECV 1.GlobalTectonics
DS2002-1079
2002
Montesi, L.G.J.Montesi, L.G.J., Zuber, M.T.A unified description of localization for application to large scale tectonicsJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol.107,B3, pp.ECV 1-18.MantleLithosphere, rheology, dynamics, Tectonics
DS201412-0653
2014
Montesi, M.D.Paczkowski, K., Thissen, C.J., Montesi, M.D., Laurent, G.j.Deflection of mantle flow beneath subducting slabs and the origin of subslab anisotropy.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 41, 19, pp. 6734-42.MantleSubduction
DS2002-1080
2002
Montesio, L.G.J.Montesio, L.G.J., Zuber, M.T.A unified description of localization for application to large scale tectonicsJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 107, No.3, pp.MantleTectonics
DS1994-1227
1994
Montes-Lauar, C.R.Montes-Lauar, C.R., et al.The Anari and Tapirapua Jurassic formations, western Brasil:paleomagnetism, geochemistry and geochronologyEarth Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 128, No. 3-4, Dec. pp. 357-372BrazilGeochemistry
DS1995-1290
1995
Montes-Lauar, C.R.Montes-Lauar, C.R., Pacca, I.G., et al.The Anari and Tapirapua Jurassic formations: western Brasil, paleomagnetism, geochemistry and geochronologyPrecambrian Research, Vol. 70, No. 3-4, Jan. pp. 357-372BrazilPaleomagnetics, Geochemistry
DS1995-1291
1995
Montes-Lauar, C.R.Montes-Lauar, C.R., Pacca, I.G., Kawashita, K.Late Cretaceous alkaline complexes, southeastern Brasil: paleomagnetism andgeochronology.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 134, No. 3-4, Sept. 1, pp. 425-440.BrazilGeochronology, Alkaline rocks
DS201707-1309
2017
Monteux, J.Bouhifd, M.A., Clesi, V., Boujibar, A., Cartier, C., Hammouda, T., Boyet, M., Manthilake, G., Monteux, J., Andrault, D.Silicate melts during the Earth's core formation.Chemical Geology, Vol. 461, pp. 128-139.Mantlemelting

Abstract: Accretion from primordial material and its subsequent differentiation into a planet with core and mantle are fundamental problems in terrestrial and solar system. Many of the questions about the processes, although well developed as model scenarios over the last few decades, are still open and much debated. In the early Earth, during its formation and differentiation into rocky mantle and iron-rich core, it is likely that silicate melts played an important part in shaping the Earth's main reservoirs as we know them today. Here, we review several recent results in a deep magma ocean scenario that give tight constraints on the early evolution of our planet. These results include the behaviour of some siderophile elements (Ni and Fe), lithophile elements (Nb and Ta) and one volatile element (Helium) during Earth's core formation. We will also discuss the melting and crystallization of an early magma ocean, and the implications on the general feature of core-mantle separation and the depth of the magma ocean. The incorporation of Fe2 + and Fe3 + in bridgmanite during magma ocean crystallization is also discussed. All the examples presented here highlight the importance of the prevailing conditions during the earliest time of Earth's history in determining the composition and dynamic history of our planet.
DS201711-2499
2017
Monteux, J.Andrault, D., Bolfan-Casanova, N., Bouhifd, M.A., Boujibar, A., Garbarino, G., Manthilake, G., Mezouar, M., Monteux, J., Parisiades, P., Pesce, G.Toward a coherent model for the melting behaviour of the deep Earth's mantle.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 265, pp. 67-81.Mantlemelting

Abstract: Knowledge of melting properties is critical to predict the nature and the fate of melts produced in the deep mantle. Early in the Earth’s history, melting properties controlled the magma ocean crystallization, which potentially induced chemical segregation in distinct reservoirs. Today, partial melting most probably occurs in the lowermost mantle as well as at mid upper-mantle depths, which control important aspects of mantle dynamics, including some types of volcanism. Unfortunately, despite major experimental and theoretical efforts, major controversies remain about several aspects of mantle melting. For example, the liquidus of the mantle was reported (for peridotitic or chondritic-type composition) with a temperature difference of ~1000 K at high mantle depths. Also, the Fe partitioning coefficient (DFeBg/melt) between bridgmanite (Bg, the major lower mantle mineral) and a melt was reported between ~0.1 and ~0.5, for a mantle depth of ~2000 km. Until now, these uncertainties had prevented the construction of a coherent picture of the melting behavior of the deep mantle. In this article, we perform a critical review of previous works and develop a coherent, semi-quantitative, model. We first address the melting curve of Bg with the help of original experimental measurements, which yields a constraint on the volume change upon melting (?Vm). Secondly, we apply a basic thermodynamical approach to discuss the melting behavior of mineralogical assemblages made of fractions of Bg, CaSiO3-perovskite and (Mg,Fe)O-ferropericlase. Our analysis yields quantitative constraints on the SiO2-content in the pseudo-eutectic melt and the degree of partial melting (F) as a function of pressure, temperature and mantle composition; For examples, we find that F could be more than 40% at the solidus temperature, except if the presence of volatile elements induces incipient melting. We then discuss the melt buoyancy in a partial molten lower mantle as a function of pressure, F and DFeBg/melt. In the lower mantle, density inversions (i.e. sinking melts) appear to be restricted to low F values and highest mantle pressures. The coherent melting model has direct geophysical implications: (i) in the early Earth, the magma ocean crystallization could not occur for a core temperature higher than ~5400 K at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). This temperature corresponds to the melting of pure Bg at 135 GPa. For a mantle composition more realistic than pure Bg, the right CMB temperature for magma ocean crystallization could have been as low as ~4400 K. (ii) There are converging arguments for the formation of a relatively homogeneous mantle after magma ocean crystallization. In particular, we predict the bulk crystallization of a relatively large mantle fraction, when the temperature becomes lower than the pseudo-eutectic temperature. Some chemical segregation could still be possible as a result of some Bg segregation in the lowermost mantle during the first stage of the magma ocean crystallization, and due to a much later descent of very low F, Fe-enriched, melts toward the CMB. (iii) The descent of such melts could still take place today. There formation should to be related to incipient mantle melting due to the presence of volatile elements. Even though, these melts can only be denser than the mantle (at high mantle depths) if the controversial value of DFeBg/melt is indeed as low as suggested by some experimental studies. This type of melts could contribute to produce ultra-low seismic velocity anomalies in the lowermost mantle.
DS201803-0432
2018
Monteux, J.Andrault, D., Pesce, G., Manthilake, G., Monteux, J., Volfan-Casanova, N., Chantel, J. , Novella, D., Guignot, N., King, A., Itie, J-P., Hennet, L.An archean mushy mantle.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 11, 2, pp. 85-86.Mantlegeodynamics

Abstract: Experimental data reveal that Earth’s mantle melts more readily than previously thought, and may have remained mushy until two to three billion years ago.
DS201811-2619
2018
Montgarri, A.Xu, J., Melgarejo, J.C., Castillo, O., Montgarri, A., Laia, S., Santamaria, J.Ilmenite generations in kimberlite from Banankoro, Guinea. ConakryNeues Jahrbuch fur Mineralogie, doi:.org/10.1127/njma/2018/0096Africa, Guineadeposit - Banakoro

Abstract: A complex mineral sequence in a kimberlite from the Banankoro Cluster (Guinea Conakry) has been interpreted as the result of magma mixing processes. The composition of the early generations of phlogopite and spinel suggest direct crystallisation of a kimberlitic magma. However, the compositional trends found in the late generations of phlogopite and spinels could suggest magma mixing. In this context, four ilmenite generations formed. The first generations (types 1 and 2) are geikielitic and are associated with spinel and phlogopite which follow the kimberlitic compositional trends. They are interpreted as produced by crystallization from the kimberlite magma. A third generation of euhedral tabular Mg-rich ilmenite (type 3) formed during the interval between two generations of serpentine. Finally, a late generation of Mn-rich ilmenite (type 4) replaces all the Ti-rich minerals and is contemporaneous with the last generation of serpophitic non-replacing serpentine. Therefore, the formation of type 3 and type 4 ilmenite took place after the crystallization of the groundmass, during late hydrothermal process. Our results suggest a detailed textural study is necessary when use Mg-rich and Mn-rich ilmenites as KIMs.
DS1989-1045
1989
Montgomery, C.W.Montgomery, C.W., Gray, B.A.Ages and Strontium isotope systematics of Archean basement rocks from the south central Beartooth MountainsThe Mountain Geologist, Vol. 26, No. 3, July pp. 75-80MontanaGeochronology, Beartooth Mountains
DS2003-1009
2003
Montigny, R.Ngounouno, I., Deruelle, B., Demaiffe, D., Montigny, R.The monchiquites from Tchircotche Upper Benoue valley, northern CameroonComptes Rendus Geosciences, IN FRENCH, Vol. 335, 3, March, pp. 289-296.CameroonBlank
DS200412-1430
2003
Montigny, R.Ngounouno, I., Deruelle, B., Demaiffe, D., Montigny, R.The monchiquites from Tchircotche Upper Benoue valley, northern Cameroon.Comptes Rendus Geoscience, Vol. 335, 3, March, pp. 289-296.Africa, CameroonPetrogenesis
DS200512-0777
2005
Montigny, R.Ngounouno, I., Deruelle, B., Montigny, R., Demaiffe, D.Petrology and geochemistry of monchiquites from Tchircotche ( Garoua rift, north Cameroon, Central Africa).Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 83, 3-4, pp. 167-190.Africa, CameroonMonchiquites
DS201312-0513
2013
Montross, C.S.Kramers, J.D., Andreoli, M.A.G., Atanasova, M., Belyanin, G.A., Block, D.L., Franklyn, C., Harris, C., Lekgoathi, M., Montross, C.S., Ntsoane, T., Pischedda, V., Segonyane, P., Viljoen, K.S., Westraadt, J.E.Unique chemistry of a diamond bearing pebble from the Libyan desert glass strewnfield, SW Egypt: evidence for a shocked comet fragment.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.382, pp. 21-31.Africa, EgyptShock diamonds
DS201501-0021
2014
Montsion, J.M.Montsion, J.M.Disrupting Canadian sovereignty? The First Nations & Chin a strategy revisited.Geoforum, Vol. 58, pp. 114-121.CanadaLegal - CSR
DS1999-0632
1999
Monz, R.Schmeling, H., Monz, R., Rubie, D.C.The influence of olivine metastability on the dynamics of subductionEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.165, No.1, Jan.15, pp.55-66.MantleGeodynamics, Subduction
DS201807-1497
2018
Moodley, T.Holtzhausen, C., Moodley, T.Practical roadmapping of technology and digital transformation in mining.SAIMM Diamonds - source to use 2018 Conference 'thriving in changing times'. June 11-13., pp. 65-72.Technologydigital solutions
DS201808-1768
2018
Moodley, T.Moodley, T.Road mapping the digital transformation. Extracting the full benefit from source to use.SAIMM Diamonds - source to use 2018 Conference 'thriving in changing tmes'. June 11-13., 16 ppts.Globaleconomics
DS1940-0215
1949
Moody, C.L.Moody, C.L.Mesozoic Igneous Rocks of Northern Gulf Coast PlainAmerican Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin., Vol. 33, PP. 1410-1428.United States, Gulf CoastBlank
DS1940-0216
1949
Moody, C.L.Moody, C.L.Mesozoic Igneous Rocks of Northern Gulf Coastal PlainAmerican Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin., Vol. 33, No. 8, PP. 1410-1428.United States, Gulf Coast, ArkansasRegional Geology
DS200712-0745
2007
Moody-Stuart, M.Moody-Stuart, M.Business and NGO's in sustainable development - common cause or endless wars. Tacitus Lecture ( Anglo American Chairman).Optima, Nov. pp. 22-37.AfricaSustainable development
DS1990-0747
1990
MooersIssler, D.R., Beaumont, C., Willett, S.D., Donelick, R.A., MooersPreliminary evidence from apatite fission track dat a concerning the thermal history of the Peace River Arch region, western Canada sedimentary basinGeology of the Peace River Arch, ed. Sc.C. O'Connell, J.S. Bell, Bulletin. Can., Vol. 38A, Special Volume, December pp. 260-269AlbertaGeochronology, Geothermometry
DS1990-1061
1990
Mooers, H.D.Mooers, H.D.A glacial-process model: the role of spatial and temporal variations in glacier thermal regimeGeological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin, Vol. 102, No. 2, February pp. 243-251MinnesotaGeomorphology, Rainy and Superior Lobes/
DS1990-1062
1990
Mooers, H.D.Mooers, H.D.Discriminating texturally similar tills in central Minnesota by graphical and multivariate techniquesQuaternary Research, Vol. 34, No. 2, September pp. 133-147MinnesotaGeomorphology, Tills
DS1991-1182
1991
Mooers, H.D.Mooers, H.D., Hobbs, H.C., Gilbertson, J.P.Correlation of Late Wisconsin ice margins in MinnesotaGeological Society of America, Abstract Volume, Vol. 23, No. 3, March p. 50MinnesotaGeomorphology, Glacial
DS200912-0511
2009
Mookeherjee, M.Mookeherjee, M., Steinle-Neumann, G.Detecting deeply subducted crust from the electricity of hollandite.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 288, 3-4, pp. 349-358.MantleSubduction
DS201112-0698
2011
Mookerjee, M.Mookerjee, M., Nakajima, Y., Steinle-Neumann, G., Glazyrin, K., Wu, X., Dubrovinsky, McCammon, ChumakovHigh pressure behaviour of iron carbide (Fe[7]C[3j] at inner core conditions.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 116, B4, B04201.MantleHP core
DS200912-0734
2009
Mookherjee, M.Stixrude, L., De Koker, N., Sun, N., Mookherjee, M., Karki, B.B.Thermodynamics of silicate liquids in the deep Earth.Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 278, 3-4, pp. 226-232.MantleGeothermometry
DS201412-0127
2014
Mookherjee, M.Chheda, T.D., Mookherjee, M., Mainprice, D., Dos Santos, A.M., Molaison, J.J., Chantel, J., Manthilake, G., Bassett, W.A.Structure and elasticity of phlogopite under compression: geophysical implications.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 233, pp. 1-12.MantleGeophysics
DS202012-2247
2021
Mookherjee, M.Saha, S., Peng, Y., Dasgupta, R., Mookherjee, M., Fischer, K.M.Assessing the presence of volatile-bearing mineral phases in the cratonic mantle as a possible cause of mid-lithospheric discontinuities.Earth and Planetary Letters, Vol.. 553, 116602, 12p. PdfMantlecratons

