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SDLRC - Scientific Articles all years by Author - V


The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation
The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation is compiled by Patricia Sheahan who publishes on a monthly basis a list of new scientific articles related to diamonds as well as media coverage and corporate announcementscalled the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service that is distributed as a free pdf to a list of followers. Pat has kindly agreed to allow her work to be made available as an online digital resource at Kaiser Research Online so that a broader community interested in diamonds and related geology can benefit. The references are for personal use information purposes only; when available a link is provided to an online location where the full article can be accessed or purchased directly. Reproduction of this compilation in part or in whole without permission from the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is strictly prohibited. Return to Diamond Resource Center
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Media/Corporate References by Name for all years
A B C D-Diam Diamonds Diamr+ E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Tips for Users
Posted/Published Reference CodesThe SDLRC provides 3 types of references identified in the reference code. DS for scientific article, DM for a media article, and DC for a corporate announcement. Consider DS0512-0001. The DS stands for "diamond scientific". 05 stands for 2005, the year the reference was posted. 12 represents the month the reference was posted. For all years prior to 2015 the default month is 12. -0001 is the reference's identifier and it does not mean anything. The number below the refence code, ie 2015, is the year the article was published. Note that the posted year may sometimes be later than the published year.
Sort OrderReferences are sorted by the "author" name and when the reference was posted to the compilation.
Most RecentIf the reference code is highlighted yellow, the reference was made available through the most recent monthly compilation of new literature. Use this to check out new references. When new references are posted, we make it our priority to track down an online link and obtain an abstract. With regard to older references, tracking down an abstract and an online link is a work in progress.
Link to external location of article: If the title has a link, it means we have found a location online where you can either retrieve the full article free, or purchase access to it. The Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is not a technical article procurement service; if you want a restricted article, you must deal directly with the vendor who controls the copyright to the article.
Searching this page for a specific term or authorIn your Firefox browser click Edit in the menu bar and then Find. In the Find box that shows up at the bottom of the web page enter your search term. Firefox will highlight all occurrences. This is particularly helpful when the author you are seeking was not the lead author by whom the compilation is sorted.
Sending or sharing a referenceThe left column (Posted/Published) has an embedded hyperlink for each reference. In Firefox, if you right click on it, you can obtain the link url for that reference's location within the page, which you can copy and paste into an email or any other document. You can also use the "share this link" option to tweet, facebook etc the link.
Author Index
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years - V
Posted/
Published
AuthorTitleSourceRegionKeywords
DS201810-2340
2018
V.G.krivovichev, Hazen, R.M. Krivovichev, V.G. Structural and chemical complexity of minerals: correlations and time evolution.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 30, 2, pp. 231-236.Mantlegeochemistry

Abstract: Correlations between chemical and structural complexities of minerals were analysed using a total of 4962 datasets on the chemical compositions and 3989 datasets on the crystal structures of minerals. The amounts of structural and chemical Shannon information per atom and per unit cell or formula unit were calculated using the approach proposed by Krivovichev with no Hcorrection for the minerals with unknown H positions. Statistical analysis shows that there are strong and positive correlations (R 2 > 0.95) between the chemical and structural complexities and the number of different chemical elements in a mineral. Analysis of relations between chemical and structural complexities provides strong evidence that there is an overall trend of increasing structural complexity with the increasing chemical complexity. Following Hazen, four groups of minerals were considered that represent four eras of mineral evolution: "ur-minerals", minerals from chondritic meteorites, Hadean minerals, and minerals of the post-Hadean era. The analysis of mean chemical and structural complexities for the four groups demonstrate that both are gradually increasing in the course of mineral evolution. The increasing complexity follows an overall passive trend: more complex minerals form with the passage of geological time, yet the simpler ones are not replaced. The observed correlations between the chemical and structural complexities understood in terms of Shannon information suggest that, at a first approximation, chemical differentiation is a major force driving the increase of complexity of minerals in the course of geological time. New levels of complexity and diversifcation observed in mineral evolution are achieved through the chemical differentiation, which favours local concentrations of particular rare elements and creation of new geochemical environments.
DS1989-0832
1989
Vaag, O.V.Kryukov, A.V., Vaag, O.V., Mkrtychyan, A.K., et al.New pyrope bearing carbonate collector in the southern part of the TunguskasynecliseSoviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 30, No. 4, pp. 47-54RussiaGarnets, Petrology
DS1999-0760
1999
Vaan der Voo, R.Vaan der Voo, R., Spakman, W., Bijwaaard, H.Tehyan subducted slabs under IndiaEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 171, No. 1, Aug. 15, pp. 7-20.IndiaSubduction - slabs
DS1991-0625
1991
Vaasjoki, M.Gulson, B.L., Solomon, M., Vaasjoki, M., Both, R.Tasmania adrift?Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 38, pp. 249-250TasmaniaTectonics, Structure
DS1991-0661
1991
Vaasjoki, M.Hanski, E., Huhma, H., Smolkin, V.F., Vaasjoki, M.The age of the ferropicritic volcanics and comagmatic nickel-bearing intrusion sat Pechenga, Kola Peninsula, U.S.S.R.Bulletin. Geological Society Finland, Vol. 62, pt. 2, pp. 123-133FinlandNickel, Pechenga
DS1995-0070
1995
Vaccari, N.E.Astini, R.A., Benedetto, J.L., Vaccari, N.E.The early Paleozoic evolution on the Argentine Pre Cordillera as a Laurentian rifted, drifted and collided terrane: a geodynamic model.Gsa Bulletin., Vol. 107, No. 3, pp. 253-73.ArgentinaTectonics
DS1995-0071
1995
Vaccari, N.E.Astini, R.A., Benedetto, J.L., Vaccari, N.E.The early Paleozoic evolution of the Argentine Pre Cordillera as a Laurentian rifted, drifted collidedGeological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin, Vol. 107, No. 3, March pp. 253-273ArgentinaTerrane, Geodynamics
DS2001-0133
2001
VaccaroBrigatti, M.F., Medici, L., Poppi, VaccaroCrystal chemistry of trioctahedral micas 1M from the Alto Paranaiba igneous provinceCanadian Mineralogist, Vol. 39, No. 5, Oct. pp. 1333-46.BrazilAlkaline rocks, Carbonatite
DS200912-0783
2009
Vaccaro, A.Vaccaro, A.A bourse, of course Toron to based diamond bourse launches but remains addresss-less.Diamonds in Canada Magazine, Northern Miner, June, pp. 17-18.CanadaDiamond bourse - brief overview
DS1996-0175
1996
Vaccaro, C.Brigatti, M.F., Medici, L., Saccani, E., Vaccaro, C.Crystal chemistry and petrologic significance of iron rich phlogopite From the Tapira carbonatite complex.American Mineralogist, Vol. 81, July-Aug. pp. 913-927.BrazilCarbonatite, Deposit -Tapira
DS200412-0117
2004
Vaccaro, C.Beccaluva, L., Bianchini, G., Bonadiman, C., Siena, F., Vaccaro, C.Coexisting anorogenic and subduction related metasomatism in mantle xenoliths from the Betic Cordillera ( southern Spain). TallaLithos, Vol. 75, 1-2, July pp. 67-87.Europe, SpainSubduction, trace element fingerprinting, petrogenetic
DS1999-0761
1999
Vacher, P.Vacher, P., Spakman, W., Wortel, M.J.R.Numerical tests on the seismic visibility of metastable minerals at subduction zones.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 170, No. 3, Julu. 15, pp. 335-MantleGeophysics - seismics, Mineralogy
DS2001-1166
2001
Vacher, P.Trampert, J., Vacher, P., Vlaar, N.Sensitivities of seismic velocities to temperature, pressure and composition in the lower mantle.Physical Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 124, No. 3-4, Aug. pp. 255-67.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS2003-0198
2003
Vacher, P.Cammarano, F., Goes, S., Vacher, P., Giardini, D.Inferring upper mantle temperatures from seismic velocitiesPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 138, 3-4, pp. 197-222.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS2003-1099
2003
Vacher, P.Poupinet, G., Arndt, N., Vacher, P.Seismic tomography beneath stable tectonic regions and the origin and composition ofEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 212, 1-2, pp. 89-101.MantleTectonics
DS200412-0231
2004
Vacher, P.Bruneton, M., Pedersen, H.A., Vacher, P., Kukkonenen, I.T., Arndt, N.T., Funke, S., Friederich, W., Farra, V.Layered lithospheric mantle in the central Baltic Shield from surface waves and xenolith analysis.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 226, 1-2, pp. 41-52.Baltic Shield, Norway, Finland, RussiaGeophysics - seismics, xenoliths
DS200412-0255
2003
Vacher, P.Cammarano, F., Goes, S., Vacher, P., Giardini, D.Inferring upper mantle temperatures from seismic velocities.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 138, 3-4, pp. 197-222.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-1574
2003
Vacher, P.Poupinet, G., Arndt, N., Vacher, P.Seismic tomography beneath stable tectonic regions and the origin and composition of the continental lithospheric mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 212, 1-2, pp. 89-101.MantleGeophysics - seismics Tectonics
DS200912-0795
2009
Vacher, P.Verhoeven, O., MacQuet, A., Vacher, P., Rivoldini, A., Menvielle, M., Arrial, P.A., Chiblet, G., Tarits,P.Constraints on thermal state and composition of the Earth's lower mantle from electromagnetic impedances and seismic data.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 114, B3, B03302.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS1960-0631
1966
Vachette, M.Bardet, M.G., Vachette, M.Determination of the Ages of West African Kimberlites and An Interpretation from the Dates of the Different Diamondifero united States Events in the World.International Symposium AFR. GEOL. 3RD., CGLU, Report No. 6660, 88P.Sierra Leone, West Africa, Guinea, Central African RepublicGeochronology
DS1960-0632
1966
Vachette, M.Bardet, M.G., Vachette, M.Age Determinations of Kimberlites of West Africa and an Attempt to Interpret the Dating of Various Diamondiferous Occurrences in the World.French Geological Survey (BRGM) Report, No. 66, 59P.West Africa, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ivory CoastGeology, Geochronology
DS1993-1637
1993
Vacquier, V.Vacquier, V.Large hot mantle plumes create oceanic lithosphereAmerican Geophysical Union, EOS, supplement Abstract Volume, October, Vol. 74, No. 43, October 26, abstract p. 598.MantleOceanic lithosphere, Mantle plumes
DS1998-1504
1998
Vacquier, V.Vacquier, V.A theory of the origin of the Earth's internal heatTectonophysics, Vol. 291, No. 1-4, June 15, pp. 1-8.MantleCore, Melt
DS201709-2009
2017
Vaczi, T.Kaldos, R., Guzmics, T., Vaczi, T., Berkesi, M., Dankhazi, Z., Szabo, C.3D Raman mapping of melt inclusions in Kerimasi alkaline and carbonatite rocks.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Africa, Tanzaniadeposit - Kerimasi

Abstract: The use of confocal HR-Raman mapping opens new perspectives in studying melt inclusions. Our major goal is to show advantages of this powerful technique through case studies carried out on alkaline and carbonatite rocks of Kerimasi volcano (East African Rift). Raman spectrometry is one of the few methods that enable qualitative nondestructive analysis of both solid and fluid phases, therefore it is widely used for the identification of minerals and volatiles within melt and fluid inclusions. For better understanding of petrogenetic processes in carbonatite systems it is essential to find all mineral phases in the melt inclusions trapped in intrusive or volcanic rocks. Previous Raman spectroscopic point measurements in melt inclusions revealed the presence of daughter phases (e.g. alkali carbonates, hydrocarbonates) [1] but utilizing Raman mapping on them even provides information on their size, shape and distribution. Raman 3D mapping were applied on unheated multiphase melt inclusions of intrusive and volcanic rocks with high spatial resolution (XY plane < 1 micron) with a depth scan (Z step) as low as 0.5 micron at every XY point, parallel to the surface of the host minerals. Analysis below the surface of the host mineral is especially useful because we can avoid the loss of sensitive (e.g. water soluble) phases and contamination of the melt inclusions, moreover unexposed melt inclusions are suitable for further analytical measurements (e.g. EPMA, microthermometry). By scanning multiple layers 2D or 3D Raman images can be gained, thus we can get an insight into post entrapment crystallization processes that contribute to a more precise description of the evolution of alkaline and carbonatite rocks.
DS201503-0147
2014
Vadaszi, E.Hainschwang, T., Notari, F., Vadaszi, E.The Rhodesian Star: an exceptional asteriated diamond.The Journal of Gemmology, Vol. 34, 4, pp. 306-315.Africa, ZimbabweDiamonds notable
DS201911-2526
2019
Vadillo, I.Giampouras, M., Garrido, C.J., Zwicker, J., Vadillo, I., Smrzka, D., Bach, W., Peckmann, J., Jemenez, P., Benavente, J., Garcia-Ruiz, J.M.Geochemistry and mineralogy of serpentinization driven hyperalkaline springs in the Ronda peridotite.Lithos, doi 10.1016/j.lithos.2019.105215, 75p. PdfEurope, Spaindeposit - Ronda

Abstract: We present a detailed study of the water geochemistry, mineralogy and textures in serpentinization-related hyperalkaline springs in the Ronda peridotites. Ronda waters can be classified into hyperalkaline fluids and river waters that are broadly similar to Ca2+-OH- and Mg2+-HCO3- water types described in serpentinite-hosted alkaline springs elsewhere. At the discharge sites of the fluids (fractures or human made outlets) and ponds along the fluid flow paths, the fluids are hyperalkaline (10.9 < pH < 12) and characterized by low Mg and high Na, K, Ca, and Cl concentrations. River waters, occurring near the spring sites, are mildly alkaline (8.5 < pH < 8.9) and enriched in Mg and DIC compared to Na, K, Ca and Cl. The chemistry of Ronda Mg-HCO3 river waters is likely due to the hydrolysis of ferromagnesian peridotite minerals in equilibrium with the atmosphere by infiltrated meteoric water and shallow groundwater in the serpentinized peridotite. The Ronda Ca-OH hyperalkaline fluids are generated by the combination of low temperature serpentinization reactions from infiltrated surface Mg-HCO3 river waters —or Ca-HCO3 waters from near karst aquifers— and deep carbonate precipitation isolated from atmospheric CO2. Mass balance calculations indicate that the weathering of Ca-bearing peridotite silicates such as diopside is a feasible source of Ca in Ronda Ca-OH hyperalkaline fluids; however, it requires steady-state dissolution rates substantially greater than those determined experimentally. Travertine, crystalline crusts and sediment deposits are the main types of solid precipitates observed in Ronda hyperalkaline spring sites. Calcite and aragonite, minor dolomite and Mg-Al-rich clays are the main minerals in the spring sites. As illustrated in the Baños del Puerto spring site, (i) calcite-dominated precipitation is due to hyperalkaline fluid uptake of atmospheric CO2 during discharge, and (ii) aragonite-dominated precipitation is due to mixing of Ca-OH hyperalkaline fluids with Mg- HCO3 river waters. Aragonite and dolomite contents increase away from the springs and toward the river waters that uniquely reflects the effect of Mg ions on the precipitation of aragonite versus calcite. Other potential factors controlling the precipitation of these CaCO3 polymorphs are the Mg/Ca ratio, the CO2 content, and the temperature of the fluids. Dolomite forms during lithification of travertine due to periodic flooding of river water combined with subsequent evaporation.
DS201809-2107
2018
Vadlamani, R.Vadlamani, R., Bera, M.K., Samata, A., Mukherjee, S., Adhikari, A., Sarkar, A.Oxygen, Sr and Nd isotopic evidence from kyanite eclogite xenoliths ( KL-2 pipe, Wajrakarur) for pre 1.1 Ga mantle metasomatism in eastern Dharwar SCLM.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractIndiadeposit - KL-2

Abstract: Kyanite-eclogite xenoliths from Wajrakarur are considered as remnants of subducted ocean-floor crust. Here trace element concentration and isotopic data are presented in garnet (Grt) and kyanite (Ky) from xenoliths KL-2 E1-E4, characterized by. We use the precise 87Sr/86Sr host kimberlite groundmass perovskite ratio (0.70312-0.70333, as a proxy for the extent of kimberlitic magma infiltration at 1.1 Ga. The xenolithic Grt and Cr-rich (upto 1506 ppm) Ky have more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr values than kimberlite, at 1.1 Ga, of 0.703829-0.705203 and 0.703811-0.704502, respectively. Furthermore, the Grt and Ky 143Nd/144Nd ratios, at 1.1 Ga, are 0.509321-0.511372 and 0.510951-0.511156, respectively, and are distinctly lower than those of the host kimberlite (0.511870-0.512290). This indicates that the infiltration of kimberlitic fluid has not altered the 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios in the Grt and Ky, and therefore their isotope compositions must be inherited and predate the kimberlite magma generation event at 1.1 Ga. Trace elements in Grt and Ky indicate extreme metasomatism (Sr in Grt 104-296 ppm, in Ky 672-8713 ppm [limit Sr<2ppm] and Nb in Grt 0.64-1.78 ppm, in Ky 1.7-4.54 ppm [limit Nb<0.5ppm]). The xenoliths underwent at least one major melting event inferred from extreme depletions in Re, Os and 177Os/178Os ratios [5]. Their mantle-like d18O values (Grt 5.3-5.4‰, Ky 5.3-5.9‰), positive Eu anomalies in both Grt and Ky (similar to Group 1 HREE-depleted garnets of) suggests that the protolith likely was a chromite-bearing leucogabbro, emplaced as a high-pressure cumulate at the crust-mantle boundary, which was later eclogitized due to deep-seated subduction and underwent episodes of extreme melting and metasomatism before 1.1 Ga and at least before 1.7 Ga, as inferred from their youngest Re depletion dates.
DS201909-2100
2019
Vadlamani, R.Vadlamani, R., Bera, M.K., Samanta, A., Mukherjee, S., Adhikari, A., Sarkar, A.Oxygen, Sr and Nd isotopic evidence from kyanite-eclogite xenoliths ( KL-2 pipe, Wajrakarur) for pre- 1.1 Ga mantle metasomatism in eastern Dharwar SCLM.Goldschmidt2019, 1p. AbstractIndiadeposit - KL-2

Abstract: Kyanite-eclogite xenoliths from Wajrakarur are considered as remnants of subducted ocean-floor crust [1]. Here trace element concentration and isotopic data are presented in garnet (Grt) and kyanite (Ky) from xenoliths KL-2 E1-E4, characterized by [2]). We use the precise 87Sr/86Sr host kimberlite groundmass perovskite ratio (0.70312-0.70333, [3]) as a proxy for the extent of kimberlitic magma infiltration at 1.1 Ga. The xenolithic Grt and Cr-rich (upto 1506 ppm) Ky have more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr values than kimberlite, at 1.1 Ga, of 0.703829-0.705203 and 0.703811-0.704502, respectively. Furthermore, the Grt and Ky 143Nd/144Nd ratios, at 1.1 Ga, are 0.509321-0.511372 and 0.510951-0.511156, respectively, and are distinctly lower than those of the host kimberlite (0.511870-0.512290, [4]). This indicates that the infiltration of kimberlitic fluid has not altered the 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios in the Grt and Ky, and therefore their isotope compositions must be inherited and predate the kimberlite magma generation event at 1.1 Ga. Trace elements in Grt and Ky indicate extreme metasomatism (Sr in Grt 104-296 ppm, in Ky 672-8713 ppm [limit Sr<2ppm] and Nb in Grt 0.64-1.78 ppm, in Ky 1.7-4.54 ppm [limit Nb<0.5ppm]). The xenoliths underwent at least one major melting event inferred from extreme depletions in Re, Os and 177Os/178Os ratios [5]. Their mantle-like d18O values (Grt 5.3-5.4‰, Ky 5.3-5.9‰), positive Eu anomalies in both Grt and Ky (similar to Group 1 HREE-depleted garnets of [1]) suggests that the protolith likely was a chromite-bearing leucogabbro, emplaced as a high-pressure cumulate at the crust-mantle boundary, which was later eclogitized due to deep-seated subduction and underwent episodes of extreme melting and metasomatism before 1.1 Ga and at least before 1.7 Ga, as inferred from their youngest Re depletion dates [5].
DS1986-0657
1986
Vagahov, V.I.Prokopchuk, B.I., Vagahov, V.I.From uncut diamonds to cut diamonds.(Russian)Nedra Moscow, (Russian), 126pRussiaDiamond cutting
DS1975-0303
1976
Vaganov, V.I.Kaminskiy, F.V., Vaganov, V.I.Petrologic Reasons for Possible Diamond Occurrence in Alpine Type Ultramafics.Izvestiya Akad. Nauk Sssr, Geol. Ser., 1976, No. 06, PP. 35-47.RussiaPetrology, Diamond Genesis
DS1980-0280
1980
Vaganov, V.I.Perchuk, L.L., Vaganov, V.I.Petrochemical and Thermodynamic Evidence on the Origin of Kimberlites.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 72, PP. 219-228.South AfricaKimberlite Genesis
DS1983-0612
1983
Vaganov, V.I.Vaganov, V.I., Varlamov, V.A.Structural position and conditions of formation of Kimberlites in Siberian and American platforms. (Russian)Soviet Geology, (Russian), No. 3, pp. 86-89RussiaGeotectonics
DS1983-0613
1983
Vaganov, V.I.Vaganov, V.I., Varlamov, V.A.Structural Position and Condition of Formation of Kimberlites in the Siberian and African Platforms.Soviet Geology, No. 3, PP. 86-89.Russia, South Africa, AfricaTectonics, Structure, Genesis
DS1992-1405
1992
Vaganov, V.I.Simakov, S.K., Vaganov, V.I.New petrological criteria for preliminary estimation of diamond content of deep mantle rocks.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 323, No. 3, pp. 531-534.RussiaKimberlites, Petrology
DS1995-1949
1995
Vaganov, V.I.Vaganov, V.I.Petrological features of Diamondiferous magmatismProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 648.Australia, ArkansasPetrology, Kimberlite magmatism
DS1995-1950
1995
Vaganov, V.I.Vaganov, V.I., Golubev, Y.K., et al.Mineralogical indicators of presence of alkali ultrapotassic potentially diamondiferous Mesozoic...Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk. (Russian), Vol. 341, No. 3, March pp. 373-376.RussiaEast European Platform, Ultrapotassics
DS1995-1951
1995
Vaganov, V.I.Vaganov, V.I., Varlamov, V.A., Feldman, A.A., et al.Diamondiferous magmatism: miner agenetic taxons and prediction prospectingmethods.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 649.RussiaMineralogy, Prospecting
DS1996-1455
1996
Vaganov, V.I.Vaganov, V.I., et al.Mineralogical indicators for the presence of Mesozoic alkali-ultrabasic potentially diamond bearing rocks...Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 344 No. 7, August pp. 42-46.Russia, East EuropeanEast European Platform, Mineralogy
DS1994-1987
1994
Vagarali, S.S.Zhang, S.G., Zvanut, M.E., Vohra, Y.K., Vagarali, S.S.Nitrogen in the isotopically enriched C-12 diamondAppl. Phys. Letters, Vol. 65, No. 23, Dec. 5, pp. 2951-2957.GlobalDiamond morphology, Nitrogen
DS200912-0478
2009
Vaidya, A.Masun, K., Sthapak, A.V., Singh, A., Vaidya, A., Krishna, C.Exploration history and geology of the Diamondiferous ultramafic Saptarshi intrusions, Madhya Pradesh, India.Lithos, In press available, 37p.IndiaBunder project area
DS1975-0644
1977
Vaidyanadhan, R.Vaidyanadhan, R.Recent Advances in Geomorphic Studies of Peninsular India: A Review.India Journal of Earth Sciences, S. Roy Volume., PP. 13-35.IndiaGeomorphology
DS1950-0434
1958
Vail, J.R.Vail, J.R.The Dembe Divula Complex (the Nuanetsi Igneous Complex)Leeds University Research Institute of African Geology Annual Report, APP. C, Vol. 1C, PP. 7-8.Tanzania, East AfricaGeology, Tectonics
DS1950-0510
1959
Vail, J.R.Vail, J.R.The Dembe Divula Complex ( the Nuanetsi Igneous Axis)Leeds University Research Institute of African Geology Annual Report, APP. C, Vol. 4B, PP. 27-29.Tanzania, East AfricaGeology, Tectonics
DS1960-0028
1960
Vail, J.R.Cox, K.G., Johnson, R.L., Monkman, L.J., Vail, J.R.Progress of Investigations in Southeast Southern RhodesiaLeeds University Research Institute of African Geology Annual Report, APP. C, Vol. 4, PP. 26-28.ZimbabweGeology, Related Rocks
DS1960-0103
1960
Vail, J.R.Vail, J.R.Geology of the Late Karroo Granitic Complex of the Dembe Divula Mateke Hills Nuanetsi District, Southern Rhodesia.Leeds: Ph.d. Thesis, University Leeds, ZimbabweRegional Studies
DS1960-0135
1961
Vail, J.R.Cox, K.G., Vail, J.R., Monkman, L.J., Johnson, R.L.Karroo Igneous Activity and Tectonics in Southeast Southern Rhodesia.Nature., Vol. 190, No. 4770, P. 40.; P. 77.ZimbabweGeology, Related Rocks, Tectonics
DS1960-0306
1962
Vail, J.R.Vail, J.R.Late Karroo Intrusion Breccias from the Nuanetsi District Of Southern Rhodesia, with Special Reference to the Granitic Complex of Dembe Divula.Geological Society of South Africa Transactions, Vol. 65, No. 2, PP. 139-152.ZimbabweGeology, Related Rocks
DS1960-0504
1964
Vail, J.R.Vail, J.R.Mesozoic Igneous Activity in Central AfricaInternational Geological Congress 22ND., (NEW DELHI), PP. 245-246.Central AfricaGeology
DS1960-0505
1964
Vail, J.R.Vail, J.R.Summary of Results of Geochronological InvestigationsLeeds University Research Institute of African Geology Annual Report 8th., Vol. 5A, PP. 50-52.South Africa, Central AfricaGeochronology
DS1960-0506
1964
Vail, J.R.Vail, J.R.Mesozoic Igneous Rocks in Southern Africa, and the Dating Of the Magmatic Activity.Leeds University Research Institute of African Geology Annual Report 8th., Vol. 3A, PP. 27-29.South Africa, Central AfricaGeochronology, Geology
DS1960-0754
1966
Vail, J.R.Vail, J.R.Dembe-divula a Late Karroo Granite Gabbro Ring Complex in The Nuanetsi Igneous Province of Southern Rhodesia.Geological Society of South Africa Transactions, Vol. 69, PP. 71-85.ZimbabweGeology, Related Rocks
DS1960-0890
1967
Vail, J.R.Vail, J.R.Distribution of Non-orogenic Igneous Complexes in Southern Rhodesia and Their Tectonic Setting.Leeds University Research Institute of African Geology Annual Report, Vol. 2C, PP. 33-35.ZimbabweRelated Rocks, Tectonics
DS1984-0179
1984
Vail, J.R.Cahen, L., Snelling, N.J., Delhal, J., Vail, J.R.The Geochronology and Evolution of AfricaOxford Clarendon Press, 512P.Africa, South Africa, West Africa, Central Africa, East AfricaKimberley, Tectonics, Structure, Regional Geology
DS1989-1534
1989
Vail, J.R.Vail, J.R.Ring complexes and related rocks in AfricaJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 8, No. 1, pp. 19-40AfricaTectonics, Ring complexes
DS1998-0091
1998
Vail, P.R.Baum, G.R., Vail, P.R.A new foundation for stratigraphy...... sequence model and geophysicsGeotimes, Vol. 43, No. 11, Nov. pp. 31-35.MantleStratigraphy, General - brief history ( not specific to diamonds)
DS200412-0331
2004
Vaillancourt, C.Ciesielski, A., Marchand, J., Vaillancourt, C.Volcanic hosted diamonds from northern Ontario: a non-kimberlitic origin.Geological Association of Canada Abstract Volume, May 12-14, SS14P02, p. 274.abstractCanada, OntarioVolcaniclastic breccias
DS200512-1113
2004
Vaillancourt, C.Vaillancourt, C., Ayer, J.A., Zubowski, S.M., Kamo, S.L.Synthesis and timing of Archean geology and diamond bearing rocks in the Michipicotem greenstone belt: Menzies and Musquash Townships.Ontario Geological Survey Report of Activities 2004, No. 6, pp. 6-1-6-8.Canada, OntarioLamprophyre, Moet, Festival Pele Mountain
DS200612-1457
2005
Vaillancourt, C.Vaillancourt, C., Ayer, J.A., Hamilton, M.A.Project 03-002. Synthesis of Archean geology and diamond bearing rocks in the Michipicoten Greenstone Belt: results from microdiamond extraction and geochronology.Ontario Geological Survey Summary of Fieldwork 2005, O.F. 6172, pp. 8-1-13.Canada, Ontario, WawaGeochronology, geochemsirty
DS2003-1403
2003
Vaillencourt, C.Vaillencourt, C., Wilson, A.C., Dessureau, G.R.Synthesis of Archean geology and diamond bearing rocks in the MichipicotenOntario Geological Survey Open File, No. 6120, pp. 9 1-11.Ontario, WawaPetrology - Band-Ore, Pele, Dia Bras, Spider, Oasis, Du
DS200412-2030
2003
Vaillencourt, C.Vaillencourt, C., Wilson, A.C., Dessureau, G.R.Synthesis of Archean geology and diamond bearing rocks in the Michipicoten greenstone belt, Geology of Menzies Township.Ontario Geological Survey Open File, No. 6120, pp. 9 1-11.Canada, Ontario, WawaPetrology - Band-Ore, Pele, Dia Bras, Spider, Oasis, Du
DS202011-2065
2020
Vainer, S.Vainer, S., Matmon, A., Erel, A.J., Hidy, A.J., Crouvi, O., De Wit, M., Geller, Y.Landscape responses to intraplate deformation in the Kalahari constrained by sediment provenance and chronology in the Okavango Basin.Basin Research, in press available Africa, South Africageomorphology

Abstract: The structural depression that occupies the Okavango Basin in southern Africa comprises a depo-centre within the intracratonic Kalahari Basin where sediments of the Cenozoic Kalahari Group have accumulated. The Okavango Basin has been formed due to stretching and subsidence at an area of diffused deformation, southwestwards to the main East African Rift System (EARS). Sediments from two full Kalahari Group sequences, located on opposite sides of the Gumare Fault that forms a major fault within the Okavango Basin, were studied to determine their provenance and chronology. Terrestrial Cosmogenic Nuclide (TCN) 26Al/10Be burial dating was used to constrain a chronostratigraphical framework, and Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic ratios combined with geochemical and sedimentological analyses were applied to track the source areas of the sediments.Results indicate the following sequence of basin filling: (a) Accumulation between ca. 4-3 Ma during which the currently downthrown (southern) block received a mixture of sediments mostly from the Choma-Kalomo, Ghanzi-Chobe, and Damara terranes, and possibly from the Lufilian Belt and/or Karoo basalts during earlier stages of deposition. Simultaneously, the upthrown (northern) block received sediments from more distant Archean sources in the Zimbabwe and/or Kasai cratons, (b) Hiatus in sedimentation occurred at both sites between ca. 3-2 Ma, (c) Sediments on both sides of the Gumare Fault share a similar source (Angolan Shield) with minor distinct contributions to the downthrown block from the Kasai Craton and local sources input to the upthrown block, and (d) Regional distribution of aeolian sand since at least 1 Ma. The change in source areas is attributed to rearrangements of the drainage systems that were probably linked to vertical crustal movements on the margins of the Okavango Basin. The tectonically induced morphodynamics controlled the landscape evolution of the endorheic basin where vast lakes, wetlands and salt pans have developed through time.
DS2000-0970
2000
Vaisanen, M.Vaisanen, M., Mantarri, I., Kriegsman, L.M., Holtta, P.Tectonic setting of post collisional magmatism in the Paleoproterozoic Svecofennian Orogen, southwest Finland.Lithos, Vol. 54, No. 1-2, Oct. pp. 63-81.FinlandTectonics, mantle enrichment, magmatism
DS2002-1628
2002
Vaisanen, M.Vaisanen, M., Manttari, I., Holtta, P.Svecofennian magmatic and metamorphic evolution in southwestern FIn land as revealed by U Pb zircon SIMS geochronology.Precambrian Research, Vol. 116, No.1-2, pp. 111-27.FinlandMagmatism, Geochronology
DS202008-1405
2020
Vaisanen, M.Kara, J., Vaisanen, M., Heinonen, J.S., Lahaye, Y., O'Brien, H., Huhma, H.Tracing arcologites in the Paleoproteroic era - a shift from 1.88 Ga calc-alkaline to 1.86 Ga high-Nb and adakite-like magmatism in central Fennoscandian shield.Lithos, in press available, 68p. PdfEurope, Fennoscandiaalkaline
DS200612-0757
2005
Vaittinen, K.Lahti, I., Korja, T., Kaikkonen, P., Vaittinen, K.Decomposition analysis of the BEAR magnetotelluric data: implications for the upper mantle conductivity in the Fennoscandian Shield.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 163, 3, Dec. pp. 900-914.Europe, Fennoscandia, Finland, SwedenGeophysics - magnetotelluric
DS201212-0742
2012
Vaittinen, K.Vaittinen, K., Korja, T., Kaikkonen, P., Lahti, I., Smirnov, M.Yu.High resolution magnetotelluric studies of the Archean Proterozoic border zone in the Fennoscandian shield, FinlandGeophysical Journal International, inpress availableEurope, FinlandGeophysics, magetics
DS200912-0752
2009
Vajda, P.Tenzer, R., Hamayun, K., Vajda, P.Global maps of the CRUST 2.0 crustal components stripped gravity disturbances.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 114, B05408.MantleGeophysics - discontinuity
DS202009-1671
2020
Vakeva, S.Tiira, T., Janik, T., Skrzynik, T., Komminaho, K., Heinonen, A., Veikkolainen, T., Vakeva, S., Korja, A.Full scale crustal interpretation of Kokkola-Kymi ( KOKKY) seismic profile, Fennoscandian shield.Pure and Applied Geophysics, Vol. 177, 8, pp. 3775-3795. pdfEurope, Finlandgeophysics - seismics

Abstract: The Kokkola-Kymi Deep Seismic Sounding profile crosses the Fennoscandian Shield in northwest-southeast (NW-SE) direction from Bothnian belt to Wiborg rapakivi batholith through Central Finland granitoid complex (CFGC). The 490-km refraction seismic line is perpendicular to the orogenic strike in Central Finland and entirely based on data from quarry blasts and road construction sites in years 2012 and 2013. The campaign resulted in 63 usable seismic record sections. The average perpendicular distance between these and the profile was 14 km. Tomographic velocity models were computed with JIVE3D program. The velocity fields of the tomographic models were used as starting points in the ray tracing modelling. Based on collected seismic sections a layer-cake model was prepared with the ray tracing package SEIS83. Along the profile, upper crust has an average thickness of 22 km average, and P-wave velocities (Vp) of 5.9-6.2 km/s near the surface, increasing downward to 6.25-6.40 km/s. The thickness of middle crust is 14 km below CFGC, 20 km in SE and 25 km in NW, but Vp ranges from 6.6 to 6.9 km/s in all parts. Lower crust has Vp values of 7.35-7.4 km/s and lithospheric mantle 8.2-8.25 km/s. Moho depth is 54 km in NW part, 63 km in the middle and 43 km in SW, yet a 55-km long section in the middle does not reveal an obvious Moho reflection. S-wave velocities vary from 3.4 km/s near the surface to 4.85 km/s in upper mantle, consistently with P-wave velocity variations. Results confirm the previously assumed high-velocity lower crust and depression of Moho in central Finland.
DS1960-0878
1967
Vakhrushev, V.A.Sobolev, N.V., Vakhrushev, V.A.Sulfides in Pyrope Peridotites in Kimberlites from YakutiaZap. Vses. Miner. Obshch., PT. 96, No. 4, P. 450.RussiaBlank
DS1970-0439
1971
Vakhrushev, V.A.Vakhrushev, V.A., Sobolev, N.V.Sulfidic Formations in Deep Xenoliths from Kimberlites in Yakutia.International Geology Review, Vol. 15, No. 1, PP. 103-110.RussiaBlank
DS1989-1535
1989
Vakil, H.B.Vakil, H.B., Banholze.., W.F., Kehl, R.J.An experimental investigation of the isotope effect in the CVD growth ofdiamondsMater. Res. Bulletin, Vol. 24, No. 6, June pp. 733-738GlobalCVD Diamond morphology, Diamond synthetic
DS200612-0376
2006
Vaksman, V.L.Eppelbaum, L.V., Vaksman, V.L., Kuznetsov, Sazonova, Smirnov, Surkov, Bezlepkin, Katz, Lorotaeva, BelovitDiscovery of microdiamonds and associated minerals in the Makhtesh Ramon Canyon (Negrev Desert) Israel.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 407, 2, Feb-Mar. pp. 202-204.Europe, IsraelMicrodiamonds
DS201703-0401
2016
Vaksman, V.L.Eppelbaum, L.V., Vaksman, V.L.Makhtesh Ramon Complex deposit ( southern Israel) - a window to the upper mantle.International Journal of Mining Science, Vol. 3, 1, pp. 1-28.Europe, IsraelKimberlite, Lamproite