Abstract: A number of possible hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of mid-lithospheric discontinuities (MLDs), typically characterized by ~2-6% reductions in seismic shear wave velocity (VS) at depths of 60 km to ~150 km in the cratonic sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). One such hypothesis is the presence of low-shear wave velocity, hydrous and carbonate mineral phases. Although, the presence of hydrous silicates and carbonates can cause a reduction in the shear wave velocity of mantle domains, the contribution of volatile metasomatism to the origins of MLDs has remained incompletely evaluated. To assess the metasomatic origin of MLDs, we compiled experimental phase assemblages, phase proportions, and phase compositions from the literature in peridotite + H2O, peridotite + CO2, and peridotite + H2O + CO2 systems at P-T conditions where hydrous silicate and/or carbonate minerals are stable. By comparing the experimental assemblages with the compiled bulk peridotite compositions for cratons, we bracket plausible proportions and compositions of hydrous silicate and carbonate mineral phases that can be expected in cratonic SCLMs. Based on the CaO and K2O contents of cratonic peridotite xenoliths and the estimated upper limit of CO2 content in SCLM, =~10 vol.% pargasitic amphibole, =~2.1 vol.% phlogopite and =~0.2 vol.% magnesite solid solution can be stable in the SCLM. We also present new elasticity data for the pargasite end member of amphibole based on first principles simulations for more accurate estimates of aggregate VS for metasomatized domains in cratonic mantle. Using the bracketed phase compositions, phase proportions, and updated values of elastic constants for relevant mineral end members, we further calculate aggregate VS at MLD depths for three seismic stations in the northern continental U.S. Depending on the choice of background wave speeds of unmetasomatized peridotite and the cratonic geotherm, the composition and abundance of volatile-bearing mineral phases bracketed here can explain as much as 2.01 to 3.01% reduction in VS. While various craton formation scenarios allow formation of the amphibole and phlogopite abundances bracketed here, presence of volatile-bearing phases in an average cratonic SCLM composition cannot explain the entire range of velocity reductions observed at MLDs. Other possible velocity reduction mechanisms thus must be considered to explain the full estimated range of shear wave speed reduction at MLD depths globally.
DS2001-0793
2001
Moon, C.Moon, C.Exploration - overviewMining Annual Review, 6p.GlobalEconomics, exploration spending, Overview - brief
DS200512-0741
2005
Moon, C.Moon, C.Mineral exploration in 2004: a global review.Mining Journal Exploration Special, March 2005 pp. 5-8.GlobalNews item - brief overview
DS200712-0746
2007
Moon, C.Moon, C.Exploration highlights.Mining Journal Exploration Special, pp. 8-12..GlobalBrief - review
DS1991-1183
1991
Moon, C.J.Moon, C.J., Aftab Khan, M.Mineral exploration... review in various countriesMining Annual Review, June 1991, pp. 175-195GlobalMineral exploration, Review 1990
DS1986-0619
1986
Moon, J.O'Neill, H.St. C., Jaques, A.L., Smith, C.B., Moon, J.Diamond bearing peridotite xenoliths from the Argyle (AK1) pipeProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 300-302AustraliaBlank
DS1990-0758
1990
Moon, J.Jaques, A.L., O'Neill, H. St., Smith, C.B., Moon, J., ChappellDiamondiferous peridotite xenoliths from the Argyle(AKl) lamproite @Western AustraliaContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 104, No. 3, pp. 255-276AustraliaArgyle AKl lamproite, Xenoliths -peridotite
DS1992-1386
1992
Moon, M.Shigley, J.E., Frutsch, E., Reinitz, I., Moon, M.An update on Sumitomo gem-quantity synthetic diamondsGems and Gemology, Vol. 28, No. 2, Summer pp. 116-122GlobalDiamonds -synthetic, Sumitomo
DS1994-0043
1994
Moon, W.M.An, P., Moon, W.M., Bonham-Carter, G.F.An object-oriented knowledge representation structure for exploration dataintegrationNonrenewable Resources, Vol. 3, No. 2, Summer, pp. 132-145GlobalBase metals, sulphides, Geostatistics -database
DS1994-0044
1994
Moon, W.M.An, P., Moon, W.M., Bonham-Carter, G.F.Uncertainty management in integration of exploration dat a using the BeliefFunctionNonrenewable Resources, Vol. 3, No. 1, Spring, pp. 60-71GlobalEBF function, Geostatistics
DS1994-1185
1994
Moon, W.M.Miao, X., Moon, W.M.Three component vertical seismic profiling (VSP) experiment in the SudburyBasinGeophy. Res. Letters, Vol. 21, No. 10, May 15, pp. 939-942OntarioGeophysics -seismics, Sudbury Structure
DS2001-0926
2001
Moonchoux, P.Pin, C., Paquette, J.L., Moonchoux, P., Hammouda, T.First field scale occurrence of Silicon, Aluminum, Sodium rich low degree partial melts from the upper mantle.Journal of Geology, Vol. 29, No. 5, May, pp. 451-4.MantlePeridoite, glass inclusions, partial melts, uppermantle
DS2001-0557
2001
MooneyKaban, M., Artemieva, Schwintzer, MooneyEstimating the density of the continental roots: compositional and thermaleffects.Slave-Kaapvaal Workshop, Sept. Ottawa, 3p. abstractMantleGeothermometry, Geophysics - gravity anomalies
DS1970-0055
1970
Mooney, H.M.Craddock, C.E., Mooney, H.M.Geologic Structure Under the Northern Midcontinent Gravity HighGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 2, No. 7, PP. 527-528. (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent
DS1970-0151
1970
Mooney, H.M.Mooney, H.M., Craddock, C.E., Farnham, P.R., Johnson, S.H., Vol.Refraction Seismic Investigations of the Northern Mid-continent Gravity High.Journal of GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, Vol. 75, No. 26, PP. 5056-5086.GlobalMid Continent
DS1970-0152
1970
Mooney, H.M.Mooney, H.M., Farnham, P.R., et al.Seismic Studies Over the Midcontinent Gravity High in Minnesota and Northwestern Wisconsin.Minnesota Geological Survey Report Invest., No. 11, 191P.GlobalMid-continent, Geophysics
DS1980-0242
1980
Mooney, H.M.Mooney, H.M., Walton, M.Seismicity and Tectonic Relationships for Upper Great Lakes precambrian Shield Province.National Technical Information Service NUREG CR 1569, 85P.GlobalMid-continent
DS1984-0529
1984
Mooney, S.Mooney, S.Geochemistry of Mica from Some Australian Lamproites and Some Marid Suite Xenoliths, Bultfontein, South Africa.Bsc.hons. Thesis, Lakehead University, Australia, Western Australia, South AfricaLamproite
DS201112-0699
1984
Mooney, S.J.Mooney, S.J.Geochemistry of mica from some Australian lamproites and some MARID suite xenoliths, Bultfontein, South Africa.Thesis, 'BSc. Lakehead University, Australia, South AfricaThesis - note availability based on request to author
DS1991-1209
1991
Mooney, T.C.Mutschler, F.E., Johnson, D.C., Mooney, T.C.A speculative plate kinematic model for the central Montana alkalic province and related gold depositsGuidebook of the Central Montana Alkalic Province, ed. Baker, D.W., Berg. R., No. 100, pp. 121-123. extended abstractMontanaAlkaline rocks, Gold emphasis
DS1991-1210
1991
Mooney, T.C.Mutschler, F.E., Mooney, T.C., Johnson, D.C.Precious metal deposits related to alkaline igneous rocks - a space timetrip through the CordilleraMining Engineering, Vol. 43, No. 3, March pp. 304-309CordilleraKimberlites, Alkaline rocks
DS1995-1318
1995
Mooney, T.C.Mutschler, F.E., Johnson, D.C., Mooney, T.C.A selected bibliography of alkaline igneous rocks and related mineraldeposits, with emphasis on N. America.United States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 94-0624A, 222p. $ 35.00CordilleraAlkaline rocks, Bibliography -metallogeny -not specific to diamonds
DS1995-0002
1995
Mooney, W.Abbott, D., Mooney, W.The structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust -support for oceanic plateau model.Review Geophysics, Vol. 33, No. 5, pp. 231-242.MantleGeochemistry, Crust -structure
DS1998-0002
1998
Mooney, W.Abbott, D., Mooney, W., Sparks, D.Growth rate of early continents from two parameters: crustal thickness and depleted mantle thickness.Geological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting, abstract. only, p.A207.MantleArchean
DS1998-0988
1998
Mooney, W.Meissner, R., Mooney, W.Weakness of the lower continental crust: a condition for delamination, uplift and escape.Tectonophysics, Vol. 296, No. 1-2, . Oct. 30, pp. 47-60.MantleTectonics, Magmatism
DS2000-0001
2000
Mooney, W.Abbott, D., Sparks, D., Herzberg, C., Mooney, W., et al.Quantifying Precambrian crustal extraction: the root is the answerTectonophysics, Vol. 322, No. 1-2, pp.163-90.MantleTectonics - root
DS2000-0033
2000
Mooney, W.Artemieva, I., Mooney, W., Sleep, N.H.Deep structure and evolution of Archean cratonsGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstracts, Vol. 32, No. 7, p.A-429.MantleCraton - tectonics, Precambrian lithosphere
DS2001-0050
2001
Mooney, W.Artemieva, I., Mooney, W.Thermal thickness of cratonic lithosphere: a global studySlave-Kaapvaal Workshop, Sept. Ottawa, 6p. abstractMantleCraton - Precambrian lithosphere, Seismic tomography
DS2002-0492
2002
Mooney, W.Fuchs, K., Tittgemeyer, M., Ryberg, T., Wenzel, F., Mooney, W.Global significance of a Sub-Moho boundary layer (SMBL) deduced from high resolution seismic observations.International Geology Review, Vol. 44, 8, pp. 671-85.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200612-1439
2006
Mooney, W.Trubitsyn, V., Kaban, M., Mooney, W., Reigher, C., Schwintzer, P.Simulation of active tectonic processes for a convecting mantle with moving continents.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 164, 3, March pp; 611-623.MantleTectonics
DS1981-0181
1981
Mooney, W.D.Ginzburg, A., Mooney, W.D., Lutter, W.J., Walter, A.W.Crustal Structure in the Mississippi Embayment: CrossprofileEos, Vol. 62, No. 45, P. 1046. (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent
DS1981-0274
1981
Mooney, W.D.Lutter, W., Peters, D., Mooney, W.D., Healy, J.H.Crustal Structure of the Mississippi Embayment; Axial ProfilEos, Vol. 62, No. 45, P. 1046. (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent
DS1982-0494
1982
Mooney, W.D.Peters, D., Mooney, W.D., Andrews, M.C., Ginzburg, A.The Deep Crustal Structure of the Northern Mississippi Embayment.Eos, Vol. 63, No. 45, P. 1118. (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent
DS1983-0256
1983
Mooney, W.D.Ginzburg, A., Mooney, W.D., Walter, A.W., Lutter, W.J., Healy, J.Deep Structure of Northern Mississippi EmbaymentAmerican Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin., Vol. 67, No. 11, NOVEMBER PP. 2031-3046.GlobalMid Continent
DS1983-0464
1983
Mooney, W.D.Mooney, W.D., Andrews, M.C., et al.Crustal Structure of the Northern Mississippi Embayment And a Comparison with Other Continental Rift Zones.Tectonophysics, Vol. 94, PP. 327-348.GlobalMid-continent
DS1990-0644
1990
Mooney, W.D.Hamilton, R.M., Mooney, W.D.Seismic wave attenuation associated with crustal faults in the New Madrid seismic zoneScience, Vol. 248, No. 4953, April 20, pp. 351-354Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, MidcontinentGeophysics -seismics, New Madrid Zone
DS1990-1151
1990
Mooney, W.D.Pakiser, L.C., Mooney, W.D.Geophysical framework of the continental United StatesGeological Society of America (GSA) Memoir, No. 172, 840p. 3 plates approx. $ 92.50United StatesGeophysics, Structure, crust, mantle
DS1990-1152
1990
Mooney, W.D.Pakiser, L.C., Mooney, W.D.Geophysical framework of the continental United StatesGsa Mwr., No. 172, 840p. 3 plates $ 93.00United States, MidcontinentGeophysics
DS1991-0415
1991
Mooney, W.D.Durrheim, R.J., Mooney, W.D.Archean and Proterozoic crustal evolution: evidence from crustalseismologyGeology, Vol. 19, No. 6, June pp. 606-609Canada, United StatesTectonics, Crust
DS1991-1119
1991
Mooney, W.D.Meissner, R., Mooney, W.D.Speculations on continental crustal evolutionEos Transactions, Vol. 72, No. 52, December 24, pp. 585.590MantleCrust, Tectonics
DS1991-1184
1991
Mooney, W.D.Mooney, W.D., Meissner, R.Continental crustal evolution observationsEos Transactions, Vol. 72, No. 48, November 26, pp. 537, 540, 541MantleCrustal evolution, Tectonics
DS1994-0473
1994
Mooney, W.D.Durrheim, R.J., Mooney, W.D.Evolution of the Precambrian lithosphere: seismological and geochemicalconstraintsJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 99, pp. 15, 359-74.Alberta, Western CanadaTectonics, Lithosphere
DS1994-0474
1994
Mooney, W.D.Durrheim, R.J., Mooney, W.D.Evolution of the Precambrian lithosphere: seismological and geochemical constraints.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 99, No. B8, Aug. 10, pp. 15, 359-374MantlePrecambrian, Xenoliths, Geophysics -seismics
DS1995-0315
1995
Mooney, W.D.Christensen, N.I., Mooney, W.D.Seismic velocity structure and composition of the continental crust: a global view.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 100, No. B 7, June 10, pp. 9761-88.MantleGeophysics - seismics, Review
DS1995-1292
1995
Mooney, W.D.Mooney, W.D.The seismic structure and composition of continental crustGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstracts, Vol. 27, No. 6, abstract p. A 194.MantleGeophysics -seismics, Crust
DS1995-1293
1995
Mooney, W.D.Mooney, W.D.Continental roots go with the flowNature, Vol. 375, No. 6526, May 4, p.15MantleTectonics, Craton
DS1997-0003
1997
Mooney, W.D.Abbott, D.H., Drury, R., Mooney, W.D.Continents as lithological icebergs: the importance of buoyant lithospheric roots.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 149, No. 1-4, pp. 15-27.MantleTectonics, Subduction, mantle, Lithospheric roots, Continental Crust
DS1997-0004
1997
Mooney, W.D.Abbott, D.H., Drury, R., Mooney, W.D.Continents as lithological icebergs: the importance of bouyant lithosphericroots.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 149, pp. 15-27.Russia, Europe, UralsSubduction, plumes, Oceanic crust
DS1998-0870
1998
Mooney, W.D.Li, S., Mooney, W.D.Crustal structure of Chin a from deep seismic sounding profilesTectonophysics, Vol. 288, No. 1-4, Mar. pp. 105-114.ChinaTectonics, Geophysics - seismic
DS1998-1031
1998
Mooney, W.D.Mooney, W.D., Abbott, D.The formation of continental crust and lithosphere: a synthesis based on seismic reflection profiling...Geological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting, abstract. only, p.A109.MantleTectonic, Lithoprobe
DS2000-0678
2000
Mooney, W.D.Mooney, W.D.Thermal thickness of Precambrian lithosphereGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstracts, Vol. 32, No. 7, p.A-165.MantleTomography - geophysics - seismics, Models
DS2001-0559
2001
Mooney, W.D.Kaban, M.K., Mooney, W.D.Density structure of lithosphere in the southwestern United States and its tectonic significance.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 106, No. 1, Jan. 10, pp. 721-40.Cordillera, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, WyomingTectonics
DS2001-0984
2001
Mooney, W.D.Romanyuk, T.V., Mooney, W.D., Blakely, R.J.Cascade subduction zone, North America: a tectono geophysical modelGeotectonics, Vol. 35, No. 3, pp. 224-44.OregonSubduction zones - not specific to diamonds
DS2002-0065
2002
Mooney, W.D.Artemieva, I.M., Mooney, W.D.On the relations between cratonic lithosphere thickness, plate motions and basal dragTectonophysics, Vol. 358, 1-4, pp. 211-31.MantleSubduction, craton
DS2002-0066
2002
Mooney, W.D.Artemieva, I.M., Mooney, W.D., Perchuc, E., Thybo, H.Processes of lithosphere evolution: new evidence on the structure of the continental crust and uppermost mantle.Tectonophysics, Vol. 358, 1-4, pp. 1-15.MantleTectonics
DS2002-0155
2002
Mooney, W.D.Billien, M., Leveque, J.J., Artemieva, I.M., Mooney, W.D.Shear wave velocity, seismic attenuation and thermal structure of the continental lithosphere.Geological Society of America Annual Meeting Oct. 27-30, Abstract p. 263.South Africa, Russia, West AfricaGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics
DS2002-0291
2002
Mooney, W.D.Chulick, G.S., Mooney, W.D.Seismic structure of the crust and uppermost mantle of North America and adjacent oceanic basins, a synthesis.Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 92, 6, pp. 2478-92.North America, United States, CanadaGeophysics - seismics, tectonics
DS2002-0795
2002
Mooney, W.D.Kaban, M., Artemieva, I., Schwintzer, P., Mooney, W.D.Density of the continental roots: compositional and thermal effectsGeological Society of America Annual Meeting Oct. 27-30, Abstract p. 263.South AfricaGeothermometry - heat flow
DS2002-1044
2002
Mooney, W.D.Meissener, R., Mooney, W.D., Artemieva, I.Seismic anisotropy and mantle creep in young orogensGeophysical Journal International, Vol.149,1,pp.1-14., Vol.149,1,pp.1-14.MantleGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics - orogeny
DS2002-1045
2002
Mooney, W.D.Meissener, R., Mooney, W.D., Artemieva, I.Seismic anisotropy and mantle creep in young orogensGeophysical Journal International, Vol.149,1,pp.1-14., Vol.149,1,pp.1-14.MantleGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics - orogeny
DS2002-1081
2002
Mooney, W.D.Mooney, W.D., Chulick, G., Detweiler, S.Crust 02: a new global modelGeological Society of America Annual Meeting Oct. 27-30, Abstract p. 263.GlobalModel - Craton
DS2002-1118
2002
Mooney, W.D.Musacchio, G., Mooney, W.D.Seismic evidence for a mantle source for mid-Proterozoic anorthosites and implications for models of crustal growth.Geological Society of London Special Publication, No. 199, pp. 125-34.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS2003-0679
2003
Mooney, W.D.Kaban, M., Schwintzer, P., Artemieva, I.M., Mooney, W.D.Density of the continental roots: compositional and thermal contributionsEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 209, 1-2, April 15, pp. 53-69.MantleGeophysics - gravity, geothermometry, heat flow, lithos, craton - East European, Siberia, Australia, India
DS2003-0680
2003
Mooney, W.D.Kaban, M.K., Schwintzer, P., Artemieva, I.M., Mooney, W.D.Density of the continental roots: compositional and thermal contributionsEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 209, 1-2, pp. 53-69.MantleTectonics, Geothermometry
DS2003-0681
2003
Mooney, W.D.Kaban, M.K., Schwintzer, P., Artemieva, I.M., Mooney, W.D.Density of the continental roots: compositional and thermal contributionsEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 209, 1-2, April 15, pp.53-69.Norway, Russia, Europe, Australia, India, South AfricaCratonic roots, Archean, Baltic shield, East European P, Siberian Platform
DS2003-0968
2003
Mooney, W.D.Mooney, W.D.Density structure of the upper mantle under North AmericaGeological Society of America, Annual Meeting Nov. 2-5, Abstracts p.14.North America, United States, CanadaGeophysics - seismics, lithosphere
DS2003-0969
2003
Mooney, W.D.Mooney, W.D., Vidale, J.E.Thermal and chemical variations in subcrustal cratonic lithosphere: evidence from crustalLithos, Vol. 71, 2-4, pp. 185-193.MantleGeothermometry, mineral chemistry
DS2003-1390
2003
Mooney, W.D.Trubitsyb, V.P., Mooney, W.D., Abbott, D.H.Cold cratonic roots and thermal blankets: how continents affect mantle convectionInternational Geology Review, Vol. 45, 6, pp. 479-96.MantleTectonics
DS2003-1392
2003
Mooney, W.D.Trubitsyn, V.P., Mooney, W.D., Abbott, D.H.Cold cratonic roots and thermal blankets: how continents affect mantle convectionInternational Geology Review, Vol. 45, 6, June pp. 479-96.MantleConvection, Geothermometry
DS2003-1439
2003
Mooney, W.D.Walker, C., Mooney, W.D., Detweiller, S.Seismicity and lithospheric structure in southern CaliforniaGeological Society of America, Annual Meeting Nov. 2-5, Abstracts p.15.CaliforniaGeophysics - seismics, lithosphere
DS2003-1445
2003
Mooney, W.D.Wang, C-Y., Chan, W.W., Mooney, W.D.Three dimensional velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in southwestern ChinaJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B9, Sept. 25, 10.1029/2002JB001973ChinaTectonics
DS2003-1564
2003
Mooney, W.D.Zobach, M.L., Mooney, W.D.Lithospheric buoyancy and continental intraplate stressesInternational Geology Review, Vol. 45, 2, Feb. pp. 95-118.MantleBlank
DS2003-1565
2003
Mooney, W.D.Zoback, M.L., Mooney, W.D.Lithospheric buoyancy and continental intraplate stressesInternational Geology Review, Vol. 45, 2, pp. 95-118.MantleTectonics
DS200412-0059
2004
Mooney, W.D.Artemieva, I.M., Billien, M., Leveque, J.J., Mooney, W.D.Shear wave velocity, seismic attenuation and thermal structure of the continental upper mantle.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 157, 2, pp. 607-628.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-0941
2003
Mooney, W.D.Kaban, M.K., Schwintzer, P., Artemieva, I.M., Mooney, W.D.Density of the continental roots: compositional and thermal contributions.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 209, 1-2, April 15, pp.53-69.Europe, Norway, Russia, Australia, India, AfricaCratonic roots, Archean, Baltic shield, East European P Siberian Platform
DS200412-1356
2003
Mooney, W.D.Mooney, W.D.Density structure of the upper mantle under North America.Geological Society of America, Annual Meeting Nov. 2-5, Abstracts p.14.United States, CanadaGeophysics - seismics, lithosphere
DS200412-1357
2003
Mooney, W.D.Mooney, W.D., Vidale, J.E.Thermal and chemical variations in subcrustal cratonic lithosphere: evidence from crustal isostasy.Lithos, Vol. 71, 2-4, pp. 185-193.MantleGeothermometry, mineral chemistry
DS200412-2015
2003
Mooney, W.D.Trubitsyn, V.P., Mooney, W.D., Abbott, D.H.Cold cratonic roots and thermal blankets: how continents affect mantle convection.International Geology Review, Vol. 45, 6, pp. 479-96.MantleTectonics
DS200412-2070
2003
Mooney, W.D.Walker, C., Mooney, W.D., Detweiller, S.Seismicity and lithospheric structure in southern California.Geological Society of America, Annual Meeting Nov. 2-5, Abstracts p.15.United States, CaliforniaGeophysics - seismics, lithosphere
DS200412-2078
2003
Mooney, W.D.Wang, C-Y., Chan, W.W., Mooney, W.D.Three dimensional velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in southwestern Chin a and its tectonic implications.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B9, Sept. 25, 10.1029/2002 JB001973ChinaTectonics
DS200412-2236
2003
Mooney, W.D.Zobach, M.L., Mooney, W.D.Lithospheric buoyancy and continental intraplate stresses.International Geology Review, Vol. 45, 2, Feb. pp. 95-118.MantleTectonics
DS200712-0871
2006
Mooney, W.D.Rao, Viljaya, V., Sain, K., Reddy, P.R., Mooney, W.D.Crustal structure and tectonics of the northern part of the southern Granulite Terrane, India.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 251, 1-2, Nov. 15, pp.90-103.IndiaTectonics - not specific to diamonds
DS200912-0102
2009
Mooney, W.D.Cawood, P.A., Kroner, A., Collins, W.J., Kusky, T.M., Mooney, W.D., Windley, B.F.Accretionary orogens through Earth history.Geological Society of London, Special Publication Earth Accretionary systems in Space and Time, No. 318, pp. 1-36.MantleOrogen
DS201112-0700
2010
Mooney, W.D.Mooney, W.D., Kaban, M.K.The North American upper mantle: density, composition, and evolution.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 115, B12424, (24p.)Mantle, Canada, United StatesGeophysics - seismics, gravity
DS201312-0001
2013
Mooney, W.D.Abbott, D.H., Mooney, W.D., Van Tongeron, J.A.The character of the Moho and lower crust within Archean cratons and the tectonic implications.Tectonophysics, Vol. 609, pp. 690-705.Africa, South Africa, ZimbabweKaapvaal Craton
DS201312-0716
2014
Mooney, W.D.Pollitiz, F.F., Mooney, W.D.Seismic structure of the central US crust and shallow upper mantle: uniqueness of the Reelfoot Rift.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 402, pp. 157-166.United StatesGeophysics - seismics
DS201412-0701
2014
Mooney, W.D.Pollitz, F.F., Mooney, W.D.Seismic structure of the central US crust and shallow upper mantle: uniqueness of the Reelfoot Rift.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 402, pp. 157-166.United StatesGeophysics - seismics
DS201412-0926
2014
Mooney, W.D.Tesauro, M., Kaban, M.K., Mooney, W.D., Cloetingh, S.NACr14: a 3D model for the crustal structure of the North American continent.Tectonophysics, Vol. 631, pp. 65-86.Canada, United StatesGeophysics - seismics
DS201503-0153
2014
Mooney, W.D.Kaban, M.K., Mooney, W.D., Cloetingh, S.A.P.Density, temperature and composition of the North American lithosphere - new insights from a joint analysis of seismic, gravity and mineral physics data: 1. density structure of the crust and upper mantle.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 15, 12, pp. 4781-4807.MantleGeophysics - seismic
DS201511-1848
2015
Mooney, W.D.Kaban, M.K., Mooney, W.D., Petrunin, A.G.Cratonic root beneath North America shifted by basal drag from the convecting mantle.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 8, 10, pp. 797-800.United States, CanadaGeophysics - seismics

Abstract: Stable continental cratons are the oldest geologic features on the planet. They have survived 3.8 to 2.5 billion years of Earth’s evolution1, 2. The key to the preservation of cratons lies in their strong and thick lithospheric roots, which are neutrally or positively buoyant with respect to surrounding mantle3, 4. Most of these Archaean-aged cratonic roots are thought to have remained stable since their formation and to be too viscous to be affected by mantle convection2, 3, 5. Here we use a combination of gravity, topography, crustal structure and seismic tomography data to show that the deepest part of the craton root beneath the North American Superior Province has shifted about 850?km to the west-southwest relative to the centre of the craton. We use numerical model simulations to show that this shift could have been caused by basal drag induced by mantle flow, implying that mantle flow can alter craton structure. Our observations contradict the conventional view of cratons as static, non-evolving geologic features. We conclude that there could be significant interaction between deep continental roots and the convecting mantle.
DS201603-0412
2016
Mooney, W.D.Pollitz, F.F., Mooney, W.D.Seismic velocity structure of the crust and shallow mantle of the central and eastern United States by seismic surface wave imaging.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 43, 1, pp. 118-126.United StatesGeophysics - seismics
DS1940-0033
1941
Moor, G.C.Moor, G.C.Micaceous Kimberlite in the North of Central SiberiaDoklady Academy of Sciences Nauk SSSR., Vol. 31, PP. 363-365.RussiaBlank
DS1950-0341
1957
Moor, G.G.Moor, G.G.Kimberlite Like Rocks with Xenoliths of Archean Rocks from The Northern Edge of the Siberian PlatformDoklady Academy of Sciences Nauk SSSR., Vol. 115, No. 6, PP. 1173-1176.RussiaBlank
DS1950-0342
1957
Moor, G.G.Moor, G.G., Sobolev, V.S.The Problem of the Siberian KimberlitesMineral. Sb. L'vov Gos. University, No. 11, PP. 369-371.RussiaBlank
DS1984-0530
1984
Moorbath, S.Moorbath, S., Thompson, R.N., Oxburgh, E.R.The relative contributions of mantle oceanic crust and continental crust to magma genesisRoyal Society of London, 342pGlobalMantle Genesis
DS1986-0430
1986
Moorbath, S.Kempton, P.D., Moorbath, S., Harmon, R.S., Hoefs, J.Heterogeneous lower crust beneath southeast Arizona: evidence fromgranulitexenoliths, Geronimo volcanic fieldGeological Society of America, Vol. 18, No. 2, p. 124. (abstract.)Colorado Plateau, ArizonaMantle
DS1988-0348
1988
Moorbath, S.Kempton, P.D., Hawkesworth, C.J., Van Calsteren, P., Moorbath, S.Evidence for Cenozoic underplating of the lower crust: isotopic andTerra Cognita, Eclogite conference Abstracts, Vol. 8, No. 3, Summer, p. 271. AbstractArizonaMantle, Geronimo
DS1990-0821
1990
Moorbath, S.Kempton, P.D., Harmon, R.S., Hawkesworth, C.J., Moorbath, S.Petrology and geochemistry of lower crustal granulites from the Geronimo volcanic field, southeastern ArizonaGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 54, pp. 3401-3426ArizonaMantle, Geochemistry
DS1991-1699
1991
Moorbath, S.Taylor, P.N., Kramers, J.D., Moorbath, S., Wilson, J.F., Orpenlead/lead samarium-neodymium (Sm-Nd) and rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) geochronology in the Archean craton of ZimbabweChemical Geology, Vol. 87, No. 3-4, October 10, pp. 175-196ZimbabweGeochronology, Craton
DS1991-1700
1991
Moorbath, S.Taylor, P.N., Kramers, J.D., Moorbath, S., Wilson, J.F., Orpenlead/lead, samarium-neodymium (Sm-Nd) and Rubidium-Strontium geochronology in the Archean craton of ZimbabweChemical Geology, Vol. 87, No. 3-4, October 10, pp. 175-196ZimbabweGeochronology, Craton
DS1992-1525
1992
Moorbath, S.Taylor, P.N., Moorbath, S., Leube, A., Hirdes, W.Early Proterozoic crustal evolution in the Birimian of Ghana: constraints from geochronology and isotope geochemistryPrecambrian Research, Vol. 56, No. 1/2, April pp. 97-112GhanaProterozoic, Geochronology
DS1992-1697
1992
Moorbath, S.Worner, G., Moorbath, S., Harmon, R.S.Andean Cenozoic volcanic centers reflect basement isotopic domainsGeology, Vol. 20, No. 12, December pp. 1103-1106Andes, South America, Chile, BoliviaGeochronology, Volcanics
DS1999-0789
1999
Moorbath, S.Whitehouse, M.J., Kamber, B.S., Moorbath, S.Age significance of uranium-thorium-lead-zircon dat a from early Archean rocks of West Greenland - a reassessment..Chemical Geology, Vol. 160, No. 3, Aug. 10, pp. 201-24.GreenlandGeochronology, Ion-microprobe, imaging studies
DS2002-1424
2002
Moorbath, S.Schoenberg, R., Kamber, B.S., Collerson, K.D., Moorbath, S.Tungsten isotope evidence from ~3.8 Gyr metamorphosed sediments for early meteorite bombardment of the Earth.Nature, Vol. 418, July 25, pp. 403-5.MantleMeteorites
DS2003-0216
2003
Moorbath, S.Caro, G., Bourdon, B., Birck, J.L., Moorbath, S.146 Sm 142 Nd evidence from Isua metamorphosed sediments for early differentiationNature, No. 6938, May 22, p. 428-31.GreenlandGeochronology
DS2003-0217
2003
Moorbath, S.Caro, G., Bourdon, B., Birck, J.L., Moorbath, S.146 Sm 142 Nd evidence from Isua metamorphosed sediments for early differentiationNature, No. 6938, May 22, pp. 428-31.MantleGeochronology, Metamorphism
DS200412-0283
2003
Moorbath, S.Caro, G., Bourdon, B., Birck, J.L., Moorbath, S.146 Sm 142 Nd evidence from Isua metamorphosed sediments for early differentiation of Earth's mantle.Nature, No. 6938, May 22, p. 428-31.Europe, GreenlandGeochronology
DS200412-0284
2003
Moorbath, S.Caro, G., Bourdon, B., Birck, J.L., Moorbath, S.146 Sm 142 Nd evidence from Isua metamorphosed sediments for early differentiation of the Earth's mantle.Nature, No. 6938, May 22, pp. 428-31.MantleGeochronology - metamorphism
DS200512-0742
2005
Moorbath, S.Moorbath, S.Oldest rocks, earliest life, heaviest impacts, and the Hadean-Archean transition.Appled Geochemistry, Vol. 20,5, pp. 819-824.Geochemistry - Archean
DS200612-0024
2006
Moorbath, S.Andre, L., Cardinal, D., Alleman, L.Y., Moorbath, S.Silicon isotopes in ~3.8 Ga West Greenland rocks as clues to the Eoarchean supracrustal Si cycle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 245, 1-2, pp. 162-173.Europe, GreenlandGeochronology, silica
DS200912-0512
2009
Moorbath, S.Moorbath, S.Geochronology - aims and reminiscences.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 24, 6, pp. 1087-1092.TechnologyBrief review
DS200912-0687
2009
MooreSgarbi, G.B.C., Karfunkel, J., De Albuquerque Sgarbi, P.B., Peregovich, B., Da Silva, F.P., Dias, S., MooreThe Paredao kimberlite, western Minas Gerais, Brazil: field relations, chemical dat a and host rocks.Neues Jahrbuch fur Geologie und Palaontologie , Vol. 253, 1, July, pp. 115-131/South America, BrazilDeposit - Paredao
DS2001-0794
2001
Moore, A.Moore, A.Argyle diamonds updateThe AusIMM Bulletin, Aug-Sept.pp. 34-5.AustraliaNews item, Deposit - Argyle
DS2002-1082
2002
Moore, A.Moore, A., Blenkisnop, T.The role of mantle plumes in the development of continental scale drainage patterns: the southern African example revisited.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 105, No. 4, pp. 353-60.South AfricaPlumes - geomorphology
DS2003-0360
2003
Moore, A.Dyke, A.S., Moore, A., Robertson, L.Deglaciation of North AmericaGeological Survey of Canada Open File, No. 1574, 1 CD, $ 26.00Canada, United StatesGeomorphology
DS200412-0494
2003
Moore, A.Dyke, A.S., Moore, A., Robertson, L.Deglaciation of North America.Geological Survey of Canada Open File, No. 1574, 1 CD, $ 26.00Canada, United StatesGeomorphology
DS200412-1606
2004
Moore, A.Quattara, T., Couture, R., Bobrovsky, P.T., Moore, A.Remote Sensing and geosciences.Geological Survey of Canada Open File, No. 4542, 1 CD $ 26. 109p.GlobalRemote sensing - overview
DS200512-0743
2005
Moore, A.Moore, A., Belousova, E.Crystallization of Cr poor and Cr rich megacrysts suites from the host kimberlite magma: implications for mantle structure and generation of kimberlite magmas.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, On lineMantleMagma - kimberlite
DS200712-0747
2006
Moore, A.Moore, A., Moore, J.A glacial ancestry for the Somabula diamond bearing alluvial deposit, Central Zimbabwe.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 109, pp. 625-636.Africa, ZimbabweConglomerates
DS200812-0762
2008
Moore, A.Moore, A., Blenkinsop, T., Cotterill, F.Controls on post-Gondwana alkaline volcanism in southern Africa.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 268, 1-2, April 15, pp. 151-164.Africa, southern AfricaAlkalic
DS200912-0513
2009
Moore, A.Moore, A., Blenkinsop, T., Cotterill, F.Southern Africa topography and erosion history: plumes or plate tectonics?Terra Nova, Vol. 21, pp. 310-315.Africa, South AfricaPaleodrainage
DS201511-1847
2015
Moore, A.Julian, B.R., Foulger, G.R., Hatfield, O., Jackson, S.E., Simpson, E., Einbeck, J., Moore, A.Hotspots in hindsight. Mentions kimberlitesGeological Society of America Special Paper, No. 514, pp. SPE514-08.MantleHotspots

Abstract: Thorne et al. (2004), Torsvik et al. (2010; 2006) and Burke et al. (2008) have suggested that the locations of melting anomalies ("hot spots") and the original locations of large igneous provinces ("LIPs") and kimberlite pipes, lie preferentially above the margins of two "large lower-mantle shear velocity provinces", or LLSVPs, near the bottom of the mantle, and that the geographical correlations have high confidence levels (> 99.9999%) (Burke et al., 2008, Fig. 5). They conclude that the LLSVP margins are "Plume-Generation Zones", and that deep-mantle plumes cause hot spots, LIPs, and kimberlites. This conclusion raises questions about what physical processes could be responsible, because, for example, the LLSVPs are apparently dense and not abnormally hot (Trampert et al., 2004). The supposed LIP-hot spot-LLSVP correlations probably are examples of the "Hindsight Heresy" (Acton, 1959), of performing a statistical test using the same data sample that led to the initial formulation of a hypothesis. In this process, an analyst will consider and reject many competing hypotheses, but will not adjust statistical assessments correspondingly. Furthermore, an analyst will test extreme deviations of the data, , but not take this fact into account. "Hindsight heresy" errors are particularly problematical in Earth science, where it often is impossible to conduct controlled experiments. For random locations on the globe, the number of points within a specified distance of a given curve follows a cumulative binomial distribution. We use this fact to test the statistical significance of the observed hot spot-LLSVP correlation using several hot-spot catalogs and mantle models. The results indicate that the actual confidence levels of the correlations are two or three orders of magnitude smaller than claimed. The tests also show that hot spots correlate well with presumably shallowly rooted features such as spreading plate boundaries. Nevertheless, the correlations are significant at confidence levels in excess of 99%. But this is confidence that the null hypothesis of random coincidence is wrong. It is not confidence about what hypothesis is correct. The correlations probably are symptoms of as-yet-unidentified processes.
DS201607-1308
2016
Moore, A.Moore, A., Costin, G.Kimberlitic olivines derived from the Cr-poor and Cr-rich megacryst suites.Lithos, Vol. 258-259, pp. 215-227.Africa, South Africa, ZimbabweDeposit - Monastery, Colossus

Abstract: Reversed-zoned olivines (Fe-richer cores compared to rims), appear to be ubiquitous in kimberlites with a wide distribution. These olivines generally comprise a subordinate population relative to the dominant normally zoned olivines. However, they are notably more abundant in the megacryst-rich mid-Cretaceous Monastery and early Proterozoic Colossus kimberlites, located on the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons, respectively. The reverse-zoned olivines at these two localities define compositional fields that are closely similar to those for two olivine megacryst populations of the Cr-poor association which have been documented in the Monastery kimberlite. This points to a genetic link between megacrysts and the reversed zoned olivines. The ubiquitous, occurrence of the Fe-rich (relative to the field for rims) olivines in kimberlites with a wide geographic distribution in turn argues for an intimate link between megacrysts and the host kimberlite. Some large olivines have inclusions of rounded Cr-rich clinopyroxenes, garnets and/or spinel, characterized by fine-scale, erratic internal compositional zoning. Olivines with such chemically heterogeneous Cr-rich inclusions are not derived from disaggregated mantle peridotites, but are rather linked to the Cr-rich megacryst suite. Consequently, they cannot be used as evidence that cores of a majority of kimberlitic olivines are derived from disaggregated mantle peridotites.
DS202003-0352
2020
Moore, A.Moore, A.,Yudovskaya, M., Prover, A., Blenkinsop, T.Evidence for olivine deformation in kimberlites and other mantle derived magmas during crustal emplacement. LemphaneContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 175, 9p. PdfAfrica, Lesothoolivine

Abstract: This paper highlights published and new field and petrographic observations for late-stage (crustal level) deformation associated with the emplacement of kimberlites and other mantle-derived magmas. Thus, radial and tangential joint sets in the competent 183 Ma Karoo basalt wall rocks to the 5 ha. Lemphane kimberlite blow in northern Lesotho have been ascribed to stresses linked to eruption of the kimberlite magma. Further examples of emplacement-related stresses in kimberlites are brittle fractures and close-spaced parallel shears which disrupt olivine macrocrysts. In each of these examples, there is no evidence of post-kimberlite regional tectonism which might explain these features, indicating that they reflect auto-deformation in the kimberlite during or immediately post-emplacement. On a microscopic scale, these inferred late-stage stresses are reflected by fractures and domains of undulose extinction which traverse core and margins of some euhedral and anhedral olivines in kimberlites and olivine melilitites. Undulose extinction and kink bands have also been documented in olivines in cumulates from layered igneous intrusions. Our observations thus indicate that these deformation features can form at shallow levels (crustal pressures), which is supported by experimental evidence. Undulose extinction and kink bands have previously been presented as conclusive evidence for a mantle provenance of the olivines—i.e. that they are xenocrysts. The observation that these deformation textures can form in both mantle and crustal environments implies that they do not provide reliable constraints on the provenance of the olivines. An understanding of the processes responsible for crustal deformation of kimberlites could potentially refine our understanding of kimberlite emplacement processes.
DS202008-1424
2018
Moore, A.Moore, A.Falconbridge discovery of the Gope ( Go25) ( Ghaghoo) kimberlite, central Kalahari, Botswana.Botswana Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 7, pp. 35-41. pdfAfrica, BotswanaDeposit - Gope