Abstract: An integrated analysis of several regional geological and geophysical factors allowed to select the Makhtesh Ramon area (northern Negev, Israel) for sesarching diamondiferous associations. The most important regional factor is the Middle Cretaceous maximum in the development of upper mantle hot spots brightly appearing in this area. Analysis of magnetic (paleomagnetic), self-potential and ionselective data inambogously indicate presence of some bodies possibly having kimberlite (lamproite) origin occurring at small depths (8 - 50 m) in the western Makhtesh Ramon. Repeated erosion processes in the area caused removing most part of sedimentary associations that significantly simplified the processes of mineral sampling and rock withdrawn for geochemical and petrological analyses. Comprehensive mineralogical analyses enabled to detect the following minerals-satellites of diamond associations: chrome-diopside, orange garnet, bright-crimson pyrope, picroilmenite, moissanite, corundum, black spinel, olivine, anatase and tourmaline (including black samples). These minerals do not rolled and oxidized that is an additional evidence of the neighboring occurrence of the indigenous rocks. Data of electronic microscopy show that the grains of (1) picroilmenite and (2) pyrope contain, respectively: (1) cobalt, chrome, magnesium and nickel and (2) chrome, magnesium and aluminum. This indicates that both picroilmenite and pyrope have the hyper-abyssal origin that also is an indicator of the possible occurring of diamondiferous pipes. List of secondary-importance satellite minerals includes feldspars, pyroxenes, magnetite, hematite, ilmenite, galenite, pyrite, limonite, mica, chromite, leucoxene, zircon, rutile, etc. These minerals (by their considering with the first group) are also indicators of diamond-bearing of the studied area. Identification of small plates of gold and silver as well as considerable traces of La, Ce, Th, Nb and Ta (Rare Earth Elements) also may be associated with the nearest kimberlite rock occurrence. The total number of recognized microdiamonds consists of more than 300 units; five diamonds (> 1 mm) were identified (sizes of the most largest crystals are 1.2 and 1.35 mm). Thus, on the basis of a set of geological-geophysical factors and identification of the mentioned minerals we can definitely estimate that the Makhtesh Ramon area is perspective for discovering diamondiferous rocks (kimberlite or lamproite pipes) as well as diamond crystals in loose deposits. Discovered silver- and gold-bearing and REE signatures may have independent importance.
DS1960-0614
1965
Valachi, L.Y.Valachi, L.Y., Kopp, O.C.Petrographic Study of the Norris Peridotite, Union County, Tennessee.Geological Society of America (GSA) SPECIAL PAPER., No. 82, PP. 310-311.Appalachia, TennesseePetrography
DS201212-0019
2012
Valadao, L.V.Araujo, D.P., Weska, R.K., Correa, R.S., Valadao, L.V., Kuberek, N.T., Suvorova, L.F.The kimberlite Juina-5 Brazil: textural and xenocryst chemistry.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractSouth America, BrazilDeposit - Juina-5
DS2001-0830
2001
Valarelli, J.V.Neumann, R., Valarelli, J.V.Technological characterization of the potential RE ores from Corrego do Garimpo, Catalao, Central Brasil.Journal of South African Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 1, p. A 27. (abs)Brazil, CentralCarbonatite, Corrego do Garimpo
DS201609-1752
2010
Valbom, D.M.C.Valbom, D.M.C., Dellas, G.State of the art recovery plant design.The 4th Colloquium on Diamonds - source to use held Gabarone March 1-3, 2010, 10p.TechnologySorting

Abstract: The introduction of new diamond sorting technologies as well as additional manufacturers I vendors, has increased the equipment selection and combinations available for recovery flowsheet design. This paper describes the methodology used and the benefits realized in the design of recovery plants by ensuring a fundamental understanding of the advantages and limitations of the technology embodied in the equipment, a comprehensive knowledge of the ore body characteristics, and the effective matching of this information in combination with operational commercial requirements.
DS1996-1456
1996
Valbracht, P.J.Valbracht, P.J., Honda, M., Weis, D.Helium, neon and argon isotope systematics in Kerguelen ultramaficxenoliths:mantle source signaturesEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 138, No. 1/4, Feb. 1, pp. 29-38.MantleGeochronology, Xenoliths
DS1997-1185
1997
Valdespino, O.E.M.Valdespino, O.E.M., Alvarez, V.C.Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic evidence for inverse zoning in the Parquazabatholith, tectonics of shieldPrecambrian Research, Vol. 85, No. 1-2, Nov. 1, pp. 1-26Venezuela, GuyanaTectonics, Paleomagnetism
DS1997-1186
1997
Valdespino, O.E.M.Valdespino, O.E.M., Costanzo Alvarez, V.Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic evidence for inverse zoning in the Parguazabatholith and tectonics of...Precambrian Research, Vol. 85, 1-2, Nov. 1, pp. 1-26.Venezuela, GuyanaTectonics, Geophysics - magnetics
DS201012-0613
2010
Valdeswaran, T.Ravi, S., Patel, S.C., Bhaskara Rao, K.S., Valdeswaran, T.Geology of the Chagapuram pyroclastic kimberlites near Kurnool Basin, southern India.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractIndiaDeposit - Chagapuram arena
DS201212-0743
2012
Valdez, M.N.Valdez, M.N., Wu, Z., Yu, Y.G., Revenaugh,J., Wentzcovitch, R.M.Thermoeleastic properties of ringwoodite: its relationship to the 520 seismic discontinuity.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 351-352, pp. 115-122.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS201812-2895
2018
Valdir da Silveira, F.Valdir da Silveira, F.Overview of diamonds in Brazil.7th Symposio Brasileiro de Geologia do Diamante , Title only South America, Brazildiamond occurrence
DS201812-2896
2018
Valdir da Silveira, F.Valdir da Silveira, F.Project diamond Brazil.7th Symposio Brasileiro de Geologia do Diamante , Title only South America, Brazilprospecting
DS201112-0904
2010
Valdir Silveira, F.Sander, A., Provenzano, C., Valdir Silveira, F., Castro, J.H., Bottari, L.Um novo corpo kimberlitico no escudo sul rio Grandense: petrografia preliminar.5th Brasilian Symposium on Diamond Geology, Nov. 6-12, abstract p. 75.South America, BrazilGeobank
DS1996-1457
1996
Valdivia, F.J.Valdivia, F.J.Simplifying cartographic boundaries by using a normalized measure ofambiguityComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 22, No. 6, pp. 607-624GlobalComputers, Cartographic boundaries
DS1960-1047
1968
Valdovinos, D.L.Valdovinos, D.L.Petrography of Some Lamprophyres of the Eastern Ouachita Mountains of Arkansaw.Msc. Thesis, University Arkansaw, 146P.United States, Oklahoma, ArkansasPetrology
DS2001-0563
2001
Vale, E.Kahn, J.R., Francheschi, D., Curi, A., Vale, E.Economic and financial aspects of mine closureNatural Res. Forum, Vol. 25, No. 4, pp. 265-74.GlobalLegal - economics, Mine closure
DS1980-0333
1980
Valenca, J.G.Valenca, J.G.Geology, Petrography and Petrogenesis of Some Alkaline Igneounited States Complexes of Rio de Janeiro State, Brasil.Ph.d. Thesis, University Western Ontario, BrazilCarbonatite, Leucite, Petrology, Kimberley
DS1991-1547
1991
Valenca, J.G.Sgarbi, P.B.A., Valenca, J.G.Petrography and general features of potassic mafic to ultramafic alkaline volcanic rocks of Mat a da Corda Formation, Minas Gerais State, BrasilProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 359-360BrazilKamafugitic lavas, Patos
DS1994-1572
1994
Valenca, J.G.Sgarbi, P.B.A., Valenca, J.G.Mineral and rock chemistry of the Mat a da Corda kamafugitic rocks Minas gerais State.International Symposium Upper Mantle, Aug. 14-19, 1994, Extended abstracts pp. 27-29.BrazilGeochemistry, Kamafugites
DS200912-0784
2009
Valencia, D.Valencia, D., O'Connell, R.J.Convection scaling and subduction on Earth and super-Earths.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 286, 3-4, pp. 492-502.MantleConvection
DS200512-0249
2005
Valencia, V.A.Ducea, M.N., Saleeby, J., Morrison, J., Valencia, V.A.Subducted carbonates, metasomatism of mantle wedges, and possible connections to diamond formation: an example from California.American Mineralogist, Vol. 90, pp. 864-870.United States, CaliforniaSierra Nevada mantle, peridotites
DS202101-0015
2020
Valencia-Cardona, J.Houser, C., Hernlund, J.W., Valencia-Cardona, J., Wentzcovitch, R.M.Discriminating lower mantle composition.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 308, 106552, 14p. PdfMantlegeophysics - seismics

Abstract: Constraining Earth's bulk composition is fundamental to understanding our planet's formation and evolution. While the lower mantle accounts for a majority of the bulk silicate Earth, it is also the least accessible. As experimental and theoretical mineral physics constraints on mineral elasticity at lower mantle temperatures and pressures have improved, comparisons between predicted seismic velocity and density profiles for hypothesized bulk compositions and 1D seismic models have become commonplace. However, the degree to which a given composition is a better or worse fit than another composition is not always reported, nor are the influences of the assumed temperature profile and other uncertainties discussed. Here we compare seismic velocities and densities for perovskitite, pyrolite, and harzburgite bulk compositions calculated using advanced ab initio techniques to explore the extent to which the associated uncertainties affect our ability to distinguish between candidate compositions. We find that predicted differences between model compositions are often smaller than the influence of temperature uncertainties and therefore these comparisons lack discriminatory power. The inability to distinguish between compositions is largely due to the high sensitivity of seismic properties to temperature accompanied by uncertainties in the mantle geotherm, coupled with diminished sensitivity of seismic velocity to composition toward the base of the mantle. An important exception is the spin transition in (Mg,Fe)O-ferropericlase, which is predicted to give a distinct variation in compressional wave velocity that should distinguish between relatively ferro-magnesian and silica-rich compositions. However, the absence of an apparent spin transition signature in global 1D seismic profiles is a significant unresolved issue in geophysics, and it has important geochemical implications. The approach we present here for establishing discriminatory power for such comparisons can be applied to any estimate of seismic velocities and associated uncertainties, and offers a straightforward tool to evaluate the robustness of model comparisons.
DS201012-0808
2010
Valente, S.Valente, S.The petrogenesis of alkaline and ultramafic lamprophyre dykes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractSouth America, BrazilLamprophyre
DS201112-1066
2011
Valente, S.C.Valente, S.C.Mantle source components of the Early Cretaceous to Paleogene mafic tholeiitic and alkaline magmatism in Rio and related mantle metasomatism processes.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.2058.South America, BrazilLamprophyre
DS200812-0023
2008
Valente, S.de C.Almeida, M.E., Macambira, M.J.B., Valente, S.de C.New geological and single zircon Pb evaporation dat a from the central Guyana Domain, southeastern Roraima, Brazil: tectonic implications for the central shield.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 26, 3, Nov. pp. 318-328.South America, Brazil, GuyanaTectonics, Roraima
DS1994-1820
1994
Valentin, C.Valentin, C.Surface sealing as affected by various rock fragment covers in WestAfricaCatena, Vol. 23, pp. 87-97West Africa, Guinea, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Benin, NigeriaPaleosols, Regosols, weathering
DS201911-2517
2019
Valentine, A.P.Davies, D.R., Valentine, A.P., Kramer, S.C., Rawlinson, N., Hoggard, M.J., Eakin, C.M., Wilson, C.R.Earth's multi-scale topographic response to global mantle flow.Nature Geosciences, Vol. 12, pp. 845-850.Mantlegeodynamics

Abstract: Earth’s surface topography is a direct physical expression of our planet’s dynamics. Most is isostatic, controlled by thickness and density variations within the crust and lithosphere, but a substantial proportion arises from forces exerted by underlying mantle convection. This dynamic topography directly connects the evolution of surface environments to Earth’s deep interior, but predictions from mantle flow simulations are often inconsistent with inferences from the geological record, with little consensus about its spatial pattern, wavelength and amplitude. Here, we demonstrate that previous comparisons between predictive models and observational constraints have been biased by subjective choices. Using measurements of residual topography beneath the oceans, and a hierarchical Bayesian approach to performing spherical harmonic analyses, we generate a robust estimate of Earth’s oceanic residual topography power spectrum. This indicates water-loaded power of 0.5?±?0.35?km2 and peak amplitudes of up to ~0.8?±?0.1?km at long wavelengths (~104?km), decreasing by roughly one order of magnitude at shorter wavelengths (~103?km). We show that geodynamical simulations can be reconciled with observational constraints only if they incorporate lithospheric structure and its impact on mantle flow. This demonstrates that both deep (long-wavelength) and shallow (shorter-wavelength) processes are crucial, and implies that dynamic topography is intimately connected to the structure and evolution of Earth’s lithosphere.
DS1989-1536
1989
Valentine, G.A.Valentine, G.A.Magma transport through dykesNature, Vol. 342, December 7, pp. 614-625GlobalMagma, Dykes
DS2002-1629
2002
Valentine, G.A.Valentine, G.A., Zhang, D., Robinson, B.A.Modeling complex, nonlinear geological processesAnnual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol.30,pp. 35-64.GlobalModels - nonlinear processes
DS2002-1630
2002
Valentine, G.A.Valentine, G.A., Zhang, D., Robinson, B.A.Modeling complex, nonlinear geological processesAnnual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol.30,pp. 35-64.GlobalModels - nonlinear processes
DS200612-1458
2006
Valentine, G.A.Valentine, G.A., Perry, F.V.Decreasing magmatic footprints of individual volcanoes in a waning basaltic field.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 33, 14, L14305.MantleMagmatism
DS201312-0103
2013
Valentine, G.A.Brown, R.J., Valentine, G.A.Physical characteristics of kimberlite and basaltic intraplate volcanism and implications of a biased kimberlite record.Geological Society of America Bulletin, Vol. 125, pp. 1224-1238.GlobalKimberlite volcanism and erosion depths
DS201504-0226
2015
Valentine, G.A.Valentine, G.A., Graettinger, A.H, Macorps, E., Ross, P-S., White, J.D.L., Dohring, E., Sonder, I.Experiments with vertically and laterally migrating subsurface explosions with applications to the geology of phreatomagmatic and hydrothermal explosion craters and diatremes.Bulletin of Volcanology, Vol. 77, 15p.TechnologyDiatremes, kimberlites
DS201504-0227
2014
Valentine, G.A.Valentine, G.A., Graettinger, A.H, Sonder, I.Explosion depths for phreatomagmatic eruptions.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 41, pp. 3045-51.TechnologyMagmatism - phreatomagmatic
DS2002-1631
2002
Valentine, J.W.Valentine, J.W.Prelude to the Cambrian explosionAnnual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol.30,pp. 285-306.GlobalCambrian - overview
DS2002-1632
2002
Valentine, J.W.Valentine, J.W.Geologic structure of the uppermost oceanic crust created at fast to intermediate rate spreading centersAnnual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol.30,pp. 347-84.MantleTectonics
DS2002-1633
2002
Valentine, J.W.Valentine, J.W.Geologic structure of the uppermost oceanic crust created at fast to intermediate rate spreading centersAnnual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol.30,pp. 347-84.MantleTectonics
DS200712-1104
2007
Valentini, L.Valentini, L., Moore, K.R.The possible role of magma mixing in the petrogenesi of carbonatite silicate rock associations: a case study from the Kola alkaline province.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p.233.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS200712-1105
2007
Valentini, L.Valentini, L., Moore, K.R.The possible role of magma mixing in the petrogenesi of carbonatite silicate rock associations: a case study from the Kola alkaline province.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p.233.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS201012-0809
2010
Valentini, L.Valentini, L., Moore, K.R., Chazot, G.Unravelling carbonatite silicate magma interaction dynamics: a case study from the Velay province ( Massif Central, France).Lithos, Vol. 116, 1-2, pp. 53-64.Europe, FranceCarbonatite
DS201112-1067
2011
Valentini, L.Valentini, L.Modelling carbonatite-silicate interaction.Peralk-Carb 2011, workshop held Tubingen Germany June 16-18, AbstractCarbonatite
DS201112-1068
2010
Valentini, L.Valentini, L.Geochemical and numerical modelling of the interaction between carbonatite and silicate magmas.Department of Earth Sciences, College of Science National University of Ireland Galway, May 154p. * I have a copyRussia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite, petrology
DS201112-1069
2011
Valentini, L.Valentini, L.Modelling carbonatite silicate magma interaction.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.153-155.MantleMagmatism
DS201112-1070
2011
Valentini, L.Valentini, L.Modelling carbonatite silicate magma interaction.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.153-155.MantleMagmatism
DS201312-0932
2010
Valentini, L.Valentini, L.Geochemical and numerical modelling of the interaction between carbonatite and silicate magmas.Thesis, Dept. of Earth and Ocean Sciences, College of Science, National University of Ireland, Galway, 139p. Paper copy donated by R. SageRussia, FranceKola alkaline, Massif Central
DS1991-0540
1991
Valentino, D.W.Gates, A.E., Valentino, D.W.Late Proterozoic rift control on the shape of the Appalachians: the Pennsylvanian reentrantJournal of Geology, Vol. 99, pp. 863-872Midcontinent, AppalachiaTectonics, Proterozoic rift
DS1994-1821
1994
Valentino, D.W.Valentino, D.W., Gates, A.E., Glover, L.Late Paleozoic transcurrent tectonic assembly of the central AppalachianpiedmontTectonics, Vol. 13, No. 1, February, pp. 110-126AppalachiaTectonics
DS1993-1638
1993
ValetValet, J-P, Meynadier, L.Geomagnetic field intensity and reversals during the past four millionyears.Nature, Vol. 366, November 18, pp. 234-238.MantlePaleomagnetics, Geophysics -magnetics
DS200612-0744
2006
ValetKravchinsky, V.A., Konstantinov, Courtillot, Savrasov, Valet, Cherniy, Mishenin, ParasotkaPaleomagnetism of East Siberian traps and kimberlites: two new poles and paleogeographic reconstructions at about 360 and 250 Ma.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 148, 1, pp. 1-33.Russia, SiberiaMaleomagnetics
DS1998-1505
1998
Valet, J.P.Valet, J.P., Gallet, Y.Paleomagnetism: ancient inclinationNature, Vol. 396, No. 6709, Nov. 26, pp. 315-6.MantleGeophysics - paleomagnetics
DS2003-0858
2003
Valet, J.P.Macouin, M., Valet, J.P., Besse, J., Buchan, K., Ernst, R., Le Goff, M., ScharerLow paleointensities recorded in 1 to 2.4. Ga Proterozoic dykes, Superior ProvinceEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 213, 1-2, pp. 79-95.Ontario, ManitobaGeochronology
DS200412-1193
2003
Valet, J.P.Macouin, M., Valet, J.P., Besse, J., Buchan, K., Ernst, R., Le Goff, M., Scharer, U.Low paleointensities recorded in 1 to 2.4. Ga Proterozoic dykes, Superior Province, Canada.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 213, 1-2, pp. 79-95.Canada, Ontario, ManitobaGeochronology
DS200612-0847
2006
Valet, J.P.Macouin, M., Valet, J.P., Besse, J., Ernst, R.E.Absolute paleointensity at 1.27 Ga from the Mackenzie dyke swarm ( Canada).Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 7, Q01H21Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology, magnetiziation
DS1992-0306
1992
Valet, J-P.Courtillot, V., Valet, J-P., Hulot, G., Le Mouel, J-L.The earth's magnetic field: which geometry?Eos, Vol. 73, No. 32, August 11, p. 337, 340, 342GlobalGeophysics, Magnetic field
DS1992-1591
1992
Valet, J-P.Valet, J-P., Tucholka, P., Courtillot, V., Meynadier, L.Paleomagnetic constraints on the geometry of the geomagnetic field duringreversalsNature, Vol. 356, April 2, pp.400-407GlobalGeophysics -paleomagnetics, Geomagnetics
DS1994-1822
1994
Valeton, I.Valeton, I.Element concentration and formation of ore deposits by weatheringCatena, Special Issue on Laterization Processes and Supergene Ore, Vol. 21, No. 2-3, pp. 99-130Brazil, India, New Caledonia, AustraliaWeathering, Laterization -element concentration
DS1997-1187
1997
Valeton, I.Valeton, I., Schumann, A.Supergene alteration since Upper Cretaceous on alkaline igneous and metasomatic rocks of Pocos de Caldas Ring.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 12, No. 2, March, 1, pp. 133-154Brazil, Minas GeraisLaterites, Alteration
DS1983-0153
1983
Valeyev, K.A.Brodskaya, S.YU., Valeyev, K.A.The Origin of Carbonatites of the Gulinskaya Alkaline Ultrabasic Intrusion.Physics Solid Earth, Vol. 19, No. 5, PP. 421-424.RussiaBlank
DS1995-2098
1995
Valin, Z.C.Yangshen, Shi, Huafu, L., Valin, Z.C.Paleozoic plate tectonic evolution of the Tarim and western Tianshanregions, western China.International Geology Review, Vol. 36, No. 11, Nov. pp. 1058-1066.ChinaTectonics
DS2002-1634
2002
Valislenko, V.B.Valislenko, V.B., Zinchuk, N.N., Krasavchikov, V.G., Kuznetsova, L.G.Diamond potential estimation based on kimberlite major element chemistryJournal of Geochemical Exploration, Vol. 76, 2, pp. 93-112.Russia, YakutiaChemistry, diamond grade, whole rock composition, Exploration - techniques
DS1996-0834
1996
Valizer, P.M.Lennykh, V.I., Valizer, P.M., Beane, R., et al.Petrotectonic evolution of the Maksyutov Complex, southern Urals, Russia:implications for metamorphismInternational Geology Review, Vol. 37, pp. 584-600.Russia, UralsPlate tectonics, Metamorphism -ultra high pressure
DS201012-0314
2010
Valizer, P.M.Ivanov, K.S., Valizer, P.M., Erokhin, Yu.V., Pogramoskaya, O.E.Genesis of carbonatites of fold belts ( exemplified by the Urals).Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 435, 1, pp. 1423-1426.Russia, UralsCarbonatite
DS201012-0412
2010
Valizer, P.M.Krasnobaev, A.A., Rusin, A.I., Valizer, P.M., Busharina, S.V.Zirconology of calcite carbonatite of the Vishnevogorsk massif, southern Urals.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 431, 1, pp. 390-393.Russia, UralsCarbonatite
DS201312-0515
2013
Valizer, P.M.Krasnobaev, A.A., Valizer, P.M., Cherednichenko, S.V., Busharina, S.V., Medvedeva, E.V., Presyakov, S.L.Zirconology of carbonate rocks ( marbles-carbonatites) of the Ilmeno-Visnevogorskii complex, southern Urals.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 450, 1, pp. 504-508.Russia, UralsCarbonatite
DS201412-0571
2014
Valizer, P.M.Medvedeva, E.V., Rusin, A.I., Krasnobaev, A.A., Baneva, N.N., Valizer, P.M.Structural compositional evolution and isotopic age of Ilmeny Vishnevogorsky complex, south urals, Russia.30th. International Conference on Ore Potential of alkaline, kimberlite and carbonatite magmatism. Sept. 29-, Russia, UralsCarbonatite
DS201610-1879
2016
Valla, P.G.King, G.E., Guralnik, B., Valla, P.G., Herman, F.Trapped charge thermochronometry and thermometry: a status review.Chemical Geology, in press available 15p.TechnologyThermometry

Abstract: Trapped-charge dating methods including luminescence and electron spin resonance dating have high potential as low temperature (< 100 °C) thermochronometers. Despite an early proof of concept almost 60 years ago, it is only in the past two decades that thermoluminescence (TL), electron-spin-resonance (ESR), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), have begun to gain momentum in geological thermochronometry and thermometry applications. Here we review the physics of trapped-charge dating, the studies that led to its development and its first applications for deriving palaeo-temperatures and/or continuous cooling histories. Analytical protocols, which enable the derivation of sample specific kinetic parameters over laboratory timescales, are also described. The key limitation of trapped-charge thermochronometry is signal saturation, which sets an upper limit of its application to < 1 Ma, thus restricting it to rapidly exhuming terrains (> 200 °C Ma- 1), or elevated-temperature underground settings (> 30 °C). Despite this limitation, trapped-charge thermochronometry comprises a diverse suite of versatile methods, and we explore potential future applications and research directions.
DS1996-0027
1996
Valladares, C.E.Anderson, D.N., Decker, D.T., Valladares, C.E.Modeling boundary blobs using time varying invectionGeophys. Research Letters, Vol. 23, No. 5, March 1, pp 579-582MantleGeophysics -seismics, Boundary
DS1970-1000
1974
Vallance, G.Vallance, G.Geology of the Country between Moyamba and Bo. Report on Reconnaissance Mapping Sheets 76, 77, 78, 79, 88, 89, 90.Geological Survey SIERRA LEONE Report, 56P.Sierra Leone, West AfricaGeology, Kimberlite
DS201112-1071
2011
Vallance, S.Vallance, S., Perkins, H.C., Dixon, J.E.What is social sustainability? A clarification of concepts.Geoforum, Vol. 42, 3, June pp. 342-348.TechnologyCSR Classification - overview of concept
DS2003-0140
2003
ValleeBouchon, ValleeSupersize shearsScience, No. 5634, Aug. 8, p. 824.MantleGeodynamics - structure
DS200412-0187
2003
ValleeBouchon, ValleeSupersize shears.Science, No. 5634, Aug. 8, p. 824.MantleGeodynamics - structure
DS1960-0830
1967
Vallee, M.Gold, D.P., Vallee, M., Charette, J.P.Economic Geology and Geophysics of the Oka Alkaline Complex, Quebec.The Canadian Mining and Metallurgical Bulletin (CIM Bulletin) ., Vol. 60, PP. 1131-1144.Canada, QuebecBlank
DS1986-0294
1986
Vallee, M.Gold, D.P., Eby, G.M., Vallee, M.Carbonatites, diatremes and ultra alakaline rocks in the Okaarea, QuebecGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Field trip Guidebook, No. 21, 51pQuebecMonteregian, Aillikite, alnoite, okaite, carbonatite, ijolit, Melilite, glimmerite, Ile C.
DS1993-1471
1993
Vallee, M.Sinclair, A.J., Vallee, M.Reviewing continuity: an essential element of quality control for depositand reserve estimationThe Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) Annual Meeting Preprint, Paper No. 33, 9pCanadaOre reserve estimation, classification, Geostatistics
DS1993-1767
1993
Vallee, M.Wortman, D., Taylor, H.K., Vallee, M.Discussion: Mineral deposit evaluation and reserve inventory practiceThe Canadian Mining and Metallurgical Bulletin (CIM Bulletin), Vol. 86, No. 968, March pp. 144-148CanadaEconomics, ore reserves, Geostatistics
DS1994-0354
1994
Vallee, M.Cranstone, D., Lemieux, A., Vallee, M.Canadian exploration and mine investmentProspectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC) Exploration and Development Highlights, March 1994, pp. 3-8CanadaExploration activities and investment, Overview
DS1997-1188
1997
Vallee, M.Vallee, M., McCutcheon, S.Are international reporting standards feasible?The Canadian Mining and Metallurgical Bulletin (CIM Bulletin), Vol. 90, No. 1007, Feb. pp. 30-37GlobalGeostatistics, Economics, ore reserves, resources, terminology
DS1997-1189
1997
Vallee, M.Vallee, M., Sinclair, A.J.Efficient resource and reserve estimation depends on high quality geology and evaluation proceduresThe Canadian Mining and Metallurgical Bulletin (CIM Bulletin), Vol. 90, No. 1011, June pp. 76-79GlobalGeostatistics, ore reserves, Evaluation, sampling
DS1998-1506
1998
Vallee, M.Vallee, M., Sinclair, A.Quality control of resource/reserve estimation - where do we go from here?The Canadian Mining and Metallurgical Bulletin (CIM Bulletin), Vol. 91, No. 1022, July/Aug. pp. 55-57CanadaGeostatistics, ore reserves, discoveries
DS1997-0799
1997
Vallee, O.Misser, F., Vallee, O.Les gemmocraties l'economie politique du diamant africain. (Political powerand markets)Paris, Descles de Brouwer, 243p.GlobalBook review Journal of Mat. Policy Vol. 13, No. 2, p. 41., Diamond markets
DS1991-1876
1991
Vallee, P.Williamson, P.A., da Silva, N.B., Vallee, P., Robey, J.V.The Moana-Tinguins melilitite province, Piaui state, northweasternProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 460-462BrazilTectonics, Mineral chemistry
DS2001-1234
2001
ValleyWiesli, R.A., Taylor, L., Valley, Tromsdorff, KurosawaGeochemistry of eclogites and metapelites from Trescolmen: as observed from major and trace elements..International Geology Review, Vol. 43, No. 2, pp. 95-119.AlpsEcolgites, Geochemistry
DS200712-0795
2007
ValleyPage, F.Z., Fu, B., Kita, N.T., Fournelle, Spicuzza, Schulze, Viljoen, Basei, ValleyZircons from kimberlite: new insights into oxygen isotopes, trace elements, and Ti in zircon thermometry.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 71, 15, pp. 3887-3903.TechnologyZircon thermometry
DS200912-0447
2009
ValleyLiu, Y., Taylor, L.A., Sarbadhikari, Valley, Ushikubo, Spicuzza, Kita, Ketchum, Carlson, Shatsky, SobolevMetasomatic origin of diamonds in the world's largest Diamondiferous eclogite.Lithos, In press - available 41p.RussiaDeposit - Udachnaya
DS201810-2360
2018
ValleyNasdala, L., Corfu, F., Schoene, B., Tapster, S.R., Wall, C.J., Schmitz, M.D., Ovtcharova, M., Schaltegger, U., Kennedy, A.K., Kronz, A., Reiners, P.W., Yang, Y-H., Wu, F-Y., Gain, S.E.M., Griffin, W.L., Szymanowski, D., Chanmuang, C., Ende, N.M., ValleyGZ7 and GZ8 - two zircon reference materials for SIMS U-Pb geochronology.Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research, http://orchid.org/0000-0002-2701-4635 80p.Asia, Sri Lankageochronology

Abstract: Here we document a detailed characterization of two zircon gemstones, GZ7 and GZ8. Both stones had the same mass at 19.2 carats (3.84 g) each; both came from placer deposits in the Ratnapura district, Sri Lanka. The U-Pb data are in both cases concordant within the uncertainties of decay constants and yield weighted mean ²°6Pb/²³8U ages (95% confidence uncertainty) of 530.26 Ma ± 0.05 Ma (GZ7) and 543.92 Ma ± 0.06 Ma (GZ8). Neither GZ7 nor GZ8 have been subjected to any gem enhancement by heating. Structure-related parameters correspond well with the calculated alpha doses of 1.48 × 10¹8 g?¹ (GZ7) and 2.53 × 10¹8 g?¹ (GZ8), respectively, and the (U-Th)/He ages of 438 Ma ± 3 Ma (2s) for GZ7 and 426 Ma ± 9 Ma (2s) for GZ8 are typical of unheated zircon from Sri Lanka. The mean U concentrations are 680 µg g?¹ (GZ7) and 1305 µg g?¹ (GZ8). The two zircon samples are proposed as reference materials for SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry) U-Pb geochronology. In addition, GZ7 (Ti concentration 25.08 µg g?¹ ± 0.18 µg g?¹; 95% confidence uncertainty) may prove useful as reference material for Ti-in-zircon temperature estimates.
DS1998-0086
1998
Valley, J.Barth, M.G., Rudnick, R.L., Spicuzza, M.J., Valley, J.The role of eclogites in the growth of Archean cratons: a case study from west Africa.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 52-54.GlobalMan Shield, eclogites, Deposit - Koidu
DS2003-1366
2003
Valley, J.Taylor, L.A., Spetsius, Z.A., Wiesli, R., Anand, M., Promprated, P., Valley, J.The origin of mantle peridotites: crustal signatures from Yakutian kimberlites8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 4, POSTER abstractRussia, YakutiaMantle geochemistry
DS200412-1974
2003
Valley, J.Taylor, L.A., Snyder, G.A., Keller, R., Remley, D.A., Anand,M., Wiesli, R., Valley, J., Sobolev, N.V.Petrogenesis of Group A eclogites and websterites: evidence from the Obnazhennaya kimberlite, Yakutia.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 145, pp. 424-443.Russia, YakutiaPetrology, genesis Deposit - Obnazhennaya
DS200612-0122
2006
Valley, J.Bennett, V., Valley, J.Earth evolution 4.5 to 3.5 Ga: deciphering the earliest global systems.Goldschmidt Conference 16th. Annual, S5-02 theme abstract 1/8p goldschmidt2006.orgMantleTectonics
DS201605-0838
2016
Valley, J.Gaschnig, R.M., Rudnick, R.L., McDonough, W.F., Kaufman, A.J., Valley, J., Hu, Z., Gao, S., Beck, M.L.Compositional evolution of the upper continental crust through time, as constrained by ancient glacial diamictites.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, in press available 78p.MantleBulk chemistry

Abstract: The composition of the fine-grained matrix of glacial diamictites from the Mesoarchean, Paleoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic, and Paleozoic, collected from four modern continents, reflect the secular evolution of the average composition of the upper continental crust (UCC). The effects of localized provenance are present in some cases, but distinctive geochemical signatures exist in diamictites of the same age from different localities, suggesting that these are global signatures. Archean UCC, dominated by greenstone basalts and less so komatiites, was more mafic, based on major elements and transition metal trace elements. Temporal changes in oxygen isotope ratios, rare earth elements, and high field strength elements indicate that the UCC became more differentiated and that tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite suites became less important with time, findings consistent with previous studies. We also document the concentrations of siderophile and chalcophile elements (Ga, Ge, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, W, Tl, Bi) and lithophile Be in the UCC through time, and use the data for the younger diamictites to construct a new estimate of average UCC along with associated uncertainties.
DS201901-0039
2018
Valley, J.Gu, T., Valley, J., Kitajima, K., Spicuzza, M., Fournelle, J., Stern, R., Ohfuji, H., Wang, W.Evidence of subducted altered oceanic crust into deep mantle from inclusions of type IaB diamonds,Gems & Gemology, Sixth International Gemological Symposium Vol. 54, 3, 1p. Abstract p. 306-7.Mantlediamond inclusions