Abstract: The Gope (Go25) kimberlite was discovered by Falconbridge Explorations Limited (Botswana) (FELB) in 1981, following a helicopter-supported sampling programme within Reconnaissance Permits RP8/79 and RP1/80, covering approximately 78 500 km2, centred on the Central Kalahari area of Botswana (Fig. 1). The majority of this area is covered by sands of the Kalahari Group, with thicknesses up to 100m. Unfortunately, most original company files, including mineral distribution maps and mineral analyses were not available to the author. This paper draws on the excellent summary of the discovery of the Gope (Go-25) kimberlite by Lee et al. (2009), together with the author’s personal recollections.
DS202011-2053
2020
Moore, A.Moore, A.The evidence for a cognate origin for the majority of all kimberlitic olivines. GSSA Talk Oct 14, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QCCPkShjw4Globalolivine
DS1970-0775
1973
Moore, A.C.Moore, A.C.Carbonatites and Kimberlites in Australia. a Review of the Evidence.Minerals Sci. Eng., Vol. 5, No. 2, PP. 81-91.AustraliaKimberlite
DS1970-0776
1973
Moore, A.C.Moore, A.C., Gray, C.M.Carbonatites of the Strangways Range, Central Australia: Evidence from Strontium Isotopes.Geological Society AUST. Journal, Vol. 20, PP. 71-73.AustraliaRelated Rocks
DS1984-0531
1984
Moore, A.C.Moore, A.C.Orbicular Rythmic Layering in the Palabora Carbonatite, South Africa.Geological Magazine., Vol. 12, No. 1, JANUARY PP. 53-60.South AfricaRelated Rocks
DS1970-0777
1973
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E.The Olivine Melilitite Kimberlite Association of Namaqualand1st International Kimberlite Conference, EXTENDED ABSTRACT VOLUME, PP. 239-242.South AfricaGenesis
DS1975-0362
1976
Moore, A.E.Mitchell, R.H., Moore, A.E.Controls of Post Gondwanaland Alkaline Volcanism in Southern Africa.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 31, No. 2, PP. 291-296.South AfricaRelated Rocks, Tectonics
DS1975-1160
1979
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E.The Geochemistry of Olivine Melilitites and Related Rocks Of the Namaqualand Bushmanland South Africa.Cape Town: Ph.d. Thesis, University Cape Town., South AfricaBlank
DS1975-1161
1979
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E., Erlank, A.J.Unusual Olivine Zoning Evidence for Complex Physico-chemical Changes During the Evolution of Olivine Melilitite and Kimberlite Magmas.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 70, No. 4, PP. 391-405.South AfricaPetrography
DS1981-0284
1981
Moore, A.E.Marsh, J.S., Hawkesworth, C.J., Moore, A.E.Strontium and Neodymium Isotopes in Tertiary Alkaline Volcanics in South western Africa.Geocongress '81 Open Session., ABSTRACT VOLUME, PP. 33-35.South AfricaNamaqualand, Melilitite, Spiegel River, Klaasvoogds, Garies
DS1981-0305
1981
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E.Unusual Perovskite Textural Relationships in Olivine Melilitites from Namaqualand- Bushmanland South Africa.Mineralogical Magazine., Vol. 44, No. 334, PP. 147-150.South AfricaPetrography
DS1982-0446
1982
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E., Erlank, A.J., Doncan, A.R.The Evolution of Olivine Melilitite and Kimberlite MagmasProceedings of Third International Kimberlite Conference, TERRA COGNITA, ABSTRACT VOLUME., Vol. 2, No. 3, P. 214, (abstract.).South AfricaKimberlite, Namaqualand, Bushmanland, Sr, Isotope, Garies, Chemistry
DS1983-0465
1983
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E.A Note on the Occurrence of Melilite in Kimberlites and Olivine Melilitites. #2Mineralogical Magazine., No. 344, SEPTEMBER, PP. 404-407.South AfricaRelated Rocks
DS1983-0466
1983
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E.A Note on the Occurrence of Melilite in Kimberlites and Olivine Melilitites. #1Mineralogical Magazine., IN PRESS.South Africa, RussiaKimberlite, Genesis, Analyses
DS1985-0257
1985
Moore, A.E.Haggerty, S.E., Moore, A.E., Erlank, A.J.Macrocryst Fe-ti Oxides in Olivine Melilitites from Namaqualand-bushmanland South Africa.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 91, No. 2, PP. 163-170.South AfricaPetrology
DS1985-0460
1985
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E., Verwoerd, W.J.The olivine melilitite kimberlite carbonatite suite of Namaqualand andBushmanland, South AfricaTransactions Geological Society of South Africa, Vol. 88, pt. 2, May-August pp. 281-294South AfricaPetrology, Carbonatite
DS1986-0579
1986
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E.Kimberlite olivinesProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 78-80Lesotho, South Africa, southwest Africa, Namibia, KansasLetseng la terai, De Beers, Newlands, Gibeon, Hamilton Bran
DS1987-0487
1987
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E.A model for the origin of ilmenite in kimberlite and diamond:Implications for the genesis of the discrete nodule (megacryst suite)Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 95, pp. 245-253South AfricaGenesis, Megacrysts
DS1988-0484
1988
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E.Olivine: a monitor of magma evolutionary pathsin kimberlites and olivinemelilititesContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 99, No. 2, pp. 238-248South AfricaOlivine, Petrology
DS1998-1032
1998
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E., Dingle, R.V.Evidence for fluvial sediment transport of Kalahari sands in centralBotswana.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 101, No. 2, June pp. 143-154.BotswanaGeomorphology
DS2001-0795
2001
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E., Larkin, P.A.Drainage evolution in south central Africa since the break up of GondwanaSouth African Journal of Geology, Vol. 104, pp. 47-68.South AfricaGeomorphology - Zambezi, Limpopo
DS2001-0796
2001
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E., Lock, N.P.The origin of mantle derived megacrysts and sheared peridotites - evidence from kimberlites in northern ..African Journal of Earth Science, Vol. 104, No. 1, pp. 23-38.Lesotho, Orange Free State, South Africa, BotswanaPetrology - megacrysts, mineral chemistry, Genesis
DS200412-1358
2004
Moore, A.E.Moore, J.M., Moore, A.E.The roles of primary kimberlitic and secondary Dwyka glacial sources in the development of alluvial and marine diamond depositsJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 38, 1-2, Jan. pp. 115-134.Africa, South AfricaPaleo drainage, alluvials, Koa River, Bushmanland Plate
DS200912-0514
2008
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E.Comments on the paper 'megacryst suites from Lekkerfontein and Uintjiesberg kimberlites, southern Africa: evidence for a non-cognate origin.African Journal of Geology, Vol. 111, 4, pp. 463-464.Africa, South AfricaPetrology
DS200912-0515
2009
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E., Cotteril, F.P.D., Broderick, T., Plowes, D.Lands cape evolution in Zimbabwe for the Permian from present with implications for kimberlite prospecting.South Africa Journal of Geology, Vol. 112, 1, pp. 65-88.Africa, ZimbabweGeomorphology
DS201501-0022
2014
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E.The origin of large irregular gem-quality type II diamonds and the rarity of blue type IIB varieties.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 117, pp. 233-250.Africa, South Africa, LesothoType 11 diamonds
DS201706-1098
2017
Moore, A.E.Moore, A.E.Quantitative modelling of the apparent decoupling of Mg# and Ni in kimberlitic olivine margins: comment on Cordier et al. Journal of Petrology, 56, pp. 1775-1796.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 58, pp. 1-6.GlobalOlivine
DS201804-0723
2018
Moore, A.E.Nestola, F., Korolev, N., Kopylova, M., Rotiroti, N., Pearson, D.G., Pamato, M.G., Alvaro, M., Peruzzo, L., Gurney, J.J., Moore, A.E., Davidson, J.CaSiO3 perovskite in diamond indicates the recycling of oceanic crust into the lower mantle.Nature, Vol. 555, March 8, pp. 237-241.Mantledeposit - Cullinan

Abstract: Laboratory experiments and seismology data have created a clear theoretical picture of the most abundant minerals that comprise the deeper parts of the Earth’s mantle. Discoveries of some of these minerals in ‘super-deep’ diamonds—formed between two hundred and about one thousand kilometres into the lower mantle—have confirmed part of this picture1,2,3,4,5. A notable exception is the high-pressure perovskite-structured polymorph of calcium silicate (CaSiO3). This mineral—expected to be the fourth most abundant in the Earth—has not previously been found in nature. Being the dominant host for calcium and, owing to its accommodating crystal structure, the major sink for heat-producing elements (potassium, uranium and thorium) in the transition zone and lower mantle, it is critical to establish its presence. Here we report the discovery of the perovskite-structured polymorph of CaSiO3 in a diamond from South African Cullinan kimberlite. The mineral is intergrown with about six per cent calcium titanate (CaTiO3). The titanium-rich composition of this inclusion indicates a bulk composition consistent with derivation from basaltic oceanic crust subducted to pressures equivalent to those present at the depths of the uppermost lower mantle. The relatively ‘heavy’ carbon isotopic composition of the surrounding diamond, together with the pristine high-pressure CaSiO3 structure, provides evidence for the recycling of oceanic crust and surficial carbon to lower-mantle depths.https://www.nature.com/articles/nature25972
DS201808-1760
2018
Moore, A.E.Korolev, N., Kopylova, M., Gurney, J.J., Moore, A.E., Davidson, J.The origin of Type II diamonds as inferred from Culli nan mineral inclusions.Mineralogy and Petrology, doi.org/10.1007/s710-018-0601-z 15p. Africa, South Africadeposit - Cullinan

Abstract: We studied a suite of Cullinan diamonds (<0.3 ct) with mineral inclusions, which comprised 266 Type I and 75 blank Type II (<20 ppm N) diamonds, as classified by infrared spectroscopy. More than 90% (n?=?68) of Type II diamonds do not luminesce. In contrast, 51.9% (n?=?177) of Type I diamonds luminesce, with blue colors of different intensity. Carbon isotopic compositions of Type I and II diamonds are similar, with d13CVPDB ranging from -2.1 to -7.7‰for Type I diamonds (n?=?25), and from -1.3 to -7.8- for Type II diamonds (n?=?20). The Type II diamonds are sourced from three parageneses, lithospheric lherzolitic (45%), lithospheric eclogitic (33%), and sublithospheric mafic (22%). The lherzolitic suite contains Cr-pyrope, forsterite, enstatite, clinopyroxene and Cr-spinel formed at 1090-1530 °C and P?=?4.6-7.0 GPa. Lithospheric eclogitic diamonds containing garnet, omphacite, kyanite and coesite comprise 33% of Type II diamonds. The sublithospheric mafic paragenesis is mainly represented by Cr-free majorite, various CaSiO3 phases and omphacite equilibrated at 11.6-26 GPa, in the transition zone and the lower mantle. The lherzolitic paragenesis predominates in Type II diamonds, whereas 79% Type I diamonds are sourced from eclogites. The higher incidence of sublithospheric inclusions was found in Type II diamonds, 22% against 6% in Type I diamonds. The similarity of the mineral parageneses and C isotopic compositions in the small Cullinan Type II and Type I diamonds indicate the absence of distinct mantle processes and carbon sources for formation of studied Type II diamonds. The parent rocks and the carbon sources generally vary for Type II diamonds within a kimberlite and between kimberlites.
DS201904-0747
2019
Moore, A.E.Howarth, G.H., Moore, A.E., Harris, C., van der Meer, Q.H.A., Le Roux , P.Crustal versus mantle origin of carbonate xenoliths from Kimberley region kimberlites using C-O-Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes and trace element abundances.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, in press available 42p.Africa, South Africageochronology
DS201905-1043
2019
Moore, A.E.Howarth, G.H., Moore, A.E., Harris, C., van der Meer, Q.H.A., Le Roux, P.Crustal versus mantle origin of carbonate xenoliths from Kimberly region kimberlites using C-O-Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes and trace element abundances.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, in press available, 16p.Africa, South Africadeposit - Kimberly region

Abstract: Carbonate-bearing assemblages in the mantle have been interpreted to be the source for Si-undersaturated, CO2-rich magmas, including kimberlites. However, direct evidence for carbonate in the mantle is rare in the contemporary literature. Here we present petrography, trace element, and C-O-Sr-Nd-Pb isotope composition for a suite of carbonate xenoliths from the Kimberley region kimberlites to ascertain their mantle or crustal origin and gain insight to the potential for the occurrence of carbonate in the mantle. Carbonate xenoliths were found in large kimberlite blocks from the Bultfontein kimberlite and Big Hole region. The xenoliths are characterised by pale green alteration margins made of fine-grained microlites of an unknown mineral as well as spherules surrounded by glassy material. They are generally 1–4?cm in size, coarse-grained (1–2?mm), and comprised entirely of calcite. Carbonate xenoliths from the Bultfontein kimberlite have low total REE concentrations (0.2–4.9?ppm), constant 87Sr/86Sri (0.7047–0.7049) combined with variable ?Ndi (-0.1 to -26.2) and 206Pb/204Pbi, 207Pb/204Pbi, and 208Pb/204Pbi of 16.7–18.8, 15.3–15.6, 36.5–38.4, respectively. Xenoliths from the Big Hole sample have higher 87Sr/86Sri (0.7088–0.7095), lower ?Ndi (-24.5 to -3.8), and 206Pb/204Pbi, 207Pb/204Pbi, and 208Pb/204Pbi of 18.9–19.9, 15.7–15.8, 38.4–38.8, respectively. The d13C values for both Bultfontein (-5.7 to -6.6‰) and Big Hole (-4.7 to -5.4‰) carbonates are within the typical range expected for mantle-derived carbonate. The d18O values (15.5–17.5‰) are higher than those of mantle silicate rocks, indicative of late-stage low-temperature interaction with fluids; a common feature of groundmass calcite in the Kimberley kimberlites. The Sr- and C- isotope composition of the Bultfontein xenoliths indicates a mantle origin whereas the Big Hole xenolith Sr- and C-isotopes are more ambiguous. Isotope mixing models are inconsistent with interaction between the host kimberlite and carbonate xenoliths. Correlation between ?Ndi and d18O values for the Bultfontein xenoliths indicates late-stage interaction with low-temperature fluids, which may also be responsible for the large range in ?Ndi. This in turn indicates that the highest ?Ndi of -0.1 represents the primary carbonate xenolith signature, and this value overlaps typical Group I kimberlites. We discuss two possible origins for the carbonate xenoliths. (1) Carbonate xenoliths from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), where quenched margins and the large range of ?Ndi are related to formation in the mantle. (2) Carbonate xenoliths from an earlier phase of carbonatite magmatism. The similarity of isotope signatures of the Bultfontein carbonates to Group I kimberlite may further suggest a link between kimberlite and carbonatite volcanism such as observed elsewhere in the world.
DS1970-0966
1974
Moore, A.M.Moore, A.M., Lang, A.R.Correlations between Habit, Ultraviolet Transparency and Birefringence Features in South African Microdiamonds.Diamond Research, 1974, PP. 16-15.South AfricaCrystallography, Micro-diamonds
DS1975-1162
1979
Moore, A.M.Moore, A.M.Optical Studies of Diamonds and Their Surfaces. a Review Of the Late Professor Tolansky's Work.In: The Properties of Diamond By J.e.field, London: Academic, PP. 245-280.GlobalDiamond Genesis, Natural, Probe, Crystallography
DS1989-1046
1989
Moore, B.E.Moore, B.E.Canadian exploration incentive ProgramMine Financing seminar, held April 17th. Toronto, 57p. and 10 slides reproduced Database # 17999GlobalEconomics, CEIP -Flow Through
DS1860-0808
1893
Moore, C.W.Moore, C.W., Wilmer, W.H.Minerals of Southern AfricaJohannesburg: Argus Printing Co., Africa, South AfricaKimberley, Catalogue Of Minerals
DS1991-1790
1991
Moore, D.Velde, B., Dubois, J., Moore, D., Touchard, G.Fractal patterns of fractures in granitesEarth Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 104, No. 1, May pp. 25-35GlobalGranites, Fractals
DS1989-1047
1989
Moore, D.E.Moore, D.E., Blake, M.C.Jr.New evidence for polyphase metamorphism of glaucophane schist and eclogite exotic blocks in the FranciscanComplex, California and OregonJournal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 7, No. 2, March pp. 211-228California, OregonEclogite
DS200712-0748
2007
Moore, D.E.Moore, D.E., Lockner, D.A.Comparative deformation behaviour of minerals in serpentinized ultramafic rock: application to the slab-mantle interface in subduction zones.International Geology Review, Vol. 49, 5, pp. 401-415.MantleSubduction
DS1984-0204
1984
Moore, D.H.Crohn, P.W., Moore, D.H.The Mud Tank Carbonatite, Strangways Range, Central AustraliB.m.r. Journal of Aust. Geol. Geophys., Vol. 9, No. 1, PP. 13-18.AustraliaBlank
DS1930-0117
1932
Moore, E.S.Moore, E.S.Diamonds Indicated in Superior RegionGlobe., Feb. 9TH.Canada, OntarioBlank
DS1995-1294
1995
Moore, G.Moore, G., Vennemann, T., Carmichael, I.S.E.Solubility of water in magmas to 2 kbarGeology, Vol. 23, No. 12, Dec. pp. 1099-1102GlobalPetrology -experimental, Magma -water composition
DS201312-0583
2013
Moore, G.Masotta, M., Mollo, S., Freda, C., Gaeta, M., Moore, G.Clinopyroxene liquid thermometers and barometers specific to alkaline differentiated magmas.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 166, 6, pp. 1545-1561.Europe, ItalyCurrent volcanic eruptions
DS201506-0274
2015
Moore, G.Hudgins, T.R., Mukasa, S.B., Simon, A.C., Moore, G., Barifaijo, E.Melt inclusion evidence for CO2 rich melts beneath the western branch of the East African Rift: implications for long term storage of volatiles in the deep lithospheric mantle.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 169, 5p.Africa, East AfricaBasanites, Foidites
DS1989-1048
1989
Moore, G.W.Moore, G.W.Tectonstratigraphic terranes in ChinaEpisodes, Vol. 1, No. 2, June pp. 130-131ChinaConference Report, Tectonics
DS1950-0301
1956
Moore, H.J.Shoemaker, E.M., Moore, H.J.Diatremes in the Navajo and Hopi ReservationsUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) TRACE ELEMENT INVESTIGATIONS Report, No. 640, PP. 197-203.Colorado Plateau, United States, Rocky MountainsBlank
DS200712-0747
2006
Moore, J.Moore, A., Moore, J.A glacial ancestry for the Somabula diamond bearing alluvial deposit, Central Zimbabwe.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 109, pp. 625-636.Africa, ZimbabweConglomerates
DS1990-0903
1990
Moore, J.C.Langseth, M.G., Moore, J.C.Fluids in accretionary prisMEos, Vol. 71, No. 5, January 30, pp. 245-246GlobalTectonics, Subduction zones
DS201708-1574
2017
Moore, J.D.Lamb, S., Moore, J.D., Smith, E., Stern, T.Episodic kinematics in continental rifts modulated by changes in mantle melt fraction.Nature, Vol. 547, 7661, pp. 84-88.Mantlemelting

Abstract: Oceanic crust is created by the extraction of molten rock from underlying mantle at the seafloor ‘spreading centres’ found between diverging tectonic plates. Modelling studies have suggested that mantle melting can occur through decompression as the mantle flows upwards beneath spreading centres, but direct observation of this process is difficult beneath the oceans. Continental rifts, however—which are also associated with mantle melt production—are amenable to detailed measurements of their short-term kinematics using geodetic techniques. Here we show that such data can provide evidence for an upwelling mantle flow, as well as information on the dimensions and timescale of mantle melting. For North Island, New Zealand, around ten years of campaign and continuous GPS measurements in the continental rift system known as the Taupo volcanic zone reveal that it is extending at a rate of 6-15?millimetres per year. However, a roughly 70-kilometre-long segment of the rift axis is associated with strong horizontal contraction and rapid subsidence, and is flanked by regions of extension and uplift. These features fit a simple model that involves flexure of an elastic upper crust, which is pulled downwards or pushed upwards along the rift axis by a driving force located at a depth greater than 15?kilometres. We propose that flexure is caused by melt-induced episodic changes in the vertical flow forces that are generated by upwelling mantle beneath the rift axis, triggering a transient lower-crustal flow. A drop in the melt fraction owing to melt extraction raises the mantle flow viscosity and drives subsidence, whereas melt accumulation reduces viscosity and allows uplift—processes that are also likely to occur in oceanic spreading centres.
DS202007-1181
2020
Moore, J.D.P.Stern, T., Lamb, S., Moore, J.D.P., Okaya, D., Hichmuth, K.High mantle seismic P-wave speeds as a signature for gravitational spreading of superplumes. Science Adavances, Vol. 6, eaba7118 May 27, 9p. PdfAsia, Javageophysics -seismic

Abstract: New passive- and active-source seismic experiments reveal unusually high mantle P-wave speeds that extend beneath the remnants of the world’s largest known large igneous province, making up the 120-million-year-old Ontong-Java-Manihiki-Hikurangi Plateau. Sub-Moho Pn phases of ~8.8 ± 0.2 km/s are resolved with negligible azimuthal seismic anisotropy, but with strong radial anisotropy (~10%), characteristic of aggregates of olivine with an AG crystallographic fabric. These seismic results are the first in situ evidence for this fabric in the upper mantle. We show that its presence can be explained by isotropic horizontal dilation and vertical flattening due to late-stage gravitational collapse and spreading in the top 10 to 20 km of a depleted, mushroom-shaped, superplume head on a horizontal length scale of 1000 km or more. This way, it provides a seismic tool to track plumes long after the thermal effects have ceased.
DS1989-1049
1989
Moore, J.E.Moore, J.E.Report planning -preparation and review guideUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 89-0275, 81p. $ 13.00GlobalReport planning
DS1990-1063
1990
Moore, J.M.Moore, J.M., Waters, D.J.Geochemistry and origin of cordierite -orthoamphiboleortho pyroxene-phlogopite rocks from Namaqualand, South AfricaChemical Geology, Vol. 85, No. 1/2, July 10 pp. 77-100South AfricaGeochemistry, Namaqualand metamorphic complex
DS1990-1565
1990
Moore, J.M.Willner, A., Schreyer, W., Moore, J.M.Peraluminous metamorphic rocks from the Namaqualand Metamorphic Complex (South Africa): geochem. evidence for an exhalation related sed. origin in a Mid.ProtChemical Geology, Vol. 81, No. 3, January 30, pp. 221-240South AfricaProterozoic - Rifting system, Geochemistry
DS1994-1764
1994
Moore, J.M.Thomas, R.J., Agenbacht, A.L.D., Cornell, D.H., Moore, J.M.The Kibaran of southern Africa: tectonic evolution and metallogenyOre Geology Reviews, Vol. 9, pp. 131-160South Africa, Ontario, NamaqualandSEDEX, metallogeny, Copper, nickel, VMS
DS200412-1358
2004
Moore, J.M.Moore, J.M., Moore, A.E.The roles of primary kimberlitic and secondary Dwyka glacial sources in the development of alluvial and marine diamond depositsJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 38, 1-2, Jan. pp. 115-134.Africa, South AfricaPaleo drainage, alluvials, Koa River, Bushmanland Plate
DS200612-0526
2006
Moore, J.M.Hanson, E.K., Moore, J.M., Robey, J., Bordy, E.M., Marsh, J.S.Re-estimation of erosion levels in Group I and II kimberlites between Lesotho, Kimberley and Victoria West, South Africa.Emplacement Workshop held September, 5p. extended abstractAfrica, South Africa, LesothoCrustal xenoliths
DS201012-0266
2009
Moore, J.M.Hanson, E.K., Moore, J.M., Bordy, E.M., Marsh, J.S., Howarth, G., Robey, J.V.A.Cretaceous erosion in central South Africa: evidence from upper crustal xenoliths in kimberlite diatremes.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 112, 2, pp. 125-140.Africa, South AfricaGeomorphology
DS2000-0679
2000
Moore, J.McM.Moore, J.McM., Mason, P.J., et al.Applied tectonic geomorphology for diamond prospecting in the Tarim Basin Xinjiang: using combined digital ...14th. International Conference Applied Remote Sensing, Nov. pp. 289-96.ChinaRemote sensing - hyperspectral imagery, Kalakash, Yuungkash River catchments
DS1995-1295
1995
Moore, J.N.Moore, J.N., Gunderson, R.P.Fluid inclusion and isotopic systematics of an evolving magmatic-hydrothermal systemGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 59, No. 19, Oct. 1, pp. 3887-3908MantleMagmatism, system
DS201012-0257
2010
Moore, K.Gwalani, L.G., Moore, K., Simonetti, A.Carbonatites, alkaline rocks and the mantle: a special issue dedicated to Keith Bell.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 98, 1-4, pp. 5-10.MantleCarbonatite
DS201012-0513
2010
Moore, K.Moore, K.Magma mingling and mantle xenolith transport in the feeder system of diatreme root zones: evidence fromInternational Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, AbstractMantleMagmatism
DS1995-1296
1995
Moore, K.R.Moore, K.R., Wood, B.J.Carbonated silicate magmas in equilibrium with mantle assemblagesGeological Society Africa 10th. Conference Oct. Nairobi, p. 118. Abstract.MantleMetasomatism, Carbonatite -natro carbonatite
DS1997-0812
1997
Moore, K.R.Moore, K.R., Wood, B.J.Experimental investigation of the transition from primary carbonate melts to silica undersaturated melts.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstracts, GlobalCarbonatite, System - CMS.CO2, CMSAN.CO2
DS1998-1033
1998
Moore, K.R.Moore, K.R., Wood, B.J.The transition from carbonate to silicate melts in the Cao Mgo SiO2 CO2systemJournal of Petrology, Vol. 39, No. 11-12, Nov-Dec. pp. 1943-51.MantleCarbonatite, Metasomatism, Petrology - experimental
DS2002-1083
2002
Moore, K.R.Moore, K.R., Costanzo, A., Feely, M.The carbonatite alkaline rock association in Sao Paulo State, Brasil18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.253.Brazil, Sao PauloJacupirangaCarbonatite Complex, Pocos de Caldas Massif
DS200612-0281
2006
Moore, K.R.Costanzo, A., Moore, K.R., Wall, F., Feely, M.Fluid inclusions in apatite from Jacupiranga calcite carbonatites: evidence for a fluid stratified carbonatite magma chamber.Lithos, In press available,South America, Brazil, Sao PauloCarbonatite, magmatism, chambers
DS200712-1104
2007
Moore, K.R.Valentini, L., Moore, K.R.The possible role of magma mixing in the petrogenesi of carbonatite silicate rock associations: a case study from the Kola alkaline province.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p.233.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS200712-1105
2007
Moore, K.R.Valentini, L., Moore, K.R.The possible role of magma mixing in the petrogenesi of carbonatite silicate rock associations: a case study from the Kola alkaline province.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p.233.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS200812-0134
2008
Moore, K.R.Brady, A.E., Moore, K.R.The role of carbonate in alkaline diatremic magmatism.9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractEurope, Greenland, Russia, UzbekistanCarbonatite
DS200912-0070
2009
Moore, K.R.Brady, A.E., Moore, K.R.Using the composition of the carbonate phase to investigate the geochemical evolution of subvolcanic intrusions.alkaline09.narod.ru ENGLISH, May 10, 2p. abstractEurope, Ireland, Greenland, Russia, UzbekistanCarbonatite
DS200912-0125
2009
Moore, K.R.Constanzo, A., Moore, K.R.Multistage fluid history of a copper province with carbonatites, lamprophyres, and associated rocks.alkaline09.narod.ru ENGLISH, May 10, 2p. abstractEurope, IrelandCarbonatite
DS200912-0516
2009
Moore, K.R.Moore, K.R., Ryan, P.D.R.Finite element modelling of the generation of carbonatite magmas: application to post-orogenic mantle processes.alkaline09.narod.ru ENGLISH, May 10, 2p. abstractEurope, Greenland, Russia, Mongolia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS201012-0126
2010
Moore, K.R.Costanzo, A., Moore, K.R., Feely, M.The influence of carbonatite during petrogenesis of nepheline syenites at the Pocos de Caldas Complex, Brazil: evidence from geochemistry and fluid inclusionsInternational Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 567.South America, Brazil, Sao PauloCarbonatite
DS201012-0167
2010
Moore, K.R.Doroshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S., Moore, K.R.Genesis of the Khaluta alkaline basic Ba Sr carbonatite complex (West Transbaikala) Russia.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 98, 1-4, pp. 245-268.RussiaCarbonatite
DS201012-0809
2010
Moore, K.R.Valentini, L., Moore, K.R., Chazot, G.Unravelling carbonatite silicate magma interaction dynamics: a case study from the Velay province ( Massif Central, France).Lithos, Vol. 116, 1-2, pp. 53-64.Europe, FranceCarbonatite
DS201012-0816
2010
Moore, K.R.Velentini, L., Moore, K.R., Chazot, G.A fluid dynamical model of carbonatite silicate magma interaction.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 579.Europe, France, globalCarbonatite
DS201212-0487
2012
Moore, K.R.Moore, K.R.Experimental study in the Na2OCaOMgOAl203Si02CO2 system at 3 Gpa: the effect of sodium on mantle melting to carbonate -rich liquids and implications for the petrogenesis of silicocarbonatites.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 76, 2, pp. 285-309.TechnologyCarbonatite, petrogenesis
DS201707-1376
2017
Moore, L.Trela, J., Gazel, E., Sobolev, A.V., Moore, L., Bizimis, M.The hottest lavas of the Phanerozoic and the survival of Archean reservoirs.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 10, 6, pp. 451-456.Mantleplumes

Abstract: Large igneous provinces and some hotspot volcanoes are thought to form above thermochemical anomalies known as mantle plumes. Petrologic investigations that support this model suggest that plume-derived melts originated at high mantle temperatures (greater than 1,500?°C) relative to those generated at ambient mid-ocean ridge conditions (about 1,350?°C). Earth’s mantle has also cooled appreciably during its history and the temperatures of modern mantle derived melts are substantially lower than those produced during the Archaean (2.5 to 4.0 billion years ago), as recorded by komatiites (greater than 1,700?°C). Here we use geochemical analyses of the Tortugal lava suite to show that these Galapagos-Plume-related lavas, which formed 89 million years ago, record mantle temperatures as high as Archaean komatiites and about 400?°C hotter than the modern ambient mantle. These results are also supported by highly magnesian olivine phenocrysts and Al-in-olivine crystallization temperatures of 1,570 ± 20?°C. As mantle plumes are chemically and thermally heterogeneous, we interpret these rocks as the result of melting the hot core of the plume head that produced the Caribbean large igneous province. Our results imply that a mantle reservoir as hot as those responsible for some Archaean lavas has survived eons of convection in the deep Earth and is still being tapped by mantle plumes.
DS201711-2532
2017
Moore, L.Trela, J., Gazel, E., Sobolev, A.V., Moore, L., Bizimis, M., Jicha, B., Batanova, V.G.The hottest lavas of the Phanerozoic and the survival of deep Archean reservoirs.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 10, pp. 451-456.Mantlegeodynamics - plumes

Abstract: Large igneous provinces and some hotspot volcanoes are thought to form above thermochemical anomalies known as mantle plumes. Petrologic investigations that support this model suggest that plume-derived melts originated at high mantle temperatures (greater than 1,500?°C) relative to those generated at ambient mid-ocean ridge conditions (about 1,350?°C). Earth’s mantle has also cooled appreciably during its history and the temperatures of modern mantle derived melts are substantially lower than those produced during the Archaean (2.5 to 4.0 billion years ago), as recorded by komatiites (greater than 1,700?°C). Here we use geochemical analyses of the Tortugal lava suite to show that these Galapagos-Plume-related lavas, which formed 89 million years ago, record mantle temperatures as high as Archaean komatiites and about 400?°C hotter than the modern ambient mantle. These results are also supported by highly magnesian olivine phenocrysts and Al-in-olivine crystallization temperatures of 1,570 ± 20?°C. As mantle plumes are chemically and thermally heterogeneous, we interpret these rocks as the result of melting the hot core of the plume head that produced the Caribbean large igneous province. Our results imply that a mantle reservoir as hot as those responsible for some Archaean lavas has survived eons of convection in the deep Earth and is still being tapped by mantle plumes.
DS1860-1001
1897
Moore, L.I.Moore, L.I.Diamonds: in History and RomanceChicago: Schulze Publishing, 20P.GlobalHistory
DS201904-0759
2018
Moore, L.R.Moore, L.R., Bodnar, R.J.A pedagogical approach to estimating the CO2 budget of magmas.Journal of the Geological Society of London, Vol. 176, pp. 398-407.Mantlecarbon

Abstract: On a planetary scale, the carbon cycle describes the movement of carbon between the atmosphere and the deep earth, which affects petrologic processes in a range of geologic settings and the long-term viability of life at the surface. In this context, volcanoes and their associated magmatic systems represent the interface through which carbon is transferred from the deep earth to the atmosphere. Thus, describing the CO2 budget of volcanic systems is necessary for understanding the deep carbon cycle. In this review, Kilauea volcano (Hawaii) is used as a case study, and we present several simple calculations that can be used to account for processes that affect the amount and distribution of CO2 in this relatively well-studied volcanic system. These processes include estimating the concentration of CO2 in a melt derived by partial melting of a source material, enrichment of CO2 in the melt during fractional crystallization, exsolution of CO2 from a fluid-saturated melt, trapping and post-entrapment modification of melt inclusions, and degassing from the volcanic edifice. Our goal in this review is to provide straightforward example calculations that can be used to derive first-order estimates regarding processes that control the CO2 budgets of magmas.
DS1985-0406
1985
Moore, M.Machado, W.G., Moore, M.On the Dodechahedral Growth of Coasted DiamondJournal of Crystal growth, Vol. 71, pp. 718-727GlobalDiamond Morphology
DS1985-0407
1985
Moore, M.Machado, W.G., Moore, M., Woods, G.S.On the Dodecahedral Growth of Coated DiamondsJournal of CRYST. GR., Vol. 71, No. 3, PP. 718-727.GlobalExperimental Petrology
DS1985-0461
1985
Moore, M.Moore, M.Diamond Morphology #2Industrial Diamond Review, Vol. 45, No. 507, February pp. 67-71GlobalDiamond Morphology
DS1990-0334
1990
Moore, M.Clackson, S.G., Moore, M., Walmsley, J.C., Woods, G.S.The relationship between platelet size and the frequency of the B infrared adsorption peak in type 1a diamondPhil. Magazine, B., Vol. 62, No. 2, August pp. 115-128GlobalDiamond morphology
DS1991-0950
1991
Moore, M.Lang, A.R., Moore, M., Makepeace, A.P., Wierzchov, W.On the dilation of synthetic type 1B diamond by substitutional nitrogenimpurityPhil. Transactions Roy. A., Vol. A 337, No. 1648, Dec. 16, pp. 497-520GlobalDiamond synthesis, Nitrogen impurity
DS1992-1710
1992
Moore, M.Yacoot, A., Moore, M.An unusual octahedral diamondMineralogical Magazine, Vol. 56, No. 382, March pp. 111-113GlobalDiamond morphology, Mineralogy
DS1993-1785
1993
Moore, M.Yacoot, A., Moore, M.X-ray topography of natural tetrahedral diamondsMineralogical Magazine, Vol. 57, No. 387, June pp. 223-230.South AfricaDiamond morphology, Williams' collection diamonds, X-ray
DS2003-0970
2003
Moore, M.Moore, M.Diamond morphology. Crystal structureRough Diamond Review, No. 2, September, pp.12-15.GlobalDiamond - morphology, crystallography
DS2003-0971
2003
Moore, M.Moore, M.Diamond morphologyRough Diamond Review, September 2003, pp. 12-15Globaldiamond morphology - basic descriptions
DS200412-1359
2003
Moore, M.Moore, M.Diamond morphology. Crystal structure.Rough Diamond Review, No. 2, September, pp.12-15.TechnologyDiamond - morphology, crystallography
DS200512-0305
2005
Moore, M.Fritsch, E., Moore, M., Rondeau, B., Waggett, R.G.X-ray topography of a natural twinned diamond of unusual pseudo-tetrahedral morphology.Journal of Crystal Growth, Vol. 280, 1-2, pp. 279-285.Diamond morphology
DS200712-0908
2007
Moore, M.Rondeau, B., Fritsch, E., Moore, M., Thomassot, E., Sirikian, J.F.On the growth of natural octaheadral diamond upon a fibrous core.Journal of Crystal Growth, Vol. 304, 1, pp. 287-293.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200812-0783
2007
Moore, M.Nailer, S.G., Moore, M., Chapman, J.On the role of nitrogen in stiffening the diamond structure.Journal of Applied Crystallography, Vol. 40, 6, pp. 1146-1152.TechnologyDiamond crystallography
DS200912-0517
2009
Moore, M.Moore, M.Imaging diamond with x-rays.Journal of Physics Condensed Matter, in press ( August)TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201012-0514
2010
Moore, M.Moore, M., Chakhmouradian, A., Clark, J.Polyphase rare earth mineralization of the Bear Lodge alkaline complex, Wyoming.International Workshop Geology of Rare Metals, held Nov9-10, Victoria BC, Open file 2010-10, extended abstract pp. 27.United States, Wyoming, Colorado PlateauCarbonatite
DS201502-0081
2015
Moore, M.Moore, M., Chakhmouradian, A.R., Mariano, A.N., Sidhu, R.Evolution of rare-earth mineralzation in the Bear Lodge carbonatite, Wyoming: mineralogical and isotopic evidence.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 64, pp. 499-521.United States, Wyoming, Colorado PlateauDeposit - Bear Lodge
DS201611-2116
2016
Moore, M.Jones, A.P., McMillan, P.F., Salzmann, C.G., Alvaro, M., Nestola, F., Prencipe, M., Dobson, D., Hazael, R., Moore, M.Structural characteristization of natural diamond shocked to 60 Gpa: implications for Earth and Planetary Systems.Lithos, in press available 25p.TechnologyNatural diamonds

Abstract: The possible presence of the high-density carbon polymorph with hexagonal symmetry known as "lonsdaleite" provides an important marker for shock impact events. It is typically considered to form as a metastable phase produced from graphite or other carbonaceous precursors. However, its existence has recently been called into question. Here we collected high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction data for laboratory-shocked and natural impact diamonds that both show evidence for deviations from cubic symmetry, that would be consistent with the appearance of hexagonal stacking sequences. These results show that hexagonality can be achieved by shocking diamond as well as from graphite precursors. The diffraction results are analyzed in terms of a general model that describes intermediate stacking sequences between pure diamond (fully cubic) and "lonsdaleite" (fully hexagonal) phases, with provision made for ordered vs disordered stacking arrangements. This approach provides a "hexagonality index" that can be used to characterize and distinguish among samples that have experienced different degrees of shock or static high pressure-high temperature treatments. We have also examined the relative energetics of diamond and "lonsdaleite" structures using density functional theoretical (DFT) methods. The results set limits on the conditions under which a transformation between diamond and "lonsdaleite" structures can be achieved. Calculated Raman spectra provide an indicator for the presence of extended hexagonal stacking sequences within natural and laboratory-prepared samples. Our results show that comparable crystallographic structures may be developed by impact-generated shockwaves starting from ambient conditions using either of the two different allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite). This broadens the scope for its occurrence in terrestrial and planetary systems.
DS201701-0016
2016
Moore, M.Jones, A.P., McMillan P.F., Salzmann, C.G., Alvaro, M., Nestola, F., Prencipe, M., Dobson, D., Hazael, R., Moore, M.Structual characterization of natural diamond shocked to 60 Gpa; implications for Earth and Planetary Systems.Lithos, In press availableTechnologyDiamond morphology

Abstract: The possible presence of the high-density carbon polymorph with hexagonal symmetry known as “lonsdaleite” provides an important marker for shock impact events. It is typically considered to form as a metastable phase produced from graphite or other carbonaceous precursors. However, its existence has recently been called into question. Here we collected high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction data for laboratory-shocked and natural impact diamonds that both show evidence for deviations from cubic symmetry, that would be consistent with the appearance of hexagonal stacking sequences. These results show that hexagonality can be achieved by shocking diamond as well as from graphite precursors. The diffraction results are analyzed in terms of a general model that describes intermediate stacking sequences between pure diamond (fully cubic) and “lonsdaleite” (fully hexagonal) phases, with provision made for ordered vs disordered stacking arrangements. This approach provides a “hexagonality index” that can be used to characterize and distinguish among samples that have experienced different degrees of shock or static high pressure-high temperature treatments. We have also examined the relative energetics of diamond and “lonsdaleite” structures using density functional theoretical (DFT) methods. The results set limits on the conditions under which a transformation between diamond and “lonsdaleite” structures can be achieved. Calculated Raman spectra provide an indicator for the presence of extended hexagonal stacking sequences within natural and laboratory-prepared samples. Our results show that comparable crystallographic structures may be developed by impact-generated shockwaves starting from ambient conditions using either of the two different allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite). This broadens the scope for its occurrence in terrestrial and planetary systems.
DS201707-1313
2017
Moore, M.A.Chakhmouradian, A.R., Cooper, M.A., Reguir, E.P., Moore, M.A.Carbocernaite from Bear Lodge, Wyoming: crystal chemistry, paragenesis, and rare earth fractionation on a microscale.American Mineralogist, Vol. 102, pp. 1340-1352.United States, Wyoming, Colorado Plateaucarbonatite - Bear Lodge