Abstract: Nitrogen is one of the most common impurities in diamond, and its aggregation styles have been used as criteria for diamond classification. Pure type IaB diamonds (with 100% nitrogen in B aggregation) are rather rare among natural diamonds. The occurrence of the B center is generally associated with high temperature and a long residence time of the host diamond, which would potentially provide information on the earth’s deep interior. Seawater circulation is the unique process that shapes the surface of our planet and potentially has a profound effect on its interior due to slab subduction. In about 50 type IaB diamonds with detectable micro-inclusions submitted to GIA for screening, we found that more than 70% of them contained a typical mineral assemblage from the sublithosphere. Jeffbenite (TAPP), majorite garnet, enstatite, and ferropericlase have been observed, which could be retrograde products of former bridgmanite. CaSiO3-walstromite with larnite and titanite is the dominant phase present in approximately 40% of all diamond samples. Direct evidence from oxygen isotope ratios measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, or SIMS, (d18OVSMOWin the range +10.7 to +12.5‰) of CaSiO3-walstromite with coexisting larnite and titanite that retrograde from CaSiO3-perovskite suggest that hydrothermally altered oceanic basalt can subduct to depths of >410 km in the transition zone. Incorporation of materials from subducted altered oceanic crust into the deep mantle produced diamond inclusions that have both lower mantle and subduction signatures. Ca(Si,Al)O3-perovskite was observed with a high concentration of rare earth elements (>5 wt.%) that could be enriched under P-Tconditions in the lower mantle. Evidence from ringwoodite with a hydroxide bond, coexisting tuite and apatite, precipitates of an NH3phase, and cohenite with trace amounts of Cl imply that the subducted brines can potentially introduce hydrous fluid to the bottom of the transition zone. In the diamonds with subducted materials, the increasing carbon isotope ratio from the core to the rim region detected by SIMS (d13C from -5.5‰ to -4‰) suggests that an oxidized carbonate-dominated fluid was associated with recycling of the subducted hydrous material. The deep subduction played an important role in balancing redox exchange with the reduced lower mantle indicated by precipitated iron nanoparticles and coexisting hydrocarbons and carbonate phases.
DS1995-1223
1995
Valley, J.M.Medaris, L.G., Beard, B.L., Johnson, O.H., Valley, J.M.Garnet pyroxenite and eclogite in the Bohemian Massif -geochemical evidence for Variscan recycling.Geologische Rundschau, Vol. 84, No. 3, Sept. pp. 489-505.GermanyEclogites, Subduction
DS2001-1039
2001
Valley, J.R.Schulze, D.K., Valley, J.R., Bell, D.R., Spicuzza, M.Oxygen isotope variations in Cromium poor megacrysts from kimberliteGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta., Vol. 65, No. 23, pp. 4375-84.Ontario, South AfricaGeochronology, Chromium
DS200612-1345
2006
Valley, J.V.Spetsius, Z.V., Taylor, L.A., Valley, J.V., Ivanov, A.S., Banzeruk, V.L., Spicuzza, M.Garnets of anomalous oxygen isotope composition in Diamondiferous xenoliths Nyurbinskaya pipe, Yakutia.Vladykin: VI International Workshop, held Mirny, Deep seated magmatism, its sources and plumes, pp. 59-78.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Nyurbaninskaya, mineralogy
DS1975-1013
1979
Valley, J.W.Essene, E.J., Valley, J.W.High Pressure Akermanite in the AdirondacksGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 11, No. 1, P. 11. (abstract.).United States, Appalachia, Canada, QuebecBlank
DS1990-1227
1990
Valley, J.W.Riciputi, L.R., Valley, J.W., McGregor, V.R.Conditions of Archean granulite metamorphism in theGodthab-Fiskenaessetregion, southern West GreenlandJournal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 8, No. 2, March pp. 171-190GreenlandMetamorphism, Granulite
DS1990-1500
1990
Valley, J.W.Van Wyck, N., Valley, J.W., Austrheim, H.Oxygen isotope geochemistry of granulites and eclogites from the Bergenarc, southwest NorwayGeological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting, Abstracts, Vol. 22, No. 7, p. A347NorwayEclogites, Geochemistry
DS1991-1524
1991
Valley, J.W.Schulze, D.J., Valley, J.W.Carbon isotope composition of mantle graphite: anomalously light carbon subducted into the shallow subcontinental lithosphereGeological Association of Canada (GAC)/Mineralogical Association of Canada/Society Economic, Vol. 16, Abstract program p. A112South AfricaGeochronology, Carbon-graphite
DS1991-1525
1991
Valley, J.W.Schulze, D.J., Valley, J.W., Viljoen, K.S., Spicuzza, M.Carbon isotope composition of graphite in mantle eclogitesProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 353-355South Africa, BotswanaXenoliths, Bellsbank, Jagersfontein, Orapa, Letlhakane, eclogites
DS1991-1772
1991
Valley, J.W.Valley, J.W.Ion microprobe analysis of oxygen isotopes in magnetite and ilmeniteEos, Spring Meeting Program And Abstracts, Vol. 72, No. 17, April 23, p. 292South AfricaGeochemistry, Monastery mine
DS1992-1592
1992
Valley, J.W.Valley, J.W.Granulite formation is driven by magmatic processes in the deep crustEarth Science Reviews, Vol. 32, pp. 145-146. Extended abstractGlobalGranulites, Magma
DS1994-1224
1994
Valley, J.W.Moecher, D.P., Valley, J.W., Essene, E.J.Extraction and carbon isotope analysis of CO2 from scapolite in deep crustal granulites and xenoliths.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 58, No. 2, January pp. 1031-1042.GlobalGeochronology, Xenoliths
DS1994-1961
1994
Valley, J.W.Yardley, B.W.D., Valley, J.W.How wet is the earth's crust?Nature, Vol. 371, Sept. 15, pp. 205-206MantleFluids, Basins
DS1995-0237
1995
Valley, J.W.Burgess, S.R., Graham, C.M., Valley, J.W., Harte, B.Oxygen isotope composition of metasomatised mantle peridotite xenoliths -laser fluorination/microprobeProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 83-85.South AfricaGeochronology, Deposit -Jagersfontein
DS1996-1091
1996
Valley, J.W.Peck, W.H., Valley, J.W.The Fisken asset anorthosite complex: stable isotope evidence for shallow emplacement -Archean ocean crustGeology, Vol. 24, No. 6, June pp. 523-526GreenlandGeochronology, Anorthosite -Fiskenaesset
DS1996-1404
1996
Valley, J.W.Taylor, L.A., Valley, J.W., Clayton, R.N., Snyder, G.A.Oxygen isotopes by laser-heating and conventional techniques a study of Siberian Diamondiferous eclogitesInternational Geological Congress 30th Session Beijing, Abstracts, Vol. 1, p. 106.Russia, SiberiaGeochronology, Eclogites
DS1996-1467
1996
Valley, J.W.Van Wyck, N., Valley, J.W., Austrheim, H.Oxygen and carbon isotopic constraints on the development of eclogites, Holsnoy, Norway.Lithos, Vol. 38, No.3-4, Sept. 10, pp. 129-146.NorwayEclogites, Geochronology
DS1997-1010
1997
Valley, J.W.Schulze, D.J., Valley, J.W., Viljoen, K.S., StiefenhoferCarbon isotope composition of graphite in mantle ecologitesJournal of Geology, Vol. 105, No. 3, May pp. 379-386.South Africa, Wyoming, BotswanaEclogites, geochronology, Jagersfontein, Deposit - Schaffer, Letlhakane, Orapa, Bellsbank, Blaau
DS1997-1138
1997
Valley, J.W.Tardley, B.W.D., Valley, J.W.The petrologic case for a dry lower crustJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 102, No. 6, June 10, pp. 12, 173-86.MantlePetrology, Crust
DS1998-1301
1998
Valley, J.W.Schulze, D.J., Valley, J.W., Bell, D.R., Spicuzza, M.Significance of oxygen isotope variations in the chromium-poor megacryst suite7th. Kimberlite Conference abstract, pp. 769-71.South Africa, North AmericaKimberlite - Group I, II, Subduction
DS1998-1507
1998
Valley, J.W.Valley, J.W., Kinny, P.D., Spicuzza, M.J.Zircon megacrysts from kimberlite: oxygen isotope variability among mantlemelts.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 133, No. 1-2, pp. 1-11.MantleGeochronology, Megacryst - mineralogy
DS1999-0758
1999
Valley, J.W.Upton, B.G.J., Hinton, R.W., Valley, J.W.Megacrysts and associated xenoliths: evidence for migration of geochemically enriched melts upper mantleJournal of Petrology, Vol. 40, No. 6, June 1, pp. 935-56.MantleGeochemistry, Xenoliths
DS2000-0874
2000
Valley, J.W.Schulze, D.J., Valley, J.W., Spicuzza, M.J.Coesite eclogites from the Roberts Victor kimberlite, South AfricaLithos, Vol. 54, No. 1-2, Oct. pp. 23-32.South AfricaTectonics - subduction, Deposit - Roberts Victor
DS2001-0899
2001
Valley, J.W.Peck, W.H., Valley, J.W., Wilde, S.A., Graham, C.M.Oxygen isotope ratios and rare earth elements in 3.3 - 4.4 Ga zircons: ion microprobe evidence high 0 18...Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 65, No. 22, pp. 4215-29.AustraliaGeochronology, Craton - Yilgarn
DS2001-1236
2001
Valley, J.W.Wilde, S.A., Valley, J.W., Graham, C.M.Evidence from detrital zircon for the existence of continental crust and ocean in the earth 4.4 Gyr ago.Nature, Vol. 409, No. 6817, Jan. 11, p. 175-7.MantleGeochronology
DS2002-1635
2002
Valley, J.W.Valley, J.W., Peck, W.H., King, E.M., Wilde, S.A.A cool early EarthGeology, Vol. 30,4,Apr.pp.351-4.MantleArchean - geochronology, impacts, meteorites
DS2003-1235
2003
Valley, J.W.Schultz, D.J., Valley, J.W., Specuzza, M.J., Channer, D.M.Oxygen isotope composition of eclogitic and peridotitic garnet xenocrysts from the LaInternational Geology Review, Vol. 45, No. 11, Nov. pp. 968-75.VenezuelaGeochronology
DS2003-1237
2003
Valley, J.W.Schulze, D.J., Harte, B., Valley, J.W., Brenan, J.M., DeR. Channer, D.M.Extreme crustal oxygen isotope signatures preserved in coesite diamondNature, No. 6935, May 1, p. 68-69.GlobalGeochronology
DS2003-1238
2003
Valley, J.W.Schulze, D.J., Valley, J.W., Viljoen, K.S., Spicuzza, M.J.Oxygen isotope composition of mantle eclogites8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 2, POSTER abstractSouth Africa, ColoradoEclogites and Diamonds, Geochronology
DS2003-1272
2003
Valley, J.W.Shulze, D.J., Harte, B., Valley, J.W., Channer, D.M. DeR.Extreme geochemical variation during and following diamond growth, Guaniamo8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 2, AbstractVenezuelaEclogites, diamonds, Geochemistry
DS200412-1767
2003
Valley, J.W.Schulze, D.J., Harte, B., Valley, J.W., Brenan, J.M., DeR Channer, D.M.Extreme crustal oxygen isotope signatures preserved in coesite diamond.Nature, No. 6935, May 1, p. 68-69.TechnologyGeochronology
DS200412-1768
2004
Valley, J.W.Schulze, D.J., Harte, B., Valley, J.W., Channer, D.M.De R.Evidence of subduction and crust mantle mixing from a single diamond.Lithos, Vol. 77, 1-4, Sept. pp. 349-358.South America, Venezuela, GuaniamoGarnet, carbon oxygen isotopes, geochonology
DS200412-1769
2003
Valley, J.W.Schulze, D.J., Valley, J.W., Specuzza, M.J., Channer, D.M.Oxygen isotope composition of eclogitic and peridotitic garnet xenocrysts from the La Ceniza kimberlite, Guaniamo, Venezuela.International Geology Review, Vol. 45, no. 11, Nov. pp. 968-75.South America, VenezuelaGeochronology
DS200412-1814
2003
Valley, J.W.Shulze, D.J., Harte, B., Valley, J.W., Channer, D.M.DeR.Extreme geochemical variation during and following diamond growth, Guaniamo, Venezuela.8 IKC Program, Session 2, AbstractSouth America, VenezuelaEclogite, diamonds Geochemistry
DS200512-0145
2005
Valley, J.W.Cavosie, A.J., Valley, J.W., Wilde, S.A.Magmatic delta 18 O in 4400-3900 Ma detrial zircons: a record of the alteration and recycling of crust in the Early Archean.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 235, 1-4, July 15, pp. 663-681.AustraliaMagmatism - not specific to diamonds
DS200512-1114
2005
Valley, J.W.Valley, J.W.A cool early Earth.Scientific American, October pp.MantleGeothermometry
DS200612-1246
2006
Valley, J.W.Schultz, D.J., Harte, B., Valley, J.W., Channer, D.M.DeR.Diamonds with multiple growth stages and variable fluid sources from the Quebrada Grande region of Guaniamo, Venezuela.International Mineralogical Association 19th. General Meeting, held Kobe, Japan July 23-28 2006, Abstract p. 137.South America, VenezuelaDiamond morphology
DS200612-1418
2005
Valley, J.W.Taylor, L.A., Spetsius, Z.V., Wiesli, R., Spicuzza, M., Valley, J.W.Diamondiferous peridotites from oceanic protoliths: crustal signatures from Yakutian.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 46, 12, pp. 1176-1184.RussiaPeridotite - diamond morphology
DS200612-1459
2006
Valley, J.W.Valley, J.W.Early Earth.Elements, Vol. 3, no. 4, August pp. 201-204.MantleGeochronology, zircon, life
DS200612-1460
2005
Valley, J.W.Valley, J.W., Lackey, J.S., Cavosie, A.J., Clechenko, C.C., Spicuzza, M.J., Basei, M.A.S., Bindeman, I.N.4.4 billion years of crustal maturation: oxygen isotope ratios.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 150, 8, Dec. pp. 561-580.MantleGeochronology
DS200712-0960
2007
Valley, J.W.Schulze, D.J., Page, F.Z., Valley, J.W., Harte, B., Kita, N., Channer, D.M.,Jaques, L.Quasi-correlation between carbon and oxygen isotope signatures in eclogitic diamonds and their mineral inclusions.Geological Association of Canada, Gac-Mac Yellowknife 2007, May 23-25, Volume 32, 1 pg. abstract p.73-74.South America, Venezuela, Australia, Africa, BotswanaGeochronology
DS200712-1106
2007
Valley, J.W.Valley, J.W.Evidence of the earliest crust on Earth.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A1051.AustraliaGeochronology
DS200812-0132
2008
Valley, J.W.Bowman, J.R., Moser, D.E., Wooden, J.L., Valley, J.W., Mazdab, F.K., Kita, N.Cathodluminescence CL isotopic Pb O and trace element zoning in lower crustal zircon documents growth of early continental lithosphere.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A107.Canada, OntarioKapuskasing Uplift
DS200812-0372
2008
Valley, J.W.Fu, B., Page, F.Z., Cavosie, A.J., Fournelle, J., Kita, N.T., Lackey, J.S., Wilde, S.A., Valley, J.W.Ti in zircon thermometry: applications and limitations.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, 37p. in press availableTechnologyGeothermometry - kimberlites
DS200812-0584
2008
Valley, J.W.Konish, H., Xu, H., Spicuzza, M.,Valley, J.W.Polycrystalline diamond inclusions in Jack Hills zircon: carbonado?Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A489.AustraliaDiamond inclusions
DS200812-0767
2008
Valley, J.W.Moser, D.E., Bowman, J.R., Wooden, J., Valley, J.W., Mazdab, F., Kita, N.Creation of a continent recorded in zircon zoning.Geology, Vol. 36, 3 March pp. 239-242.Canada, OntarioGeochronology - Kapuskasing
DS200812-1103
2008
Valley, J.W.Spetsius, Z.V., Taylor, L.A., Valley, J.W., DeAngelsi, M., Spicuzza, M., Ivanov, A.S., Banzeruk, V.I.Diamondiferous xenoliths from crustal subduction: garnet oxygen isotopes from the Nyurbinskaya pipe, Yakutia.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 375-385.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Nyurbinskaya
DS200812-1194
2008
Valley, J.W.Ushikobo, T., Kita, N.T., Cavosie, A.J., Wilde, S.A., Rudnick, R.L., Valley, J.W.Lithium in Jack Hills zircon: evidence for extreme weathering of Earth's crust at 4300 Ma.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A968.AustraliaWeathering
DS200812-1195
2008
Valley, J.W.Ushikubo, T., Kita, N.T., Cavosie, A.J., Wilde, S.A., Rudnick, R.L., Valley, J.W.Lithium in Jack Hills zircons: evidence for extensive weathering of Earth's earliest crust.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 272, 3-4, pp. 666-676.AustraliaGeochronology, Hadean
DS201012-0589
2010
Valley, J.W.Pivin, M., Valley, J.W., Spicuzza, M.J., Demaiffe, D.Oxygen isotopic composition of garnet clinopyroxene and zircon megacrysts from kimberlites in Democratic Republic of Congo: insights into their petrogenesis.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 560.Africa, Democratic Republic of CongoDeposit - Mbuji-Mayi
DS201112-0982
2011
Valley, J.W.Sobolev, N.V., Schertl, H-P., Valley, J.W., Page, F.Z., Kita, N.T., Spicuzza, M.J., Neuser, R.D., Logvinova, A.M.Oxygen isotope variations of garnets and clinopyroxenes in a layered Diamondiferous calcsilicate rock from Kokchetav Massif, Kazakhstan: a window into geochemicalContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 162, 5, pp.1079-1092.Russia, KazakhstanDeeply subducted UHPM rocks
DS201212-0609
2012
Valley, J.W.Russell, A.K., Kitajima, K., Strickland, A., Medaris, L.G.Jr., Schulze, D.J., Valley, J.W.Eclogite facies fluid infiltration: constraints from delta 10 O zoning in garnet.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, in press available, 14p.Europe, NorwayEclogite
DS201312-0794
2013
Valley, J.W.Schulze, D., Harte, B., Page, F.Z., Valley, J.W., DeR Channer, D.M., Jaques, A.L.Anticorrelation between low d13c of eclogitic diamonds and high d180 of their coesite and garnet inclusions requires a subduction origin.Geology, Vol. No. 4, pp. 455-458.South America, Venezuela, Australia, Africa, BotswanaDeposit - Guaniamo, Arygle, Orapa
DS201412-0676
2014
Valley, J.W.Pernet-Fisher, J.F., Howarth, G.H., Liu, Y., Barry, P.H., Carmody, L., Valley, J.W., Bodnar, R.J., Spetsius, Z.V., Taylor, L.A.Komsomolskaya Diamondiferous eclogites: evidence for oceanic crustal protoliths.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 167, pp. 1-17.Russia, SiberiaDeposit - Komsomolskaya
DS201412-0938
2014
Valley, J.W.Valley, J.W., Cavosie, T., Ushikubo, T., Reinhard, D.A., Lawrence, D.F., Larson, D.J., Clifton, P.H., Kelly, T.F., Wilde, S.A., Moser, D.E., Spicuzza, M.J.Hadean age for a post-magma-ocean zircon confirmed by atom-probe tomography.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 7, pp.219-223.MantleGeochronology
DS201505-0243
2015
Valley, J.W.Katzir, Y., Anenburg, M., Kaminchik, J., Segev, A., Blichert-Toft, J., Spicuzza, M.J., Valley, J.W.Garnet pyroxenites as markers of recurring extension and magmatism at the rifted margins of the Levant basin.Israel Geological Society, Abstracts 1p.Europe, Israel, Mt. CarmelPyroxenite
DS201509-0434
2015
Valley, J.W.Valley, J.W., Reinhard, D.A., Cavosie, A.J., Ushikubo, T., Lawrence, D.F., Larson, D.J., Kelly, T.F., Snoeyenbos, D.R., Strickland, A.Nano- and micro-geochronology in Hadean and Archean zircons by atom-probe tomography and SIMS: new tools for old minerals.American Mineralogist, Vol. 100, pp. 1355-1377.AustraliaGeochronology

Abstract: Atom-probe tomography (APT) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) provide complementary in situ element and isotope data in minerals such as zircon. SIMS measures isotope ratios and trace elements from 1–20 µm spots with excellent accuracy and precision. APT identifies mass/charge and three-dimensional position of individual atoms (±0.3 nm) in 100 nm-scale samples, volumes up to one million times smaller than SIMS. APT data provide unique information for understanding element and isotope distribution; crystallization and thermal history; and mechanisms of mineral reaction and exchange. This atomistic view enables evaluation of the fidelity of geochemical data for zircon because it provides new understanding of radiation damage, and can test for intracrystalline element mobility. Nano-geochronology is one application of APT in which Pb isotope ratios from sub-micrometer domains of zircon provide model ages of crystallization and identify later magmatic and metamorphic reheating.
DS202012-2219
2020
Valley, J.W.Hoover, W.F., Page, F.Z., Schulze, D.J., Kitajima, K., Valley, J.W.Massive fluid influx beneath the Colorado Plateau ( USA) related to slab removal and diatreme emplacement: evidence from oxygen isotope zoning in eclogite xenoliths.Journal of Petrology, in press available, 52p. PdfUnited States, Colorado Plateaueclogite

Abstract: The Colorado Plateau has undergone as much as 1.8?km of uplift over the past 80?Ma, but never underwent the pervasive deformation common in the neighboring tectonic provinces of the western USA. To understand the source, timing and distribution of mantle hydration, and its role in plateau uplift, garnets from four eclogite xenoliths of the Moses Rock diatreme (Navajo Volcanic Field, Utah, USA) were analyzed in situ for d18O by secondary ion mass spectrometry. These garnets have the largest reported intra-crystalline oxygen isotope zoning to date in mantle-derived xenoliths with core-to-rim variations of as much as 3‰. All samples have core d18O values greater than that of the pristine mantle (~5.3‰, mantle garnet as derived from mantle zircon; Valley et al., 1998; Page et al., 2007) consistent with an altered upper oceanic crust protolith. Oxygen isotope ratios decrease from core to rim recording interaction with a low-d18O fluid at high temperature, likely derived from serpentinite in the foundering Farallon slab. All zoned samples converge at a d18O value of ~6‰, regardless of core composition, suggesting that fluid infiltration was widely distributed. Constraints on the timing of this fluid influx, relative to diatreme emplacement, can be gained from diffusion modeling of major element zoning in garnet. Modeling using best-estimates of peak metamorphic conditions (620ºC, 3.7?GPa) yield durations of?
DS1994-0586
1994
Vallier, T.L.Geist, E.L., Vallier, T.L., Scholl, D.W.Origin, transport, and emplacement of an exotic island arc terrane expose din eastern Kamchatka, Russia.Geological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 106, No. 9, Sept. pp. 1182-1994.RussiaTectonics, Paleomagnetism, Ophiolite
DS2001-0342
2001
Vallis, F.FruhGreen, G.L., Scamelluri, M., Vallis, F.Oxygen and Hydrogen isotope ratios of high pressure ultramafic rocks: implications for fluid sources and mobility mantle...Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 141, No. 1, pp. 145-59.MantleSubduction - hydrous mantle, Oxygen, Hydrogen, Geochronology
DS1997-1014
1997
Vallve, M.Seber. D., Vallve, M., et al.Middle East Tectonics: applications of geographic information systems(GIS)Gsa Today, Vol. 7, No. 2, Feb. pp. 1-7GlobalTectonics, Computers - GIS
DS2000-0191
2000
Valsami-JonesCotter-Howells, J., Campbell, Valsami-Jones, BatchelderEnvironmental mineralogy: microbial interactions, anthropegenic influences, contaimined land and waste management.Mineralogical Society of America, No. 9, 414p. $ 70.GlobalBook - ad, Mineralogy, environment
DS1984-0788
1984
Valter, A.A.Yeremenko, G.K., Valter, A.A.Abyssal Inclusions of Proterozoic Camptonites of the Azov Region.Geolog. Zhurn., Vol. 44, No. 3, PP. 59-65.RussiaBlank
DS1990-1491
1990
Valter, A.A.Valter, A.A., Kvasnitsa, V.N., Yeremenko, G.K.Structure, composition and optical properties of diamond paramorphs bygraphite.(Russian)Mineral. Zhurn., (Russian), Vol. 12, No. 3, pp. 3-16RussiaDiamond, Crystallography
DS1991-1773
1991
Valter, A.A.Valter, A.A., Kolesov, G.M.Distribution of rare earth elements in astrobleme rocksGeochemistry International, Vol. 28, No. 1, pp. 1-11Russiarare earth elements (REE)., Geochemistry
DS1991-1774
1991
Valter, A.A.Valter, A.A., Kvasnitsa, .N.The genetic types of natural diamondsProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 569-570RussiaDiamond morphology, Mantle, ultrabasic, peridotite, eclogite, metamorphic
DS2003-1404
2003
Valter, A.A.Valter, A.A., Oleynik, H.S., Fisenko, A.V., Semenova, I.F.Structural and morphological evidence of the impact induced development of diamondGeochemistry International, Vol. 41, 10, pp. 939-946.GlobalMeteoritic - diamond
DS2003-1405
2003
Valter, A.A.Valter, A.A., Oleynik, H.S., Fisenko, A.V., Semenova, L.F.Structural and morphological evidence from impact induced development of diamondGeochemistry International, Vol. 41, 10, pp. 939-46.GlobalMicromorphology - martensite transformation
DS200412-2031
2003
Valter, A.A.Valter, A.A., Oleynik, H.S., Fisenko, A.V., Semenova, L.F.Structural and morphological evidence from impact induced development of diamond after graphite in the Novo-Urei meteorite.Geochemistry International, Vol. 41, 10, pp. 939-46.TechnologyMicromorphology - martensite transformation
DS2003-0864
2003
Valuev, E.P.Mahotkin, I.L., Robey, J., Kurszlaukis, S., Valuev, E.P., Pylaev, N.F.Pipe emplacement model of the Lomonosov diamond deposit, Arkangelsk region, NW8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 1, AbstractRussiaGeology, economics, Deposit - Lomonosov
DS200412-1203
2003
Valuev, E.P.Mahotkin, I.L., Robey, J., Kurszlaukis, S., Valuev, E.P., Pylaev, N.F.Pipe emplacement model of the Lomonosov diamond deposit, Arkangelsk region, NW Russia.8 IKC Program, Session 1, AbstractRussiaGeology, economics Deposit - Lomonosov
DS2000-0971
2000
Valverde-Vaquero, P.Valverde-Vaquero, P., Dorr, Belka, Franke, WiszniewskaUranium-lead (U-Pb) single grain dating of detrital zircon in the Cambrian of central Poland: implications for GondwanaEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 184, No.1, Dec.30, pp. 225-40.GlobalTectonics - Baltica, Trans European Suture Zone - not specific to diamonds
DS202011-2050
2020
Van, K.V.Limanov, E.V., Butvina, V.G., Safonov, O.G., Van, K.V., Aranovich, L. Ya.Phlogopite formation in the orthopyroxene-garnet system in the presence of H2O-KCL fluid to the processes of mantle metasomatism.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 494, 1, pp. 713-717.Russiametasomatism

Abstract: The results of experimental studies are presented for reactions in the orthopyroxene-garnet-phlogopite system in the presence of H2O-KCl fluid at 3-5 GPa and 900-1000°C, which model the processes of phlogopite formation in garnet peridotites and pyroxenites during alkaline metasomatism of the upper mantle. The experiments demonstrated regular variations in the composition of garnet, pyroxenes, and phlogopite depending on the KCl content of the fluid. With increasing KCl content of the fluid, enstatite and garnet become unstable, the Al2O3 content of enstatite decreases, and the amount of grossular and knorringite components in garnet are maximum at a KCl content of ~10 mol %. Our results illustrate well the regular variations in the compositions of the coexisting minerals and their zoning in phlogopite-bearing peridotites of the lithospheric mantle.
DS2003-1406
2003
Van Achetrbergh, E.Van Achetrbergh, E., Ryan, C.G., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y.Natural trace element distribution between immiscible silicate and carbonate melts8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 7, POSTER abstractNorthwest TerritoriesDeposit - A 154N Lac de Gras
DS200412-2032
2003
Van Achetrbergh, E.Van Achetrbergh, E., Ryan, C.G., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y.Natural trace element distribution between immiscible silicate and carbonate melts imaged by nuclear microprobe.8 IKC Program, Session 7, POSTER abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesKimberlite petrogenesis Deposit - A 154N Lac de Gras
DS1998-1139
1998
Van AchterberghPearson, N.J., Griffin, Kaminsky, Van AchterberghTrace element discrimination of garnet from Diamondiferous kimberlites andlamproites.7th. Kimberlite Conference abstract, pp. 673-5.South Africa, Russia, Siberia, Yakutia, Venezuela, GhanaGeochemistry, Garnets
DS2000-0363
2000
Van AchterberghGriffin, W.L., Pearson, N., Bolousova, Van AchterberghThe hafnium isotope composition of cratonic mantle: LAM MC ICPMS analysis of zircon megacrysts in kimberlites.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 64, pp. 133-47.AustraliaGeochronology
DS2001-1178
2001
Van Achterbergh, A.E.Van Achterbergh, A.E., Griffin, Kivi, Pearson, O'ReillyCarbonatites at 200 km: quenched melt inclusions in megacrystalline lherzolite xenoliths Slave Craton.Journal of South African Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 1, p. A 35.(abs)Northwest TerritoriesCarbonatite, A 154 kimberlite
DS2001-1179
2001
Van Achterbergh, A.E.Van Achterbergh, A.E., Griffin, W.L., Stiefenhofer, J.Metasomatism in mantle xenoliths from the Letlhakane kimberlites: estimation of element fluxes.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 141, No. 4, pp. 397-414.BotswanaXenoliths - alteration, Deposit - Letlhakane
DS1998-1508
1998
Van Achterbergh, E.Van Achterbergh, E., Griffin, W.L., Shee, S.R., WyattNatural trace element distribution coefficients for garnet, clino-orthopyroxene: variations T and P.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 934-6.South AfricaXenoliths, Metasomatism, Deposit - Wesselton
DS1998-1509
1998
Van Achterbergh, E.Van Achterbergh, E., Griffin, W.L., Steifenhofer, J.Xenoliths from the Letlhakane kimberlite: geochemistry and implications for mantle processes.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 937-9.BotswanaHarzburgite, lherzolite, Metasomatism, Deposit - Latlhakane
DS2002-1636
2002
Van Achterbergh, E.Van Achterbergh, E., Griffin, W.L., Ryan, C.G., O'Reilly, S.Y., Pearson, N.J.Subduction signature for quenched carbonatites from the deep lithosphereGeology, Vol.30,8,Aug.pp.743-6.MantleSubduction, Carbonatite
DS2003-1407
2003
Van Achterbergh, E.Van Achterbergh, E., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., Ryan, C.G., Pearson, N.J.Melt inclusions from the deep Slave lithosphere: constraints on the origin and evolution8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, AbstractNorthwest TerritoriesDiamonds - melting
DS200412-2033
2003
Van Achterbergh, E.Van Achterbergh, E., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., Ryan, C.G., Pearson, N.J., Kivi, K., Doyle, B.J.Melt inclusions from the deep Slave lithosphere: constraints on the origin and evolution of mantle derived carbonatite and kimbe8 IKC Program, Session 3, AbstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDiamonds - melting
DS200612-1461
2006
Van Achterbergh, E.Van Achterbergh, E., O'Reilly, S.Y., Griffin, W.L.The origin of fertile enstatite by deep seated carbonatite metasomatism.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, 1, p. 3, abstract only.MantleCarbonatite
DS200912-0008
2009
Van Achterbergh, E.Araujo, D.P., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., Grant, K.J., Ireland, T., Van Achterbergh, E.Micro inclusions in monocrystalline octahedral diamonds and coated diamonds from Diavik, Slave Craton: clues to diamond genesis.Lithos, In press available 38p.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS201112-1072
2005
Van Achterbergh, E.Van Achterbergh, E.Geochemical fingerprints of mantle metasomatism.Thesis: Macquarie University Phd. , MantleThesis: note availability based on request to author
DS200712-1107
2007
Van Acken, D.Van Acken, D., Becker, H., Wombacher, Walker, McDonough, Ash, PiccoliFractionated HSE in suboceanic mantle: assessing the influence of refertilization processes on upper mantle peridotites.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A1051.Europe, SwitzerlandWebsterite
DS200812-1186
2007
Van Acken, D.Trumbull, R.B., Reid, D.L., De Beer, C., Van Acken, D., Romer, R.L.Magmatism and continental breakup at the west margin of southern Africa: a geochemical comparison of dolerite dikes from northwestern Namibia and the Western Cape.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 110, 2-3, Sept. pp. 477-502.Africa, South Africa, NamibiaMagmatism
DS200812-1198
2008
Van Acken, D.Van Acken, D., Becker, H., Walker, R.J.Refertilization of Jurassic oceanic peridotites from the Tethys Ocean: implications for the Re Os systematics of the upper mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 268, 1-2, pp. 171-181.MantlePeridotite
DS201609-1748
2016
van Acken, D.Tappe, S., Brand, N.B., Stracke, A., van Acken, D., Liu, C-Z., Strauss, H., Wu, F-Y., Luguet, A., Mitchell, R.H.Plates or plumes in the origin of kimberlites: U/PB perovskite and Sr-Nd-Hf-Os-C-O isotope constraints from the Superior craton ( Canada).Chemical Geology, in press available 85p.Canada, QuebecDeposit - Renard, Wemindji

Abstract: Neoproterozoic kimberlite, ultramafic lamprophyre, and carbonatite magmatic activity was widespread across the Canadian-Greenland Shield. Models to explain the preponderance of this deeply-derived CO2-rich magmatism between 680-540 Ma range from impingement of multiple mantle plumes to rifting activity linked to the breakout of the Laurentian plate from the Rodinia supercontinent configuration. We add to the debate about the origin of kimberlite magmas and evaluate possible mantle sources of the 655 Ma ‘diamond-rich’ Renard (new SIMS U/Pb perovskite ages) and 629 Ma ‘barren’ Wemindji kimberlites on the eastern Superior craton in Quebec, Canada. Our Sr-Nd-Hf and carbon isotope data (87Sr/86Sri = 0.70241-0.70442; eNdi = + 0.2 to + 4.8; eHfi = + 0.3 to + 6.5; d13C = - 5.6 to - 3.9‰) suggest a common and moderately depleted convecting upper mantle source region for both the Renard and Wemindji kimberlites, which occur 400-km apart in the interior of the Superior craton. In contrast, the low Os isotope ratios (187Os/188Osi = 0.11078-0.12620; ?Osi = - 13.7 to - 1.6) and unfractionated chondritic relative HSE abundances (Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re) indicate significant involvement of ancient refractory cratonic mantle material in kimberlite magma formation. Our model calculations suggest that for both the diamond-rich Renard and the barren Wemindji kimberlite magmas up to 30% of the Os was derived from refractory cratonic peridotites. This material might have been assimilated by originally more CO2-rich carbonated silicate melts derived from the asthenosphere. We also show that the geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf-Os isotopic compositions of the Renard and Wemindji kimberlites do not require significant input from melts derived from olivine-poor cratonic mantle lithologies such as MARID-type veins and pyroxenites/eclogites. This contrasts with the petrogenesis of deeply-derived volatile-rich potassic magmas found along the peripheries of cratons (e.g., ultramafic lamprophyres, kamafugites, and olivine lamproites), a setting where abundant non-peridotitic components have been added to the lithospheric mantle over the course of continent evolution. Provided that CO2-rich melts, such as proto-kimberlites, occur near the solidus of volatile-fluxed peridotites, no excess mantle heat is required in their formation. This important but often overlooked constraint, together with the observation that there exist no spatial or temporal relationships between the Superior craton kimberlites and Large Igneous Provinces during the Late Neoproterozoic, suggests that kimberlite magmatic activity was tectonically controlled. In our preferred model, ubiquitous CO2-rich proto-kimberlite melts form during volatile-controlled redox melting processes at ambient mantle temperatures in a thermal boundary layer directly beneath thick cratonic lithosphere. The success rate of ‘evolving’ hybrid kimberlite magmas reaching Earth’s surface increases when tensile stresses propagate into the > 200 km thick keels of continental lithosphere. These conditions are frequently met during fast and changing plate motions associated with the assembly and breakup of supercontinents.
DS201612-2341
2016
van Acken, D.Tappe, S., Brand, N.B., Strackc, A., van Acken, D., Lie, C-Z., Strausf, H., Wu, F-Y., Luguet, A., Mitchell, R.H.Plates or plumes in the origin of kimberlites: U/PB perovskite and Sr-Nd-Hf-Os-C-O isotope constraints from the Superior craton ( Canada).Chemical Geology, on line August 27p.Canada, QuebecDeposit - Renard, Wemindji

Abstract: Neoproterozoic kimberlite, ultramafic lamprophyre, and carbonatite magmatic activity was widespread across the Canadian-Greenland Shield. Models to explain the preponderance of this deeply-derived CO2-rich magmatism between 680-540 Ma range from impingement of multiple mantle plumes to rifting activity linked to the breakout of the Laurentian plate from the Rodinia supercontinent configuration. We add to the debate about the origin of kimberlite magmas and evaluate possible mantle sources of the 655 Ma ‘diamond-rich’ Renard (new SIMS U/Pb perovskite ages) and 629 Ma ‘barren’ Wemindji kimberlites on the eastern Superior craton in Quebec, Canada. Our Sr-Nd-Hf and carbon isotope data (87Sr/86Sri = 0.70241-0.70442; eNdi = + 0.2 to + 4.8; eHfi = + 0.3 to + 6.5; d13C = - 5.6 to - 3.9‰) suggest a common and moderately depleted convecting upper mantle source region for both the Renard and Wemindji kimberlites, which occur 400 km apart in the interior of the Superior craton. In contrast, the low Os isotope ratios (187Os/188Osi = 0.11078-0.12620; ?Osi = - 13.7 to - 1.6) and unfractionated chondritic relative HSE abundances (Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re) indicate significant involvement of ancient refractory cratonic mantle material in kimberlite magma formation. Our model calculations suggest that for both the diamond-rich Renard and the barren Wemindji kimberlite magmas up to 30% of the Os was derived from refractory cratonic peridotites. This material might have been assimilated by originally more CO2-rich carbonated silicate melts derived from the asthenosphere. We also show that the geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf-Os isotopic compositions of the Renard and Wemindji kimberlites do not require significant input from melts derived from olivine-poor cratonic mantle lithologies such as MARID-type veins and pyroxenites/eclogites. This contrasts with the petrogenesis of deeply-derived volatile-rich potassic magmas found along the peripheries of cratons (e.g., ultramafic lamprophyres, kamafugites, and olivine lamproites), a setting where abundant non-peridotitic components have been added to the lithospheric mantle over the course of continent evolution. Provided that CO2-rich melts, such as proto-kimberlites, occur near the solidus of volatile-fluxed peridotites, no excess mantle heat is required in their formation. This important but often overlooked constraint, together with the observation that there exist no spatial or temporal relationships between the Superior craton kimberlites and Large Igneous Provinces during the Late Neoproterozoic, suggests that kimberlite magmatic activity was tectonically controlled. In our preferred model, ubiquitous CO2-rich proto-kimberlite melts form during volatile-controlled redox melting processes at ambient mantle temperatures in a thermal boundary layer directly beneath thick cratonic lithosphere. The success rate of ‘evolving’ hybrid kimberlite magmas reaching Earth’s surface increases when tensile stresses propagate into the > 200 km thick keels of continental lithosphere. These conditions are frequently met during fast and changing plate motions associated with the assembly and breakup of supercontinents.
DS201703-0436
2017
Van Acken, D.Van Acken, D., Luguet, A., Pearson, D.G., Nowell, G.M., Fonseca, R.O.C., Nagel, T.J., Schulz, T.Mesoarchean melting and Neoarchean ro Paleoproterozoic metasomatism during the formation of the cratonic mantle keel beneath West Greenland.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 203, pp. 37-53.Europe, GreenlandCraton
DS201707-1375
2017
van Acken, D.Tappe, S., Brand, N.B., Stracke, A., van Acken, D., Liu, C-Z., Strauss, H., Wu, F-Y., Luguet, A., Mitchell, R.H.Plates or plumes in the origin of kimberlites: U/pb perovskite and Sr-Nd-Hf-Os-C-O isotope contraints from the Superior craton ( Canada).Chemical Geology, Vol. 455, pp. 57-83.Canadadeposit - Renard, Wemndiji

Abstract: Neoproterozoic kimberlite, ultramafic lamprophyre, and carbonatite magmatic activity was widespread across the Canadian-Greenland Shield. Models to explain the preponderance of this deeply-derived CO2-rich magmatism between 680–540 Ma range from impingement of multiple mantle plumes to rifting activity linked to the breakout of the Laurentian plate from the Rodinia supercontinent configuration. We add to the debate about the origin of kimberlite magmas and evaluate possible mantle sources of the 655 Ma ‘diamond-rich’ Renard (new SIMS U/Pb perovskite ages) and 629 Ma ‘barren’ Wemindji kimberlites on the eastern Superior craton in Quebec, Canada. Our Sr-Nd-Hf and carbon isotope data (87Sr/86Sri = 0.70241–0.70442; eNdi = + 0.2 to + 4.8; eHfi = + 0.3 to + 6.5; d13C = - 5.6 to - 3.9‰) suggest a common and moderately depleted convecting upper mantle source region for both the Renard and Wemindji kimberlites, which occur 400 km apart in the interior of the Superior craton. In contrast, the low Os isotope ratios (187Os/188Osi = 0.11078–0.12620; ?Osi = - 13.7 to - 1.6) and unfractionated chondritic relative HSE abundances (Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re) indicate significant involvement of ancient refractory cratonic mantle material in kimberlite magma formation. Our model calculations suggest that for both the diamond-rich Renard and the barren Wemindji kimberlite magmas up to 30% of the Os was derived from refractory cratonic peridotites. This material might have been assimilated by originally more CO2-rich carbonated silicate melts derived from the asthenosphere. We also show that the geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf-Os isotopic compositions of the Renard and Wemindji kimberlites do not require significant input from melts derived from olivine-poor cratonic mantle lithologies such as MARID-type veins and pyroxenites/eclogites. This contrasts with the petrogenesis of deeply-derived volatile-rich potassic magmas found along the peripheries of cratons (e.g., ultramafic lamprophyres, kamafugites, and olivine lamproites), a setting where abundant non-peridotitic components have been added to the lithospheric mantle over the course of continent evolution. Provided that CO2-rich melts, such as proto-kimberlites, occur near the solidus of volatile-fluxed peridotites, no excess mantle heat is required in their formation. This important but often overlooked constraint, together with the observation that there exist no spatial or temporal relationships between the Superior craton kimberlites and Large Igneous Provinces during the Late Neoproterozoic, suggests that kimberlite magmatic activity was tectonically controlled. In our preferred model, ubiquitous CO2-rich proto-kimberlite melts form during volatile-controlled redox melting processes at ambient mantle temperatures in a thermal boundary layer directly beneath thick cratonic lithosphere. The success rate of ‘evolving’ hybrid kimberlite magmas reaching Earth’s surface increases when tensile stresses propagate into the > 200 km thick keels of continental lithosphere. These conditions are frequently met during fast and changing plate motions associated with the assembly and breakup of supercontinents.
DS201809-2060
2018
van Acken, D.Liu, J., Brin, L.E., Pearson, D.G., Bretschneider, L., Luguet, A., van Acken, D., Kjarsgaard, B., Riches, A., Miskovic, A.Diamondiferous Paleoproterozoic mantle roots beneath Arctic Canada: a study of mantle xenoliths from Parry Peninsula and Central Victoria Island.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2018.08.010 78p.Canada, Nunavut, Parry Peninsula. Central Victoria Islandxenoliths

Abstract: While the mantle roots directly beneath Archean cratons have been relatively well studied because of their economic importance, much less is known about the genesis, age, composition and thickness of the mantle lithosphere beneath the regions that surround the cratons. Despite this knowledge gap, it is fundamentally important to establish the nature of relationships between this circum-cratonic mantle and that beneath the cratons, including the diamond potential of circum-cratonic regions. Here we present mineral and bulk elemental and isotopic compositions for kimberlite-borne mantle xenoliths from the Parry Peninsula and Central Victoria Island, Arctic Canada. These xenoliths provide key windows into the lithospheric mantle underpinning regions to the North and Northwest of the Archean Slave craton, where the presence of cratonic material has been proposed. The mantle xenolith data are supplemented by mineral concentrate data obtained during diamond exploration. The mineral and whole rock chemistry of peridotites from both localities is indistinguishable from that of typical cratonic mantle lithosphere. The cool mantle paleogeotherms defined by mineral thermobarometry reveal that the lithospheric mantle beneath the Parry Peninsula and Central Victoria Island terranes extended well into the diamond stability field at the time of kimberlite eruption, and this is consistent with the recovery of diamonds from both kimberlite fields. Bulk xenolith Se and Te contents, and highly siderophile element (including Os, Ir, Pt, Pd and Re) abundance systematics, plus corresponding depletion ages derived from Re-Os isotope data suggest that the mantle beneath these parts of Arctic Canada formed in the Paleoproterozoic Era, at ~2?Ga, rather than in the Archean. The presence of a diamondiferous Paleoproterozoic mantle root is part of the growing body of global evidence for diamond generation in mantle roots that stabilized well after the Archean. In the context of regional tectonics, we interpret the highly depleted mantle compositions beneath both studied regions as formed by mantle melting associated with hydrous metasomatism in the major Paleoproterozoic Wopmay-Great Bear-Hottah arc systems. These ~2?Ga arc systems were subsequently accreted along the margin of the Slave craton to form a craton-like thick lithosphere with diamond potential thereby demonstrating the importance of subduction accretion in building up Earth’s long-lived continental terranes.
DS201809-2062
2018
Van Acken, D.Liu, J., Pearson, D.G., Bretschneider, L., Luguet, A., Van Acken, D., Kjarsgaard, B., Riches, A., Miskovic, A.Diamondiferous Proterozoic mantle roots beneath Arctic Canada.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractCanada, Parry Peninsula, Victoria Islandxenoliths

Abstract: The mantle roots directly beneath Archean cratons have been relatively well studied because of their economic importance, yet much less is known about the genesis, age, composition and thickness of the mantle lithosphere beneath the regions surrounding these cratons. However, it is critically important to establish the nature of the relationship between this circum-cratonic mantle and that beneath the cratons, including the diamond potential of circum-cratonic regions. Here we present mineral and bulk elemental and isotopic compositions for kimberlite-borne mantle xenoliths from the Parry Peninsula (PP) and Central Victoria Island (CVI), Arctic Canada. These xenoliths provide key windows into the lithospheric mantle underpinning regions to the North and Northwest of the Slave craton, where the presence of cratonic mantle has been proposed. The mineral and whole rock chemistry of peridotites from both localities is indistinguishable from that of typical cratonic mantle lithosphere. The cool mantle geotherms defined by mineral thermobarometry reveal that the lithospheric mantle beneath the PP and CVI terranes extended well into the diamond stability field at the time of kimberlite eruption, consistent with the recovery of diamonds from both kimberlite fields. Bulk Se, Te, and highly siderophile element abundance systematics, plus Re-Os isotope age data suggest that the mantle beneath these parts of Arctic Canada formed at ~2 Ga, rather than in the Archean. The presence of a diamondiferous Paleoproterozoic mantle root is part of the growing body of evidence for peridotitic diamond generation in mantle roots that stabilized well after the Archean. In the context of regional tectonics, the highly depleted mantle compositions beneath both regions developed during mantle melting associated with hydrous metasomatism in the major Paleoproterozoic Wopmay- Great Bear-Hottah arc systems. These terranes were subsequently accreted along the margin of the Slave craton to form a craton-like thick lithosphere with significant diamond potential.
DS202009-1669
2020
van Acken, D.Tappe, S., Stracke, A., van Acken, D., Strauss, H., Luguet, A.Origins of kimberlites and carbonatites during continental collision - insights beyond decoupled Nd-Hf isotopes. Earth-Science Reviews, in press available 72p.Global, Africa, South Africadeposit - Cullinan

Abstract: During the past two decades significant progress has been made in understanding the origin and evolution of kimberlites, including relationships to other diamondiferous magma types such as lamproites and aillikites. However, the association of kimberlites and carbonatites on continental shields remains poorly understood, and two opposing ideas dominate the debate. While one school of thought argues that primary carbonatite melts transform into hybrid carbonated silicate magmas akin to kimberlites by assimilation of cratonic mantle material, others use geochemical evidence to show that carbonatite magmas can evolve from near-primary kimberlite melts within the cratonic lithosphere. The 1.15 Ga Premier kimberlite pipe on the Kaapvaal craton in South Africa hosts several kimberlite and carbonatite dykes. Reconstructions of magma compositions suggest that up to 20 wt.% CO2 was lost from near-primary kimberlite melts during ascent through the cratonic lithosphere, but the carbonatite dyke compositions cannot be linked to the kimberlite melts via differentiation. Geochemical evidence, including mantle-like d13C compositions, suggests that the co-occurring kimberlite and carbonatite dykes represent two discrete CO2-rich magma batches derived from a mixed source in the convecting upper mantle. The carbonatites probed a slightly more depleted source component in terms of Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions relative to the peridotitic matrix that was more effectively tapped by the kimberlites (87Sr/86Sri = 0.70257 to 0.70316 for carbonatites vs. 0.70285 to 0.70546 for kimberlites; eNdi = +3.0 to +3.9 vs. +2.2 to +2.8; eHfi = -2.2 to +0.7 vs. -5.1 to -1.9). Platinum-group element systematics suggest that assimilation of refractory lithospheric mantle material by the carbonatite melts was negligible (<1 vol.%), whereas between 5 - 35 vol.% of digested cratonic peridotite account for the kimberlite compositions, including the low 187Os/188Os signature (?Osi = -12.7 to -4.5). The kimberlite and carbonatite dykes show similarly strong Nd-Hf isotope decoupling (?eHfi = -10.7 to -7.6 vs. -8.8 to -6.1), regardless of the variable lithospheric mantle imprints. This observation suggests a common sublithospheric origin of the negative ?eHf signature, possibly linked to ancient recycled oceanic crust components in the convecting upper mantle to transition zone sources of CO2-rich magmatism. Mesoproterozoic kimberlite and carbonatite magmatism at Premier was coeval with subduction and collision events along the southern Kaapvaal craton margin during the 1,220 -1,090 Ma Namaqua-Natal orogeny associated with Rodinia supercontinent formation. Thermochronology suggests that the entire Kaapvaal craton was affected by this collisional tectonic event, and it appears that the changing lithospheric stress-field created pathways for deep-sourced kimberlite and carbonatite magmas to reach Earth’s surface. We find that collision-induced (e.g., Premier) and continental breakup-related (e.g., Kimberley) kimberlite magmas are compositionally indistinguishable, with the inference that plate tectonic processes aid solely in the creation of magma ascent pathways without a major influence on deep mantle melting beneath cratons. It follows that on-craton kimberlite magmatism in the hinterland of collision zones is not necessarily more likely to entrain large sublithospheric diamonds than kimberlite eruptions linked to continental breakup. This implies that Premier’s world-class endowment with ‘ultradeep’ Type-II diamonds is not causally related to its setting behind an active orogenic front.
DS1999-0545
1999
Van ActerberghPearson, Griffin, Doyle, O'Reilly, Van Acterbergh, KiviXenoliths from kimberlite pipes of the Lac de Gras area, Slave Craton, Canada. (DO18, 27, A154S)7th International Kimberlite Conference Nixon, Vol. 2, pp. 644-58.Northwest TerritoriesPetrography, mineral chemistry, analyses, thermometry
DS200512-0369
2005
Van Acterbergh, E.Griffin, W.L., Natapov, L.M., O Reilly, S.Y., Van Acterbergh, E., Cherenkova, A.F., Cherenkov, V.G.The Kharamai kimberlite field, Siberia: modification of the lithospheric mantle by the Siberian Trap event.Lithos, Vol. 81, 1-4, pp. 167-187.Russia, SiberiaMetasomatism
DS200412-1258
2004
Van Aken, P.A.McCammon, C.A., Lauterbach, S., Seifert, F., Langenhorst, F., Van Aken, P.A.Iron oxidation state in lower mantle mineral assemblages. Part 2.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 222, 2, pp. 435-449.MantleMineral chemistry
DS2002-1023
2002
Van Akern, P.McCammon, C., Lauterbach, S., Van Akern, P., Langenhorst, F., Seifert, F.EELS studies of lower mantle mineral assemblages: a window to redox conditions18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.77.MantleUHP mineralogy - perovskite
DS1986-0827
1986
Van Allen, B.R.Van Allen, B.R., Emmons, D.L., Paster, T.P.Carbonatite dike of the Chupadera Mountains, Socorro County, New MexicoNew Mexico Geology, Vol. 8, No. 2, May pp. 25-29., p. 40United States, Colorado Plateau, New MexicoCarbonatite
DS1991-1775
1991
Van Allen, J.A.Van Allen, J.A.Why radiation belts existEos, Vol. 72, n0. 34, August 20, pp. 361, 363GlobalRadiation, Magnetosphere
DS1950-0359
1957
Van antwerpen, C.Van antwerpen, C.Diamonds All over the World. #2Brussels, Edition Du Marais, 38P.GlobalPromotional, Kimberley
DS2001-0111
2001
Van Ark, E.M.Bina, C.R., Stein, S., Marton, F.C., Van Ark, E.M.Implications of slab mineralogy for subduction dynamicsPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 127, No. 1-4, Dec. 1, pp. 51-66.MantleMineralogy - slab, Subduction - geodynamics
DS1990-1492
1990
Van Arsdale, E.B.Van Arsdale, E.B., Scherer, G.G., Schweig, E.S., Williams, R.A.Seismic reflection survey of Crowley's Ridge ArkansawEos, Vol. 71, No. 43, October 23, p. 1435 AbstractArkansasGeophysics -seismics, Crowley's Ridge
DS2002-0334
2002
Van Arsdale, R.B.Cox, R.T., Van Arsdale, R.B.The Mississippi embayment, North America: a first order continental structure generated by the Cretaceous superplume mantle event.Journal of Geodynamics, Vol.34,pp. 163-76.Kansas, Appalachia, MidcontinentTectonics, superplume, hotspot
DS201702-0247
2016
Van Avendonk, H.J.AVan Avendonk, H.J.A, Davis, J.K., Harding, J.L.Decrease in oceanic crustal thickness since the break up of Pangea.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 10, pp. 58-61.MantleTectonics

Abstract: Earth’s mantle has cooled by 6-11?°C every 100 million years since the Archaean, 2.5 billion years ago. In more recent times, the surface heat loss that led to this temperature drop may have been enhanced by plate-tectonic processes, such as continental breakup, the continuous creation of oceanic lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges and subduction at deep-sea trenches. Here we use a compilation of marine seismic refraction data from ocean basins globally to analyse changes in the thickness of oceanic crust over time. We find that oceanic crust formed in the mid-Jurassic, about 170 million years ago, is 1.7?km thicker on average than crust produced along the present-day mid-ocean ridge system. If a higher mantle temperature is the cause of thicker Jurassic ocean crust, the upper mantle may have cooled by 15-20?°C per 100 million years over this time period. The difference between this and the long-term mantle cooling rate indeed suggests that modern plate tectonics coincide with greater mantle heat loss. We also find that the increase of ocean crustal thickness with plate age is stronger in the Indian and Atlantic oceans compared with the Pacific Ocean. This observation supports the idea that upper mantle temperature in the Jurassic was higher in the wake of the fragmented supercontinent Pangaea due to the effect of continental insulation.
DS201703-0451
2016
Van Avendonk, H.J.AVan Avendonk, H.J.A, Davis, J.K., Harding, J.L.Decrease in oceanic crustal thickness since the break up of Pangea.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 10, pp. 58-61.MantleTectonics

Abstract: Earth’s mantle has cooled by 6-11?°C every 100 million years since the Archaean, 2.5 billion years ago. In more recent times, the surface heat loss that led to this temperature drop may have been enhanced by plate-tectonic processes, such as continental breakup, the continuous creation of oceanic lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges and subduction at deep-sea trenches. Here we use a compilation of marine seismic refraction data from ocean basins globally to analyse changes in the thickness of oceanic crust over time. We find that oceanic crust formed in the mid-Jurassic, about 170 million years ago, is 1.7?km thicker on average than crust produced along the present-day mid-ocean ridge system. If a higher mantle temperature is the cause of thicker Jurassic ocean crust, the upper mantle may have cooled by 15-20?°C per 100 million years over this time period. The difference between this and the long-term mantle cooling rate indeed suggests that modern plate tectonics coincide with greater mantle heat loss. We also find that the increase of ocean crustal thickness with plate age is stronger in the Indian and Atlantic oceans compared with the Pacific Ocean. This observation supports the idea that upper mantle temperature in the Jurassic was higher in the wake of the fragmented supercontinent Pangaea due to the effect of continental insulation.
DS1998-1510
1998
Van Balen, R.T.Van Balen, R.T., Heeremans, M.Middle Proterozoic early Paleozoic evolution of central Baltoscandi nan intracratonic basins: evidence diapirs..Tectonophysics, Vol. 300, No. 1-4, Dec. 31, pp. 131-42.Norway, Sweden, ScandinaviaTectonic, Craton - Baltoscandia
DS1998-1511
1998
Van Balen, R.T.Van Balen, R.T., Podladchikov, Y.Y., Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.A new multilayered model for intraplate stress induced differential subsidence of faulted lithosphere..Tectonics, Vol. 17, No. 6, Dec. pp. 938-54.GlobalBasins - rift, Subduction
DS201605-0876
2016
Van Bart, A.Mzimela, B., Kothao, L., Van Bart, A.Reducing the risk of mud flow events in block cave drawpoints through water abstraction.Diamonds Still Sparkling SAIMM 2016 Conference, Mar. 14-17, pp. 105-116.TechnologyMining - applied
DS1997-0257
1997
Van Beek, A.J.J.De Boorder, H., Van Beek, A.J.J., Panov, B.S.Crustal architecture of the Donets Basin: tectonic implications for diamond and mercury-antimony mineralsTectonophysics, Vol. 268, No. 1/4, Dec. 31, pp. 293-UKraineTectonics, Structure, Diamond mineralization, genesis
DS201112-0373
2011
Van Beek, P.H.Gleeson, T., Smith, L., Moosdorf, N., Hartmann, J., Durr, H.H., manning, A.H., Van Beek, P.H., Jellinek, A.Mapping permeability over the surface of the Earth.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 38, L02401MantleGeophysics
DS1981-0075
1981
Van bergen, M.J.Barton, M., Van bergen, M.J.Green Clinopyroxenes and Associated Phases in a Potassium Rich Lava from the Leucite Hills, Wyoming.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 77, No. 3, PP. 101-114.GlobalLeucite Hills, Leucite
DS1983-0614
1983
Van bergen, M.J.Van bergen, M.J., Ghezzo, C., Ricci, C.A.Minette inclusions in the rhyodacitic lavas of Mt. Amiata(CentralItaly); mineralogical and chemical evidence of mixing between Tuscan and Roman type lavasJournal of Vol. Geotherm. Research, Vol. 19, No. 1-2, pp. 1-35ItalyMinette
DS1992-1598
1992
Van bergen, M.J.Varekamp, J.C., Kreulen, R., Poorter, R.P.E., Van bergen, M.J.Carbon sources in arc volcanism, with implications for the carbon cycleTerra Nova, Vol. 4, pp. 363-373GlobalArc volcanism., Carbon cycle
DS201112-0740
2011
Van Bergen, M.J.Nikogosian, I.K., Van Bergen, M.J.Near source composition of Italian kamafugite melt.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1541.Europe, ItalyMagmatism
DS201312-0648
2013
Van Bergen, M.J.Nikogosian, I., Van Bergen, M.J., Chaneva, S.Multiple origins of carbon in Italian kamafugite melt.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractEurope, ItalyKamafugite
DS201806-1233
2018
van Bergen, M.J.Koornneef, J.M., Berndsen, M., Hageman, L., Gress, M.U., Timmerman, S., Nikogosian, I., van Bergen, M.J., Chinn, I.L., Harris, J.W., Davies, G.R.Melt and mineral inclusions as messengers of volatile recycling in space and time. ( olivine hosted inclusions)Geophysical Research Abstracts www.researchgate.net, Vol. 20, EGU2018-128291p. AbstractAfrica, South Africadiamond inclusions

Abstract: Changing recycling budgets of surface materials and volatiles by subduction of tectonic plates influence the compositions of Earth’s major reservoirs and affect climate throughout geological time. Fluids play a key role in processes governing subduction recycling, but quantifying the exact fate of volatiles introduced into the mantle at ancient and recent destructive plate boundaries remains difficult. Here, we report on the role of fluids and the fate of volatiles and other elements at two very different tectonic settings: 1) at subduction settings, and 2) within the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). We will show how olivine-hosted melt inclusions from subduction zones and mineral inclusions in diamond from the SCLM are used to reveal how changing tectonic settings influence volatile cycles with time. Melt inclusions from the complex Italian post-collisional tectonic setting are used to identify changing subduction recycling through time. The use of CO2 in deeply trapped melt inclusions instead of in lavas or volcanic gases provides a direct estimate of deep recycling, minimizing possible effects of contamination during transfer through the crust. The aim is to distinguish if increased recycling of sediments from the down-going plate at continental subduction settings results in increased deep CO2 recycling or if the increased CO2 flux results from crustal degassing of the overriding plate. Both processes likely affected climate through Earth history but could thus far not be discriminated. The study of mineral inclusions and their host diamonds from the SCLM can link changes in the cycling of carbon-rich fluids and the time and process through which the carbon redistribution took place. We use Sm-Nd isotope techniques to date the mineral inclusions and use the carbon isotope data of the host diamonds to investigate the growth conditions. I will present case-studies of peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds from three mines in Southern Africa.
DS201908-1782
2019
van Bergen, M.J.Koornneef, J.M., Nikogosian, I., van Bergen, M.J., Vroon, P.Z., Davies, G.R.Ancient recycled lower crust in the mantle source of recent Italian magmatism.Nature Communications, doi.org/10.1038/ s41467-019-11072-5 10p. PdfEurope, Italysubduction

Abstract: Recycling of Earth’s crust through subduction and delamination contributes to mantle heterogeneity. Melt inclusions in early crystallised magmatic minerals record greater geochemical variability than host lavas and more fully reflect the heterogeneity of magma sources. To date, use of multiple isotope systems on small (
DS1990-1493
1990
Van Bever Donker, J.M.Van Bever Donker, J.M., Humphreys, H.C., Swartz, H.G., Domoney, R.N.The history of deformation along the boundary between an Archean craton And a Proterozoic island arcTerra, Abstracts of Crustal Dynamics: Pathways and Records held Bochum FRG, Vol. 2, December p. 20South AfricaCraton -Kaapvaal, Tectonics
DS1988-0722
1988
Van Blerck, M.C.Van Blerck, M.C.Mining tax: income tax capital allowances granted to South african gold and natural oil MinesJournal of South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (IMM), Vol. 88, No. 7, July pp. 227-232. Database # 17379South AfricaEconomics, Legal -taxes
DS1994-1823
1994
Van Blerck, M.C.Van Blerck, M.C.Mining and the environment: tax incentives encourage orderly planningSouth African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (IMM), June pp. 129-132South AfricaLaw, legal, Environment
DS1993-1639
1993
Van Bockstael, M.Van Bockstael, M.Western Australian diamondsBulletin. Soc. Belge de Geologie, Vol. 101, No. 1, 2, pp. 55-63.AustraliaLamproites, Deposit -Argyle
DS201610-1853
2014
Van Bockstael, M.Chirico, P.G., Malpeti, K.C., Van Bockstael, M., Mamandou, D., Cisse, K., Diallo, T.A., Sano, M.Alluvial diamond resource potential and production capacity assessment of Guinea.U.S. Geological Survey, Report 2012-5256, 49p.Africa, GuineaAlluvials, resources

Abstract: In May of 2000, a meeting was convened in Kimberley, South Africa, by representatives of the diamond industry and leaders of African governments to develop a certification process intended to assure that export shipments of rough diamonds were free of conflict concerns. Outcomes of the meeting were formally supported later in December of 2000 by the United Nations in a resolution adopted by the General Assembly. By 2002, the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) was ratified and signed by diamond-producing and diamond-importing countries. The goal of this study was to estimate the alluvial diamond resource endowment and the current production capacity of the alluvial diamond mining sector of Guinea. A modified volume and grade methodology was used to estimate the remaining diamond reserves within Guinea’s diamondiferous regions, while the diamond-production capacity of these zones was estimated by inputting the number of artisanal miners, the number of days artisans work per year, and the average grade of the deposits into a formulaic expression. Guinea’s resource potential was estimated to be approximately 40 million carats, while the production capacity was estimated to lie within a range of 480,000 to 720,000 carats per year. While preliminary results have been produced by integrating historical documents, five fieldwork campaigns, and remote sensing and GIS analysis, significant data gaps remain. The artisanal mining sector is dynamic and is affected by a variety of internal and external factors. Estimates of the number of artisans and deposit variables, such as grade, vary from site to site and from zone to zone. This report has been developed on the basis of the most detailed information available at this time. However, continued fieldwork and evaluation of artisanally mined deposits would increase the accuracy of the results.
DS202011-2066
2020
Van Bockstael, S.Van Bockstael, S.From boom to bust, and back again: the Tortiya diamond fields of Cote d'Ivoire, 1947-2018.Canadian Journal of Development Studies, Vol. 41, 3, pp. 450-466. pdfAfrica, Ivory Coasthistory

Abstract: Implementation of the African Mining Vision in Côte d’Ivoire is weak, and AMV domestication is unlikely to happen soon. Focusing on the artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) sector, a key section of the AMV, we look at the tumultuous recent history of the diamond mining town Tortiya. The subject of a halting and uneven formalisation process, the case is emblematic for the lack of interest shown in ASM at a policy level. This is due to high costs, and low political and economic returns of formalisation. It underscores a broader lack of strategic vision for the mining sector.
DS200512-0834
2005
Van BreemanPehrsson, S.L., Berman, R.G., Rainbird, R., Davis, W., Skulski, Sanborn-Barrie, Van Breeman, Corrigan, TellaInterior collisional orogenesis related to supercontinent assembly: the ca. 1.9- 1.5 Ga tectonic history of the western Churchill province.GAC Annual Meeting Halifax May 15-19, Abstract 1p.Canada, SaskatchewanNuna, tectonics
DS200512-0402
2005
Van Breeman, O.Harper, C.T., Van Breeman, O., Wodick,N., Pehrsson, S., Heaman, L., Hartlaub, R.The Paleoproterozoic lithostructural history and thermotectonic reactivation of the Archean basement in southern Hearne domain of northeastern Saskatchewan.GAC Annual Meeting Halifax May 15-19, Abstract 1p.Canada, SaskatchewanTrans Hudson orogen
DS200912-0079
2009
Van Breeman, O.Buchan, K.L., LeCheminant, A.N., Van Breeman, O.Paleomagnetism and UPb geochronology of the Lac de Gras diabase dyke swarm, Slave Province, Canada: implications for relative drift of Slave and SuperiorCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 46, 5, May pp.361-379.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesPaleproterozoic
DS201012-0077
2010
Van Breeman, O.Buchan, K.L., Ernst, R.E., Bleeker, W., Davis, W.J., Villeneuve, M., Van Breeman, O., Hamilton, SoderlundMap of Proterozoic magmatic events in the Slave Craton, Wopmay Orogen and environs, Canadian Shield.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesMagmatism
DS201012-0511
2010
Van Breeman, O.Mitchell, R.N., Van Breeman, O., Buchan, K.L., Le Cheminant, T.N., Bleeker, W., Evans, D.A.D.Supercratons at the ends of Early Proterozoic Earth: reconstruction of Slave, Superior, and Kaapvaal cratons at 2200-2000 Ma.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractCanada, Africa, South AfricaKenorland
DS2001-0352
2001
Van BreemenGandhi, S.S., Mortensen, J.K., Prasad, N., Van BreemenMagmatic evolution of the southern Great Bear continental arc, northwestern Canadian shield....Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 38, No. 5, May, pp. 767-85.Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology - Slave Craton
DS2001-0912
2001
Van BreemenPeterson, T.D., Van Breemen, Sandeman, CousensPostorogenic granitoids and ultrapotassic rocks in the Hinterland of the Trans Hudson Orogen.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting Abstracts, Vol. 26, p. 117.abstract.Saskatchewan, GreenlandMinettes
DS1990-0380
1990
Van Breemen, O.Culshaw, N., Van Breemen, O.A zoned low pressure-high T complex at the level of anatexis- structural and plutonic patterns in metasediments of the Archean Yellowknife Supergroup, near Bathurst InletPrecambrian Research, Vol. 48, pp. 1-20Northwest TerritoriesArchean Yellowknife Supergroup, Tectonics
DS1992-0661
1992
Van Breemen, O.Hanmer, S., Bowring, S., Van Breemen, O., Parrish, R.Great Slave Lake shear zone, northwest Canada: mylonitic record of early Proterozoic continental convergence, collision and indentationJournal of Structural Geology, Vol. 14, No. 7, pp. 757-773Northwest TerritoriesStructure Tectonics, Shear zone
DS1992-0708
1992
Van Breemen, O.Higgins, M.D., Van Breemen, O.The age of Lac Saint Jean anorthosite intrusion and associated mafic rocksCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 29, pp. 1412-23.QuebecGeochronology
DS1994-0187
1994
Van Breemen, O.Bostock, H.H., Van Breemen, O.Ages of detrital and metamorphic zircons, monazites a pre-Taltson magmatic zone basin w edge of Rae Province.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 31, No. 8, August, pp. 1353-1364.Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology, tectonics, craton, Rae Province
DS1994-0361
1994
Van Breemen, O.Currie, K.L., Van Breemen, O.Tectonics and age of the Kipawa syenite complex, western QuebecGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstract Volume, Vol. 19, p.QuebecTectonics, Kipawa Syenite
DS1994-1009
1994
Van Breemen, O.LeCheminant, A.N., Van Breemen, O.uranium-lead (U-Pb) (U-Pb) ages of Proterozoic dyke swarms, Lac de Gras area, Northwest Territories: evidence for progressive break up of an Archean supercontinent.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstract Volume, Vol. 19, p.Northwest TerritoriesDyke, Supercontinent
DS1994-1235
1994
van Breemen, O.Morin, D., Corriveau, L., Tellier, M., van Breemen, O.A 1070 Ma ultrapotassic breccia dyke in the Central metasedimentary belt ofQuebec.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstract Volume, Vol. 19, p. posterQuebecDyke, Ultrapotassic
DS1994-1860
1994
Van Breemen, O.Villeneuve, M.E., Van Breemen, O.A compilation of uranium-lead (U-Pb) age dat a from the Slave ProvinceGeological Survey of Canada Open file, No. 2972, 53p.Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology, Slave Province
DS1995-1076
1995
Van Breemen, O.LeCheminant, A.N., Van Breemen, O., Buchan, K.L.Proterozoic dyke swarms Lac de Gras Aylmer Lake area: regional distribution ages and PaleomagnetismGeological Association of Canada (GAC)/Mineralogical Association of Canada (MAC) Annual Meeting Abstracts, Vol. 20, p. A57 AbstractNorthwest TerritoriesPaleomagnetics, Dyke swarms
DS1996-0318
1996
Van Breemen, O.Currie, K.L., Van Breemen, O.The origin of rare minerals in the Kipawa syenite complex, western QuebecCanadian Mineralogist, Vol. 34, pt. 2, April pp. 435-452.QuebecAlkaline, carbonatite, Deposit -Kipawa
DS1996-0341
1996
Van Breemen, O.Davis, W.J., Gariepy, C., Van Breemen, O.lead isotopic composition of late Archean granites and the extent of recycling early Archean crust Slave ProvinceChemical Geology, Vol. 130, pp. 255-269Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology, Point Lake, Contwoyto Lake, Slave Province
DS1996-0628
1996
Van Breemen, O.Higgins, M.D., Van Breemen, O.Three generations of AMCG magmatism contact metamorphism and tectonism in Saguenay Lac Saint JeanPrecambrian Research, Vol. 79, pp. 327-46.QuebecGeochronology
DS1996-0823
1996
Van Breemen, O.LeCheminant, A.N., Heaman, L.M., Van Breemen, O., et al.Mafic magmatism, mantle roots and kimberlites in the Slave CratonGeological Survey of Canada, LeCheminant ed, OF 3228, pp. 161-169.Northwest TerritoriesCraton - dykes, plumes, rifting, Mackenzie Dyke swarm
DS1996-1093
1996
Van Breemen, O.Pehrsson, S., Hanmer, S., Van Breemen, O.uranium-lead (U-Pb) geochronology of the Raglan gabbro belt: implications for an ensialic marginal basin GrenvilleCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 33, pp. 691-702.Quebec, Labrador, UngavaGeochronology, Orogeny - Grenville
DS1999-0068
1999
Van Breemen, O.Bingen, B., Demaiffe, D., Van Breemen, O.The 616 Ma old Egersund basaltic dike swarm and late Neoproterozoic opening of the Iapetus Ocean.Journal of Geology, Vol. 106, No. 5, Sept. pp. 565-74.Norway, Labrador, QuebecTectonics, Dikes, Long Range
DS2002-1254
2002
Van Breemen, O.Peterson, T.D., Van Breemen, O., Sandeman, H., Cousens, B.Proterozoic (1.85-1.75 Ga) igneous suites of the Western Churchill Province: granitoidPrecambrian Research, Vol. 119, No. 1-4, pp. 73-100.Alberta, Northwest TerritoriesMagmatism - tectonics, Minettes, Trans Hudson
DS200612-0422
2005
Van Breemen, O.Gandhi, S.S., Van Breemen, O.SHRIMP U Pb geochronology of detrital zircons from the Treasure Lake Group - new evidence for Paleoproterozoic collisional tectonics in the southern Hottah terrane.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 42, 5, pp. 833-845.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology - not specific to diamonds
DS200912-0080
2009
Van Breemen, O.Buchan, K.L., LeCheminant, A.N., Van Breemen, O.Paleomagnetism and U-Pb geochronology of the Lac de Gras diabase dyke swarm, Slave Province Canada: implications for relative drift of Slave and Superior provinces in the Paleoproterozoic.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 46, pp. 361-379.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeophysics
DS2003-1055
2003
Van BreenenPehrsson, S.J., Peterson, T., Davis, W.J., Sandeman, Skulski, Van BreenenAncient Archean crust in the Western Churchill Province: a review of direct and indirect31st Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 75. (abst.)Saskatchewan, Manitoba, NunavutTectonics - lithosphere
DS2003-1056
2003
Van BreenenPehrsson, S.J., Peterson, T., Davis, W.J., Sandeman, Skulski, Van BreenenThe Western Churchill metallogeny project: from Melville to Uranium City, a new look31st Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 77. (abst.)Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Nunavut, Northwest TerritoriesBedrock compilation
DS200412-1515
2003
Van BreenenPehrsson, S.J., Peterson, T., Davis, W.J., Sandeman, Skulski, Van Breenen, Hartlaub, Wodicks, Hanmer, CousensAncient Archean crust in the Western Churchill Province: a review of direct and indirect evidence.31st Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 75. (abst.)Canada, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, NunavutTectonics - lithosphere
DS200412-1516
2003
Van BreenenPehrsson, S.J., Peterson, T., Davis, W.J., Sandeman, Skulski, Van Breenen, Hartlaub, Wodicks, Hanmer, CousensThe Western Churchill metallogeny project: from Melville to Uranium City, a new look at the largest under explored Craton in the31st Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 77. (abst.)Canada, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Northwest Territories, NunavutBedrock compilation
DS201212-0288
2012
Van Breugel, B.Harvey, S., Read, G., DesGagnes, B., Shimell, M., Danoczi, J., Van Breugel, B., Fourie, L., Stilling, A.Utilization of olivine macrocryst grain size and abundance dat a as a proxy for diamond size and grade in pyroclastic deposits of the Orion South kimberlite Fort a la Corne, Sasakatchewan, Canada.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractCanada, SaskatchewanDeposit - Orion South
DS201412-0344
2013
van Breugel, B.Harvey, S., Read, G., DesGagnes, B., Shimell, M., van Breugel, B., Fourie, L.Utilization of olivine macrocryst grain size and abundance dat a as a proxy for diamond size and grade in pyroclastic deposits of the Orion South kimberlite, Fort a la Corne, Saskatchewan, Canada.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, pp. 79-96.Canada, SaskatchewanDeposit - Orion South
DS201412-0135
2014
van Buren, R.Combrink, M., van Buren, R.Shallow alluvial diamond exploration with GENESIS airborne TEMGSSA Kimberley Diamond Symposium and Trade Show provisional programme, Sept. 10-12, POSTERTechnologyGeophysics - GENESIS
DS1975-1232
1979
Van buren, W.Steele, K.F., Jackson, K.C., Van buren, W.Geochemical Comparison of Arkansaw SyeniteGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 11, No. 2, P. 166. (abstract.).United States, Gulf Coast, Arkansas, Garland County, Hot Spring CountyMagnet Cove, Potash Sulfur Springs, Geochemistry
DS1986-0349
1986
Van Calsteren, P.Hawkesworth, C.J., Van Calsteren, P., Palacz, Z., Rogers, N.W.Crustal xenoliths from southern Africa: chemical and age variations within the continental crustProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 253-255South Africa, LesothoBlank
DS1987-0282
1987
Van Calsteren, P.Hawkesworth, C.J., Van Calsteren, P., Rogers, N.W., Menzies, M.A.Isotope variations in recent volacnics: a trace element perspectiveIn: Mantle Metasomatism, edited M.A. Menzies, C.J. Hawkesworth, Academic, pp. 365-388GlobalBlank
DS1988-0348
1988
Van Calsteren, P.Kempton, P.D., Hawkesworth, C.J., Van Calsteren, P., Moorbath, S.Evidence for Cenozoic underplating of the lower crust: isotopic andTerra Cognita, Eclogite conference Abstracts, Vol. 8, No. 3, Summer, p. 271. AbstractArizonaMantle, Geronimo
DS1995-0829
1995
Van Calsteren, P.Huang, Y.-M., Van Calsteren, P., Hawkesworth, C.J.The evolution of the lithosphere in southern Africa: a perspective on basic granulite xenoliths - kimberlitesGeochim. Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 59, No. 23, Dec. 1, pp. 4905-4920.South Africa, BotswanaXenoliths, Kimberlites
DS1982-0265
1982
Van calsteren, P.W.Hawkesworth, C.J., Rogers, N.W., Van calsteren, P.W., Menzies.Neodymium and Strontium Isotope Studies on Crustal Xenoliths from southernafrica.Proceedings of Third International Kimberlite Conference, TERRA, Vol. 2, No. 3, P. 236, (abstract.).South Africa, LesothoKimberlite, Geochronology
DS1980-0237
1980
Van calsteren, P.W.C.Minnigh, L.D., Van calsteren, P.W.C., Den tex, E.Quenching: an Additional Model for Emplacement of the Lherzolite at Lers (french Pyrenees.)Geology, Vol. 8, JANUARY PP. 18-21.GlobalGeology
DS1984-0349
1984
Van calsteren, P.W.C.Hawkesworth, C.J., Rogers, N.W., Van calsteren, P.W.C., Menzies.Mantle Enrichment ProcessesNature., Vol. 311, No. 6984, SEPT. 27TH. PP. 331-335.GlobalBasanite, Kimberlite, Genesis
DS1987-0532
1987
Van Calsteren, P.W.C.Nixon, P.H., Van Calsteren, P.W.C., Boyd, F.R., Hawkesworth, C.J.Harzburgites with garnets of diamond facies from southernAfricankimberlitesin: Nixon, P.H. ed. Mantle xenoliths, J. Wiley, pp. 523-534South Africap. 527 analyses
DS200812-0806
2008
Van Collar, B.Nowicki, T., Hetman, C.J., Gurney, J., Van Collar, B., Galloway, M., Mukodzani, B.Optimizing kimberlite evaluation programs by integrating geological, mineralogical and geophysical data.Northwest Territories Geoscience Office, p. 46-47. abstractTechnologyBrief overview - evaluation
DS2003-1408
2003
Van Coller, B.Van Coller, B., Hildenbrand, P., Verran, D., Barnes, F., Nowicki, T.E.Southern African case studies of variations in indicator mineral characteristics with8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 8, POSTER abstractSouth AfricaBlank
DS2003-1478
2003
Van Coller, B.Williams, C., Van Coller, B., Nowicki, T., Gurney, J.J.Mega Kalahari geology: challenges of kimberlite exploration in this medium8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 8, POSTER abstractSouth Africa, Democratic Republic of CongoKaapvaal Craton
DS200412-2034
2003
Van Coller, B.Van Coller, B., Hildenbrand, P., Verran, D., Barnes, F., Nowicki, T.E., Baumgartner, M., Ott, L., Gurney, J.J.Southern African case studies of variations in indicator mineral characteristics with distance from kimberlite source.8 IKC Program, Session 8, POSTER abstractAfrica, South AfricaDiamond exploration
DS200412-2115
2003
Van Coller, B.Williams, C., Van Coller, B., Nowicki, T., Gurney, J.J.Mega Kalahari geology: challenges of kimberlite exploration in this medium.8 IKC Program, Session 8, POSTER abstractAfrica, South Africa, Democratic Republic of CongoDiamond exploration Kaapvaal Craton
DS200812-0805
2008
Van Coller, B.Nowicki, T., Helman, C., Gurney, J., Van Coller, B., Galloway, M., Smith, C., Mukodzani, B.Optimizing kimberlite evaluation programs by integrating geological, mineralogical and geophysical data.GSSA-SEG Meeting Held July, Johannesburg, 19 Power point slidesTechnologyEvaluation
DS200912-0240
2009
Van Coller, B.Galloway, M., Nowicki, T., Van Coller, B., Mukodzani, B., Siemens, K., Hetman, C., Webb, K., Gurney, J.Constraining kimberlite geology through integration of geophysical, geological and geochemical methods: a case study of the Mothae kimberlite, northern Lesotho.Lithos, In press - available 47p.Africa, LesothoDeposit - Mothae
DS1995-0758
1995
Van Couvering, J.Harris, J., Van Couvering, J.Mick aridity and the paleoecology of volcanically influenced ecosystemsGeology, Vol. 23, No. 7, July pp. 593-596KenyaVolcanicity volcanics, Arid environments
DS1997-1190
1997
Van Couvering, J.Van Couvering, J.Diamond desert memoriesNatural History, Vol. 106, No. 10, Nov. pp. 16-21.NamibiaHistory, Popular article
DS2001-1182
2001
Van De CarVan der Lee, S., Van De Car, Fouch, JamesCombined sensitivity to the Kaapvaal tectosphere of regional and teleseismic surface and S Waves.Slave-Kaapvaal Workshop, Sept. Ottawa, 3p. abstractSouth AfricaGeophysics - seismics, Lithosphere
DS200412-0567
2004
Van De Car, J.C.Fouch, M.J., James, D.E., Van De Car, J.C., Van Der Lee, S.Mantle seismic structure beneath the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 107, 1/2, pp. 33-44.Africa, South Africa, ZimbabweGeophysics - seismics, tectonics, magmatism
DS2001-0528
2001
Van De Car, M.J.James, D.E., Fouch, D.J., Van De Car, M.J., VanderleeTectosphere structure beneath southern AfricaGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 28, No. 13, July 1, pp. 2485-88.South AfricaTectonics
DS1975-0751
1978
Van De Graaff, W.J.E.Van De Graaff, W.J.E., Crowe, R.W.A., Bunting, J.A., Jackson, M.Relic Early Cainozoic Drainages in Arid Western AustraliaZeitschr. Geomorph., Vol. 21, No. 4, PP. 379-400.Australia, Western AustraliaDiamond, Geomorphology
DS201805-0986
2018
van de Locht, J.van de Locht, J., Hoffmann, J.E., Li, C., Wang, Z., Becker, H., Rosing, M.T., Kleinschrodt, R., Munker, C.Earth's oldest mantle peridotites show entire record of late accretion.Geology, Vol. 46, 3, pp. 199-202.Europe, Greenlandperidotites