Abstract: Zoned crystals of carbocernaite occur in hydrothermally reworked burbankite-fluorapatite-bearing calcite carbonatite at Bear Lodge, Wyoming. The mineral is paragenetically associated with pyrite, strontianite, barite, ancylite-(Ce), and late-stage calcite, and is interpreted to have precipitated from sulfate-bearing fluids derived from an external source and enriched in Na, Ca, Sr, Ba, and rare-earth elements (REE) through dissolution of the primary calcite and burbankite. The crystals of carbocernaite show a complex juxtaposition of core-rim, sectoral, and oscillatory zoning patterns arising from significant variations in the content of all major cations, which can be expressed by the empirical formula (Ca0.43–0.91Sr0.40–0.69REE0.18–0.59Na0.18–0.53Ba0–0.08)?1.96–2.00(CO3)2. Interelement correlations indicate that the examined crystals can be viewed as a solid solution between two hypothetical end-members, CaSr(CO3)2 and NaREE(CO3)2, with the most Na-REE-rich areas in pyramidal (morphologically speaking) growth sectors representing a probable new mineral species. Although the Bear Lodge carbocernaite is consistently enriched in light REE relative to heavy REE and Y (chondrite-normalized La/Er = 500–4200), the pyramidal sectors exhibit a greater degree of fractionation between these two groups of elements relative to their associated prismatic sectors. A sample approaching the solid-solution midline [(Ca0.57Na0.42)?0.99(Sr0.50REE0.47Ba0.01)?0.98(CO3)2] was studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and shown to have a monoclinic symmetry [space group P11m, a = 6.434(4), b = 7.266(5), c = 5.220(3) Å, ? = 89.979(17)°, Z = 2] as opposed to the orthorhombic symmetry (space group Pb21m) proposed in earlier studies. The symmetry reduction is due to partial cation order in sevenfold-coordinated sites occupied predominantly by Ca and Na, and in tenfold-coordinated sites hosting Sr, REE, and Ba. The ordering also causes splitting of carbonate vibrational modes at 690–740 and 1080–1100 cm-1 in Raman spectra. Using Raman micro-spectroscopy, carbocernaite can be readily distinguished from burbankite- and ancylite-group carbonates characterized by similar energy-dispersive spectra.
DS200812-0763
2008
Moore, M.L.Moore, M.L., Blowes, D.W., Ptacek, C.J., Gould, W.D., Smith, L.,Sego, D.Humidity cell analysis of waste rock from the Diavik diamond mine NWT, Canada.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A647.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS200412-1360
2004
Moore, M.M.Moore, M.M., Garnero, E.J., Lay, T., Williams, Q.Shear wave splitting and waveform complexity for lowermost mantle structures with low velocity lamellae and transverse isottropyJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 109, B2, 10.1029/2003 JB002546MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS1997-0813
1997
Moore, P.Moore, P.Hard choices for environmentalists and the mining industryProspectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC) Paper presentation, 12pCanadaEconomics, Environment
DS200612-0944
2006
Moore, P.Moore, P.Mining: insuring the uninsurable. Due to the levels and variety of risk, mining is an area of insurance generally tackled by specia list brokers.Mining Magazine, Vol. 195, 2, August pp. 40-43.GlobalMining - insurance
DS2003-0626
2003
Moore, P.L.Iverson, N.R., Cohen, D., Hooyer, T.S., Fischer, U.H., Jackson, M., Moore, P.L.Effects of basal debris on glacier flowScience, No. 5629, July 4, pp. 81-83.GlobalGeomorphology
DS200412-0884
2003
Moore, P.L.Iverson, N.R., Cohen, D., Hooyer, T.S., Fischer, U.H., Jackson, M., Moore, P.L., Lappegard, G., Kohler, J.Effects of basal debris on glacier flow.Science, No. 5629, July 4, pp. 81-83.TechnologyGeomorphology
DS1989-1384
1989
Moore, R.Shimizu, N., Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.Trace element geochemistry of garnet inclusions in diamonds from The finsch and Koffiefontein kimberlite pipes #2Diamond Workshop, International Geological Congress, July 15-16th., pp. 100-101. AbstractSouth AfricaDiamond Inclusions, Diamond morphology
DS1989-1385
1989
Moore, R.Shimizu, N., Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.Trace element geochemistry of garnet inclusions in diamonds from The finsch and Koffiefontein kimberlite pipes #1Geological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting Abstracts, Vol. 21, No. 6, p. A361. AbstractSouth AfricaGeochemistry, Diamond Inclusions
DS1992-1081
1992
Moore, R.Moore, R.Placer diamonds in West AfricaNorthwest Territories Geoscience Forum held November 25, 26th. 1992, AbstractWest Africa, NamibiaAlluvials
DS1995-1297
1995
Moore, R.Moore, R.Geology of the Exeter diamond deposits, northwest Territories, Canada.Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC) Annual Meeting, p. 50. abstractNorthwest TerritoriesReview, Deposit -Exeter
DS1998-1623
1998
Moore, R.Zartman, R.E., Richardson, S., Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.Uranium-thorium-lead ages of megacrystic zircon from the Monastery kimberlite, FreeState, South Africa.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 989-91.South AfricaGeochronology, tectonics, Deposit - Monastery
DS2000-0680
2000
Moore, R.Moore, R., Thomas, E.The Superior Craton - Canada's next world class diamond discovery?Toronto Geological Discussion Group, absts Oct. 24, pp. 27-32.OntarioHistory - companies, Diamond exploration
DS2001-0797
2001
Moore, R.Moore, R., Read, G.H.The Superior Craton: the diamond search intensifiesOntario Geological Survey, Northeastern Mineral Symposium, p.16-7, abstract.OntarioDiamond exploration - brief
DS2003-0512
2003
Moore, R.Grutter, H., Gurney, J., Nowicki, T., Moore, R.Early stage assessment of kimberlites using indicator minerals, petrography andQuebec Exploration Conference, Nov. 25-27, 1p. abstractGlobalMicrodiamonds
DS200412-0733
2003
Moore, R.Grutter, H., Gurney, J., Nowicki, T., Moore, R.Early stage assessment of kimberlites using indicator minerals, petrography and microdiamonds.Quebec Exploration Conference, Nov. 25-27, 1p. abstractTechnologyMicrodiamonds
DS200712-0396
2007
Moore, R.Gurney, J., Nowicki, T., Moore, R., Baumgartner, M.Recent advances in understanding diamond formation events, their relevance to exploration and some remaining questions.Diamonds in Kimberley Symposium & Trade Show, Bristow and De Wit held August 23-24, Kimberley, South Africa, GSSA Diamond Workshop CD slides 19Africa, southern AfricaGeochemistry, geochronology, evolution , geothermometry
DS201712-2707
2017
Moore, R.Moore, R., Hrkac, C., Nelson, L.Kennady North project 2017 field season update.45th. Annual Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 52 abstractCanada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Kennady North
DS1920-0038
1920
Moore, R.C.Moore, R.C., Haynes, W.P.An Outcrop of Basic Igneous Rock in KansasAmerican Association of Petroleum Geologists, Vol. 4, PP. 183-187.United States, Central States, Kansas, WilsonRelated Rocks, Diatreme
DS1993-0600
1993
Moore, R.L.Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.L.Geochemical correlations between kimberlitic indicator minerals And diamonds #2Prospectors and Developers Diamond Workshop, held March 27th, Toronto, 23pSouth AfricaGeochemistry, Indicator minerals, diamonds
DS1995-0133
1995
Moore, R.OBell, D.R., Gurney, J.J., Le Roex, A.P., Moore, R.O, et al.Compositional evolution of the Monastery megacrysts and parent magmaProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 50-51.South AfricaPetrology, Deposit -Monastery
DS1985-0254
1985
Moore, R.O.Gurney, J.J., Harris, J.W., Rickard, . R.S., Moore, R.O.Inclusions in Premier Mine DiamondsTransactions Geological Society of South Africa, Vol. 88, pt. 2, May-August pp. 301-310South AfricaMineralogy, Geothermometry
DS1985-0462
1985
Moore, R.O.Moore, R.O., Gurney, J.J.Pyroxene Solid Solutions in Garnets Included in DiamondNature, Vol. 318, No. 6046, Dec. 12, pp. 553-555South AfricaMineral Chemistry, Diamond Morphology
DS1985-0463
1985
Moore, R.O.Moore, R.O., Gurney, J.J.Pyroxene solid solution in garnets included in diamonds from the Monastery mine kimberliteTransactions Geological Society of South Africa, Vol. 88, pt. 2, May-August p. 477. abstractSouth AfricaMonastery, Geochemistry
DS1986-0580
1986
Moore, R.O.Moore, R.O., Gurney, J.J.Mineral inclusions in diamonds from the Monastery kimberlite,SouthAfricaProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 406-408South AfricaDiamond morphology
DS1986-0581
1986
Moore, R.O.Moore, R.O., Otter, M.L., Rickard, R.S., Harris, J.W., Gurney, J.J.The occurrence of moissanite and ferro-periclase as inclusionsindiamondProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 409-411South Africa, ColoradoMonastery, Sloan, Diamond morphology
DS1987-0263
1987
Moore, R.O.Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.O.Diamonds and inclusions: remnants of old lithosphere?Terra Cognita, Conference abstracts Oceanic and Continental Lithosphere:, Vol. 7, No. 4, Autumn, abstract only p. 614South AfricaBlank
DS1987-0488
1987
Moore, R.O.Moore, R.O.A study of the kimberlites, diamonds and Associated rocks and minerals from the Monastery mine,South AfricaPh.D. thesis, University of Cape Town, South AfricaPetrology, Deposit -Monastery mine
DS1988-0633
1988
Moore, R.O.Shimizu, N., Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.O.Trace element abundance patterns of garnet inclusions in diamondsV.m. Goldschmidt Conference, Program And Abstract Volume, Held May, p. 74. AbstractSouth AfricaBlank
DS1989-1050
1989
Moore, R.O.Moore, R.O., Gurney, J.J.Mineral inclusions in diamond from the Monasterykimberlite, SouthAfricaGeological Society of Australia Inc. Blackwell Scientific Publishing, Special, No. 14, Vol. 2, pp. 1029-1041South AfricaDeposit -Monastery, Diamond inclusions, Garnet
DS1989-1051
1989
Moore, R.O.Moore, R.O., Gurney, J.J., Griffin, W.L.Trace element abundance patterns in diamond inclusions from the MonasteryMine, South AfricaDiamond Workshop, International Geological Congress, July 15-16th. editors, pp. 65-68. AbstractSouth AfricaDiamond Inclusions -Monastery, Diamond morphology
DS1991-0634
1991
Moore, R.O.Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.O.Geochemical correlations between kimberlitic indicator minerals And diamonds as applied to explorationProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 125-126GlobalDiamond potential, Peridotite, eclogite
DS1991-0635
1991
Moore, R.O.Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.O.Diamond resources on the continental shelf of southern AfricaThe Canadian Mining and Metallurgical Bulletin (CIM Bulletin) ., Session on Diamonds at The Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) Annual Meeting April, Vol. 84, No. 947, March p. 99. AbstractSouthwest Africa, NamibiaAlluvials -sea, Recovery
DS1991-0636
1991
Moore, R.O.Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.O., Griffin, W.L., Sobolev, N.V.The use of macrocryst minerals to predict diamond potential in kimberlites based on Southern Africa and a comparison with SiberiaGeological Society The Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) First Annual Field Conference symposium held, 2pg. abstractSouth Africa, RussiaDiamond potential, Garnet, nickel thermometry
DS1991-0637
1991
Moore, R.O.Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.O., Otter, M.L., Kirkley, M.B., Hops, J.J.Southern African kimberlites and their xenolithsMagmatism in Extensional structural settings, Springer pp. 495-536.South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Lesotho, SwazilandKimberlites, Review
DS1991-0730
1991
Moore, R.O.Hops, J.J., Moore, R.O., Gurney, J.J.The individuality of on and off craton megacryst suites in SouthernAfricaProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 177-179South Africa, SwazilandMonastery, Granny Smith, Dokolwayo, Barkly West, Mineral chemistry
DS1991-1185
1991
Moore, R.O.Moore, R.O., Gurney, J.J, Griffin, W.L., Shimizu, N.Ultra high pressure garnet inclusions in Monastery diamonds -trace element abundance patterns and conditions of originEur. Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 213-230South AfricaGeochemistry, Monastery -inclusions -garnet
DS1991-1186
1991
Moore, R.O.Moore, R.O., Gurney, J.J.Garnet megacrysts from Group II kimberlites in southern AfricaProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 298-300GlobalDokolwayo, garnets, compositional trends, Geochemistry, trace elements
DS1991-1187
1991
Moore, R.O.Moore, R.O., Gurney, J.J., Fipke, C.E.Geochemical correlations between kimberlitic indicator minerals And diamonds #1The Canadian Mining and Metallurgical Bulletin (CIM Bulletin) ., Session, Vol. 84, No. 947, March p. 90. AbstractSouth AfricaGeochemistry, Macrocrysts -garnet and chromite
DS1992-0620
1992
Moore, R.O.Griffin, W.L., Ryan, C.G., Moore, R.O., Gurney, J.J.Geochemistry of magnesian ilmenites from kimberlites and basaltsV.m. Goldschmidt Conference Program And Abstracts, Held May 8-10th. Reston, p. A 44. abstractSouth AfricaGeochemistry, Magnesian ilmenites
DS1992-0638
1992
Moore, R.O.Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.O.Geochemical correlation between kimberlite indicator minerals and diamond son the Kalahari cratonInternational Roundtable Conference on Diamond Exploration and Mining, held, pp. 58-81South AfricaMineral chemistry, Geochemistry
DS1992-1082
1992
Moore, R.O.Moore, R.O., Griffin, W.L., Gurney, J.J., Ryan, C.G., Cousens, D.R.Trace element geochemistry of ilmenite megacrysts from the Monasterykimberlite, South Africa.Lithos, Vol. 29, No. 1-2, December pp. 1-18.South AfricaGeochemistry, Ilmenites
DS1993-0598
1993
Moore, R.O.Gurney, J.J., Helmstaedt, H., Moore, R.O.A review of the use and application of mantle mineral geochemistry in diamond exploration.Pure and Applied Chemistry, Vol. 65, No. 12, December pp. 2423-2442.GlobalGeochemistry, Diamond exploration
DS1993-0599
1993
Moore, R.O.Gurney, J.J., Helmstaedt, J., Moore, R.O.A review of the use and application of mantle geochemistry in diamondexploration.Pure and Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 65, No. 12, pp. 2423-2442.MantleRoots, Geochemistry
DS1994-0470
1994
Moore, R.O.Dummett, H.T., Fipke, C.E., Moore, R.O.Update on the BHP- DIA MET joint venture diamond project, NorthwestTerritories.The Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) District 6, Oct. 11-15th. Vancouver, p.63 abstract plus 4p.Northwest TerritoriesSampling, Deposit -Point Lake
DS1994-0682
1994
Moore, R.O.Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.O.Geochemical correlations between kimberlitic indicator minerals And diamonds on the Kalahari craton.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 35, No. 2, pp. 9-18.South Africa, BotswanaGeochemistry, Kimberlitic indicator minerals
DS1994-1228
1994
Moore, R.O.Moore, R.O., Fipke, C.E., Dummett, H.T.The BHP Dia Met joint venture diamond project, Northwest Territories, Canada.The Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) Section Meeting Oct. 12, Vancouver, 4p.Northwest TerritoriesProject update, Exploration, sampling, geophysics
DS1995-0067
1995
Moore, R.O.Ashley, R.M., Carlson, J.A., Kirkley, M.B., Moore, R.O.Geology and exploration of Diamondiferous kimberlites in the NorthwestTerritories, Canada.Yellowknife 95, program and abstracts, Sept. 6-8, p. 35-37.Northwest TerritoriesOverview, BHP Dia Met
DS1995-0268
1995
Moore, R.O.Carlson, J.A., Kirkley, M.B., Ashley, R.M., Moore, R.O.Geology and exploration of kimberlites on the BHP/Dia Met claims, Lac deGras region.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 98-100.Northwest TerritoriesGeology -0verview, Deposit -Lac de Gras area
DS1995-0542
1995
Moore, R.O.Fipke, C.E., Dummett, H.T., Moore, R.O., Carlson, J.A.History of the discovery of Diamondiferous kimberlites in the Northwest Territories of Canada.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 158-60.Northwest TerritoriesDiscovery -brief overview
DS1995-0543
1995
Moore, R.O.Fipke, C.E., Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.O.Diamond exploration techniques emphasing indicator mineral geochemistry and Canadian examples.Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin. 423, 86p. approx. $ 32.00Canada, North AmericaPetrology, kimberlites, lamproites, Exploration techniques
DS1995-0684
1995
Moore, R.O.Griffin, W.L., Moore, R.O., Ryan, C.G., Gurney, J., Win, T.Geochemistry of magnesian ilmenite megacrysts from southern African kimberlites #1Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended, p. 196-7.South AfricaGeochemistry -ilmenite, Deposit -Kimberley, Uintjiesberg
DS1995-0833
1995
Moore, R.O.Hutchinson, M.T., Harte, B., Moore, R.O., Gurney, J.A rare earth elements (REE) study of megacrysts from the Monastery diatremeTerra Nova, Abstract Vol., p. 334.South AfricaGeochronology, Deposit -Monastery
DS1997-0445
1997
Moore, R.O.Griffin, W.L., Moore, R.O., Ryan, Gurney, WinGeochemistry of magnesian ilmenite megacrysts from Southern african kimberlites #2Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 38, No. 2, pp. 421-443.South Africa, Botswana, Namibia, LesothoGeochemistry, Megacrysts
DS1998-0046
1998
Moore, R.O.Armstrong, R.A., Moore, R.O.Rubidium-Strontium ages on kimberlites from the Lac de Gras area, Northwest Canada.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 101, No. 2, June pp. 155-158.Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology, Lac de Gras area
DS1998-0550
1998
Moore, R.O.Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.O., Bell, D.R.Mineral associations and compositional evolution of Monastery kimberlitemegacrysts.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 290-2.South AfricaPetrogenetic - Metasomatism, Deposit - Monastery
DS2003-0514
2003
Moore, R.O.Grutter, H.S., Moore, R.O.Pyroxene geotherms revisited - an empirical approach based on Canadian xenoliths8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 6, AbstractNorthwest Territories, Ontario, Somerset IslandMantle petrology, Pyroxene geothermometry
DS2003-0939
2003
Moore, R.O.Menzies, A.H., Frazenburg, M., Baumgartner, M.C., Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.O.Evaluation of chromites derived from kimberlites and implications for diamond8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 8, POSTER abstractAustraliaBlank
DS200412-0128
2004
Moore, R.O.Bell, D.R., Moore, R.O.Deep chemical structure of the southern African mantle from kimberlite megacrysts.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 107, 1/2, pp. 59-80.Africa, South AfricaGeochemistry, tectonics
DS200412-0129
2004
Moore, R.O.Bell, D.R., Rossman, G.R., Moore, R.O.Abundance and partitioning of OH in a high pressure magmatic system: megacrysts from the Monastery kimberlite, South Africa.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 45, 8, pp. 1539-1564.Africa, South AfricaMineral chemistry - Monastery
DS200412-0280
2004
Moore, R.O.Carlson, R.W., Moore, R.O.Age of the eastern Kaapvaal mantle: Re Os isotope dat a from peridotite xenoliths from the Monastery kimberlite.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 107, 1/2, pp. 81-90.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Monastery, geochronology
DS200412-0736
2003
Moore, R.O.Grutter, H.S., Moore, R.O.Pyroxene geotherms revisited - an empirical approach based on Canadian xenoliths.8 IKC Program, Session 6, AbstractCanada, Nunavut, Somerset IslandMantle petrology Pyroxene geothermometry
DS200412-1300
2003
Moore, R.O.Menzies, A.H., Frazenburg, M., Baumgartner, M.C., Gurney, J.J., Moore, R.O.Evaluation of chromites derived from kimberlites and implications for diamond exploration programs.8 IKC Program, Session 8, POSTER abstractAustraliaDiamond exploration
DS200712-0783
2007
Moore, R.O.Nowicki, T.E., Moore, R.O., Gurney, J.J., Baumgartner, M.C.Diamonds and associated heavy minerals in kimberlite: a review of key concepts and applications.Developments in Sedimentology, Vol. 58, pp. 1235-1267.TechnologyGeochemistry - indicator minerals
DS1994-1605
1994
Moore, S.Simon, J.L., Weinrauch, G., Moore, S.The reserves of extracted resources: historical dataNonrenewable Resources, Vol. 3, No. 4, Winter pp. 325-340GlobalEconomics, Forecasting, metal prices, resource scarcity
DS1994-0742
1994
Moore, T.A.Hausel, W.D., Harris, R.E., Moore, T.A.Diamond exploration and history of WyomingMining Engineering, Vol. 46, No. 5, May pp. 421, 422.WyomingNews item, Redaurum
DS201702-0229
2016
Moore, T.P.Moore, T.P.Moore's Compendium of mineral discoveries, 1960-2015.Mineralogical Record, 2 Volumes 809;813pp., approx $400.00 USTechnologyBook - mineral discoveries