Abstract: An important issue in Earth’s earliest history is the timing and mixing history of the late accreted material that supplied highly siderophile elements to Earth’s mantle after core segregation. Previously, constraints on ancient mantle processes could only be obtained indirectly from mantle-derived magmas such as basalts or komatiites. Relics of Eoarchean (older than 3.8 Ga) mantle were proposed to occur within the Eoarchean terrains of western Greenland. Here we provide geochemical evidence, including combined platinum group element (PGE) and Re-Os isotope data, showing that modern mantle-like peridotites occur at two localities in southwest Greenland. Rhenium-depletion model ages of these peridotites are mostly of Eoarchean age, in accord with U-Pb zircon ages of crosscutting granitoid intrusives. PGE abundances and patterns are similar to those of modern depleted mantle peridotites. For the first time, such patterns provide conclusive evidence for preservation of Eoarchean depleted mantle rocks that are clearly distinguishable from magmatic cumulates or komatiites. Abundances of Os, Ir, and Ru combined with Os isotope compositions in the Greenland peridotites reveal that primitive late accreted material appears to have been efficiently mixed into the sampled mantle domains by Eoarchean time.
DS201602-0229
2016
van de Moortele, B.Perrillat, J.P., Chollet, M., Durand, S., van de Moortele, B., Chambat, F., Mezouar, M., Daniel, I.Kinetics of the olivine-ring woodite transformation and seismic attentuation in the Earth's mantle transition zone.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 433, pp. 360-369.MantleGeophysics - seismics

Abstract: In regions of the mantle where multi-phases coexist like at the olivine-wadsleyite-ringwoodite transitions, the stress induced by the seismic waves may drive a mineralogical reaction between the low to high pressure phases, a possible source of dissipation. In such a situation, the amount of attenuation critically depends on the timescale for the phase transformations to reach equilibrium relative to the period of the seismic wave. Here we report synchrotron-based measurements of the kinetics of the olivine to ringwoodite transformation at pressure-temperature conditions of the co-stability loop, for iron-rich olivine compositions. Both microstructural and kinetic data suggest that the transformation rates are controlled by growth processes after the early saturation of nucleation sites along olivine grain boundaries. Transformation-time data show an increase of reaction rates with temperature and iron content, and have been fitted to a rate equation for interface-controlled transformation: G=k0·T·exp?[n·XFa]·exp?[-(?Ha+PV?)/RT]×[1-exp?(?Gr/RT)]G=k0·T·exp?[n·XFa]·exp?[-(?Ha+PV?)/RT]×[1-exp?(?Gr/RT)], where XFaXFa is the fayalite fraction, the exponential factor n=9.7n=9.7, View the MathML sourceln?k0=-9.1 ms-1. View the MathML sourceXFa-1 and ?Ha=199 kJ/mol?Ha=199 kJ/mol, assuming V?=0 cm3/molV?=0 cm3/mol. Including these new kinetic results in a micro-mechanical model of a two-phase loop (Ricard et al., 2009), we predict View the MathML sourceQK-1 and View the MathML sourceQµ-1 significantly higher than the PREM values for both body waves and normal modes. This attests that the olivine-wadsleyite transition can significantly contribute to the attenuation of the Earth's mantle transition zone.
DS1996-1436
1996
Van de VooTorsvik, T.H., Smethurst, M.A., Meert, J.G., Van de VooContinental breakup and collision in the Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic - atale of Baltica and Laurentia.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 40, pp. 229-258.Baltica, Laurentia, Rodinia, PangeaSupercontinent, Tectonics
DS2001-1180
2001
Van de Zedde, D.M.A.Van de Zedde, D.M.A., Wortel, M.J.R.Shallow slab detachment as a transient source of heat at midlithospheric depthsTectonics, Vol. 20, No. 6, Dec. pp. 868-82.MantleSlab, breakoff, Subduction
DS2002-1523
2002
Van Decan, J.C.Sol, S., Thomson, C.J., Kendall, J.M., White, D., Van Decan, J.C., Asudeh, I.Seismic tomographic images of the cratonic upper mantle beneath the Western SuperiorPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Letters, Vol. 134, 1-2, pp. 53-69.Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Northwest TerritoriesGeophysics - seismics, subduction
DS1998-1240
1998
Van Decar, J.C.Ritsema, J., Nyblade, A.A., Van Decar, J.C.Upper mantle seismic velocity structure beneath Tanzania, implications For the stability of cratonic..Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 103, No. 9, Sept. 10, pp. 21, 201-14.Tanzania, East AfricaGeophysics - seismics, Craton, lithosphere
DS200612-0124
2006
Van Decar, J.C.Benoit, M.H., Nyblade, A.A., Van Decar, J.C.Upper mantle P wave speed variations beneath Ethiopia and the origin of the Afar hotspot.Geology, Vol. 34, 5, pp. 329-332.Africa, EthiopiaGeophysics - seismic, plume
DS200712-0188
2007
Van den Berg, A.Cizkova, H., Van Hunden, J., Van den Berg, A.Stress distribution within subducting slabs and their deformation in the transition zone.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 161, 3-4, pp. 202-214.MantleSubduction
DS1993-1640
1993
Van den Berg, A.P.Van den Berg, A.P., et al.High melting temperature of perovskite: dynamical implications for creep In the lower mantle.American Geophysical Union, EOS, supplement Abstract Volume, October, Vol. 74, No. 43, October 26, abstract p. 557.MantlePerovskite, Petrology
DS1994-1864
1994
Van den Berg, A.P.Vlaar, N.J., Van Keken, .E., Van den Berg, A.P.Cooling of the Earth in the Archean: consequences of pressure release melting in a hotter mantleEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 121, No. 1-2, January pp. 1-18MantleArchean, Melting
DS1994-1865
1994
Van den Berg, A.P.Vlaar, N.J., Van Keken, P.E., Van den Berg, A.P.Cooling of the earth in thr Archean: consequences of pressure release melting in a hotter mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 121, No. 1/2, January pp. 1-18.MantleArchean, Hot spots
DS1998-0197
1998
Van den Berg, A.P.Cadek, O., Van den Berg, A.P.Radial profiles of temperature and viscosity in the Earth's mantle inferred from the geoid and lateral seismic structure.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 164, No.4, Dec.30. pp. 607-616.MantleGeophysics - seismics, tomography
DS1998-0325
1998
Van den Berg, A.P.De Smet, J.H., Van den Berg, A.P., Vlaar, N.J.Stability and growth of continental shields in mantle convection models including recurrent melt production.Tectonophysics, Vol. 296, No. 1-2, . Oct. 30, pp. 15-30.MantleCraton, Magmatism
DS1999-0161
1999
Van Den Berg, A.P.De Smet, J.H., Van Den Berg, A.P., Vlaar, N.J.The evolution of continental roots in numerical thermo-chemical mantle convection models including ...Lithos, Vol. 48, No. 1-4, Sept. pp. 153-70.MantleGeothermometry - model, Melting - differentiation of partial
DS2000-0216
2000
Van den Berg, A.P.De Smet, J., Van den Berg, A.P., Vlaar, N.J.Early formation and long term stability of continents resulting from decompression melting convecting mantle.Tectonophysics, Vol. 322, No. 1-2, pp. 19-33.MantleMagmatism - convection
DS2000-0217
2000
Van den Berg, A.P.De Smet, J., Van den Berg, A.P., Vlaar, N.J.Early formation and long term stability of continents resulting decompression melting in convecting mantle.Tectonophysics, Vol.322, No.1-2, July10, pp.19-34.MantleMagmatism, Convection
DS2002-1637
2002
Van den Berg, A.P.Van den Berg, A.P., Yuen, D.A., Allwardt, J.R.Non linear effects from variable thermal conductivity and mantle internal heating: implications for melting..Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol.129, 3-4, pp.359-75.MantleMelting - massive and secular cooling
DS2002-1644
2002
Van den Berg, A.P.Van Hunen, J., Van den Berg, A.P., Vlaar, N.J.The impact of the South American plate motion and the Nazca Ridge subduction on the flat subduction below south Peru.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 29, 14, DOI 10.1029/2001GL014004PeruTectonics - subduction
DS200512-1115
2005
Van den Berg, A.P.Van den Berg, A.P., Rainey, E.S., Yuen, D.A.The combined influence of variable thermal conductivity, temperature and pressure dependent viscosity and core mantle coupling on thermal evolutionPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 149, 3-4, pp. 259-278.MantleGeothermometry
DS200512-1116
2005
Van den Berg, A.P.Van den Berg, A.P., Rainey, E.S.G., Yuen, D.A.Dependent viscosity and core mantle coupling on thermal evolution.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 149, 3-4, April 15, pp. 259-278.MantleGeothermometry
DS200512-1120
2004
Van den Berg, A.P.Van Hunen, J., Van den Berg, A.P., Vlaar, N.J.Various mechanisms to induce present day shallow flat subduction and implications for the younger Earth: a numerical parameter study.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 146, 1-2, pp. 159-194.MantleSubduction
DS200512-1124
2004
Van den Berg, A.P.Van Thiemen, P., Van den Berg, A.P., Vlaar, N.J.On the formation of continental silicic melts in thermochemical mantle convection models: implications for early Earth.Tectonophysics, Vol. 394, 1-2, pp. 111-138.MantleGeothermometry
DS200812-1203
2008
Van den Berg, A.P.Van Hunen, J., Van den Berg, A.P.Plate tectonics on the Early Earth: limitations imposed by strength and bouyancy of subducted lithosphere.Lithos, Vol. 103, 1-2, pp. 217-235.MantleTectonics
DS201412-0939
2014
Van den Berg, A.P.Van den Berg, A.P., Yuen, D.A.Is the lower mantle rheology Newtonian today?Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 23, 16, pp. 2033-20136.MantleRheology
DS2002-1638
2002
Van den Berg, E.H.Van den Berg, E.H., Meetsers, Kenter, SchlagerAutomated separation of touching grains in digital images of thin sectionsComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 28, No. 2, Feb. pp. 179-90.GlobalComputers, Thin sections - not specific to diamonds
DS2003-1410
2003
Van den Berg, P.M.Van der Kruk, J., Wapenaar, C.P.A., Fokkema, J.T., Van den Berg, P.M.Three dimensional imaging of multicomponent ground penetrating radar dataGeophysics, Vol. 68, 4, pp. 1241-54.GlobalGeophysics - radar not specific to diamonds
DS200412-2036
2003
Van den Berg, P.M.Van der Kruk, J., Wapenaar, C.P.A., Fokkema, J.T., Van den Berg, P.M.Three dimensional imaging of multicomponent ground penetrating radar data.Geophysics, Vol. 68, 4, pp. 1241-54.TechnologyGeophysics - radar not specific to diamonds
DS1990-1494
1990
Van den Beukel, J.Van den Beukel, J.Breakup of young oceanic lithosphere in the upper part of a subductionzone: implications for the emplacement of ophiolitesTectonics, Vol. 9, No. 4, August pp. 825-844GlobalOphiolite, Tectonics
DS1990-1495
1990
Van Den Beukel, P.J.Van Den Beukel, P.J.Thermal and mechanical modelling of convergent plate marginsGeol. Ultraiectina, University of Utrech, Institute of Earth Sciences, The, No. 62, 126pGlobalOphiolites, Plate Tectonics, Table of contents only
DS2002-0730
2002
Van den Bogaard, P.Hoernle, K., Van den Bogaard, P., Werner, R., Lissinaa, B., Hauff, F., AlvaradoMissing history ( 16 -71 Ma) of the Galapagos hotspot: implications for the tectonicGeology, Vol. 30, 9, Sept. pp. 795-98.United StatesTectonics
DS200812-0392
2008
Van den Bogaard, P.Geldmacher, J., Hoernle, K., Lgel, A., Van den Bogaard, P., Bindeman, I.Geochemistry of a new enriched mantle type locality in the northern hemisphere: implications for the origin of the EM-I source.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 265, 1-2, pp. 167-182.MantleGeophysics - EM
DS200812-0420
2007
Van den Bogaard, P.Goldmacher, J., Hoernle, K., Klugel, A., Van den Bogaard, P., Bindeman, I.Geochemistry of a new enriched mantle type locality in the northern hemisphere: implications for the origin of the EM-I source.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 265, 1-2, pp. 167-182.MantleMetasomatism
DS201012-0598
2010
Van den Bogaard, P.Prelevic, D., Akal, C., Foley, S.F., Romer, R.L., Stracke, A., Van den Bogaard,P.Post collisional mantle dynamics of an orogenic lithosphere: lamproitic mafic rocks from SW Anatolia, Turkey.Geological Society of America Abstracts, 1p.Europe, TurkeyLamproite
DS201112-0824
2011
Van den Bogaard, P.Prelevic, D., Akal, C., Foley, S.F., Romer, R.R.,Stracke, A., Van den Bogaard, P.Ultrapotassic mafic rocks as geochemical proxies for post collisional dynamics of orogenic lithospheric mantle: the case of southwestern Anatolia, Turkey.Peralk-Carb 2011, workshop held Tubingen Germany June 16-18, PosterEurope, TurkeyAlkalic
DS201112-0825
2011
Van den Bogaard, P.Prelevic, D., Akal, C., Romer, R.R., Sracke, A., Van den Bogaard, P.Ultrapotassic mafic rocks as geochemical proxies for post collisional dynamics of orogenic lithospheric mantle: the case of southwestern Anatolia, Turkey.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.119-121.Europe, TurkeyLamproite
DS201112-0826
2011
Van den Bogaard, P.Prelevic, D., Akal, C., Romer, R.R., Sracke, A., Van den Bogaard, P.Ultrapotassic mafic rocks as geochemical proxies for post collisional dynamics of orogenic lithospheric mantle: the case of southwestern Anatolia, Turkey.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.119-121.Europe, TurkeyLamproite
DS201312-0485
2013
Van den Bogaard, P.Kipl, A.F., Werner, R., Gohl, K., Van den Bogaard, P., Hoemle, K., Maichur, D., Klugel, A.Seamounts off the West Antarctic margin: a case for non-hotpsot driven intra-plate volcanism.Gondwana Research, Vol. 25, 4, pp. 1660-1679.AntarcticaIntra-plate volcanism
DS201512-1976
2016
van den Bogaard, P.Tappe, S., Smart, K.A., Stracke, A., Romer, R.L., Prelevic, D., van den Bogaard, P.Melt evolution beneath a rifted carton edge: 40Ar/39/Ar geochronology and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope systematics of primitive alkaline basalts and lamprophyres from the SW Baltic Shield.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 173, pp. 1-36.Europe, SwedenAlkalic
DS201602-0244
2016
van den Bogaard, P.Tappe, S., Smart, K.A., Stracke, A., Romer, R.L., Prelevic, D., van den Bogaard, P.Melt evolution beneath a rifted craton edge: 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope systematics of primitive alkaline basalts and lamprophyres from the SW Baltic shield.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 173, pp. 1-36.EuropeGeochronology

Abstract: A new high-precision 40Ar/39Ar anorthoclase feldspar age of 176.7 ± 0.5 Ma (2-sigma) reveals that small-volume alkaline basaltic magmatism occurred at the rifted SW margin of the Baltic Shield in Scania (southern Sweden), at a time of global plate reorganization associated with the inception of Pangea supercontinent break-up. Our combined elemental and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope dataset for representative basanite and nephelinite samples (>8 wt.% MgO) from 16 subvolcanic necks of the 30 by 40 km large Jurassic volcanic field suggests magma derivation from a moderately depleted mantle source (87Sr/86Sri = 0.7034-0.7048; eNdi = +4.4 to +5.2; eHfi = +4.7 to +8.1; 206Pb/204Pbi = 18.8-19.5). The mafic alkaline melts segregated from mixed peridotite-pyroxenite mantle with a potential temperature of ~1400 °C at 2.7-4.2 GPa (~90-120 km depths), which places ultimate melt generation within the convecting upper mantle, provided that the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath the southern Baltic Shield margin was at ?100 km depth during Mesozoic-Cenozoic rifting. Isotopic shifts and incompatible element enrichment relative to Depleted Mantle reflect involvement of at least 20% recycled oceanic lithosphere component (i.e., pyroxenite) with some minor continent-derived sediment during partial melting of well-stirred convecting upper mantle peridotite. Although pargasitic amphibole-rich metasomatized lithospheric mantle is excluded as the main source of the Jurassic magmas from Scania, hydrous ultramafic veins (i.e., hornblendite) may have caused subtle modifications to the compositions of passing sublithospheric melts. For example, modeling suggests that the more radiogenic Hf (eHfi = +6.3 to +8.1) and Pb (206Pb/204Pbi = 18.9-19.5) isotopic compositions of the more sodic and H2O-rich nephelinites, compared with relatively homogenous basanites (eHfi = +4.7 to +6.1; 206Pb/204Pbi = 18.8-18.9), originate from minor interactions between rising asthenospheric melts and amphibole-rich metasomatic components. The metasomatic components were likely introduced to the lithospheric mantle beneath the southern Baltic Shield margin during extensive Permo-Carboniferous magmatic activity, a scenario that is supported by the geochemical and isotope compositions of ca. 286 Ma lamprophyres from Scania (87Sr/86Sri = 0.7040-0.7054; eNdi = +2.0 to +3.1; eHfi = +6.1 to +9.0; 206Pb/204Pbi = 17.8-18.2). Strong variations in lithosphere thickness and thermal structure across the southern Baltic Shield margin may have caused transient small-scale mantle convection. This resulted in relatively fast and focused upwellings and lateral flow beneath the thinned lithosphere, where mafic alkaline magmas formed by low degrees of decompression melting of sublithospheric mantle. Such a geodynamic scenario would allow for enriched recycled components with low melting points to be preferentially sampled from the more depleted and refractory convecting upper mantle when channeled along a destabilizing craton edge. Similar to the ‘lid effect’ in oceanic island volcanic provinces, lithospheric architecture may exert strong control on the mantle melting regime, and thus offer a simple explanation for the geochemical resemblance of continental and oceanic intraplate mafic alkaline magmas of high Na/K affinity.
DS1975-0883
1978
Van den bosch, L.W.P.Van den bosch, L.W.P.Time to Marshall All South Africa's Economic ResourcesSth. Afr. Min. Surv., No. 89, PP. 2-14.South AfricaDiamonds, Resources
DS202008-1453
2020
van den Broeck, J.M.van den Broeck, J.M., Gaina, C.Microcontinents and continental fragments associated with subduction systems.Tectonics, in press available, e2020TC006063 39p. PdfGlobalsubduction

Abstract: Microcontinents and continental fragments are small pieces of continental crust that are surrounded by oceanic lithosphere. Although classically associated with passive margin formation, here we present several preserved microcontinents and continental fragments associated with subduction systems. They are located in the Coral Sea, South China Sea, central Mediterranean and Scotia Sea regions and a ‘proto-microcontinent’, in the Gulf of California. Reviewing the tectonic history of each region and interpreting a variety of geophysical data allows us to identify parameters controlling the formation of microcontinents and continental fragments in subduction settings. All these tectonic blocks experienced long, complex tectonic histories with an important role for developing inherited structures. They tend to form in back-arc locations and separate from their parent continent by oblique or rotational kinematics. The separated continental pieces and associated marginal basins are generally small and formation is quick (<50 Myr). Microcontinents and continental fragments formed close to large continental masses tend to form faster than those created in systems bordered by large oceanic plates. A common triggering mechanism for formation is difficult to identify, but seems to be linked with rapid changes of complex subduction dynamics. The young ages of all contemporary pieces found in situ suggest that microcontinents and continental fragments in these settings are short lived. Although presently the amount of in-situ subduction-related microcontinents is meagre (an area of 0.56% and 0.28% of global, non-cratonic, continental crustal area and crustal volume respectively), through time microcontinents contributed to terrane amalgamation and larger continent formation.
DS202009-1672
2020
van den Broek, J.M.van den Broek, J.M., Gaina, C.Microcontinents and continental fragments associated with subduction systems.Tectonics, 10.1029/2020/TC006063 29p. PdfGlobalsubduction

Abstract: Microcontinents and continental fragments are small pieces of continental crust that are surrounded by oceanic lithosphere. Although classically associated with passive margin formation, here we present several preserved microcontinents and continental fragments associated with subduction systems. They are located in the Coral Sea, South China Sea, central Mediterranean and Scotia Sea regions, and a “proto-microcontinent,” in the Gulf of California. Reviewing the tectonic history of each region and interpreting a variety of geophysical data allows us to identify parameters controlling the formation of microcontinents and continental fragments in subduction settings. All these tectonic blocks experienced long, complex tectonic histories with an important role for developing inherited structures. They tend to form in back-arc locations and separate from their parent continent by oblique or rotational kinematics. The separated continental pieces and associated marginal basins are generally small and their formation is quick (<50 Myr). Microcontinents and continental fragments formed close to large continental masses tend to form faster than those created in systems bordered by large oceanic plates. A common triggering mechanism for their formation is difficult to identify, but seems to be linked with rapid changes of complex subduction dynamics. The young ages of all contemporary pieces found in situ suggest that microcontinents and continental fragments in these settings are short lived. Although presently the amount of in-situ subduction-related microcontinents is meager (an area of 0.56% and 0.28% of global, non-cratonic, continental crustal area and crustal volume, respectively), through time microcontinents contributed to terrane amalgamation and larger continent formation.
DS201705-0885
2017
van den Heuvel, Q.van den Heuvel, Q., Matveev, S., Drury, M., Gress, M., Chinn, I., Davies, G.Genesis of diamond inclusions: an integrated cathodluminescence ( CL) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) study on eclogitic and peridotitic inclusions and their diamond host.European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2017, Vienna April 23-28, 1p. 6564 AbstractAfrica, BotswanaDeposit - Jwaneng, Letlhakane
DS201810-2308
2018
van den Heuvel, Q.Davies, G.R., van den Heuvel, Q., Matveev, S., Drury, M.R., Chinn, I.L., Gress, M.U.A combined catholuminescence and electron backscatter diffraction examination of the growth relationships between Jwaneng diamonds and their eclogitic inclusions.Mineralogy and Petrology, doi.org/10.1007/s00710-018-0634-3 12p.Africa, Botswanadeposit - Jwaneng

Abstract: To fully understand the implications of the compositional information recorded by inclusions in diamond it is vital to know if their growth was syn- or protogenetic and the extent to which they have equilibrated with diamond forming agents. The current paradigm is that the majority of inclusions in diamond are syngenetic but recently this assumption has been questioned. This study presents an integrated cathodoluminescence (CL) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) study of 8 diamonds containing eclogitic inclusions: 19 pyrope-almandine garnets, 12 omphacitic clinopyroxenes, 4 sulphides, 1 coesite and 1 rutile from the Jwaneng diamond mine, Botswana. Diamond plates were sequentially polished to expose inclusions at different levels and CL imaging and EBSD were performed to constrain the relationship between diamond and inclusion growth. Despite complex growth and resorption, individual diamonds are single crystals with a homogeneous crystallographic orientation. All individual inclusions have homogeneous crystallographic orientation and no resolvable compositional zonation. The combined CL and EBSD data suggest that epitaxial inclusion-diamond growth is rare (none of 24 inclusions) and that the imposition of cubo-octahedral faces on inclusions does not necessarily result in epitaxy. Individual diamonds contain inclusions that record evidence of both syngentic and protogenetic relationships with the host diamond and in one case an inclusion appears syngenetic to the diamond core but protogenetic to the growth zone that surrounds 70% of the inclusion. These findings emphasise that inclusions in diamonds have multiple modes of origin and that in order to validate the significance of geochronological studies, further work is needed to establish that there is rapid chemical equilibration of protogenetic inclusions with diamond forming agents at mantle temperatures.
DS1989-1371
1989
Van Den Hul, H.J.Sengupta, S., Acharyya, S.K., Van Den Hul, H.J., Chattopadhyay, B.Geochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Naga Hillsophiolites,northeast India and their inferred tectonic settingJournal of the Geological Society of London, Vol. 146, No. 3, May pp. 491-498IndiaHarzburgite, Tectonics
DS200512-1234
2005
Van den Kerkhof, A.M.Zeming, Z., Kun, S., Van den Kerkhof, A.M., Hoefs, J., Liou, J.G.Fluid composition and evolution attending UHP metamorphism: study of fluid inclusions from drill cores, southern Sulu Belt, eastern China.International Geology Review, Vol. 47, 3, pp. 297-309.ChinaUHP
DS2002-1746
2002
Van den Kerkof, A.M.Xiao, Y., Hoefs, J., Van den Kerkof, A.M., Simon, K., Fiebig, J., Zheng, Y.F.Fluid evolution in the Baia Mare epithermal gold/polymetallic district, Inner Carpathians, RomaniaJournal of Petrology, Vol. 43, No. 8, pp. 1505-28.ChinaGeochemistry, UHP
DS2002-0344
2002
Van denberg, A.P.Czkova, H., Van Hunen, J., Van denberg, A.P., Vlaar, N.J.The influence of rheological weakening and yield stress on the interaction of slabs with the 670 km discontinuity.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.199,3-4,pp.447-57.MantleBoundary, Subduction
DS2002-1639
2002
Van denberg, A.P.Van denberg, A.P., Yuen, D.A.Delayed cooling of the Earth's mantle due to variable thermal conductivity and the formation of low conductivity zone.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.199,3-4,pp.403-13.MantleGeophysics - conductivity
DS1993-1641
1993
Van der al, D.Van der al, D.Deformation processes in mantle peridotites: with emphasis on the Rondaperidotite of southwest Spain.Utrecht Geologisch Institut der Rijksuniversiteit, 180p.GlobalPeridotite
DS1995-1952
1995
Van der Beek, P.Van der Beek, P., Andriessen, ClotinghMorphotectonic evolution of rifted continental margins: inferences from acoupled tectonic surface processes model and fission track thermochronology.Tectonics, Vol. 14, No. 2, Apr. pp. 406-21.MantleTectonics - rifting
DS1995-1953
1995
Van der Beek, P.Van der Beek, P., Andriessen, P., Cloetingh, S.Morphotectonic evolution of fluid continental margins: inferences from acoupled tectonic surface processes...Tectonics, Vol. 14, No. 2, Apr. pp. 406-21.GlobalTectonics - model, Thermochronology
DS1996-1206
1996
Van der Beek, P.Rohrman, M., Van der Beek, P.Cenozoic postrift domal uplift of North Atlantic margins: an asthenopheric diapirism model.Geology, Vol. 24, No. 10, Oct. pp. 901-904.Norway, United KingdomTectonics - rifting, Diapirs
DS200612-0167
2006
Van der Beek, P.Braun, J., Van der Beek, P., Batt, G.Quantitative thermochronology. Numerical methods for the interpretation of thermochronologic data. Case studies, review of isotopic ages.cambridge.org/us/earth, 232p. $ 100.00 ISBN 10-0521830575TechnologyBook - geochronology, geothermometry
DS1993-0744
1993
Van der Beek, P.A.Jelsma, H.A., Van der Beek, P.A., Vinyu, M.L.Tectonic evolution of the Bindura-Shamva greenstone belt (northernZimbabwe): progressive deformation around diapiric batholithsJournal of Structural Geology, Vol. 15, No. 2, pp. 165-176ZimbabweStructure, Greenstone belt
DS2003-1176
2003
Van der Beek, P.A.Rohrman, M., Van der Beek, P.A., Van der Hilst, R.D., Reemst, P.Timing and mechanisms of North Atlantic Cenozoic uplift: evidence for mantleGeological Society of London, Special Publication, No. 196, pp. 27-44.MantlePlumes
DS200412-1681
2003
Van der Beek, P.A.Rohrman, M., Van der Beek, P.A., Van der Hilst, R.D., Reemst, P.Timing and mechanisms of North Atlantic Cenozoic uplift: evidence for mantle upwelling.Geological Society of London, Special Publication, No. 196, pp. 27-44.MantlePlume
DS1998-1512
1998
Van der Berg, A.P.Van der Berg, A.P.Early formation and longterm stability of continents resulting from convection and pressure release meltingGeological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting, abstract. only, p.A208.MantleCraton, Peridotite
DS2001-1181
2001
Van der Berg, A.P.Van der Berg, A.P., Yuen, D.A., Steinbach, V.The effects of variable thermal conductivity on mantle heat transferGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 28, No. 5, Mar. 1, pp. 875-8.MantleGeothermometry
DS200912-0785
2009
Van der Bogert, C.H.Van der Bogert, C.H., Smith, C.P., Hainschwang, T., McClure, S.F.Gray to blue to violet hydrogen rich diamonds from the Argyle mine, Australia.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 45, 1, Spring pp. 20-37.AustraliaDeposit - Argyle, diamond mineralogy
DS2003-1409
2003
Van der Hagaeghe, O.Van der Hagaeghe, O., Medvedev, S., Fullsack, P., Beaumont, C., Jamieson, R.A.Evolution of orogenic wedges and continental plateaux: insights from crustalGeophysical Journal International, Vol. 153, 1, pp. 27-51.MantleGeothermometry, Subduction
DS200412-2035
2003
Van der Hagaeghe, O.Van der Hagaeghe, O., Medvedev, S., Fullsack, P., Beaumont, C., Jamieson, R.A.Evolution of orogenic wedges and continental plateaux: insights from crustal thermalmechanical models overlying subducting mantlGeophysical Journal International, Vol. 153,1, pp. 27-51.MantleGeothermometry Subduction
DS1991-1776
1991
Van der Hilst, R.Van der Hilst, R., Engdahl, R., Spakman, W., Nolet, G.Tomographic imaging of subducted lithosphere below northwest Pacific islandarcsNature, Vol. 353, Septe. 5, pp. 37-43Pacific IslandsMantle, Tectonics
DS1994-1824
1994
Van der Hilst, R.Van der Hilst, R., Kennett, B., Ziehuis, A.SKIPPY: a broad band study of seismic structure of the lithosphere And upper mantle below Australia.Geological Society of Australia Abstracts, No. 37, p. 442.AustraliaGeophysics -seismics, Program -SKIPPY
DS1994-1825
1994
Van der Hilst, R.Van der Hilst, R., Kennettm B., Christie, D., Grant, J.Project Skippy explores the lithosphere and mantle beneath AustraliaEos, Vol. 75, No. 15, April 12, pp. 177, 180, 181AustraliaMantle, Geophysics -seismics
DS1994-1826
1994
Van der Hilst, R.Van der Hilst, R., Mann, P.Tectonic implications of tomographic images of subducted lithosphere beneath northwestern South AmericaGeology, Vol. 22, No. 5, May pp. 451-454Venezuela, Colombia, South America, ChileTectonics, Slab subduction
DS1995-1954
1995
Van der Hilst, R.Van der Hilst, R.Complex morphology of subducted lithosphere in the mantle beneath the Tongatrench.Nature, Vol. 374, No. 6518, March 9, pp. 154-157.MantleSubduction, Tonga Trench
DS200712-0892
2007
Van der Hilst, R.Ribe, N.M., Stutzmann, E., Ren, Y., Van der Hilst, R.Bucking instabilities of subducted lithosphere beneath the transition zone.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 254, 1-2, Feb. 15, pp. 173-179.MantleSubduction
DS1997-0437
1997
Van der Hilst, R.D.Grand, S.P., Van der Hilst, R.D., Widiyantoro, S.Global seismic tomography: a snapshot of convection in the earthGsa Today, Vol. 7, No. 4, April pp. 1-7.GlobalTomography, Geophysics - seismics
DS1997-1191
1997
Van der Hilst, R.D.Van der Hilst, R.D., Widiyantoro, S., Engdahl, E.R.Evidence for deep mantle circulation from global tomographyNature, Vol. 386, No. 6625, Apr. 10, pp. 578-586.MantleTomography, Geophysics - seismic
DS1998-1513
1998
Van der Hilst, R.D.Van der Hilst, R.D.Seismological constraints on the fate of slabs and the scale of mantleconvection.Mineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 1571-2.MantleGeophysics - seismic tomography, Subduction
DS1998-1514
1998
Van der Hilst, R.D.Van der Hilst, R.D., Kennett, B.L.N., Shibutani, T.Upper mantle structure beneath Australia from portable array deploymentsStructure EVol. Austral., American Geophysical Union (AGU) geodynamics Vol. 26, pp. 39-58.Mantle, AustraliaGeophysics - seismics
DS1999-0218
1999
Van der Hilst, R.D.Fischer, K.M., Van der Hilst, R.D.Geophysics : a seismic look under the continentsScience, Vol. 285, No. 5432, Aug. 27, pp. 1365-6.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS1999-0671
1999
Van der Hilst, R.D.Simons, F.J., Zielhuis, A., Van der Hilst, R.D.The deep structure of the Australian continent from surface wavetomography.Lithos, Vol. 48, No. 1-4, Sept. pp. 17-44.AustraliaGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics
DS2000-0156
2000
Van der Hilst, R.D.Chevrot, S., Van der Hilst, R.D.The Poisson ratio of the Australian crust: geological and geophysical implications.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.183, No.1-2, Nov.30, pp.121-32.AustraliaGeophysics - crust
DS2001-0572
2001
Van der Hilst, R.D.Karason, H., Van der Hilst, R.D.Tomographic imaging of the lowermost mantle with differential times of refracted diffracted core phasesJournal of Geophy. Res., Vol. 106, No. 4, Apr. 10, pp. 6569-88.MantleGeophysics - seismics, PKP, Pdiff
DS2001-1104
2001
Van der Hilst, R.D.Soltzer, R.L., Van der Hilst, R.D., Karason, H.Comparing P and S wave heterogeneity in the mantleGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 28, No. 7, April 1, pp.1335-8.MantleHeterogeneity
DS2002-0016
2002
Van der Hilst, R.D.Albarede, F., Van der Hilst, R.D.Zoned mantle convectionPhilosophical Transactions, Royal Society of London Series A Mathematical, Vol.1800, pp. 2569-92.MantleGeochemistry - model, convection
DS2002-1353
2002
Van der Hilst, R.D.Rogers, R.D., Karason, H., Van der Hilst, R.D.Epeirogenic uplift above a detached slab in northern Central AmericaGeology, Vol. 30, 11, Nov. pp. 1031-4.Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador, GuatemalaTectonics - subduction zones ( not specific to diamonds
DS2002-1491
2002
Van der Hilst, R.D.Simons, F.J., Van der Hilst, R.D.Age dependent seismic thickness and mechanical strength of the Australian lithosphereGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 29, 11, pp. 24- DOI 10.1029/2001GLO14962AustraliaGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics
DS2002-1541
2002
Van der Hilst, R.D.Stankiewicz, J., Chevrot, S., Van der Hilst, R.D., De Wit, M.J.Crustal thickness, discontinuity depth and upper mantle structure beneath southern Africa: constraints from body wave conversions.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 130, No. 3-4, pp. 235-51.South AfricaGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics
DS2003-0225
2003
Van der Hilst, R.D.Castle, J.C., Van der Hilst, R.D.Using ScP precursors to search for mantle structures beneath 1800 km depthGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 8, 4, 10.1029/2002GLO16023MantleGeophysics - seismics, Discontinuity
DS2003-0226
2003
Van der Hilst, R.D.Castle, J.C., Van der Hilst, R.D.Searching for seismic scattering off mantle interfaces between 800 km and 2000 kmJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, 2, ESE 13MantleGeophysics - seismics, Lower mantle
DS2003-0779
2003
Van der Hilst, R.D.Lebedev, S., Chevrot, S., Van der Hilst, R.D.Correlation between shear speed structure and thickness of the mantle transition zonePhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 136, 1-2, pp. 25-40.MantleBlank
DS2003-1176
2003
Van der Hilst, R.D.Rohrman, M., Van der Beek, P.A., Van der Hilst, R.D., Reemst, P.Timing and mechanisms of North Atlantic Cenozoic uplift: evidence for mantleGeological Society of London, Special Publication, No. 196, pp. 27-44.MantlePlumes
DS2003-1283
2003
Van der Hilst, R.D.Simons, F.J., Van der Hilst, R.D.Seismic and mechanical anisotropy and the past and present deformation of theEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 211, 3-4, June 30, pp. 271-86.AustraliaGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics, mantle deformation
DS2003-1284
2003
Van der Hilst, R.D.Simons, F.J., Van der Hilst, R.D.Seismic and mechanical anisotropy and the past and present deformation of theEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 211, 3-4, pp. 271-86.AustraliaTectonics
DS2003-1356
2003
Van der Hilst, R.D.Sze, E.K., Van der Hilst, R.D.Core mantle boundary topography from short period PcP PKP and PKKP dataPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 135, 1, pp. 27-46.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-0294
2003
Van der Hilst, R.D.Castle, J.C., Van der Hilst, R.D.Using ScP precursors to search for mantle structures beneath 1800 km depth.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 8, 4, 10.1029/2002 GLO16023MantleGeophysics - seismics Discontinuity
DS200412-0295
2003
Van der Hilst, R.D.Castle, J.C., Van der Hilst, R.D.Searching for seismic scattering off mantle interfaces between 800 km and 2000 km depth.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, 2, ESE 13MantleGeophysics - seismics Lower mantle
DS200412-1095
2003
Van der Hilst, R.D.Lebedev, S., Chevrot, S.,Van der Hilst, R.D.Correlation between shear speed structure and thickness of the mantle transition zone.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 136, 1-2, pp. 25-40.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-1654
2004
Van der Hilst, R.D.Replumaz, A., Karason, H., Van der Hilst, R.D., Besse, J., Tapponnier, P.4 D evolution of SE Asia's mantle from geological reconstructions and seismic tomography.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 221, 1-4, pp. 103-115.India, Asia, ChinaGeophysics - seismics, tectonics
DS200412-1681
2003
Van der Hilst, R.D.Rohrman, M., Van der Beek, P.A., Van der Hilst, R.D., Reemst, P.Timing and mechanisms of North Atlantic Cenozoic uplift: evidence for mantle upwelling.Geological Society of London, Special Publication, No. 196, pp. 27-44.MantlePlume
DS200412-1723
2004
Van der Hilst, R.D.Saltzer, R.L., Stutzmann, E., Van der Hilst, R.D.Poisson's ratio in the lower mantle beneath Alaska: evidence for compositional heterogeneity.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 109, B6, B06301, June 9, 10.1029/2003 JB002712United States, AlaskaGeochemistry
DS200412-1835
2003
Van der Hilst, R.D.Simons, F.J., Van der Hilst, R.D.Seismic and mechanical anisotropy and the past and present deformation of the Australian lithosphere.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 211, 3-4, pp. 271-86.AustraliaGeophysics - seismics, tectonics
DS200512-1117
2004
Van der Hilst, R.D.Van der Hilst, R.D.Changing views on Earth's deep mantle.Science, No. 5697, Oct. 29, p. 817.MantleGeophysics
DS200512-1126
2004
Van der Hilst, R.D.Vangeren, L., Deschamps, F., Van der Hilst, R.D.Geophysical evidence for chemical variations in the Australian continental mantle.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 31, 17, Sept. 16, L17607AustraliaGeophysics - geochemistry
DS200612-0811
2006
Van der Hilst, R.D.Li, C., Van der Hilst, R.D., Toksoz, M.N.Constraining P wave velocity variations in the upper mantle beneath southeast Asia.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 154, 2, Feb. 16, pp. 180-195.Asia, ChinaGeophysics - seismics
DS200612-1435
2005
Van der Hilst, R.D.Trampert, J., Van der Hilst, R.D.Towards a qunatitative interpretation of global seismic tomography.American Geophysical Union, Geophysical Monograph, ed. Van der Hilst, Earth's Deep mantle, structure ...., No. 160, pp. 47-62.MantleTomography
DS200612-1462
2005
Van der Hilst, R.D.Van der Hilst, R.D., Bass, J.D., Matas, J., Trampert, J.Earth's deep mantle structure, composition, and evolution - an introduction.American Geophysical Union, Geophysical Monograph, Ed. Van der Hilst, Earth's Deep Mantle, structure ...., No. 160, pp. 1-8.MantleTectonics
DS200612-1463
2005
Van der Hilst, R.D.Van der Hilst, R.D., De Hoop, M.V.Banana doughnut kernels and mantle tomography.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 163, 3, Dec. pp. 956-961.MantleGeophysics - tomography
DS200712-0660
2007
Van der Hilst, R.D.Ma, P., Wang, P., Tenorio, L., de Hoop, M.V., Van der Hilst, R.D.Imaging of structure at and near the core mantle boundary using a generalized radon transform2. inference of singularities.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 112, B8, B08403.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200712-0890
2007
Van der Hilst, R.D.Ren, Y., Stutmann, E., Van der Hilst, R.D., besse, J.Understanding seismic heterogeneities in the lower mantle: beneath the Americas from seismic tomography and plate tectonic history.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 112, B1, Jan. 17, B01302.MantleTectonics, geophysics
DS200812-0977
2008
Van der Hilst, R.D.Royden, L.H., Burchfiel, B.C., Van der Hilst, R.D.The geological evolution of Tibetan Plateau.Science, Vol. 321, no. 5892, August 22, pp. 1054-1058.Asia, TibetTectonics
DS200812-1236
2008
Van der Hilst, R.D.Wang, P., De Hoop, M.V., Van der Hilst, R.D.Imaging the lowermost mantle 'D' and the core mantle boundary with SKKS coda waves.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 175, 1, pp. 103-115.MantleBoundary
DS200912-0790
2009
Van der Hilst, R.D.Van Summeren, J.R., Vandenberg, A.P., Van der Hilst, R.D.Upwellings from a deep mantle reservoir filtered at the 660 km phase transition in thermochemical convection models and implications for intra-plate volcanism.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 172, 3-4, pp. 210-224.MantleGeothermometry
DS200712-1108
2007
Van der Hislt, R.Van der Hislt, R.Boldly going deeper into Earth: as we look closer and in ever greater detail at the crust and mantle, we are discovering that the interior layers of Earth ....Geotimes, Vol. 52, 7, pp. 34-37.MantleInteresting and enigmatic - models
DS1998-1605
1998
Van der Kerkof, A.M.Xiao, Y.L., Hoefs, J., Van der Kerkof, A.M., Zheng, Y.Fluid inclusions in ultra high pressure eclogites from the Dabie Shan, eastern China.Mineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 1667-8.ChinaEclogites, metamorphic, Deposit - Dabie Shan
DS200512-0534
2004
Van der Klauw, S.N.G.C.King, R.L., Bebout, G.E., Kobayashi, E., Van der Klauw, S.N.G.C.Ultrahigh pressure metabasaltic garnets as probes into deep subduction zone chemical weathering.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 5, pp. Q12J14 10.1029/2004 GC000746MantleSubduction, eclogite
DS200512-0535
2005
Van der Klauw, S.N.G.C.King, R.L., Bebout, G.E., Kobayashi, K., Nakamura, E., Van der Klauw, S.N.G.C.Ultrahigh pressure metabasaltic garnets as probes into deep subduction zone chemical cycling.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 5, Q12J14, doi:10.1029/2004 GC000746TechnologyUHP
DS2003-1410
2003
Van der Kruk, J.Van der Kruk, J., Wapenaar, C.P.A., Fokkema, J.T., Van den Berg, P.M.Three dimensional imaging of multicomponent ground penetrating radar dataGeophysics, Vol. 68, 4, pp. 1241-54.GlobalGeophysics - radar not specific to diamonds
DS200412-2036
2003
Van der Kruk, J.Van der Kruk, J., Wapenaar, C.P.A., Fokkema, J.T., Van den Berg, P.M.Three dimensional imaging of multicomponent ground penetrating radar data.Geophysics, Vol. 68, 4, pp. 1241-54.TechnologyGeophysics - radar not specific to diamonds
DS1960-0615
1965
Van der laan, H.L.Van der laan, H.L.The Sierra Leone Diamonds: an Economic Study Covering the Years 1952-1961.London: Oxford University Press, 234P.Sierra Leone, West AfricaEconomics, Production, History, Kimberley
DS1995-0547
1995
Van der Laan, S.R.Foley, S.F., Van der Laan, S.R., Horn, I.Experimental melting reactions amphibole and phlogopite bearing mantle vein assemblages -trace elementsProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 161-63.GlobalPetrology -experimenta, Mantle -alkaline magmas
DS1995-0976
1995
Van der Laan, S.R.Klemme, S., Van der Laan, S.R., et al.Experimentally determined trace and minor elements partitioning between clinopyroxene and carbonatite meltEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 133, No. 3-4, July 15, pp. 439-448.GlobalCarbonatite
DS1998-0438
1998
Van der Laan, S.R.Foley, S.F., Musselwhite, D.S., Van der Laan, S.R.Melting processes in veined lithospheric mantle in cratonic and non-cratonic settings.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 220-223.MantleMelt temperatures, Experimental petrology
DS2001-0325
2001
Van der LeeFouch, M.J., James, Silver, VanDecar, Van der LeeImaging broad ranges in structural variations beneath the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons, southern Africa.Slave-Kaapvaal Workshop, Sept. Ottawa, 5p. abstractSouth Africa, ZimbabweGeophysics - seismics, Tomography - Kimberley array
DS1995-1955
1995
Van der Lee, S.Van der Lee, S.North American Upper Mantle 3D S- velocity structureEos, Abstracts, Vol. 76, No. 17, Apr 25, p. S 200.Mantle, North AmericaGeophysics -seismics, Structure
DS1995-1956
1995
Van der Lee, S.Van der Lee, S.The Farallon plate in the North American upper mantleEos, Vol. 76, No. 46, Nov. 7. p.F422. Abstract.Mantle, North AmericaUpper mantle
DS1997-1192
1997
Van der Lee, S.Van der Lee, S., Nolet, G.Upper mantle S velocity structure of North AmericaJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 102, No. 10, Oct. 10, pp. 22, 815-838.North America, United States, CanadaMantle, Tectonics - geophysics - seismics
DS2001-1182
2001
Van der Lee, S.Van der Lee, S., Van De Car, Fouch, JamesCombined sensitivity to the Kaapvaal tectosphere of regional and teleseismic surface and S Waves.Slave-Kaapvaal Workshop, Sept. Ottawa, 3p. abstractSouth AfricaGeophysics - seismics, Lithosphere
DS2002-0584
2002
Van der Lee, S.Goes, S., Van der Lee, S.Thermal structure of the North American uppermost mantle inferred from seismic tomography.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 107, No. 3, pp. ETG 2.MantleGeothermometry, Geophysics - seismics
DS2002-0585
2002
Van der Lee, S.Goes, S., Van der Lee, S.Thermal structure of the North American uppermost mantle inferred from seismic tomography.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol.107,B3, pp.ETG 2-1-20North America, United States, Midcontinent, WyomingSubduction, Tomography, tectonics, seismics
DS2002-0586
2002
Van der lee, S.Goes, S., Van der lee, S.Thermal structure of the North American uppermost mantle inferred from seismic tomography.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 107, No.3, pp.United States, Canada, North AmericaGeothermometry
DS2002-0938
2002
Van Der Lee, S.Li, A., Fischer, K.M., Van Der Lee, S., Wysession, M.E.Crust and upper mantle discontinuity structure beneath eastern North AmericaJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 107, No. 5, ESE7AppalachiaGeophysics - seismics, Core-mantle boundary
DS2002-0939
2002
Van der Lee, S.Li, Aibing, Fischer, K.M., Van der Lee, S., Wysession, M.Crust and upper mantle discontinuity structure beneath eastern North AmericaJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol.107,5, May 28, 10.1029/2002JB001891AppalachiaCore - mantle boundary, Geophysics - seismics
DS2002-1640
2002
Van der Lee, S.Van der Lee, S.High resolution estimates of lithospheric thickness from Missouri to Massachusetts, USA.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 203, 1, pp. 15-23.Appalachia, MissouriGeophysics - seismics
DS2003-1412
2003
Van Der Lee, S.Van der Meijde, M., Marone, F., Giardini, D., Van Der Lee, S.Seismic evidence for water deep in Earth's upper mantleScience, No. 5625, June 6, p. 1556-57.MantleWater
DS200412-0567
2004
Van Der Lee, S.Fouch, M.J., James, D.E., Van De Car, J.C., Van Der Lee, S.Mantle seismic structure beneath the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 107, 1/2, pp. 33-44.Africa, South Africa, ZimbabweGeophysics - seismics, tectonics, magmatism
DS200412-1227
2004
Van der Lee, S.Marone, F., Van der Lee, S., Giardini, D.Three dimensional upper mantle S velocity model for the Eurasia Africa plate boundary region.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 158, 1, pp.109-130.Africa, EuropeTectonics, geophysics - seismics
DS200412-1228
2004
Van der Lee, S.Marone, F., Van der Meijde, M., Van der Lee, S., Giadini, D.Joint inversion of local, regional and teleseismic dat a for crustal thickness in the Eurasia Africa plate boundary region.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 154, 2, pp. 499-514.Europe, AsiaGeophysics - seismics, boundary
DS200412-2037
2003
Van der Lee, S.Van der Lee, S.Notes: 3 D structure of continental upper mantle, derived from seismograms.Journal Geological Society of India, Vol. 62, 1, pp. 121-122.IndiaGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-2039
2003
Van Der Lee, S.Van der Meijde, M., Marone, F., Giardini, D., Van Der Lee, S.Seismic evidence for water deep in Earth's upper mantle.Science, No. 5625, June 6, p. 1556-57.MantleWater
DS200612-1464
2005
Van der Lee, S.Van der Lee, S., Frederiksen, A.Surface wave tomography applied to the North American Upper Mantle.American Geophysical Union, Geophysical Monograph, No. 157, pp. 67-80.United States, CanadaGeophysics - seismics
DS200612-1564
2006
Van der lee, S.Yang, T., Shen, Y., Van der lee, S., Solomon, S.C., Hung, S.H.Upper mantle structure beneath the Azores hotspot from finite frequency seismic tomography.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 250, 1-2, pp. 11-26.AzoresGeophysics - seismics
DS200712-0104
2006
Van der Lee, S.Braunmiller, J., Van der Lee, S., Doermann, L.Mantle transition zone thickness in the central South American subduction zone.American Geophysical Union, Geophysical Monograph, No. 168, pp. 215-224.South AmericaSubduction
DS200712-0312
2007
Van der Lee, S.Feng, M., Van der Lee, S., Assumpca, M.Upper mantle structure of South America from joint inversion of waveforms and fundamental mode group velocities of Rayleigh waves.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 112, B4, B04312.South AmericaGeophysics - seismics
DS200712-0476
2007
Van der Lee, S.Jacobsen, S.D., Van der Lee, S., Smyth, J.R., Holl, C.M.Detecting hydration in the Earth's mantle.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p.187-188.MantleWater
DS200712-0477
2007
Van der Lee, S.Jacobsen, S.D., Van der Lee, S., Smyth, J.R., Holl, C.M.Detecting hydration in the Earth's mantle.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p.187-188.MantleWater
DS200812-1199
2008
Van der Lee, S.Van der Lee, S., Regenauer Lieb, K., Yuen, D.A.The role of water in connecting past and future episodes of subduction.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 273, 1-2, Aug. 30, pp. 15-27.MantleSubduction
DS200812-1200
2008
Van der Lee, S.Van der Lee, S., Regenauer-Lieb, K., Yuen, D.A.The role of water in connecting past and future episodes of subduction.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 273, pp. 15-27.MantleSubduction - water
DS201012-0457
2010
Van der Lee, S.Lloyd, S., Van der Lee, S., Franka, G.S., Assumpcio, M., Feng, W.Moho map of South America from receiver functions and surface waves.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 115, B 11, B11315.South AmericaGeophysics - seismics
DS201112-0171
2011
Van der Lee, S.Chang, S-J., Van der Lee, S.Mantle plumes and associated flow beneath Arabia and East Africa.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 302, pp. 448-454.AfricaHotspots, tectonics
DS201312-0278
2013
Van der Lee, S.Frederiksen, A.W., Bollmann, T., Darbyshire, F., Van der Lee, S.Modification of continental lithosphere by tectonic processes: a tomographic image of central North America.Journal of Geophysical Research, 50060Canada, United StatesTomography - Laurentia, Superior
DS1991-1777
1991
Van der Leeden, F.Van der Leeden, F.Groundwater bibliographyGeraghty and Miller Publ, 507p. approx. $ 70.00GlobalGroundwater bibliography, Book-ad
DS1993-1642
1993
Van der Linde, A.Van der Linde, A.On least squares estimation of generalized covariance functionsMathematical Geology, Vol. 25, No. 1, January pp. 1-8GlobalGeostatistics, Computer Program
DS201212-0339
2012
Van der Linde, G.Jelsma, H.,Krishnan, S.U., Perritt, S.,Kumar, M., Preston, R., Winter, F., Lemotlo, L., Costa, J., Van der Linde, G., Facatino, M., Posser, A., Wallace, C., Henning, A., Joy, S., Chinn, I., Armstrong, R., Phillips, D.Kimberlites from central Angola: a case stidy of exploration findings.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractAfrica, AngolaOverview of kimberlites
DS201412-0427
2013
van der Linde, G.Jelsma, H., Krishnan, U., Perritt, S., Preston, R., Winter, F., Lemotlo, L., van der Linde, G., Armstrong, R., Phillips, D., Joy, S., Costa, J., Facatino, M., Posser, A., Kumar, M., Wallace, C., Chinn, I., Henning, A.Kimberlites from central Angola: a case study of exploration findings.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, pp. 173-190.Africa, AngolaExploration - kimberlites
DS201601-0038
2015
Van Der Linde, G.Perritt, S., Preston, R., Viljoen, F., Van Der Linde, G.Morphology, micro-structure and chemistry of a deformed garnet megacryst suite from Montelo kimberlite, Free State Province, South Africa.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 118, 4, pp. 439-454.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Montelo
DS201809-2047
2018
Van der Linde, G.Joy, S., Van der Linde, G., Choudbury, A.K., Deb, G.K., Tappe, S.Reassembly of the Dharwar and Bastar cratons at ca. 1 Ga: evidence from multiple tectonothermal events along the Karimnagar granulite belt and Khammam schist belt, southern India.Journal of Earth System Science, Vol. 127, 6, pp. 76- doi:10.1007/s12040-018-0988-2Indiacratons

Abstract: The northern part of the Nellore-Khammam schist belt and the Karimnagar granulite belt, which are juxtaposed at high angle to each other have unique U-Pb zircon age records suggesting distinctive tectonothermal histories. Plate accretion and rifting in the eastern part of the Dharwar craton and between the Dharwar and Bastar craton indicate multiple and complex events from 2600 to 500 Ma. The Khammam schist belt, the Dharwar and the Bastar craton were joined together by the end of the Archaean. The Khammam schist belt had experienced additional tectonic events at ~1900 and ~1600 Ma. The Dharwar and Bastar cratons separated during development of the Pranhita-Godavari (P-G) valley basin at ~1600 Ma, potentially linked to the breakup of the Columbia supercontinent and were reassembled during the Mesoproterozoic at about 1000 Ma. This amalgamation process in southern India could be associated with the formation of the Rodinia supercontinent. The Khammam schist belt and the Eastern Ghats mobile belt also show evidence for accretionary processes at around 500 Ma, which is interpreted as a record of Pan-African collisions during the Gondwana assembly. From then on, southern India, as is known today, formed an integral part of the Indian continent.
DS201012-0810
2010
Van der Meer, D.G.Van der Meer, D.G., Spakman, W., Van Hinsbergen, D.J.J., Amaru, M.L., Torsvik, T.H.Towards absolute plate motions constrained by lower mantle slab remnants.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 3, Jan. pp. 36-40.MantleTectonics, Pangea
DS201212-0071
2012
Van der Meer, D.G.Biggin, A.J., Steinberger, B., Aubert, J., Suttle, N., Holme, R., Torsvik, H., Van der Meer, D.G., Van Hinsbergen, J.J.Possible links between long term geomagnetic variations and whole mantle convection processes.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 5, pp. 526-533.MantleConvection
DS201811-2616
2018
van der Meer, D.G.van der Meer, D.G., van Hinsbergen, D.J.J., Spakman, W.Atlas of the underworld: slab remnants in the mantle, their sinking history, and a new outlook on lower mantle viscosity.Tectonophysics, Vol. 773, 1, pp. 309-448.Mantlegeophysics - seismic

Abstract: Across the entire mantle we interpret 94 positive seismic wave-speed anomalies as subducted lithosphere and associate these slabs with their geological record. We document this as the Atlas of the Underworld, also accessible online at www.atlas-of-the-underworld.org, a compilation comprising subduction systems active in the past ~ 300 Myr. Deeper slabs are correlated to older geological records, assuming no relative horizontal motions between adjacent slabs following break-off, using knowledge of global plate circuits, but without assuming a mantle reference frame. The longest actively subducting slabs identified reach the depth of ~ 2500 km and some slabs have impinged on Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces in the deepest mantle. Anomously fast sinking of some slabs occurs in regions affected by long-term plume rising. We conclude that slab remnants eventually sink from the upper mantle to the core-mantle boundary. The range in subduction-age versus - depth in the lower mantle is largely inherited from the upper mantle history of subduction. We find a significant depth variation in average sinking speed of slabs. At the top of the lower mantle average slab sinking speeds are between 10 and 40 mm/yr, followed by a deceleration to 10-15 mm/yr down to depths around 1600-1700 km. In this interval, in situ time-stationary sinking rates suggest deceleration from 20 to 30 mm/yr to 4-8 mm/yr, increasing to 12-15 mm/yr below 2000 km. This corroborates the existence of a slab deceleration zone but we do not observe long-term (> 60 My) slab stagnation, excluding long-term stagnation due to compositional effects. Conversion of slab sinking profiles to viscosity profiles shows the general trend that mantle viscosity increases in the slab deceleration zone below which viscosity slowly decreases in the deep mantle. This is at variance with most published viscosity profiles that are derived from different observations, but agrees qualitatively with recent viscosity profiles suggested from material experiments.
DS201902-0328
2018
Van der Meer, D.G.Van der Meer, D.G., van Hinsbergen, D.J.J., Spakman, W.Atlas of the underworld: slab remnants in the mantle, their sinking history, and a new outlook on lower mantle viscosity.Tectonophysics, Vol. 723, 1, pp. 309-448.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: Across the entire mantle we interpret 94 positive seismic wave-speed anomalies as subducted lithosphere and associate these slabs with their geological record. We document this as the Atlas of the Underworld, also accessible online at www.atlas-of-the-underworld.org, a compilation comprising subduction systems active in the past ~ 300 Myr. Deeper slabs are correlated to older geological records, assuming no relative horizontal motions between adjacent slabs following break-off, using knowledge of global plate circuits, but without assuming a mantle reference frame. The longest actively subducting slabs identified reach the depth of ~ 2500 km and some slabs have impinged on Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces in the deepest mantle. Anomously fast sinking of some slabs occurs in regions affected by long-term plume rising. We conclude that slab remnants eventually sink from the upper mantle to the core-mantle boundary. The range in subduction-age versus - depth in the lower mantle is largely inherited from the upper mantle history of subduction. We find a significant depth variation in average sinking speed of slabs. At the top of the lower mantle average slab sinking speeds are between 10 and 40 mm/yr, followed by a deceleration to 10-15 mm/yr down to depths around 1600-1700 km. In this interval, in situ time-stationary sinking rates suggest deceleration from 20 to 30 mm/yr to 4-8 mm/yr, increasing to 12-15 mm/yr below 2000 km. This corroborates the existence of a slab deceleration zone but we do not observe long-term (> 60 My) slab stagnation, excluding long-term stagnation due to compositional effects. Conversion of slab sinking profiles to viscosity profiles shows the general trend that mantle viscosity increases in the slab deceleration zone below which viscosity slowly decreases in the deep mantle. This is at variance with most published viscosity profiles that are derived from different observations, but agrees qualitatively with recent viscosity profiles suggested from material experiments.
DS1995-1957
1995
Van der Meer, F.Van der Meer, F.Estimating and simulating degree of serpentinization of peridotites usinghyper spectral remote sensed imageryNonrenewable Resources, Vol. 4, No. 1, Spring pp. 84-98GlobalRemote sensing, geostatistics, Ronda, ultramafics
DS201412-0958
2014
Van der Meer, H.A.Waight, T.E., Van der Meer, H.A., Palin, J.M., Cooper, A.F.,Munker, C.Metasomatized ancient lithospheric mantle beneath the young Zealandia microcontinent and its role in HIMU-like intraplate magmatism. Geophysics, Geochemistry, Geosystems, Vol. 15, pp. 3477-3501.New ZealandMagmatism
DS201710-2273
2017
Van der Meer, Q.Van der Meer, Q., Klaver, M., Reisberg, L., Riches, A. J.V., Davies, G.R.Preservation of an Archean whole rock Re-Os isochron for the Venetia lithospheric mantle: evidence for rapid crustal recycling and lithosphere stabilization at 3.3 Ga.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 216, pp. 242-263.Africa, South Africadeposit - Venetia
DS201112-1073
2011
Van der Meer, Q.H.A.Van der Meer, Q.H.A., Klaver, M., Reisberg, L., Davidheiser, B., Davies, G.R.The age and origin of the Limpopo sub-continental lithospheric mantle.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.2064.Africa, South AfricaVenetia
DS201212-0744
2012
Van der Meer, Q.H.A.Van der Meer, Q.H.A., Klaver, M., Reisberg, L., Davies, G.R.The age and origin of the Limpopo ( South Africa) subcontinental lithospheric mantle.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractAfrica, South AfricaGeochronology
DS201312-0933
2013
Van der Meer, Q.H.A.Van der Meer, Q.H.A., Klaver, M., Waight, T.E., Davies, G.R.The provenance of sub-cratonic mantle beneath the Limpopo mobile belt, (South Africa).Lithos, Vol. 170-171, pp. 90-104.Africa, South Africa, ZimbabweCraton, geothermobarometry, diamond potential
DS201709-2068
2017
van der Meer, Q.H.A.van der Meer, Q.H.A., Klaver, M., Reisberg, L., Riches, A.J.V., Davies, G.R.Preservation of an Archaean whole rock Re-Os isochron for the Venetia lithospheric mantle: evidence for rapid crustal recycling and lithospheric stabilization at 3.3 Ga.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, in press available, 22p.Africa, South Africadeposit - Venetia

Abstract: Re-Os and platinum group element analyses are reported for peridotite xenoliths from the 533 Ma Venetia kimberlite cluster situated in the Limpopo Mobile Belt, the Neoarchaean collision zone between the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons. The Venetian xenoliths provide a rare opportunity to examine the state of the cratonic lithosphere prior to major regional metasomatic disturbance of Re-Os systematics throughout the Phanerozoic. The 32 studied xenoliths record Si-enrichment that is characteristic of the Kaapvaal lithospheric mantle and can be subdivided into five groups based on Re-Os analyses. The most pristine group I samples (n = 13) display an approximately isochronous relationship and fall on a 3.28 ± 0.17 Ga (95 % conf. int.) reference line that is based on their mean TMA age. This age overlaps with the formation age of the Limpopo crust at 3.35–3.28 Ga. The group I samples derive from ~50 to ~170 km depth, suggesting coeval melt depletion of the majority of the Venetia lithospheric mantle column. Group II and III samples have elevated Re/Os due to Re addition during kimberlite magmatism. Group II has otherwise undergone a similar evolution as the group I samples with overlapping 187Os/188Os at eruption age: 187Os/188OsEA, while group III samples have low Os concentrations, unradiogenic 187Os/188OsEA and were effectively Re-free prior to kimberlite magmatism. The other sample groups (IV and V) have disturbed Re-Os systematics and provide no reliable age information. A strong positive correlation is recorded between Os and Re concentrations for group I samples, which is extended to groups II and III after correction for kimberlite addition. This positive correlation precludes a single stage melt depletion history and indicates coupled remobilisation of Re and Os. The combination of Re-Os mobility, preservation of the isochronous relationship, correlation of 187Os/188Os with degree of melt depletion and lack of radiogenic Os addition puts tight constraints on the formation and subsequent evolution of Venetia lithosphere. First, melt depletion and remobilisation of Re and Os must have occurred within error of the 3.28 Ga mean TMA age. Second, the refractory peridotites contain significant Re despite recording >40 % melt extraction. Third, assuming that Si-enrichment and Re-Os mobility in the Venetia lithospheric mantle were linked, this process must have occurred within ~100 Myr of initial melt depletion in order to preserve the isochronous relationship. Based on the regional geological evolution, we propose a rapid recycling model with initial melt depletion at ~3.35 Ga to form a tholeiitic mafic crust that is recycled at ~3.28 Ga, resulting in the intrusion of a TTG suite and Si-enrichment of the lithospheric mantle. The non-zero primary Re contents of the Venetia xenoliths imply that TRD model ages significantly underestimate the true depletion age even for highly depleted peridotites. The overlap of the ~2.6 Ga TRD ages with the time of the Kaapvaal-Limpopo collision is purely fortuitous and has no geological significance. Hence, this study underlines the importance of scrutiny if age information is to be derived from whole rock Re-Os analyses.
DS201904-0747
2019
van der Meer, Q.H.A.Howarth, G.H., Moore, A.E., Harris, C., van der Meer, Q.H.A., Le Roux , P.Crustal versus mantle origin of carbonate xenoliths from Kimberley region kimberlites using C-O-Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes and trace element abundances.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, in press available 42p.Africa, South Africageochronology
DS201905-1043
2019
van der Meer, Q.H.A.Howarth, G.H., Moore, A.E., Harris, C., van der Meer, Q.H.A., Le Roux, P.Crustal versus mantle origin of carbonate xenoliths from Kimberly region kimberlites using C-O-Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes and trace element abundances.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, in press available, 16p.Africa, South Africadeposit - Kimberly region

Abstract: Carbonate-bearing assemblages in the mantle have been interpreted to be the source for Si-undersaturated, CO2-rich magmas, including kimberlites. However, direct evidence for carbonate in the mantle is rare in the contemporary literature. Here we present petrography, trace element, and C-O-Sr-Nd-Pb isotope composition for a suite of carbonate xenoliths from the Kimberley region kimberlites to ascertain their mantle or crustal origin and gain insight to the potential for the occurrence of carbonate in the mantle. Carbonate xenoliths were found in large kimberlite blocks from the Bultfontein kimberlite and Big Hole region. The xenoliths are characterised by pale green alteration margins made of fine-grained microlites of an unknown mineral as well as spherules surrounded by glassy material. They are generally 1–4?cm in size, coarse-grained (1–2?mm), and comprised entirely of calcite. Carbonate xenoliths from the Bultfontein kimberlite have low total REE concentrations (0.2–4.9?ppm), constant 87Sr/86Sri (0.7047–0.7049) combined with variable ?Ndi (-0.1 to -26.2) and 206Pb/204Pbi, 207Pb/204Pbi, and 208Pb/204Pbi of 16.7–18.8, 15.3–15.6, 36.5–38.4, respectively. Xenoliths from the Big Hole sample have higher 87Sr/86Sri (0.7088–0.7095), lower ?Ndi (-24.5 to -3.8), and 206Pb/204Pbi, 207Pb/204Pbi, and 208Pb/204Pbi of 18.9–19.9, 15.7–15.8, 38.4–38.8, respectively. The d13C values for both Bultfontein (-5.7 to -6.6‰) and Big Hole (-4.7 to -5.4‰) carbonates are within the typical range expected for mantle-derived carbonate. The d18O values (15.5–17.5‰) are higher than those of mantle silicate rocks, indicative of late-stage low-temperature interaction with fluids; a common feature of groundmass calcite in the Kimberley kimberlites. The Sr- and C- isotope composition of the Bultfontein xenoliths indicates a mantle origin whereas the Big Hole xenolith Sr- and C-isotopes are more ambiguous. Isotope mixing models are inconsistent with interaction between the host kimberlite and carbonate xenoliths. Correlation between ?Ndi and d18O values for the Bultfontein xenoliths indicates late-stage interaction with low-temperature fluids, which may also be responsible for the large range in ?Ndi. This in turn indicates that the highest ?Ndi of -0.1 represents the primary carbonate xenolith signature, and this value overlaps typical Group I kimberlites. We discuss two possible origins for the carbonate xenoliths. (1) Carbonate xenoliths from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM), where quenched margins and the large range of ?Ndi are related to formation in the mantle. (2) Carbonate xenoliths from an earlier phase of carbonatite magmatism. The similarity of isotope signatures of the Bultfontein carbonates to Group I kimberlite may further suggest a link between kimberlite and carbonatite volcanism such as observed elsewhere in the world.
DS201905-1082
2019
van der Meer, Q.H.A.van der Meer, Q.H.A., Scott, J.M., Serre, S.H., Whitehouse, M.J., Kristoffersen, M., Le Roux, P.J., Pope, E.C.Low delta 18 O zircon xenocrysts in alkaline basalts; a window into the complex carbonatite-metasomatic history of the Zealandia lithospheric mantle.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 254, pp. 21-39.New Zealandmetasomatism