Abstract: It is no exaggeration to say that Moore’s Compendium of Mineral Discoveries 1960-2015 is the most important publication for mineral collectors since Dana’s System of Mineralogy. Think of it as a "What’s New in Minerals" covering the last 55 years, which has truly been a Golden Age of mineral collecting. Detailed information on mineral specimen discoveries made worldwide since 1960 has been gleaned from every major mineral collector magazine in English, German, French, Spanish and Italian, as well as books, mineral dealer catalogs and unpublished manuscripts - all meticulously referenced. The vast majority of the publications have never been indexed and are not available online, so this information has been inaccessible to all collectors lacking a personal library of such journals and the ability to read five languages. The description of each occurrence covers as many aspects as possible, beginning with the general appearance and style of specimens; the sizes, morphologies and habits of major crystals; associated species; geological settings; the histories of the localities; the circumstances of the discoveries, including the names of collectors; interesting or amusing collecting stories; marketing information (i.e. where, when and how specimens have been offered for sale); and whatever else may seem in some way noteworthy.
DS200412-1361
2004
Moore, V.M.Moore, V.M., Wiltschko, D.V.Syncollisional delamination and tectonic wedge development in convergent orogens.Tectonics, Vol. 23, 2, 10.1029/2002 TC001430MantleTectonics
DS201902-0267
2019
Moore, W.Deales, J., Lenardic, A., Moore, W.Assessing the intrinsic uncertainty and structural stability of planetary models: 1) parameterized thermal/tectonic history models.Researchgate preprint, 21p. Pdf availableMantlegeothermometry

Abstract: Thermal history models, that have been used to understand the geological history of Earth, are now being coupled to climate models to map conditions that allow planets to maintain surface water over geologic time - a criteria considered crucial for life. However, the lack of intrinsic uncertainty assessment has blurred guidelines for how thermal history models can be used toward this end. A model, as a representation of something real, is not expected to be complete. Unmodeled effects are assumed to be small enough that the model maintains utility for the issue(s) it was designed to address. The degree to which this holds depends on how unmodeled factors affect the certainty of model predictions. We quantify this intrinsic uncertainty for several parameterized thermal history models (a widely used subclass of planetary models). Single perturbation analysis is used to determine the reactance time of different models. This provides a metric for how long it takes low amplitude, unmodeled effects to decay or grow. Reactance time is shown to scale inversely with the strength of the dominant feedback (negative or positive) within a model. A perturbed physics analysis is then used to determine uncertainty shadows for model outputs. This provides probability distributions for model predictions and tests the structural stability of a model. That is, do model predictions remain qualitatively similar, and within assumed model limits, in the face of intrinsic uncertainty. Once intrinsic uncertainty is accounted for, model outputs/predictions and comparisons to observational data should be treated in a probabilistic way.
DS1999-0490
1999
Moore, W.B.Moore, W.B., Schubert, P.J., Tackley, P.J.The role of rheology in lithospheric thinning by mantle plumesGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 26, No. 8, Apr. 15, pp. 1073-76.MantlePlumes, hotspots, Lithosphere - thinning
DS200912-0518
2008
Moore, W.B.Moore, W.B.Heat transport in a convecting layer heated from within and below.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 113, B 11, B11407.MantleGeothermometry
DS1975-0632
1977
Moore, W.J.Stewart, J.H., Moore, W.J., Zeitz, I.East-west Patterns of Cenozoic Igneous Rocks, Aeromagnetic Anomalies and Mineral Deposits, Nevada and Utah.Geological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 88, PP. 67-77.GlobalMid-continent, Geophysics
DS1981-0306
1981
Moores, E.M.Moores, E.M.Ancient Suture Zones Within ContinentsScience., Vol. 213, JULY 3, PP. 41- 46.GlobalMid-continent
DS1990-0977
1990
Moores, E.M.Malpas, J., Moores, E.M., Pantayiotou, A., Xenophontos, C.Ophiolites- oceanic crustal analoguesCyprus Geological Survey, 733p. $ 65.00Japan, Indonesia, California, Oregon, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, ScotlandOphiolites, Book -ad
DS1991-1188
1991
Moores, E.M.Moores, E.M.Southwest U.S. -East Antarctic (SWEAT) connection: a hypothesisGeology, Vol. 19, No. 5, May pp. 425-428United States, AntarcticaGondwana, Tectonics
DS1993-1067
1993
Moores, E.M.Moores, E.M.Neoproterozoic oceanic crustal thining, emergence of continents, and origin of the Phanerozoic ecosystem: a modelGeology, Vol. 21, No. 1, January pp. 5-8GlobalCrust, EcosysteM.
DS1997-0814
1997
Moores, E.M.Moores, E.M., Fairbridge, R.W.Encyclopedia of European and Asian regional geology #1Chapman and Hall, 800p. $ 500.00Europe, AsiaCountry - profile geology, Book - ad, Book - table of contents, Reference - encyclopedia
DS2002-1084
2002
Moores, E.M.Moores, E.M.Pre I Ga (pre-Rodinian) ophiolites: their tectonic and environmental implicationsGeological Society of America Bulletin, Vol. 114, No. 1, pp. 80-95.GlobalTectonics - ophiolites
DS2002-1085
2002
Moores, E.M.Moores, E.M., Wakabayashi, J., Unruh, J.R.Crustal scale cross section of the U.S. Cordillera, California and beyond, its tectonic significance and speculations on the Andean Orogeny.International Geology Review, Vol. 44, 6, pp. 479-500.United States, CaliforniaTectonics
DS1989-1052
1989
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J.Geologie de la region du lac ChukotatQuebec Department of Mines, ET 87-10, 56p.QuebecGeology
DS1992-0125
1992
Moorhead, J.Birkett, T.C., Girard, R., Moorhead, J., Marchilfon, N.Carte geologique de la Province Grenville a l'est de l'axe LouvicourtVald'Or Senneterre.Quebec Department of Mines, MB 92-15, 15p.QuebecMap - geology
DS1993-0096
1993
Moorhead, J.Beaumier, M., Dion, D-J., LaSalle, P., Moorhead, J.Exploration du diamant au Temiscamingue. (in French)Quebec Department of Mines Promotional, PRO 93-08, 7p.Quebec, TimiskamingGeochemistry, Heavy minerals-brief overview
DS1993-0548
1993
Moorhead, J.Girard, R., Birkett, T., Moorhead, J., Marchildon, N.Geologie de la region de Press ClovaQuebec Department of Mines, MB 93-04, 54p.QuebecGeology
DS1993-1068
1993
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J.Characteristics and distribution of kimberlite in north western Quebec; apreliminary report.Quebec Exploration Conference summaries held September 15-1th. Val d'Or, pp. 6-9.QuebecLe Tac Township, Bachelor Lake area
DS1993-1069
1993
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J., Girard, R., Boudreau, M-A.Circular aeromagnetic anomalies possibly related to kimberlite intrusions in northwest Quebec.Quebec Department of Mines preliminary promotion document, handout at PDA, 25p. 5 p. text and listing of anomalies by locationQuebecGeophysics, Aeromagnetic anomalies
DS1994-1229
1994
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J.Potentiel diamantifere au Quebec: implication du MRNQ.(in French)Seventh Colloque Annuel en Ressources Minerales, Universite du Quebec a, p. 4-5. abstract in FrenchQuebecBrief overview of area
DS1994-1230
1994
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J.Carateristiques de certaines kimberlites de la region deDesmaraisville.(in French)The Professional Association of Geologists and Geophysicists of QuTbec (APGGQ) 1994, held Val'D'Or Aprl 13-15., 1p. abstractQuebecKimberlite, Desmaraisville area
DS1994-1231
1994
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J.Diamond potential of QuebecGeological Survey of Canada Open Forum January 17-19th. Abstracts only, p. 28.QuebecKimberlites
DS1996-0989
1996
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J.Geologie de la region du lac Vigneau Fosse de l'UngavaQuebec Department of Mines, MB 96-21, 84p.Quebec, Ungava, LabradorGeology
DS1996-0990
1996
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J., Girard, R., Boudreau, M.A.Anomalies aeromagnetic circulars possiblement reliees a des intrusions de kimberlite dans le nord ouest QuebecQuebec Department of Mines, MB 93-49, 23p.Quebec, Ungava, LabradorGeophysics - magnetics
DS1999-0491
1999
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J., Beaumier, M., Lefevbre, Bernier, MartelKimberlites, lineaments et rifts crustaux au Quebec #1Quebec Ministere des Ressources naturelles, (in French), MB99-35, approx. 60p.Quebec, Ungava, LabradorKimberlite, Tectonics, structure, fields, lineaments
DS2000-0083
2000
Moorhead, J.Bernier, L., Moorhead, J.Controles structuraux caracteristiques petrographiques et mineralogiques de la kimberlite d'Otish.Quebec Department of Mines, MB 2000-14, 55p.QuebecTectonics, structure, petrography, Deposit - Otish area
DS2000-0681
2000
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J., Beaumier, M.Distribution and characteristics of kimberlite fields in QuebecToronto Geological Discussion Group, absts Oct. 24, pp. 38-44.QuebecHistory, Diamond exploration
DS2000-0682
2000
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J., Beaumier, M., Lefebvre, Bernier, MartelKimberlites, lineaments et rifts crustaux au Quebec #2Quebec Department of Mines, Report, 69p.QuebecKimberlites, tectonics, lineaments, rifts, Area - overviews
DS2000-0683
2000
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J., Perreault, S., Berclaz, Sharma, BeaumierKimberlites and diamonds in northern QuebecQuebec Department of Mines, Pro 99-09, 11p.Quebec, Ungava, LabradorExploration
DS2002-0127
2002
Moorhead, J.Beaumier, M., Moorhead, J., Parent, M., Paradis, S.J.Synthese de l'activite d'exploration diamondifere au QuebecQuebec dept. of Mines, 2p.QuebecGeochemistry
DS2002-1086
2002
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J.Recent developments in diamond exploration in QuebecProspectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC) 2002, 1p. abstractQuebecExploration
DS2002-1087
2002
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J., Beaumier, M.L'exploration diamantifere au Quebec coup d'oeil sur la situationQuebec dept. of Mines, May 29, 2p.Quebec, Otish MountainsNews item, Brief - update on activity
DS2002-1088
2002
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J., Beaumier, M.Ruee vers le diamant au Quebec - Otish, Wemindji, Alluviaq, Torngat, Temiscamingue, Desmaraisville, la Beaver, Renard, Nottaway, Caniapiscau, Bienville, AigneaultQuebec dept. of Mines, May 29, 6p.Quebec, Otish MountainsNews item, Brief - update on activity
DS2003-0468
2003
Moorhead, J.Girard, R., Moorhead, J., Marchand, P.Kimberlites in Quebec: current statusQuebec Exploration Conference, Nov. 25-27, 1p. abstractQuebecBrief overview
DS2003-0972
2003
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J., Beaumier, M., Girard, R., Heaman, L.Distribution, structural controls and ages of kimberlite fields in the Superior Province of8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 8, POSTER abstractQuebecGeochronology, tectonics
DS200412-0668
2003
Moorhead, J.Girard, R., Moorhead, J., Marchand, P.Kimberlites in Quebec: current status.Quebec Exploration Conference, Nov. 25-27, 1p. abstractCanada, QuebecBrief overview
DS200412-1362
2003
Moorhead, J.Moorhead, J., Beaumier, M., Girard, R., Heaman, L.Distribution, structural controls and ages of kimberlite fields in the Superior Province of Quebec.8 IKC Program, Session 8, POSTER abstractCanada, QuebecDiamond exploration Geochronology, tectonics
DS200512-0318
2005
Moorkamp, M.Gatzmeier, A., Moorkamp, M.3D modelling of electrical anisotropy from electromagnetic array data: hypothesis testing for different upper mantle conduction mechanisms.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 149, 3-4, April 15, pp. 225-242.MantleGeophysics - electromagnetic, EM
DS200512-0769
2005
Moorthy, J.N.Natarajam, R., Savitha, G., Dominiak, P., Wozniak, K., Moorthy, J.N.Corundum, diamond and PtS metal organic frameworks with a difference: self assembly of a unique pair of 3-connecting D2d symmetric 3,3',5,5' tetrakis(4-pyridyl)bimesity1.Angewandie Chemie, Vol. 44, 14, March 29, pp. 2115-2119.Chemistry - framework
DS201112-0373
2011
Moosdorf, N.Gleeson, T., Smith, L., Moosdorf, N., Hartmann, J., Durr, H.H., manning, A.H., Van Beek, P.H., Jellinek, A.Mapping permeability over the surface of the Earth.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 38, L02401MantleGeophysics
DS2002-1611
2002
Mora, H.P.Trenkamp, R., Kellogg, J.N., Freymueller, J.T., Mora, H.P.Wide plate margin deformation, southern Central America and northwestern South America, CASA GPS observations.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vo. 15,2,June pp. 157-71.South America, GuyanaTectonics
DS201312-0956
2013
Morad, G.Wang, Y., Hilairet, N., Nishiyama, N., Yahata, N., Tsuchiya, T., Morad, G., Fiquet, G.High pressure, high temperature deformation of CaGeO3 ( perovskite) +-MgO aggregates: implications for multiphase rheology of the lower mantle.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 14, 9, pp. 3389-3408.MantlePerovskite
DS2002-1089
2002
Moraes, R.Moraes, R., Brown, M., Fuck, R.A., Camargo, M.A., Lima, T.M.Characterization and P T evolution of melt bearing ultrahigh temperature granulites: anJournal of Petrology, Vol. 43, 9, Sept.pp. 1673-1706.BrazilUHP - mineralogy - not specific to diamonds
DS200512-1229
2004
Moraes, R.Zack, T., Moraes, R., Kronz, A.Temperature dependence of Zr in rutile: empirical calibration of a rutile thermometer.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 148, 4, pp. 471-488.Thermometry
DS201710-2233
2017
Moraes, R.A.V.Hoover, D.B., Karfunkel, J., Ribeiro, L.C.B., Michelfelder, G.., Moraes, R.A.V., Krambrock, K., Quintao, D., Walde, D.Diamonds of the Alto Paranaiba, Brazil: Nixon's prediction verified?The Australian Gemmologist, Vol. 26, 5&6, pp. 88-99.South America, Brazil, Minas Geraisdeposit - Alto Paranaiba

Abstract: The authors, in a paper in this journal in 2009, note a puzzle, that in spite of extensive exploration for diamonds by major producers in the Alto Paranaiba region of West Minas Gerais State, Brazil, no primary source, such as kimberlites, for the many diamonds produced since their discovery over 250 years has been found. To answer this puzzle we propose that the diamonds are present within a large extrusive volcanic unit probably derived from the Serra Negra alkaline-carbonatitic complex which comprises a super volcano. This origin fits with the 1995 prediction of Nixon on the future direction of diamona-exploration that extrusive units may contain very large volumes of ore, and that carbonatitic emplacement sources need to be considered. The authors argue, based on available evidence from geology and geophysics, that such an origin is compatible with the known data, but that much additional information is needed to substantiate these ideas. Diamonds of the Alto Paraniaba, Brazil: Nixon's prediction verified?
DS201809-2036
2018
Moraes, R.A.V.Hoover, D.B., Karfunkel, J., Walde, D., Moraes, R.A.V., Michelfelder, G., Henger, F.E., Ribeira, L.C., Krambock, K.The Alto Paranaiba region, Brazil: a continuing source for pink diamonds?The Australian Gemmologist, Vol. 26, 9-10, pp. 196-204.South America, Brazildeposit - Alto Paranaiba
DS1997-0815
1997
Morain, S.Morain, S., Lopez Banos, S.Raster imagery in Geographic Information SystemsEarth Observation Magazine books, $ 60.00GlobalBook - ad, GIS - Raster imagery
DS201212-0204
2012
MoralesFlor De Lis, M., Stitch, Morales, Juli, Diaz, Cordoba, Pulgar, Ibarra, Harnafi, Gonzalez-LodeiroCrustal thickness variations in northern Morocco.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 117, B2, B02312.Africa, MoroccoGeophysics - seismics
DS2003-0172
2003
Morales, J.Brown, M., Baldwin, J., Morales, J., Fuck, R.Modelling ultra hot beauties from Brazil: peak temperature and P-T evolutionGeological Society of America, Annual Meeting Nov. 2-5, Abstracts p.222.BrazilUHP
DS200412-0227
2003
Morales, J.Brown, M., Baldwin, J., Morales, J., Fuck, R.Modelling ultra hot beauties from Brazil: peak temperature and P-T evolution.Geological Society of America, Annual Meeting Nov. 2-5, Abstracts p.222.South America, BrazilUHP
DS201312-0556
2013
Morales, J.Luciana, B., Schimmel, M., Gallart, J., Morales, J.Studying the 410-km and 660-km discontinuities beneath Spain and Morocco through detection of P-to-s conversions.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 194, 2, pp. 920-935.Europe, Spain, Africa, MoroccoGeophysics -
DS201312-0331
2013
Morales, L.Grant, T., Milke, R., Wunder, B., Morales, L., Wirth, R.The kinetic effects of H20 in metasomatic and xenolith breakdown reactions.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractMantleFluids
DS201312-0456
2013
Morales, L.Kaminsky, F.V., Wirth, R., Morales, L.Internal texture and syngenetic inclusions in carbonado.Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 51, 1, Feb. pp. 39-56.South America, Brazil, Africa, Central African RepublicCarbonado
DS201604-0612
2016
Morales, L.Kaminisky, F.V., Wirth, R., Anikin, L.P., Morales, L., Schreiber, A.Carbonado-like diamond from the Avacha active volcano in Kamchatka, Russia.Lithos, in press available, 15p.RussiaCarbonado