Abstract: Megacrystic zircon grains from alkaline basaltic fields are rare but can provide fundamental insights into mantle metasomatic processes. Here, we report in-situ U-Pb ages, trace element concentrations and hafnium and oxygen isotopes for fourteen zircon megacrysts from two intraplate alkaline basalt locations in New Zealand. U-Pb ages indicate the zircons crystallised between 12.1 and 19.8 Ma. Zircon oxygen isotopic compositions range from low to mantle-like compositions (grain average d ¹8 O = 3.8-5.1‰). Hafnium isotopes (eHf (t) = +3.3 to +10.4) mostly overlap with intraplate mafic rocks and clinopyroxene in metasomatized peridotitic mantle xenoliths but show no correlation with most trace element parameters or oxygen isotopes. The zircons are interpreted to have formed by the reaction between low-degree melts derived from pre-existing mantle metasomes and the depleted mantle lithosphere prior to eruption and transport to the surface. The low Hf concentration, an absence of Eu anomalies, and elevated U/Yb compared to Nb/Yb in the megacrystic zircons are interpreted to show that the source metasomes comprised subduction- and carbonatite-metasomatised lithospheric mantle. As these trace element characteristics are common for megacrystic zircon in intra-plate basaltic fields globally, they suggest the prevalence of subduction- and carbonatite-metsasomatised mantle under these intraplate volcanic regions. The unusually low d ¹8 O was likely present prior to metasomatic enrichment and may have resulted from high-temperature hydrothermal alteration during initial mantle lithosphere formation at a mid ocean ridge or, possibly, during subduction-related processes associated with continent formation. The combination of proportionally varied contributions from carbonatite- and subduction-metasomatised lithospheric melts with asthenospheric melts may explain the variety of primitive intraplate basalt compositions, including low d ¹8 O reported for some local intraplate lavas.
DS2003-1411
2003
Van der MeijdeVan der MeijdeWet mantle below the MediterraneanScience, No. 5625, June 6, p. 1556.MantleSubduction - water
DS200412-2038
2003
Van der MeijdeVan der MeijdeWet mantle below the Mediterranean.Science, No. 5625, June 6, p. 1556.MantleSubduction - water
DS2003-1412
2003
Van der Meijde, M.Van der Meijde, M., Marone, F., Giardini, D., Van Der Lee, S.Seismic evidence for water deep in Earth's upper mantleScience, No. 5625, June 6, p. 1556-57.MantleWater
DS200412-1228
2004
Van der Meijde, M.Marone, F., Van der Meijde, M., Van der Lee, S., Giadini, D.Joint inversion of local, regional and teleseismic dat a for crustal thickness in the Eurasia Africa plate boundary region.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 154, 2, pp. 499-514.Europe, AsiaGeophysics - seismics, boundary
DS200412-2039
2003
Van der Meijde, M.Van der Meijde, M., Marone, F., Giardini, D., Van Der Lee, S.Seismic evidence for water deep in Earth's upper mantle.Science, No. 5625, June 6, p. 1556-57.MantleWater
DS201112-1036
2011
Van der Meijde, M.Tedia, G.E., Van der Meijde, M., Nyblade, A.A., Ven der Meer, F.D.A crustal thickness map of Africa derived from a global gravity field model using Euler deconvolution.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 187, 1, pp. 1-9.AfricaGeophysics - gravity
DS201502-0118
2015
van der Meijde, M.van der Meijde, M., Fadel, I., Ditmar, P., Hamayun, M.Uncertainties in crustal thickness models for dat a sparse environments: a review for South America and Africa.Journal of Geodynamics, Vol. 84, 1, pp. 1-18.South America, AfricaGeophysics - seismics
DS202007-1131
2020
Van der Meijde, M.Chisenga, C., Van der Meijde, M., Yan, J., Fadel. I., Atekwana, E.A., Steffen, R., Ramotoroko, C.Gravity derived crustal thickness model of Botswana: its implication for the Mw 6.5 April 3, 2017, Botswana earthquake. Tectonophysics, Vol. 787, 228479 12p. PdfAfrica, Botswanageophysics - gravity

Abstract: Botswana experienced a Mw 6.5 earthquake on 3rd April 2017, the second largest earthquake event in Botswana's recorded history. This earthquake occurred within the Limpopo-Shashe Belt, ~350 km southeast of the seismically active Okavango Rift Zone. The region has no historical record of large magnitude earthquakes or active faults. The occurrence of this earthquake was unexpected and underscores our limited understanding of the crustal configuration of Botswana and highlight that neotectonic activity is not only confined to the Okavango Rift Zone. To address this knowledge gap, we applied a regularized inversion algorithm to the Bouguer gravity data to construct a high-resolution crustal thickness map of Botswana. The produced crustal thickness map shows a thinner crust (35-40 km) underlying the Okavango Rift Zone and sedimentary basins, whereas thicker crust (41-46 km) underlies the cratonic regions and orogenic belts. Our results also show localized zone of relatively thinner crust (~40 km), one of which is located along the edge of the Kaapvaal Craton within the MW 6.5 Botswana earthquake region. Based on our result, we propose a mechanism of the Botswana Earthquake that integrates crustal thickness information with elevated heat flow as the result of the thermal fluid from East African Rift System, and extensional forces predicted by the local stress regime. The epicentral region is therefore suggested to be a possible area of tectonic reactivation, which is caused by multiple factors that could lead to future intraplate earthquakes in this region.
DS202011-2067
2020
van der Meijde, M.White-Gaynor, A.L., Nyblade, A.A., Durrheim, R., Raveloson, R., van der Meijde, M., Fadel, I., Paulssen, H., Kwadiba, M., Ntibinyane, O., Titus, N., Sitali, M.Lithospheric boundaries and upper mantle structure beneath southern Africa imaged by P and S wave velocity models.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, 10.1029/GC008925 20p. PdfAfrica, South AfricaGeophysics, seismic

Abstract: We report new P and S wave velocity models of the upper mantle beneath southern Africa using data recorded on seismic stations spanning the entire subcontinent. Beneath most of the Damara Belt, including the Okavango Rift, our models show lower than average velocities (-0.8% Vp; -1.2% Vs) with an abrupt increase in velocities along the terrane's southern margin. We attribute the lower than average velocities to thinner lithosphere (~130 km thick) compared to thicker lithosphere (~200 km thick) immediately to the south under the Kalahari Craton. Beneath the Etendeka Flood Basalt Province, higher than average velocities (0.25% Vp; 0.75% Vs) indicate thicker and/or compositionally distinct lithosphere compared to other parts of the Damara Belt. In the Rehoboth Province, higher than average velocities (0.3% Vp; 0.5% Vs) suggest the presence of a microcraton, as do higher than average velocities (1.0% Vp; 1.5% Vs) under the Southern Irumide Belt. Lower than average velocities (-0.4% Vp; -0.7% Vs) beneath the Bushveld Complex and parts of the Mgondi and Okwa terranes are consistent with previous studies, which attributed them to compositionally modified lithosphere resulting from Precambrian magmatic events. There is little evidence for thermally modified upper mantle beneath any of these terranes which could provide a source of uplift for the Southern African Plateau. In contrast, beneath parts of the Irumide Belt in southern and central Zambia and the Mozambique Belt in central Mozambique, deep-seated low velocity anomalies (-0.7% Vp; -0.8% Vs) can be attributed to upper mantle extensions of the African superplume structure.
DS2002-0224
2002
Van der Merve, R.Bumby, A.J., Eriksson, P.G., Van der Merve, R., Brummer, J.J.Shear zone controlled basins in the Blouberg area, Northern Province, syn and post tectonic sedimentation relating to 2.0 Ga reactivation of Limopo Belt.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 33, No. 3-4,pp. 445-61.South AfricaStructure, tectonics - not specific to diamonds
DS2002-0432
2002
Van der Merwe, H.Eriksson, P.G., Condie, K.C., Van der Westhuizen, R., Van der Merwe, H.Late Archean superplume events: a Kaapvaal Pilbara perspectiveJournal of Geodynamics, Vol. 34, 2, pp. 207-47.AustraliaTectonics
DS1995-1958
1995
Van der Merwe, S.W.Van der Merwe, S.W.The relationship between thrusting, vertical shears, and open folds in western part of Namaqua mobile beltSouth African Journal of Geology, Vol. 98, No. 1, March pp. 68-77South AfricaTectonics, structure, Namaqua belt
DS200512-1091
2005
Van der Phuijm, B.A.Tohver, E., Van der Phuijm, B.A., Mezger, K., Scandolara, J.E., Essene, E.J.Two stage tectonic history of the SW Amazon Craton in the late Mesoproterozoic in the late Mesoproterozoic: identifying a cryptic suture zone.Precambrian Research, Vol. 137, 1-2, Apr.28, pp. 35-59.South America, BrazilParagua Craton, tectonics, geochronology
DS1996-0202
1996
Van der Ploijm, B.A.Busch, J.P., Essene, E.J., Van der Ploijm, B.A.Evolution of deep crustal normal faults: constraints from thermo barometry in the Grenville Orogen, OntarioTectonophysics, Vol. 265, No. 1/2, Nov. 5, pp. 83-100.OntarioTectonics, Thermobarometry
DS1998-0945
1998
Van der Pluijm, B.Marshak, S., Hamburger, M., Van der Pluijm, B.Tectonics of continental interiors..... Penrose Conference ReportGsa Today, Vol. 8, No. 2, Feb. pp. 23-24GlobalTectonics, Precambrian
DS200512-1092
2004
Van der Pluijm, B.Tohver, E., Van der Pluijm, B., Mezger, B., Essene, E., Scandolara, J., Rizzotto, G.Significance of the Nova Brasilandia metasedimentary belt in western Brazil: redefining the Mesoproterozoic boundary of the Amazon Craton.Tectonics, Vol. 23, 6, TC 6004 1029/2003 TC001563South America, BrazilCraton - Amazon
DS1989-0302
1989
Van der Pluijm, B.A.Craddock, J.P., Van der Pluijm, B.A.Late Paleozoic deformation of the cratonic carbonate cover of eastern North AmericaGeology, Vol. 17, No. 5, May pp. 416-419Midcontinent, Arkansas, Minnesota, WisconsinOuachita orogenic front
DS1990-0724
1990
Van der Pluijm, B.A.Howell, P.D., Van der Pluijm, B.A.Early history of the Michigan Basin: subsidence and Appalachian tectonicsGeology, Vol. 18, No. 12, December pp. 1195-1198MichiganTectonics, Midcontinent
DS1990-1496
1990
Van der Pluijm, B.A.Van der Pluijm, B.A., Johnson, R.J.E., Van der Voo, R.Early Paleozoic paleogeography and accretionary history of the NewfoundlandAppalachiansGeology, Vol. 18, No. 9, September pp. 898-901NewfoundlandTectonics -accretion, Paleogeography
DS1991-1145
1991
Van der Pluijm, B.A.Mezger, K., Van der Pluijm, B.A., Essene, E.J., Halliday, A.N.Synorogenic collapse: a perspective from the middle crust, the Proterozoic Grenville orogenScience, Vol. 254, November 1, pp. 695-698OntarioTectonics, Grenville orogeny
DS1993-1026
1993
Van der Pluijm, B.A.Mezger, K., Essene, E.J., Van der Pluijm, B.A.Uranium-lead (U-Pb) geochronology of the Grenville Orogen of Ontario and New York:constraints on ancient crustal tectonicsContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 114, No. 1, pp. 13-26Ontario, New YorkTectonics, Geochronology
DS1996-1458
1996
Van der Pluijm, B.A.Van der Pluijm, B.A., Catacosinos, P.A.Basement and basins of eastern North America #1Geological Society of America Special paper, No. 308, $ 50.00, pp. 204Eastern North America, Midcontinent, IllinoisBook - ad, Book - table of contents, Basement, tectonics, basins
DS1996-1459
1996
Van der Pluijm, B.A.Van der Pluijm, B.A., Catacostinos, P.A.Basement and basins of eastern North America #2Geological Society of America, SPE308, 220p. approx. $ 50.00 United StatesNorth AmericaBook - ad, Basins
DS1997-1193
1997
Van der Pluijm, B.A.Van der Pluijm, B.A., Braddocks, J.P., Harris, J.H.Paleostress in cratonic North America: implications for deformation of continental interiors.Science, Vol. 277, No. 5327, Aug. 8, pp. 794-5.United States, CanadaCraton, Deformation, tectonics
DS1998-0946
1998
Van der Pluijm, B.A.Marshak, S., Hamburger, M., Van der Pluijm, B.A.Tectonics of continental interiors. Penrose Conference reportGsa Today, Vol. 8, No. 2, Feb. pp. 23-24.GlobalContinental interior, Precambrian, Craton
DS2001-1183
2001
Van der Pluijm, B.A.Van der Pluijm, B.A., Hall, Vrolljk, Pevear, CoveyThe dating of shallow faults in the Earth's crustNature, Vol. 412, July 12, pp. 172-5.British Columbia, CordilleraStructure
DS2002-1216
2002
Van der Pluijm, B.A.Pares, J.M., Van der Pluijm, B.A.Evaluating magnetic lineations ( AMS) in deformed rocksTectonophysics, Vol. 350, No. 4, pp. 283-298.GlobalGeophysics - magnetics, Lineaments
DS2000-0937
2000
Van der Pluijn, B.A.Streepey, M.M., Van der Pluijn, B.A., Essene, E.J., HallLate Proterozoic (ca 930 Ma) extension in eastern LaurentiaGeological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 112, No. 10, Oct. pp. 1522-30.GlobalGrenville Province, calcium, Geochronology
DS200612-1432
2006
Van der Pluijum, B.Tohver, E., Teixeira, W., Van der Pluijum, B., Geraldes, M.C., Bettencourt, J.S., Rizzotto, G.Restored transect across the exhumed Grenville Orogen of Laurentia and Amazonia, with implications for crustal architecture.Geology, Vol. 34, 8, pp. 669-672.South America, BrazilGeochronology, Amazon Craton, tectonics
DS1989-0962
1989
Van der Plum, B.A.Mauk, J.J., Seasor, R.O., Kelly, W.C., Van der Plum, B.A.The relationship between structure and second stage copper mineralization in the White Pine district of the Midcontinent Rift, northern MichiganGeological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting Abstracts, Vol. 21, No. 6, p. A130. AbstractMichiganMidcontinent, Tectonics
DS1860-0566
1887
Van Der Post And BukesVan Der Post And BukesImportant Public Sales of the Diamondiferous Farm Jagersfontein, No. 14.Fauresmith: Van Der Post And Bukes, 7P.Africa, South AfricaEconomics
DS1993-1643
1993
Van der Schrick, G.Van der Schrick, G.Evolving geological and mineralogical research in view of an evolving diamond market.Bulletin. Soc. Belge de Geologie, Vol. 101, No. 1, 2, pp. 3-7.GlobalDiamond, Production
DS2002-0465
2002
Van der StedtFoden, J., Song-Suck-Hwan, Turner, S., Elburg, M., Smith, P.B., Van der StedtGeochemical evolution of lithospheric mantle beneath S.E. South AustraliaChemical Geology, Vol. 182, No. 2-4, pp. 663-95.AustraliaMagmatism
DS201609-1753
2010
Van der Steen, P.Van der Steen, P.Revolution in diamond manufacturing.The 4th Colloquium on Diamonds - source to use held Gabarone March 1-3, 2010, 10p.GlobalHistory

Abstract: This paper examines the historical developments in diamond beneficiation technology and the impacts on the industry. The art of diamond beneficiation has given way to the application of scientific process, but at considerable capital expenditure. The shift in beneficiation methodologies has been disruptive to the traditional skills set of the industry, but evolutionary change continues and has been beneficial to the quality of the final product.
DS1997-0085
1997
Van der Steen, T.Bedford, S., Van der Steen, T.Extending the limits of subsea earthmovingWorld Diamond Conference, held Oct 7-8, 17p.GlobalTechnology - marine mining, Bulk sampling
DS1998-1515
1998
Van der Steen, T.Van der Steen, T.Production determining processes of subsea deposit removal29th. Annual Underwater Mining Institute, 1p. abstractGlobalMarine mining
DS201807-1495
2018
Van der Valk, E.A.S.Gress, M.U., Pearson, D.G., Chinn, I.L., Koornneef, J.M., Pals, A.S.M., Van der Valk, E.A.S., Davies, G.R.Episodic eclogitic diamond genesis at Jwaneng diamond mine, Botswana.Goldschmidt2018, abstract 1p.Africa, Botswanadeposit - Jwaneng

Abstract: The diamondiferous Jwaneng kimberlite cluster (~240 Ma) is located on the NW rim of the Archaean Kaapvaal Craton in central Botswana. Previous studies report eclogitic diamond formation in the late Archean (2.9 Ga) and in the Middle Proterozoic (1.5 Ga) involving different mantle and sedimentary components [1;2;3]. Here we report newly acquired Sm- Nd ages of individual eclogitic pyrope-almandine and omphacite inclusions along with their major element data and nitrogen data from the diamond hosts to re-examine Jwaneng’s diamond formation ages. The Sm-Nd isotope analyses were performed via TIMS using 1013O resistors [4]. An initial suite of three pyropealmandine and 14 omphacite inclusions yield 143Nd/144Nd from 0.51102±7 to 0.5155±5. 147Sm/144Nd vary from 0.024 to 0.469. Major element data defines two inclusion populations: (1) seven omphacites with high Mg#, high Cr# and one pyropealmandine with low-Ca define an isochron age of 1.93±0.16 Ga with ?Ndi= +3.5; (2) seven omphacites with low Mg#, low Cr# and two pyrope-almandines with low-Ca define an isochron age of 0.82±0.06 Ga with ?Ndi= +3.7. Nitrogen contents of corresponding diamond host growth zones in Group (1) are = 50 at.ppm whereas Group (2) range between 50 to 700 at.ppm with N-aggregation > 70 %B. Additional data used to define “co-genetic” inclusion suites include Sr-isotopes and trace elements of the inclusions and carbon isotopes of the diamond hosts. Re-Os data of coexisting sulphide inclusions from the same silicate-bearing diamonds further validates the ages and indicates more periods of diamond formation at Jwaneng than previously assumed. The integrated data indicate the possibility of an extensive Paleoproterozoic diamond-forming event in southern Africa.
DS1998-0375
1998
Van der VeldenEaton, D., Ross, G., Cook, F., Van der VeldenLithoprobes vault survey: pushing the depth limit of vibroseis profilingGeological Association of Canada (GAC)/Mineralogical Association of Canada (MAC) Abstract Volume, p. A50. abstract.AlbertaGeophysics - seismics, VAULT.
DS200412-2109
2003
Van der Velden, A.White, D.J., Musacchio, G., Helmstaedt, H.H., Harrap, R.M., Thurston, P.C., Van der Velden, A., Hall, K.Images of lower crustal oceanic slab: direct evidence for tectonic accretion in the Archean western Superior Province.Geology, Vol. 31, 11, pp. 997-1000.Canada, OntarioSubduction - not specific to diamonds
DS1993-0284
1993
Van der Velden, A.J.Cook, F.A., Van der Velden, A.J.Proterozoic crustal transition beneath the Western Canada sedimentary basin.Geology, Vol. 21, No. 9, September pp. 785-788Alberta, British ColumbiaTectonics, Basin, Geophysics -seismics
DS1993-0285
1993
Van der Velden, A.J.Cook, F.A., Van der Velden, A.J.Proterozoic crustal transition beneath the Western Canada sedimentary basinGeology, Vol. 21, No. 9, Sept. oo, 785-88.Western Canada, AlbertaGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics
DS1994-1827
1994
Van der Velden, A.J.Van der Velden, A.J., Cook, F.A.Displacement of the Lewis thrust sheet in southwestern Canada: new evidence from seismic reflection data.Geology, Vol. 22, No. 9, September pp. 819-822.British ColumbiaTectonics, Geophysics -seismics
DS1995-0349
1995
Van der Velden, A.J.Cook, F.A., Van der Velden, A.J.Three dimensional crustal structure of the Purcell anticlinorium in the Cordillera of southwestern CanadaGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 107, June. pp.642-64.Western Canada, Cordillera, British ColumbiaGeophysics - seismics, Vibroseis, Lithoprobe
DS1996-1460
1996
Van der Velden, A.J.Van der Velden, A.J., Cook, F.A.Structure and tectonic development of the southern Rocky Mountain trenchTectonics, Vol. 15, No. 3, June pp. 517-544.British ColumbiaTectonics, Rocky Mountain Trench system
DS1997-0213
1997
Van der Velden, A.J.Cook, F.A., Van der Velden, A.J., Hall, K.W., Roberts, B.R.Upper mantle reflectors beneath the SNORCLE transect - images of the base of the lithosphere.Lithoprobe Slave/SNORCLE., pp. 58-62.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS1998-0270
1998
Van der Velden, A.J.Cook, F.A., Van der Velden, A.J., Hall, K.W., Roberts, B.R.Tectonic delamination and subcrustal imbrication of the Precambrian lithosphere in northwestern Canada...Geology, Vol. 26, No. 9, Sept. pp. 839-42.Northwest TerritoriesLithoprobe - Slave Province, Geophysics - seismics
DS1999-0146
1999
Van der Velden, A.J.Cook, F.A., Van der Velden, A.J., Hall, K.W.Frozen subduction in Canada's Northwest Territories: Lithoprobe deep lithospheric reflection profiling....Tectonics, Vol. 18, No. 1, Feb. pp. 1-24.Northwest TerritoriesGeophysics - seismics, Lithoprobe western Canadian Shield
DS1999-0762
1999
Van der Velden, A.J.Van der Velden, A.J., Cook, F.A.Proterozoic and Cenozoic subduction complexes: a comparison of geometricfeatures.Tectonics, Vol. 18, No. 4, Aug. pp. 575-81.Cordillera, British ColumbiaTectonics - subduction, Geophysics - seismics, snorcle
DS2002-1641
2002
Van der Velden, A.J.Van der Velden, A.J., Cook, F.A.Products of 2.65 - 2.58 Ga orogenesis in the Slave Province correlated with Slave - Northern Cordillera Lithospheric Evolution ( SNORCLE) seismic reflectionCanadian Journal of Earth Science, Vol. 39,8,August pp. 1189-1200.Northwest TerritoriesGeophysics - seismic, Slave Province - tectonics, geodynamics
DS200412-0357
2004
Van der Velden, A.J.Cook, F.A., Clowes, R.M., Snyder, D.B., Van der Velden, A.J., Hall, K.W., Erdmer, P., Evenchick, C.A.Precambrian crust beneath the Mesozoic northern Canadian Cordillera discovered by lithoprobe seismic reflection profiling.Tectonics, Vol. 23, 2, TC2012 10.1029/2003TC001412Canada, Northwest Territories, British Columbia, YukonGeophysics - seismics
DS200512-0174
2005
Van der Velden, A.J.Clowes, R.M., Hanmer, P.T.C., Van der Velden, A.J.The Trans Canada crustal cross section: imaging the internal structure of our continent.GAC Annual Meeting Halifax May 15-19, Abstract 1p.CanadaGeophysics - seismics
DS200512-1118
2005
Van der Velden, A.J.Van der Velden, A.J., Cook, F.A.Relict subduction zones in Canada.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 110, B8, Aug. 5, B808403 DOI 10.1029/2004 JB003333CanadaTectonics, subduction
DS200612-1465
2005
Van der Velden, A.J.Van der Velden, A.J., Cook, F.A., Drummond, B.J., Goleby, B.R.Reflections of the Neoarchean: a global perspective.Benn, K., Mareschal, J-C., Condie, K.C. Archean Geodynamics and Environments, AGU Geophysical Monograph, No. 164, pp. 255-266.MantleGeophysics - seismsics
DS201012-0264
2010
Van der Velden, A.J.Hammer, P.T.C., Clowes, R.M., Cook, F.A., Van der Velden, A.J., Vasudevan, K.The lithoprobe trans continental lithospheric cross sections: imaging the internal structure of the North American continent.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 47, 5, pp. 821-957.Canada, United StatesGeophysics - seismics
DS1986-0392
1986
Van der Voo, R.Jackson, M., Van der Voo, R.A paleomagnetic estimate of the age and thermal history of the Kentland Indiana cryptoexplosion structureJournal of Geology, Vol. 94, No. 5, September pp. 713-724IndianaPaleomagnetics, Geophysics, Thermobarometry
DS1988-0723
1988
Van der Voo, R.Van der Voo, R., Johnson, R.J.E.Displaced terranes in the northern AppalachiansGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstract Volume, Vol. 20, No. 3, February p. 239-240. abstractNewfoundlandBlank
DS1990-0729
1990
Van der Voo, R.Hurley, N.F., Van der Voo, R.Magnetostratigraphy, Late Devonian iridium anomaly, andimpacthypothesesGeology, Vol. 18, No. 4, April pp. 291-294GlobalStratigraphy, Impact hypotheses
DS1990-1496
1990
Van der Voo, R.Van der Pluijm, B.A., Johnson, R.J.E., Van der Voo, R.Early Paleozoic paleogeography and accretionary history of the NewfoundlandAppalachiansGeology, Vol. 18, No. 9, September pp. 898-901NewfoundlandTectonics -accretion, Paleogeography
DS1990-1497
1990
Van der Voo, R.Van der Voo, R.The reliability of paleomagnetic dataTectonophysics, Vol. 184, pp. 1-9United States, Canada, AfricaGeophysics, Paleomagnetics -review
DS1991-1778
1991
Van der Voo, R.Van der Voo, R., Meert, J.G.Late Proterozoic paleomagnetism and tectonic models: a critical appraisalPrecambrian Research, Vol. 53, pp. 149-163South Africa, Democratic Republic of CongoTectonics,, Proterozoic
DS1992-1352
1992
Van der Voo, R.Scotese, C.R., Van der Voo, R.A global apparent Polar Wander PathEos Transactions, Vol. 73, No. 14, April 7, supplement abstracts p. 88-89GlobalPaleomagnetism, tectonics, Polar Wander Path
DS1994-1163
1994
Van der Voo, R.Meet, J.G., Hargraves, R.B., Van der Voo, R., HallPaleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar studies of Late Kebaran intrusives in Burundi:Proterozoic supercontinentsJournal of Geology, Vol. 102, No. 6, Nov. pp. 621-638GlobalGeochronology, Proterozoic, Rodinia
DS1994-1828
1994
Van der Voo, R.Van der Voo, R.True polar wander during the middle Paleozoic?Earth and Planet. Science Letters, Vol. 122, No. 1/2, March pp. 239-244.MantlePaleomagnetism, Polar wander
DS1995-1227
1995
Van der Voo, R.Meert, J.G., Van der Voo, R.The making of Gondwana 800 - 550 MaGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstracts, Vol. 27, No. 6, abstract p. A 339.MantleGondawana
DS1995-1959
1995
Van der Voo, R.Van der Voo, R.Remagnetization and superchronsEos, Vol. 76, No. 46, Nov. 7. p.F171. Abstract.MantleGeophysics -magnetics, Paleomagnetics
DS1996-0941
1996
Van der Voo, R.Meert, J.G., Van der Voo, R.Paleomagnetic and 40 Ar- 39 Ar study of the Sinyai dolerite, Kenya:implications for Gondwana assembly.Journal of Geology, Vol. 104, pp. 131-42.KenyaTectonics, Gondwana, Kuunga Orogeny, Geochronology, argon
DS1997-0758
1997
Van der Voo, R.Meert, J.G., Van der Voo, R.The assembly of Gondwana 800- 550 MaJournal of Geodynamics, Vol. 23, No. 3-4, pp. 223-236.Tectonics
DS1998-1516
1998
Van der Voo, R.Van der Voo, R.A complex field - PaleomagnetismScience, Vol. 281, Aug. 7, pp. 79-80GlobalGeophysics, Paleomagnetism
DS1999-0443
1999
Van Der Voo, R.Marcano, M.C., Van Der Voo, R., MacNiocaill C.True polar wander during the Permo-TriassicJournal of Geodynamics, Vol. 28, No. 2-3, Sept. 2, pp. 75-95.MantleGeophysics - thermodynamics, Lithosphere
DS2002-1608
2002
Van der Voo, R.Torsvik, T.H., Van der Voo, R., Redfield, T.F.Relative hotspot motions versus True Polar WanderEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 202, 2, pp. 185-200.MantleHot spots
DS2003-0087
2003
Van der Voo, R.Bayona, G., Thomas, W.A., Van der Voo, R.Kinematics of thrust sheets within transverse zones: a structural and paleomagneticJournal of Structural Geology, Vol. 25, 8, pp. 1193-1212.Georgia, Alabama, AppalachiaStructural geology
DS200412-0115
2003
Van der Voo, R.Bayona, G., Thomas, W.A., Van der Voo, R.Kinematics of thrust sheets within transverse zones: a structural and paleomagnetic investigation in the Appalachian thrust beltJournal of Structural Geology, Vol. 25, 8, pp. 1193-1212.United States, Georgia, AlabamaStructural geology
DS200512-1119
2004
Van der Voo, R.Van der Voo, R.Paleomagnetism, oroclines and growth of the continental crust.Geology Today, Vol. 14, 12, Dec. pp. 4-9.Europe, SpainContinental drift - overview - not specific to diamonds
DS201112-0280
2011
Van der Voo, R.Dominguez, A.R., Van der Voo, R., Torsvik, T.H., Hendriks, B.W.H, Abrajevitch, A., Domeier, M., Larsen, B.T., Rousse, S.The ~270 Ma paleolatitude of Baltica and its significance for Pangea models.Geophysical Journal International, In press availableEurope, Baltic ShieldGeochronology
DS1993-1644
1993
Van der Wal, D.Van der Wal, D., Vissers, R.L.M.Uplift and emplacement of upper mantle rocks in the western MediterraneanGeology, Vol. 23, No. 12, December pp. 1119-1122.GlobalMantle rocks, Peridotites
DS1993-1645
1993
Van der Wal, D.Van der Wal, D., Vissers, R.L.M.Uplift and emplacement of upper mantle rocks in the western MediterraneanGeology, Vol. 21, No. 12, December pp. 1119-1122GlobalMantle, Tectonics
DS1995-2001
1995
Van der Wal, D.Vissers, R.L.M., Drury, M.R., Van der Wal, D.Mantle shear zones and their effect on lithosphere strength during continental breakup.Tectonophysics, Vol. 249, No. 3/4, Sept. 30, pp. 155-172.MantleTectonics, Geodynamics
DS1995-2002
1995
Van der Wal, D.Vissers, R.L.M., Platt, J.P., Van der Wal, D.Late Orogenic extension of the Betic Cordillera and Alboran Domain: alithospheric view.Tectonics, Vol. 14, No. 4, Aug. pp. 786-803.MoroccoTectonics
DS1996-1461
1996
Van der Wal, D.Van der Wal, D., Vissers, R.L.M.Structural petrology of the Ronda Peridotite: deformation historyJournal of Petrology, Vol. 37, No. 1, Feb pp. 23-44GlobalLatered Intrusion, Ronda
DS201112-0061
2011
Van der Wal, W.Barnhoorn, A., Van der Wal, W., Drury, M.R.Upper mantle viscosity and lithospheric thickness under Iceland.Journal of Geodynamics, Vol. 52, 3-4, pp. 260-270.Europe, IcelandGeophysics - seismics
DS1960-0891
1967
Van der westhuizan, H.L.Van der westhuizan, H.L.Descriptive Geology of the Kimberlite Occurrences at Bellsbank and the Frank Smith Mine Area.International Geological Congress 10TH, UNPUBL.South AfricaGeology, Mines
DS2000-0212
2000
Van der WesthuizenDe Bruiyn, H., Schoch, Van der Westhuizen, MyburghPicrite from the Katse area, Lesotho: evidence for flow differentiationJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 31, No. 3-4, pp. 657-88.LesothoPicrite, Geochemistry - magma
DS2002-0432
2002
Van der Westhuizen, R.Eriksson, P.G., Condie, K.C., Van der Westhuizen, R., Van der Merwe, H.Late Archean superplume events: a Kaapvaal Pilbara perspectiveJournal of Geodynamics, Vol. 34, 2, pp. 207-47.AustraliaTectonics
DS1989-0554
1989
Van der Westhuizen, W.A.Grobler, N.J., Van der Westhuizen, W.A., Tordiffe, E.A.W.The Sodium Group, South Africa: reference section for Late Archean- early Proterozoic cratonic cover sequencesAustralian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 36, pp. 41-64. Database # 17953South AfricaProterozoic, Kaapvaal Craton
DS2002-1730
2002
Van der Westhuizen, W.A.Winter, H. De La. R., Cheney, E.S., Van der Westhuizen, W.A.Sequence chronostratigraphic analysis of the Kaapvaal Province, southern Africa: responses to the 3-2 Ga plate tectonics and magmatism.11th. Quadrennial Iagod Symposium And Geocongress 2002 Held Windhoek, Abstract p. 45.South AfricaGeochronology
DS201412-0940
2014
Van der Westhuyzen, P.Van der Westhuyzen, P., Bouwer, W., Jakins, A.Current trends in the development of new or optimization of existing diamond processing plants, with focus on beneficiation.South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 114, July pp. 537-546.TechnologyDiamond processing plants
DS201805-0974
2018
van der Westhuyzen, P.Sasman, F., Deetlefs, B., van der Westhuyzen, P.Application of diamond size frequency distribution and XRT technology at a large diamond producer. The Journal of the Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 118, Jan. pp. 1-6.Africa, South Africadiamond size frequency

Abstract: Diamond size frequency distribution (SFD) curves, combined with the associated dollar per carat per size class, play an important role in the diamond industry. Value per size class is unique for each deposit and typically varies from less than a dollar per carat to several thousands of dollars per carat for special stones. Recovery of large stone therefore contributes significantly to the bottom line of a large diamond producer. While the design of the process plant should prevent damage and possible breakage of large stones, it should also ensure adequate liberation of the finer diamonds. Innovative solutions are required to protect and recover type I and II diamonds if prominent within the resource. X-ray transmission (XRT) sorting presents the opportunity to develop flow sheet designs that incorporate a balance between exploitation of the resource and process efficiency, as well as practical capital and operating costs. This paper serves to illustrate the role and application of SFD curves in determining optimum cut-off and re-crush sizes within the flow sheet of a large diamond producer. A thorough understanding of the unique technical and economic aspects of a deposit provides the basis from where new and innovative technologies can be proposed, allowing mining companies to maintain and improve profit margins. It highlights the results of various plant trials and newly commissioned XRT sorters for larger size fractions. It also provides recommendations for future applications of XRT machines in the diamond process flow sheet.
DS200712-0220
2007
Van der Zwan, F.Davies, G.R., Wasch, L., Van der Zwan, F., Morel, M.L.A., Nebel, Van Westrenen, Pearson, HellebrandThe origin of silica rich Kaapvaal lithospheric mantle.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A205.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Kimberley
DS200912-0807
2009
Van der Zwan, F.M.Wasch, L.J., Van der Zwan, F.M., Nebel, O., Morel, M.L.A., Hellebrand, E.W.G., Pearson, D.G., Davies, G.R.An alternative model for silica enrichment in the Kaapvaal subcontinental lithospheric mantle.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 73, 22, pp. 6894-6917.MantleMelting
DS1995-1960
1995
Van Deventer, J.Van Deventer, J.Investment in the South African minerals industryInternational Minerals and Metals Technology, pp. 19-28.South AfricaEconomics, Minerals industry -general
DS1995-1961
1995
Van Deventer, J.S.J.Van Deventer, J.S.J.Investment in the South African minerals industryInternational Minerals and Metals Tech, pp. 19-28South AfricaEconomics, Investment
DS200812-1201
2008
Van Deventer, P.W.Van Deventer, P.W., et al.Soil quality as a key success factor in sustainable rehabilitation of kimberlite mine waste.Journal of South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 108, 3, pp.Africa, South AfricaMine - rehabilitation
DS200812-1202
2008
Van Deventer, P.W.Van Deventer, P.W., et al.Soil quality as a key success factor in sustainable rehabilitation of kimberlite mine waste.Journal of the South African Institute or Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 108, 3, pp.Africa, South AfricaMining
DS201212-0745
2012
Van Dijk, M.Van Dijk, M., Kleinhans, M.G., Postma, G., Kraal, E.Contrasting morphodynamics in alluvial fans and fan deltas: effect of the Down stream boundary.Sedimentology, in press availableGlobalGeomorphology
DS201212-0746
2012
Van Dijk, M.Van Dijk, M., Kleinhans, M.G., Postma, G., Kraal, E.Contrasting morphodynamics in alluvial fans and fan deltas: effect of the Down stream boundary.Sedimentology, Vol. 59, 7, Dec. pp. 2125-2145.TechnologyGeomorphology - fans
DS201012-0811
2010
Van Dinther, Y.Van Dinther, Y., Morra, G., Funiciello, F., Faccenna, C.Role of overriding plate in the subduction process: insights from numerical models.Tectonophysics, Vol. 484, pp. 74-86.MantleSubduction
DS1982-0613
1982
Van eck, O.J.Van eck, O.J., Anderson, R.R., Cumerlato, C.L., et al.Regional Tectonics and Seismicity of Southwestern IowaIowa State Geological Survey, NUREG CR 3021, 72P. (NOVEMBER).GlobalMid-continent, Gravity, Geophysics, Thurman-redfield
DS1983-0160
1983
Van eck, O.J.Burchett, R.R., Luza, K.V., Van eck, O.J., Wilson, F.W.Seismicity and Tectonic Relationships of the Nemaha Uplift And Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly.National Technical Information Service NUREG-CR 3117, 122P.GlobalMid-continent
DS1985-0096
1985
Van eck, O.J.Burchett, R.R., Luza, K.V., Van eck, O.J., Wilson, F.W.Seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and midcontinent geophysical anomaly (final report summary)Oklahoma Geological Survey Special Report, No. 85-2, 33pMidcontinent, Gulf Coast, OklahomaGeophysics, Tectonics
DS201808-1774
2018
Van Eeden, M.Nowicki, T., Garlick, G., Webb, K., Van Eeden, M.Estimation of commercial diamond grades based on microdiamonds: a case study of the Koidu diamond mine, Sierra Leone.Mineralogy and Petrology, doi.org/10.1007/s00710-018-0620-9 11p.Africa, Sierra Leonedeposit - Koidu