Abstract: In addition to a series of finds of diamond in mafic volcanic and ultramafic massive rocks in Kamchatka, Russia, a carbonado-like diamond aggregate was identified in recent lavas of the active Avacha volcano. This aggregate differs from ‘classic carbonado’ by its location within an active volcanic arc, well-formed diamond crystallites, and cementing by Si-containing aggregates rather than sintering. The carbonado-like aggregate contains inclusions of Mn-Ni-Si-Fe alloys, native ß-Mn, tungsten and boron carbides, which are uncommon for both carbonado and monocrystalline diamonds. Mn-Ni-Si-Fe alloys, trigonal W2C and trigonal B4C are new mineral species that were not previously found in the natural environment. The formation of the carbonado-like diamond aggregate started with formation at ~ 850-1000 °C of tungsten and boron carbides, Mn-Ni-Si-Fe alloys and native ß-Mn, which were used as seeds for the subsequent crystallization of micro-sized diamond aggregate. In the final stage, the diamond aggregate was cemented by amorphous silica, tridymite, ß-SiC, and native silicon. The carbonado-like aggregate was most likely formed at near-atmospheric pressure conditions via the CVD mechanism during the course or shortly after one of the volcanic eruption pulses of the Avacha volcano. Volcanic gases played a great role in the formation of the carbonado-like aggregate.
DS201612-2310
2016
Morales, L.Kaminsky, F.V., Wirth, R., Anikin, L.P., Morales, L., Schreiber, A.Carbonado-like diamond from the Avacha active volcano in Kamchatka, Russia.Lithos, Vol. 265, pp. 222-236.RussiaCarbonado

Abstract: Abstract In addition to a series of finds of diamond in mafic volcanic and ultramafic massive rocks in Kamchatka, Russia, a carbonado-like diamond aggregate was identified in recent lavas of the active Avacha volcano. This aggregate differs from ‘classic carbonado’ by its location within an active volcanic arc, well-formed diamond crystallites, and cementing by Si-containing aggregates rather than sintering. The carbonado-like aggregate contains inclusions of Mn-Ni-Si-Fe alloys, native ß-Mn, tungsten and boron carbides, which are uncommon for both carbonado and monocrystalline diamonds. Mn-Ni-Si-Fe alloys, trigonal W2C and trigonal B4C are new mineral species that were not previously found in the natural environment. The formation of the carbonado-like diamond aggregate started with formation at ~ 850-1000 °C of tungsten and boron carbides, Mn-Ni-Si-Fe alloys and native ß-Mn, which were used as seeds for the subsequent crystallization of micro-sized diamond aggregate. In the final stage, the diamond aggregate was cemented by amorphous silica, tridymite, ß-SiC, and native silicon. The carbonado-like aggregate was most likely formed at near-atmospheric pressure conditions via the CVD mechanism during the course or shortly after one of the volcanic eruption pulses of the Avacha volcano. Volcanic gases played a great role in the formation of the carbonado-like aggregate.
DS201807-1501
2018
Morales, L.Kaminsky, F.V., Wirth, R., Anikin, L.P., Morales, L., Schreiber, A.Carbonado like diamond from the Avacha active volcano in Kamchatka, Russia.Lithos, in press available, 57p.Russiacarbonado

Abstract: In addition to a series of finds of diamond in mafic volcanic and ultramafic massive rocks in Kamchatka, Russia, a carbonado-like diamond aggregate was identified in recent lavas of the active Avacha volcano. This aggregate differs from 'classic carbonado' by its location within an active volcanic arc, well-formed diamond crystallites, and cementing by Si-containing aggregates rather than sintering. The carbonado-like aggregate contains inclusions of Mn-Ni-Si-Fe alloys, native ß-Mn, tungsten and boron carbides, which are uncommon for both carbonado and monocrystalline diamonds. Mn-Ni-Si-Fe alloys, trigonal W2C and trigonal B4C are new mineral species that were not previously found in the natural environment. The formation of the carbonado-like diamond aggregate started with formation at 850-1000 °C of tungsten and boron carbides, Mn-Ni-Si-Fe alloys and native ß-Mn, which were used as seeds for the subsequent crystallization of micro-sized diamond aggregate. In the final stage, the diamond aggregate was cemented by amorphous silica, tridymite, ß-SiC, and native silicon. The carbonado-like aggregate was most likely formed at near-atmospheric pressure conditions via the CVD mechanism during the course or shortly after one of the volcanic eruption pulses of the Avacha volcano. Volcanic gases played a great role in the formation of the carbonado-like aggregate.
DS201601-0006
2015
Morales, L.F.G.Boneh, Y., Morales, L.F.G., Kaminiski, E., Skemer, P.Modeling olivine CPO evolution with complex deformation histories: implications for the interpretation of seismic anisotropy in the mantle.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 16, 10, pp. 3436-3455.MantleGeophysics - seismics

Abstract: Relating seismic anisotropy to mantle flow requires detailed understanding of the development and evolution of olivine crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Recent experimental and field studies have shown that olivine CPO evolution depends strongly on the integrated deformation history, which may lead to differences in how the corresponding seismic anisotropy should be interpreted. In this study, two widely used numerical models for CPO evolution—D-Rex and VPSC—are evaluated to further examine the effect of deformation history on olivine texture and seismic anisotropy. Building on previous experimental work, models are initiated with several different CPOs to simulate unique deformation histories. Significantly, models initiated with a preexisting CPO evolve differently than the CPOs generated without preexisting texture. Moreover, the CPO in each model evolves differently as a function of strain. Numerical simulations are compared to laboratory experiments by Boneh and Skemer (2014). In general, the D-Rex and VPSC models are able to reproduce the experimentally observed CPOs, although the models significantly over-estimate the strength of the CPO and in some instances produce different CPO from what is observed experimentally. Based on comparison with experiments, recommended parameters for D-Rex are: M*?=?10, ?*?=?5, and ??=?0.3, and for VPSC: a?=?10-100. Numerical modeling confirms that CPO evolution in olivine is highly sensitive to the details of the initial CPO, even at strains greater than 2. These observations imply that there is a long transient interval of CPO realignment which must be considered carefully in the modeling or interpretation of seismic anisotropy in complex tectonic settings.
DS1970-0247
1971
Moralev, V.M.Borodin, L.S., Gopal, V., Moralev, V.M., Suramanian, V., PonikarPrecambrian Carbonatites of Tamil Nadu, South IndiaGeological Society INDIA Journal, Vol. 12, No. 2, PP. 101-112.India, Tamil NaduPetrography, Analyses
DS1992-1083
1992
Moralev, V.M.Moralev, V.M.Isotopic rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) dating of Archean metabasites from the Aldan shield and early Proterozoic thermotectogenesisRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 32, No. 2, pp. 44-48Russia, AldanGeochronology, Metamorphic layers
DS1993-0553
1993
Moralev, V.M.Glukhovskiy, M.Z., Moralev, V.M.Archean metabasites of the Sunnagin Dome, Aldan Shield: petrochemistry andoriginInternational Geology Review, Vol. 35, No. 8, August pp. 739-757Russia, Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)Alkaline rocks, Petrochemistry
DS1995-0917
1995
Moralev, V.M.Karpuz, R., Roberts, D., Moralev, V.M., Terekhov, E.Regional lineaments of eastern Finnmark, Norway and the western KolaPeninsula, Russia.Ngu Report, No. 7, pp. 121-135.Russia, Kola PeninsulaTectonics, Regional - not specific to diamonds
DS1998-0517
1998
Moralev, V.M.Glukhovski, M.Z., Moralev, V.M.The hot belt of the early earth and present day mantle geodynamics according to seismic tomographic data.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 39, No. 1, pp. 3-10.RussiaGeodynamics, Geophysics - seismic
DS2000-0684
2000
Moralev, V.M.Moralev, V.M., Glukhovsky, M.Z.Diamond bearing kimberlite fields of the Siberian Craton and the Early Precambrian geodynamics.Ore Geology Review, Vol. 17, pp. 141-53.Russia, SiberiaTectonics - basement, structure, magmatism, seismics, Deposit - Udachnaya, Mir
DS2001-0389
2001
Moralev, V.M.Glukhovskii, M.Z., Moralev, V.M., Borisovskii, S.E.Zirconium and hafnium in zircons from Archean enderbites of Sunnagin dome, evolution of ancient crustDoklady, Vol.381A,No.9, Nov-Dec. pp. 1088-91.Russia, Aldan shieldPetrology
DS2003-0476
2003
Moralev, V.M.Glukhovskii, M.Z., Moralev, V.M.Archean mafic dyke swarms as the indicators of the specific features of the early Earth'sGeotectonics, Vol. 37, 2, pp. 124-139.RussiaDike swarms
DS200412-0678
2004
Moralev, V.M.Glukhovskii, M.Z., Bayanova, T.B., Moralev, V.M., Levkovich, N.V.The problem of tectonic evolution of the ancient continental crust: evidence from new U Pb zircon datings of rocks from the SunnDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 395, 2, pp. 157-160.Russia, Aldan ShieldTectonics
DS200412-0679
2003
Moralev, V.M.Glukhovskii, M.Z., Moralev, V.M.Archean mafic dyke swarms as the indicators of the specific features of the early Earth's plume tectonic regime ( with referenceGeotectonics, Vol. 37, 2, pp. 124-139.RussiaDike swarms
DS200412-1363
2004
Moralev, V.M.Moralev, V.M., Samsonov, M.D.A tectonic interpretation of petrochemical signatures of Proterozoic and Paleozoic alkaline rocks from the Porjaguba dyke swarm,Geotectonics, Vol. 38, 2, pp. 102-111.RussiaAlkalic
DS1994-0630
1994
Moralyov, V.M.Glukhovskii, M.Z., Moralyov, V.M., Zhavoron, V.E.Prospecting of diamond bearing kimberlites in Voronezh crystal massif using satellite images.(Russian)Soviet Journal of Remote, (Russian), Vol. 11, No. 6, pp. 1015-1026. # QA799RussiaRemote sensing, Voronezh
DS1992-1084
1992
Moran, A.E.Moran, A.E., Sisson, V.B., Leeman, W.P.Boron depletion during progressive metamorphism: implications for subduction processes #1Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 111, No. 2-4, July pp. 319-330Globalmetamorphism, Subduction processes
DS1992-1085
1992
Moran, A.E.Moran, A.E., Sisson, V.B., Leeman, W.P.Boron depletion during progressive metamorphism: implications for subduction processes #2Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 111, pp. 331-349New MexicoKilbourne Hole material, Tectonics
DS1991-1189
1991
Moran, C.J.Moran, C.J., McBratney, A.B.STRUCTURA: a C program for estimating attributes of two=phase heterogeneous structures digitized from planar specimensComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 17, No. 3, pp. 335-350GlobalProgram -STRUCTURA.
DS2000-0668
2000
Moran, J.Miskelly, N., Moran, J.Benefitting the investor by better resources - reserves disclosuresMin. Res. Ore Res. Est. AusIMM Guide, Mon. 23, pp. 661-6.AustraliaEconomics - geostatistics, ore reserves, exploration, Not specific to diamonds
DS201112-0701
2011
Moran, S.C.Moran, S.C., Newhall, C., Roman, D.C.Failed magmatic eruptions: late stage cessation of magma ascent.Bulletin of Volcanology, Vol. 73, 2, pp.MantleMagmatism
DS1994-1232
1994
Moran Zenteno, D.Moran Zenteno, D.The geology of the Mexican RepublicAmerican Association of Petroleum Geologists, No. 39, 150pMexicoBook -table of contents, Regional geology
DS201909-2076
2019
Morana, M.Piazzi, M., Morana, M., Coisson, M., Marone, F., Campione, M., Bindi, L., Jones, A.P., Ferrara, E., Alvaro, M.Multi-analytical characterization of Fe-rich magnetic inclusions in diamonds.Diamonds and Related Materials, in press available 36p. PdfAfrica, Ghanadeposit - Akwatia

Abstract: Magnetic mineral inclusions, as iron oxides or sulfides, occur quite rarely in natural diamonds. Nonetheless, they represent a key tool not only to unveil the conditions of formation of host diamonds, but also to get hints about the paleointensity of the geomagnetic field present at times of the Earth's history otherwise not accessible. This possibility is related to their capability to carry a remanent magnetization dependent on their magnetic history. However, comprehensive experimental studies on magnetic inclusions in diamonds have been rarely reported so far. Here we exploit X-ray diffraction, Synchrotron-based X-ray Tomographic Microscopy and Alternating Field Magnetometry to determine the crystallographic, morphological and magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic Fe-oxides entrapped in diamonds coming from Akwatia (Ghana). We exploit the methodology to estimate the natural remanence of the inclusions, associated to the Earth's magnetic field they experienced, and to get insights on the relative time of formation between host and inclusion systems. Furthermore, from the hysteresis loops and First Order Reversal Curves we determine qualitatively the anisotropy, size and domain state configuration of the magnetic grains constituting the inclusions.
DS201910-2292
2019
Morana, M.Piazzi, M., Morana, M., Coisson, M., Marone, F., Campione, M., Bindi, L., Jones, A.P., Ferrara, E., Alvaro, M.Multi-analytical characterization of Fe-rich magnetic inclusions in diamonds. Akwatiaresearchgate.net, June 18, 333866141 12p. PdfAfrica, Ghanadeposit - Akwatia

Abstract: Magnetic mineral inclusions, as iron oxides or sulfides, occur quite rarely in natural diamonds. Nonetheless, they represent a key tool not only to unveil the conditions of formation of host diamonds, but also to get hints about the paleointensity of the geomagnetic field present at times of the Earth's history otherwise not accessible. This possibility is related to their capability to carry a remanent magnetization dependent on their magnetic history. However, comprehensive experimental studies on magnetic inclusions in diamonds have been rarely reported so far. Here we exploit X-ray diffraction, Synchrotron-based X-ray Tomographic Microscopy and Alternating Field Magnetometry to determine the crystallographic, morphological and magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic Fe-oxides entrapped in diamonds coming from Akwatia (Ghana). We exploit the methodology to estimate the natural remanence of the inclusions, associated to the Earth's magnetic field they experienced, and to get insights on the relative time of formation between host and inclusion systems. Furthermore, from the hysteresis loops and First Order Reversal Curves we determine qualitatively the anisotropy, size and domain state configuration of the magnetic grains constituting the inclusions.
DS201912-2768
2019
Morana, M.Alvaro, M., Mazzucchelli, M.L., Angel, R.J., Murri, M., Campmenosi, N., Scambelluri, M., Nestola, F., Korsakov, A., Tomilenko, A.A., Marone, F., Morana, M.Fossil subduction recorded by quartz from the coesite stability field. GeobarometryGeology, in press, 5p. PdfRussia, Yakutiadeposit - Mir

Abstract: Metamorphic rocks are the records of plate tectonic processes whose reconstruction relies on correct estimates of the pressures and temperatures (P-T) experienced by these rocks through time. Unlike chemical geothermobarometry, elastic geobarometry does not rely on chemical equilibrium between minerals, so it has the potential to provide information on overstepping of reaction boundaries and to identify other examples of non-equilibrium behavior in rocks. Here we introduce a method that exploits the anisotropy in elastic properties of minerals to determine the unique P and T of entrapment from a single inclusion in a mineral host. We apply it to preserved quartz inclusions in garnet from eclogite xenoliths hosted in Yakutian kimberlites (Russia). Our results demonstrate that quartz trapped in garnet can be preserved when the rock reaches the stability field of coesite (the high-pressure and high-temperature polymorph of quartz) at 3 GPa and 850 °C. This supports a metamorphic origin for these xenoliths and sheds light on the mechanisms of craton accretion from a subducted crustal protolith. Furthermore, we show that interpreting P and T conditions reached by a rock from the simple phase identification of key inclusion minerals can be misleading.
DS1995-1298
1995
Morand, J.G.Morand, J.G., Winfield, G.J.New developments in executive compensationMining Tax Strategies, Held Feb. 1995, 67pCanadaTaxation, Economics
DS200812-0959
2008
MorardRicolleau, A., Fei, Cottrell, Watson, Zhang, Fiquet, Auzende, Roskosz, Morard, PrakapenkaNew constraints on the pyrolitic model under lower mantle conditions.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A795.MantleX-ray diffraction
DS201112-0099
2011
MorardBoulard, E., Menguyy, Auzende, Benzerara, Bureau, Antonangeli, Corgne, Morard, Siebert, Perrilat, GuyotExperimental investigation of the stability of Fe rich carbonates in the lower mantle.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.561.MantleCarbon reduced.... diamonds
DS201904-0719
2019
Morard, D.Boulard, E., Harmand, M., Guyot, F., Lelong, G., Morard, D., Cabaret, D., Boccato, S., Rosa, A.D., Briggs, R., Pascarelli, S., Fiquet, G.Ferrous iron under oxygen rich conditions in the deep mantle.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 46, 3, pp. 1348-1356.MantleUHP

Abstract: Iron oxides are important end-members of the complex materials that constitute the Earth's interior. Among them, FeO and Fe2O3 have long been considered as the main end-members of the ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) states of iron, respectively. All geochemical models assume that high oxygen concentrations are systematically associated to the formation of ferric iron in minerals. The recent discovery of O22- peroxide ions in a phase of chemical formula FeO2Hx stable under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions challenges this general concept. However, up to now, the valences of iron and oxygen in FeO2Hx have only been indirectly inferred from a structural analogy with pyrite FeS2. Here we compressed goethite (FeOOH), an Fe3+-bearing mineral, at lower mantle pressure and temperature conditions by using laser-heated diamond-anvil cells, and we probed the iron oxidation state upon transformation of FeOOH in the pressure-temperature stability field of FeO2Hx using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The data demonstrate that upon this transformation iron has transformed into ferrous Fe2+. Such reduced iron despite high oxygen concentrations suggests that our current views of oxidized and reduced species in the lower mantle of the Earth should be reconsidered.
DS201412-0151
2014
Morard, G.Crepisson, C., Morard, G., Bureau, H., Prouteau, G., Morizet, Y., Petitgirard, S., Sanloup, C.Magmas trapped at the continental lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 393, pp. 105-112.MantleBoundary, magmatism
DS201912-2808
2019
Morard, G.Oka, K., Hirose, K., Tagawa, S., Kidokoro, Y., Nakajima, Y., Kuwayama, Y., Morard, G., Coudurier, N., Fiquet, G.Melting in the Fe-FeO system to 204 GPa: implications for oxygen in Earth's core.American Mineralogist, Vol. 104, pp. 1603-1607.Mantlemelting

Abstract: We performed melting experiments on Fe-O alloys up to 204 GPa and 3500 K in a diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and determined the liquidus phase relations in the Fe-FeO system based on textural and chemical characterizations of recovered samples. Liquid-liquid immiscibility was observed up to 29 GPa. Oxygen concentration in eutectic liquid increased from >8 wt% O at 44 GPa to 13 wt% at 204 GPa and is extrapolated to be about 15 wt% at the inner core boundary (ICB) conditions. These results support O-rich liquid core, although oxygen c