Abstract: This paper documents the application of a microdiamond-based approach to the estimation of diamond grade in the Pipe 1 kimberlite at the Koidu mine in Sierra Leone. A geological model of Pipe 1 was constructed to represent the distribution and volume of the dominant kimberlite units within the pipe. Bulk samples, along with representative microdiamond samples, were collected from these units at surface and were used to define the ratio between microdiamond stone frequency (+212 µm stones per kilogram) and recoverable macrodiamond grade (+1.2 mm carats per tonne; 1 carat?=?0.2 g). These ratios were applied to a comprehensive, spatially representative microdiamond sample dataset and were combined with a spatial model of country-rock xenolith dilution within the pipe to estimate +1.2 mm recoverable grades. The resource estimate was reconciled with subsequent production results in the elevation range 160 to 100 m above sea level. Production results for each of the six 10 m benches covering this elevation range were compared to the estimated average grades for these zones in the pipe. For the five cases where most of the kimberlite mass on a given bench is represented in the production data, the results show a maximum discrepancy of 6% between predicted and reported production grade with no indication of any consistent bias. This indicates that, when supported by a sound geological model and suitable microdiamond and macrodiamond data, the microdiamond-based estimation approach can provide reliable constraints on macrodiamond grade, even in the case of geologically complex bodies such as Koidu Pipe 1.
DS1970-0610
1972
Van eeden, O.R.Van eeden, O.R.The Geology of the Republic of South Africa- an Explanation of the 1: 1 Million Map.Geological Survey of South Africa, SPECIAL Publishing No. 18, 85P.South Africa, Lesotho, Botswana, Swaziland, Southern AfricaRegional Geology, Kimberley
DS1991-1657
1991
Van Eijnsberger, A.C.Stein, A., Van Eijnsberger, A.C., Barendregt, L.G.Cokriging nonstationary dataMathematical Geology, Vol. 23, No. 5, July pp. 703-720GlobalGeostatistics, Kriging
DS1991-1779
1991
Van Fossen, M.C.Van Fossen, M.C., Kent, D.V.Paleomagnetism of Late Jurassic -Early Cretaceous kimberlite dikes from Ithaca New YorkEos, Spring Meeting Program And Abstracts, Vol. 72, No. 17, April 23, p. 99GlobalPaleomagnetism, Kimberlite dikes
DS1993-1646
1993
Van Fossen, M.C.Van Fossen, M.C., Kent, D.V.A paleomagnetic study of 143 MA kimberlite dikes in central New YorkState.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 113, No. 1, April pp. 175-185.GlobalGeophysics -dikes, Paleomagnetism
DS1996-1462
1996
Van Geest, F.Van Geest, F., Corrigan, C.Mineral policy update 1990-1994Centre for Resource Studies, 305p. $ 35.00CanadaBook -ad, Mineral policy
DS2003-0929
2003
Van Geet, M.Mees, F., Swennen, R., Van Geet, M., Jacobs, P.Applications of X ray computed tomography in the GeosciencesGeological Society of London Publ., http://bookshop.geolsoc.org.uk, SP 215, 256p. approx. $110.USGlobalBook - tomography - general interest
DS200412-1288
2003
Van Geet, M.Mees, F., Swennen, R., Van Geet, M., Jacobs, P.Applications of X ray computed tomography in the Geosciences.Geological Society of London , SP 215, 256p. approx. $110.USTechnologyBook - tomography
DS200912-0727
2009
Van Gool, A.M.St.Onge, M.R., Van Gool, A.M., Garde, A.A., Scott, D.J.Correlation of Archean and paleoproterozoic units between northeastern Canada and western Greenland: constraining the pre-collisional upper plate accretionary historyGeological Society of London, Special Publication Earth Accretionary systems in Space and Time, No. 318, pp. 193-235.Canada, Ontario, Europe, GreenlandTrans-Hudson Orogen
DS1993-1312
1993
Van Gool, J.A.M.Rivers, T., Van Gool, J.A.M., Connelly, J.N.Contrasting tectonic styles in the northern Grenville province:implications for the dynamics of orogenic frontsGeology, Vol. 21, No. 12, December pp. 1127-1130Labrador, Quebec, Ungava, OntarioTectonics, Geodynamics
DS2000-0172
2000
Van Gool, J.A.M.Connelly, J.N., Van Gool, J.A.M., Mengel, F.C.Temporal evolution of a deeply eroded orogen: the Nagssugtoqidian OrogenCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 37, No. 8, Aug. pp. 1121-42.GreenlandCraton - North Atlantic, Geochronology
DS2002-1642
2002
Van Gool, J.A.M.Van Gool, J.A.M., Connelly, J.N., Marker, M., Mengel, F.C.The Nagssugtoqidian Orogen of West Greenland: tectonic evolution and regional correlations from a West Greenland perspective.Canadian Journal of Earth Science, Vol.39,5, May, pp.665-86.GreenlandTectonics - Orogen, ESCOOT
DS1998-0929
1998
Van Gool. J.Manatschal, G., Ulfbeck, D., Van Gool. J.Change from thrusting to syncollisional extension at a mid-crustal level:an example from the PaleoproterozoicCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 35, No. 7, July pp. 802-19.GreenlandOrogen - Nagssugtoquidian, Tectonics
DS2002-1643
2002
Van Goot, J.A.M.Van Goot, J.A.M., et al.Precambrian geology of the northern Nagssugtoqidian orogen, west Greenland: mapping of the Kangaatsiaq area.Geology of Greenland Survey Bulletin, No. 191, pp. 13-23.GreenlandTectonics
DS1989-1537
1989
Van Gosen, B.S.Van Gosen, B.S., Wenrich, K.J., Thoen, W.L.Ground magnetometer survey over known and suspected breccias pipes on the Coconino Plateau, NorthwesternArizonaUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Bulletin, No. 1683-C 31pArizonaBreccia pipes, Geophysics
DS1989-1538
1989
Van Gosen, B.S.Van Gosen, B.S., Wenrich, K.J., Thoen, W.L.Ground magnetometer surveys over known and suspected breccia pipes on the Coconino Plateau northwesternArizonaUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Bulletin, No. B 1683-C, pp. C 1-C 31. $ 2.75Arizona, Colorado PlateauGeophysics -Magnetics, Breccia pipes
DS1993-1647
1993
Van Gosen, B.S.Van Gosen, B.S.Bibliography of geologic references (1872-1992) to the Absaroka-Beartoothstudy area in Custer and Gallatin forestsUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open file, No. 93-0285-A, B., 71p. 1 disc. $ 17.00MontanaBibliography, Absaroka, Beartooth
DS201112-0615
2010
Van Gosen, B.S.Long, K.R., Van Gosen, B.S., Foley, N.K., Cordier, D.The principal rare earth elements deposits of the United States - a summary of domestic deposits and a global perspective.U.S. Geological Survey, United StatesREE
DS201702-0240
2016
Van Gosen, B.S.Sengupta, D., Van Gosen, B.S.Placer type rare earth element deposits.Reviews in Economic Geology, Vol. 18, pp. 81-100.GlobalREE placers
DS1997-0311
1997
Van Groos, A.F.K.Eggenkamp, H.G.M., Van Groos, A.F.K.Chlorine stable isotopes in carbonatites: evidence for isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle. #1Chemical Geology, Vol. 140, No. 1-2, July 15, pp. 137-144.MantleCarbonatite, Geochronology
DS201312-0934
2013
Van Heck, H.Van Heck, H., Davies, J.H.Novel particle method for modelling melt generated heterogeneity in spherical mantle convection models.Goldschmidt 2013, 1p. AbstractMantleConvection
DS1998-1343
1998
Van HeerdenShirey, S.B., Carlson, R.W., Gurney, J.J., Van HeerdenRe Os isotope systematics of eclogites from Roberts Victor: Implications for diamond growth ...7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 808-810.South AfricaArchean tectonic processes, geochronology, Deposit - Roberts Victor
DS201112-0605
2011
Van Heerden, E.Lippmann-Pipke, J., Sherwood Lollar, B., Niedermann, S., Stroncik, N.A., Naumann, R., Van Heerden, E., Onstott, T.C.Neon identifies two billion year old fluid component in Kaapvaal Craton.Chemical Geology, Vol. 283, 3-4, pp. 287-296.Africa, South AfricaGeochronology
DS1995-1962
1995
Van Heerden, L.A.Van Heerden, L.A., Boyd, S.R., Pillinger, C.T.The carbon and nitrogen isotope characteristics of Argyle and Ellendalediamonds.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 225-227.AustraliaGeochronology, Deposit -Argyle, Ellendale
DS1995-1963
1995
Van Heerden, L.A.Van Heerden, L.A., Boyd, S.R., Pillinger, C.T.The carbon and nitrogen isotope characteristics of the Argyle and Ellendalediamonds, Western Australia.International Geology Review, Vol. 37, No. 1, Jan. pp. 39-50.AustraliaGeochronology, Deposit -Argyle, Ellendale
DS1995-1964
1995
Van Heerden, L.A.Van Heerden, L.A., Boyd, S.R., Pillinger, C.T., MilledgeThe fractionation of nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios in Western Australian diamonds.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 228-230.AustraliaGeochronology, Deposit -Argyle, Ellendale
DS1995-1965
1995
Van Heerden, L.A.Van Heerden, L.A., Gurney, J.J., Deines, P.The carbon isotopic composition of harzburgite, lherzolite, websterite, eclogite paragenetic diamondsSouth. African Journal of Geology, Vol. 98, No. 2, June pp. 119-125.South Africa, BotswanaGeochronology -diamonds, Models -genetic
DS1995-1966
1995
Van Heerden, L.A.Van Heerden, L.A., Taylor, W.R., Kirkley, Gurney, BulanovaComparison of physical spectroscopic and stable isotope characteristics of Roberts Victor diamonds.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 231-232.South AfricaCathodluminescence, Deposit -Roberts Victor
DS2002-1345
2002
Van Heijst, H.J.Ritsema, J., Rivera, L.A., Komatitsch, D., Tromp, J., Van Heijst, H.J.Effects of crust and mantle heterogeneity on PP/P and SS/S amplitude ratiosGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 29,10,May15,pp.72-MantleGeophysics
DS200912-0630
2009
Van Heijst, H.J.Ritsema, J., Van Heijst, H.J., Woodhouse, J.H., deuss, A.Long period body wave traveltimes through the crust: implications for crustal corrections and seismic tomography.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 179, 2, Nov. pp. 1255-1261.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS201412-0119
2014
van Heijst, H.J.Chang, S-J., Ferreira, A.M.G., Ritsema, J., van Heijst, H.J., Woodhouse, J.H.Global radially anisotropic mantle structure from multiple datasets: a review, current challenges, and outlook.Tectonophysics, Vol. 617, pp. 1-19.MantleTomography
DS201212-0714
2012
Van Hinsberg, V.J.Szilas, K., Naeraa, T., Schersten, A., Stendal, H., Frei, R., Van Hinsberg, V.J., Kokfelt, T.F., Rosing, M.T.Origin of Mesoarchean arc related rocks with boninite-komatiite affinities from southern West Greenland.Lithos, in pressEurope, GreenlandBoninites
DS201412-0909
2014
Van Hinsberg, V.J.Szilas, K.,Van Hinsberg, V.J., Creaser, R.A., Kisters, A.F.M.The geochemical composition of serpentinites in the Mesoarchean Tartoq Group, SW Greenland: harzburgite cumulates or melt-modified mantle?Lithos, Vol. 198-199, pp. 103-116.Europe, GreenlandMelting
DS202002-0163
2019
van Hinsberg, V.J.Beard, C.D., van Hinsberg, V.J., Stix, J., Wilke, M.Clinopyroxene melt trace element partitioning in sodic alkaline magmas.Journal of Petrology, in press available 92p. PdfEurope, Canary IslandsREE

Abstract: Clinopyroxene is a key fractionating phase in alkaline magmatic systems, but its impact on metal enrichment processes, and the formation of REE + HFSE mineralisation in particular, is not well understood. To constrain the control of clinopyroxene on REE + HFSE behaviour in sodic (per)alkaline magmas, a series of internally heated pressure vessel experiments was performed to determine clinopyroxene-melt element partitioning systematics. Synthetic tephriphonolite to phonolite compositions were run H2O-saturated at 200?MPa, 650-825?C with oxygen fugacity buffered to log f O2 ˜ ?QFM + 1 or log f O2 ˜ ?QFM +5. Clinopyroxene-glass pairs from basanitic to phonolitic fall deposits from Tenerife, Canary Islands, were also measured to complement our experimentally-derived data set. The REE partition coefficients are 0.3-53, typically 2-6, with minima for high-aegirine clinopyroxene. Diopside-rich clinopyroxenes (Aeg5-25) prefer the MREE and have high REE partition coefficients (DEuup to 53, DSmup to 47). As clinopyroxene becomes more Na- and less Ca-rich (Aeg25-50), REE incorporation becomes less favourable, and both the VIM1 and VIIIM2 sites expand (to 0.79 Å and 1.12 Å), increasing DLREE/DMREE. Above Aeg50 both M sites shrink slightly and HREE (VIri= 0.9 Å ˜ Y) partition strongly onto the VIM1 site, consistent with a reduced charge penalty for REE3+ ? Fe3+ substitution. Our data, complemented with an extensive literature database, constrain an empirical model that predicts trace element partition coefficients between clinopyroxene and silicate melt using only mineral major element compositions, temperature and pressure as input. The model is calibrated for use over a wide compositional range and can be used to interrogate clinopyroxene from a variety of natural systems to determine the trace element concentrations in their source melts, or to forward model the trace element evolution of tholeiitic mafic to evolved peralkaline magmatic systems.
DS201801-0074
2017
van Hinsbergen, D.J.van Hinsbergen, D.J., Lippert, P.C., Huang, W.Unfeasible subduction?Nature Geoscience, Vol. 10, 12, pp. 878-9.Mantlesubduction
DS201012-0810
2010
Van Hinsbergen, D.J.J.Van der Meer, D.G., Spakman, W., Van Hinsbergen, D.J.J., Amaru, M.L., Torsvik, T.H.Towards absolute plate motions constrained by lower mantle slab remnants.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 3, Jan. pp. 36-40.MantleTectonics, Pangea
DS201112-1074
2011
Van Hinsbergen, D.J.J.Van Hinsbergen, D.J.J., Buiter, S.J.H., Torsvik, T.H., Gaina, C., Webb, S.J.The formation and evolution of Africa from the Archean to Present; introduction.The Formation and Evolution of Africa: A synopsis of 3.8 Ga of Earth History, Geol. Soc. London Special Publ., 357, pp. 1-8.AfricaHistory
DS201112-1075
2011
Van Hinsbergen, D.J.J.Van Hinsbergen, D.J.J., Steinberger, B., Doubrovine, P.V., Gassmuller, R.Acceleration and deceleration of India-Asia convergence since the Cretaceous: roles of mantle plumes and continental collision.Journal of Geophysical Research, in press availableIndia, China, AsiaHotspots
DS201811-2616
2018
van Hinsbergen, D.J.J.van der Meer, D.G., van Hinsbergen, D.J.J., Spakman, W.Atlas of the underworld: slab remnants in the mantle, their sinking history, and a new outlook on lower mantle viscosity.Tectonophysics, Vol. 773, 1, pp. 309-448.Mantlegeophysics - seismic

Abstract: Across the entire mantle we interpret 94 positive seismic wave-speed anomalies as subducted lithosphere and associate these slabs with their geological record. We document this as the Atlas of the Underworld, also accessible online at www.atlas-of-the-underworld.org, a compilation comprising subduction systems active in the past ~ 300 Myr. Deeper slabs are correlated to older geological records, assuming no relative horizontal motions between adjacent slabs following break-off, using knowledge of global plate circuits, but without assuming a mantle reference frame. The longest actively subducting slabs identified reach the depth of ~ 2500 km and some slabs have impinged on Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces in the deepest mantle. Anomously fast sinking of some slabs occurs in regions affected by long-term plume rising. We conclude that slab remnants eventually sink from the upper mantle to the core-mantle boundary. The range in subduction-age versus - depth in the lower mantle is largely inherited from the upper mantle history of subduction. We find a significant depth variation in average sinking speed of slabs. At the top of the lower mantle average slab sinking speeds are between 10 and 40 mm/yr, followed by a deceleration to 10-15 mm/yr down to depths around 1600-1700 km. In this interval, in situ time-stationary sinking rates suggest deceleration from 20 to 30 mm/yr to 4-8 mm/yr, increasing to 12-15 mm/yr below 2000 km. This corroborates the existence of a slab deceleration zone but we do not observe long-term (> 60 My) slab stagnation, excluding long-term stagnation due to compositional effects. Conversion of slab sinking profiles to viscosity profiles shows the general trend that mantle viscosity increases in the slab deceleration zone below which viscosity slowly decreases in the deep mantle. This is at variance with most published viscosity profiles that are derived from different observations, but agrees qualitatively with recent viscosity profiles suggested from material experiments.
DS201902-0328
2018
van Hinsbergen, D.J.J.Van der Meer, D.G., van Hinsbergen, D.J.J., Spakman, W.Atlas of the underworld: slab remnants in the mantle, their sinking history, and a new outlook on lower mantle viscosity.Tectonophysics, Vol. 723, 1, pp. 309-448.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: Across the entire mantle we interpret 94 positive seismic wave-speed anomalies as subducted lithosphere and associate these slabs with their geological record. We document this as the Atlas of the Underworld, also accessible online at www.atlas-of-the-underworld.org, a compilation comprising subduction systems active in the past ~ 300 Myr. Deeper slabs are correlated to older geological records, assuming no relative horizontal motions between adjacent slabs following break-off, using knowledge of global plate circuits, but without assuming a mantle reference frame. The longest actively subducting slabs identified reach the depth of ~ 2500 km and some slabs have impinged on Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces in the deepest mantle. Anomously fast sinking of some slabs occurs in regions affected by long-term plume rising. We conclude that slab remnants eventually sink from the upper mantle to the core-mantle boundary. The range in subduction-age versus - depth in the lower mantle is largely inherited from the upper mantle history of subduction. We find a significant depth variation in average sinking speed of slabs. At the top of the lower mantle average slab sinking speeds are between 10 and 40 mm/yr, followed by a deceleration to 10-15 mm/yr down to depths around 1600-1700 km. In this interval, in situ time-stationary sinking rates suggest deceleration from 20 to 30 mm/yr to 4-8 mm/yr, increasing to 12-15 mm/yr below 2000 km. This corroborates the existence of a slab deceleration zone but we do not observe long-term (> 60 My) slab stagnation, excluding long-term stagnation due to compositional effects. Conversion of slab sinking profiles to viscosity profiles shows the general trend that mantle viscosity increases in the slab deceleration zone below which viscosity slowly decreases in the deep mantle. This is at variance with most published viscosity profiles that are derived from different observations, but agrees qualitatively with recent viscosity profiles suggested from material experiments.
DS201910-2306
2019
Van Hinsbergen, D.J.J.Van Hinsbergen, D.J.J., Torsvik, T.H., Schmid, S.M., Matenco, L.C., Maffione, M., Vissers, R.L.M., Gurer, D., Spakman, W.Orogenic architecture of the Mediterranean region and kinematic reconstruction of its tectonic evolution since the Triassic. AtriaGondwana Research, in press available 427p.Europecraton

Abstract: The basins and orogens of the Mediterranean region ultimately result from the opening of oceans during the early break-up of Pangea since the Triassic, and their subsequent destruction by subduction accommodating convergence between the African and Eurasian Plates since the Jurassic. The region has been the cradle for the development of geodynamic concepts that link crustal evolution to continental break-up, oceanic and continental subduction, and mantle dynamics in general. The development of such concepts requires a first-order understanding of the kinematic evolution of the region for which a multitude of reconstructions have previously been proposed. In this paper, we use advances made in kinematic restoration software in the last decade with a systematic reconstruction protocol for developing a more quantitative restoration of the Mediterranean region for the last 240 million years. This restoration is constructed for the first time with the GPlates plate reconstruction software and uses a systematic reconstruction protocol that limits input data to marine magnetic anomaly reconstructions of ocean basins, structural geological constraints quantifying timing, direction, and magnitude of tectonic motion, and tests and iterations against paleomagnetic data. This approach leads to a reconstruction that is reproducible, and updatable with future constraints. We first review constraints on the opening history of the Atlantic (and Red Sea) oceans and the Bay of Biscay. We then provide a comprehensive overview of the architecture of the Mediterranean orogens, from the Pyrenees and Betic-Rif orogen in the west to the Caucasus in the east and identify structural geological constraints on tectonic motions. We subsequently analyze a newly constructed database of some 2300 published paleomagnetic sites from the Mediterranean region and test the reconstruction against these constraints. We provide the reconstruction in the form of 12 maps being snapshots from 240 to 0 Ma, outline the main features in each time-slice, and identify differences from previous reconstructions, which are discussed in the final section.
DS201212-0071
2012
Van Hinsbergen, J.J.Biggin, A.J., Steinberger, B., Aubert, J., Suttle, N., Holme, R., Torsvik, H., Van der Meer, D.G., Van Hinsbergen, J.J.Possible links between long term geomagnetic variations and whole mantle convection processes.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 5, pp. 526-533.MantleConvection
DS200512-0602
2004
Van Horn, S.Law, E., Bear, S., Van Horn, S.Petrographic evidence of an instant freeze of kimberlite diatreme.Geological Society of America Northeastern Meeting ABSTRACTS, Vol. 36, 2, p. 71.United States, PennsylvaniaTanoma kimberlite dykes, phreatomagmatism
DS200712-0188
2007
Van Hunden, J.Cizkova, H., Van Hunden, J., Van den Berg, A.Stress distribution within subducting slabs and their deformation in the transition zone.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 161, 3-4, pp. 202-214.MantleSubduction
DS2001-1184
2001
Van Hunen, J.Van Hunen, J., VandenBerg, A.P., Vlaar, N.J.Latent heat effects of the major mantle phase transitions on low angle subduction.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 190, No. 3-4, pp. 125-35.MantleSubduction
DS2002-0344
2002
Van Hunen, J.Czkova, H., Van Hunen, J., Van denberg, A.P., Vlaar, N.J.The influence of rheological weakening and yield stress on the interaction of slabs with the 670 km discontinuity.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.199,3-4,pp.447-57.MantleBoundary, Subduction
DS2002-1644
2002
Van Hunen, J.Van Hunen, J., Van den Berg, A.P., Vlaar, N.J.The impact of the South American plate motion and the Nazca Ridge subduction on the flat subduction below south Peru.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 29, 14, DOI 10.1029/2001GL014004PeruTectonics - subduction
DS2003-0606
2003
Van Hunen, J.Huang, J., Zhong, S., Van Hunen, J.Controls on sublithospheric small scale convectionJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B8,Aug. 30., 2405 10.1029/2003JB002456MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-0855
2003
Van Hunen, J.Huang, J., Zhong, S., Van Hunen, J.Controls on sublithospheric small scale convection.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B8,Aug. 30., 2405 10.1029/2003 JB002456MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200512-1120
2004
Van Hunen, J.Van Hunen, J., Van den Berg, A.P., Vlaar, N.J.Various mechanisms to induce present day shallow flat subduction and implications for the younger Earth: a numerical parameter study.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 146, 1-2, pp. 159-194.MantleSubduction
DS200812-1203
2008
Van Hunen, J.Van Hunen, J., Van den Berg, A.P.Plate tectonics on the Early Earth: limitations imposed by strength and bouyancy of subducted lithosphere.Lithos, Vol. 103, 1-2, pp. 217-235.MantleTectonics
DS200812-1204
2008
Van Hunen, J.Van Hunen, J., Van Kekn, P.E., Hynes, A., Davies, G.F.Tectonics of early Earth: some geodynamic considerations.Geological Society of America Special Paper, 440, pp. 157-198.MantleTectonics
DS201012-0812
2010
Van Hunen, J.Van Wijk, J.W., Baldridge, W.S., Van Hunen, J., Goes, S., Aster, R., Coblentz, D.D., Grand, S.P., Ni, J.Small scale convection at the edge of the Colorado Plateau: implications for topography, magmatism, and evolution of Proterozoic lithosphere.Geology, Vol. 38, 7, pp. 611-614.United States, Colorado PlateauMagmatism
DS201212-0397
2012
Van Hunen, J.Laurie, A., Stevens, G., Van Hunen, J.The end of continental growth by TTG magmatism.Terra Nova, In press availableMantleSubduction
DS201212-0499
2012
Van Hunen, J.Moyen, J-F., Van Hunen, J.Short term episodicity of Archean plate tectonics.Geology, Vol. 40, 5, pp. 451-454.MantleGeodynamics
DS201212-0747
2012
Van Hunen, J.Van Hunen, J., Moyen, J-F.Archean subduction: fact or fiction?Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 40, pp. 195-219.MantlePlate tectonics, geodynamics
DS201312-0082
2013
van Hunen, J.Bianco, T.A., Ito, G., van Hunen, J., Mahoney, J.J., Ballmer, M.D.Geochemical variations at ridge centered hotspots caused by variable melting of a veined mantle plume.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 371-372, pp. 191-202.GlobalGeochemisty
DS201312-0935
2013
Van Hunen, J.Van Hunen, J., Moyen, J-F.Archean subduction Fact or Fiction?Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 40, pp. 195-216.MantleSubduction
DS201412-0959
2014
Van Hunen, J.Wang, H., Van Hunen, J., Pearson, D.G., Allen, M.B.Craton stability and longevity: the roles of composition- dependent rheology and buoyancy.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 391, 1, pp. 224-233.MantleCraton
DS201702-0232
2016
van Hunen, J.Plethean, J.J.J., Kalnins, L.M., van Hunen, J., Biffi, P.G., Davies, R.J., McCaffrey, K.J.W.Madagascar's escape from Africa: a resolution plate reconstruction for the Western Somali Basin and for supercontinent dispersal.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 17, 2, pp. 5036-5055.Africa, MadagascarTectonics

Abstract: Accurate reconstructions of the dispersal of supercontinent blocks are essential for testing continental breakup models. Here, we provide a new plate tectonic reconstruction of the opening of the Western Somali Basin during the breakup of East and West Gondwana. The model is constrained by a new comprehensive set of spreading lineaments, detected in this heavily sedimented basin using a novel technique based on directional derivatives of free-air gravity anomalies. Vertical gravity gradient and free-air gravity anomaly maps also enable the detection of extinct mid-ocean ridge segments, which can be directly compared to several previous ocean magnetic anomaly interpretations of the Western Somali Basin. The best matching interpretations have basin symmetry around the M0 anomaly; these are then used to temporally constrain our plate tectonic reconstruction. The reconstruction supports a tight fit for Gondwana fragments prior to breakup, and predicts that the continent-ocean transform margin lies along the Rovuma Basin, not along the Davie Fracture Zone (DFZ) as commonly thought. According to our reconstruction, the DFZ represents a major ocean-ocean fracture zone formed by the coalescence of several smaller fracture zones during evolving plate motions as Madagascar drifted southwards, and offshore Tanzania is an obliquely rifted, rather than transform, margin. New seismic reflection evidence for oceanic crust inboard of the DFZ strongly supports these conclusions. Our results provide important new constraints on the still enigmatic driving mechanism of continental rifting, the nature of the lithosphere in the Western Somali Basin, and its resource potential.
DS201702-0251
2017
van Hunen, J.Wang, H., van Hunen, J., Pearson, D.G.Making Archean cratonic roots by lateral compression: a two stage thickening and stabilization model.Tectonophysics, in press available, 10p.MantleCraton, tectonics

Abstract: Archean tectonics was capable of producing virtually indestructible cratonic mantle lithosphere, but the dominant mechanism of this process remains a topic of considerable discussion. Recent geophysical and petrological studies have refuelled the debate by suggesting that thickening and associated vertical movement of the cratonic mantle lithosphere after its formation are essential ingredients of the cratonization process. Here we present a geodynamical study that focuses on how the thick stable cratonic lithospheric roots can be made in a thermally evolving mantle. Our numerical experiments explore the viability of a cratonization process in which depleted mantle lithosphere grows via lateral compression into a > 200-km thick, stable cratonic root and on what timescales this may happen. Successful scenarios for craton formation, within the bounds of our models, are found to be composed of two stages: an initial phase of tectonic shortening and a later phase of gravitational self-thickening. The initial tectonic shortening of previously depleted mantle material is essential to initiate the cratonization process, while the subsequent gravitational self-thickening contributes to a second thickening phase that is comparable in magnitude to the initial tectonic phase. Our results show that a combination of intrinsic compositional buoyancy of the cratonic root, rapid cooling of the root after shortening, and the long-term secular cooling of the mantle prevents a Rayleigh-Taylor type collapse, and will stabilize the thick cratonic root for future preservation. This two-stage thickening model provides a geodynamically viable cratonization scenario that is consistent with petrological and geophysical constraints.
DS201704-0615
2017
van Hunen, J.Agrusta, R., Goes, S., van Hunen, J.Subducting slab transition zone interaction: stagnation, penetration and mode switches.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 464, pp. 10-23.MantleSubduction

Abstract: Seismic tomography shows that subducting slabs can either sink straight into the lower mantle, or lie down in the mantle transition zone. Moreover, some slabs seem to have changed mode from stagnation to penetration or vice versa. We investigate the dynamic controls on these modes and particularly the transition between them using 2D self-consistent thermo-mechanical subduction models. Our models confirm that the ability of the trench to move is key for slab flattening in the transition zone. Over a wide range of plausible Clapeyron slopes and viscosity jumps at the base of the transition zone, hot young slabs (25 Myr in our models) are most likely to penetrate, while cold old slabs (150 Myr) drive more trench motion and tend to stagnate. Several mechanisms are able to induce penetrating slabs to stagnate: ageing of the subducting plate, decreasing upper plate forcing, and increasing Clapeyron slope (e.g. due to the arrival of a more hydrated slab). Getting stagnating slabs to penetrate is more difficult. It can be accomplished by an instantaneous change in the forcing of the upper plate from free to motionless, or a sudden decrease in the Clapeyron slope. A rapid change in plate age at the trench from old to young cannot easily induce penetration. On Earth, ageing of the subducting plate (with accompanying upper plate rifting) may be the most common mechanism for causing slab stagnation, while strong changes in upper plate forcing appear required for triggering slab penetration.
DS201707-1329
2017
van Hunen, J.Goes, S., Agrusta, R., van Hunen, J., Garel, F.Subduction - transition zone interaction: a review.Geosphere, Vol. 13, 3, pp. 644-8.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: As subducting plates reach the base of the upper mantle, some appear to flatten and stagnate, while others seemingly go through unimpeded. This variable resistance to slab sinking has been proposed to affect long-term thermal and chemical mantle circulation. A review of observational constraints and dynamic models highlights that neither the increase in viscosity between upper and lower mantle (likely by a factor 20–50) nor the coincident endothermic phase transition in the main mantle silicates (with a likely Clapeyron slope of –1 to –2 MPa/K) suffice to stagnate slabs. However, together the two provide enough resistance to temporarily stagnate subducting plates, if they subduct accompanied by significant trench retreat. Older, stronger plates are more capable of inducing trench retreat, explaining why backarc spreading and flat slabs tend to be associated with old-plate subduction. Slab viscosities that are ~2 orders of magnitude higher than background mantle (effective yield stresses of 100–300 MPa) lead to similar styles of deformation as those revealed by seismic tomography and slab earthquakes. None of the current transition-zone slabs seem to have stagnated there more than 60 m.y. Since modeled slab destabilization takes more than 100 m.y., lower-mantle entry is apparently usually triggered (e.g., by changes in plate buoyancy). Many of the complex morphologies of lower-mantle slabs can be the result of sinking and subsequent deformation of originally stagnated slabs, which can retain flat morphologies in the top of the lower mantle, fold as they sink deeper, and eventually form bulky shapes in the deep mantle.
DS201707-1380
2016
van Hunen, J.Wang, H., van Hunen, J., Pearson, D.G.Making Archean cratonic roots by lateral compression: a two stage thickening and stabilization model.Tectonophysics, in press availableMantlecraton

Abstract: Archean tectonics was capable of producing virtually indestructible cratonic mantle lithosphere, but the dominant mechanism of this process remains a topic of considerable discussion. Recent geophysical and petrological studies have refuelled the debate by suggesting that thickening and associated vertical movement of the cratonic mantle lithosphere after its formation are essential ingredients of the cratonization process. Here we present a geodynamical study that focuses on how the thick stable cratonic lithospheric roots can be made in a thermally evolving mantle. Our numerical experiments explore the viability of a cratonization process in which depleted mantle lithosphere grows via lateral compression into a > 200-km thick, stable cratonic root and on what timescales this may happen. Successful scenarios for craton formation, within the bounds of our models, are found to be composed of two stages: an initial phase of tectonic shortening and a later phase of gravitational self-thickening. The initial tectonic shortening of previously depleted mantle material is essential to initiate the cratonization process, while the subsequent gravitational self-thickening contributes to a second thickening phase that is comparable in magnitude to the initial tectonic phase. Our results show that a combination of intrinsic compositional buoyancy of the cratonic root, rapid cooling of the root after shortening, and the long-term secular cooling of the mantle prevents a Rayleigh-Taylor type collapse, and will stabilize the thick cratonic root for future preservation. This two-stage thickening model provides a geodynamically viable cratonization scenario that is consistent with petrological and geophysical constraints.
DS201709-2027
2017
van Hunen, J.Magni, V., Allen, M.B., van Hunen, J., Bouihol, P.Continental underplating after slab break-off.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 474, pp. 59-67.Mantle, India-Eurasiasubduction

Abstract: We present three-dimensional numerical models to investigate the dynamics of continental collision, and in particular what happens to the subducted continental lithosphere after oceanic slab break-off. We find that in some scenarios the subducting continental lithosphere underthrusts the overriding plate not immediately after it enters the trench, but after oceanic slab break-off. In this case, the continental plate first subducts with a steep angle and then, after the slab breaks off at depth, it rises back towards the surface and flattens below the overriding plate, forming a thick horizontal layer of continental crust that extends for about 200 km beyond the suture. This type of behaviour depends on the width of the oceanic plate marginal to the collision zone: wide oceanic margins promote continental underplating and marginal back-arc basins; narrow margins do not show such underplating unless a far field force is applied. Our models show that, as the subducted continental lithosphere rises, the mantle wedge progressively migrates away from the suture and the continental crust heats up, reaching temperatures >900?°C. This heating might lead to crustal melting, and resultant magmatism. We observe a sharp peak in the overriding plate rock uplift right after the occurrence of slab break-off. Afterwards, during underplating, the maximum rock uplift is smaller, but the affected area is much wider (up to 350 km). These results can be used to explain the dynamics that led to the present-day crustal configuration of the India–Eurasia collision zone and its consequences for the regional tectonic and magmatic evolution.
DS201711-2513
2017
van Hunen, J.Freeburn, R., Bouilhol, P., Maunder, B., Magni, V., van Hunen, J.Numerical models of the magmatic processes induced by slab breakoff.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 478, pp. 203-213.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: After the onset of continental collision, magmatism often persists for tens of millions of years, albeit with a different composition, in reduced volumes, and with a more episodic nature and more widespread spatial distribution, compared to normal arc magmatism. Kinematic modelling studies have suggested that slab breakoff can account for this post-collisional magmatism through the formation of a slab window and subsequent heating of the overriding plate and decompression melting of upwelling asthenosphere, particularly if breakoff occurs at depths shallower than the overriding plate. To constrain the nature of any melting and the geodynamic conditions required, we numerically model the collision of two continental plates following a period of oceanic subduction. A thermodynamic database is used to determine the (de)hydration reactions and occurrence of melt throughout this process. We investigate melting conditions within a parameter space designed to generate a wide range of breakoff depths, timings and collisional styles. Under most circumstances, slab breakoff occurs deeper than the depth extent of the overriding plate; too deep to generate any decompressional melting of dry upwelling asthenosphere or thermal perturbation within the overriding plate. Even if slab breakoff is very shallow, the hot mantle inflow into the slab window is not sustained long enough to sufficiently heat the hydrated overriding plate to cause significant magmatism. Instead, for relatively fast, shallow breakoff we observe melting of asthenosphere above the detached slab through the release of water from the tip of the heating detached slab. Melting of the subducted continental crust during necking and breakoff is a more common feature and may be a more reliable indicator of the occurrence of breakoff. We suggest that magmatism from slab breakoff alone is unable to explain several of the characteristics of post-collisional magmatism, and that additional geodynamical processes need to be considered when interpreting magmatic observations.
DS201801-0078
2017
van Hunen, J.Wang, H., van Hunen, J., Pearson, D.G.Making Archean cratonic roots by lateral compression: a two stage thickening and stabilization model.Tectonophysics, in press available, 10p.Mantlecraton

Abstract: Making Archean cratonic roots by lateral compression: a two stage thickening and stabilization model.
DS201901-0035
2017
van Hunen, J.Goes, S., Agrusta, R., van Hunen, J., Garel, F.Subduction - transition zone interaction: a review.Geosphere, Vol. 13, 3, pp. 644-664.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: As subducting plates reach the base of the upper mantle, some appear to flatten and stagnate, while others seemingly go through unimpeded. This variable resistance to slab sinking has been proposed to affect long-term thermal and chemical mantle circulation. A review of observational constraints and dynamic models highlights that neither the increase in viscosity between upper and lower mantle (likely by a factor 20-50) nor the coincident endothermic phase transition in the main mantle silicates (with a likely Clapeyron slope of -1 to -2 MPa/K) suffice to stagnate slabs. However, together the two provide enough resistance to temporarily stagnate subducting plates, if they subduct accompanied by significant trench retreat. Older, stronger plates are more capable of inducing trench retreat, explaining why backarc spreading and flat slabs tend to be associated with old-plate subduction. Slab viscosities that are ~2 orders of magnitude higher than background mantle (effective yield stresses of 100-300 MPa) lead to similar styles of deformation as those revealed by seismic tomography and slab earthquakes. None of the current transition-zone slabs seem to have stagnated there more than 60 m.y. Since modeled slab destabilization takes more than 100 m.y., lower-mantle entry is apparently usually triggered (e.g., by changes in plate buoyancy). Many of the complex morphologies of lower-mantle slabs can be the result of sinking and subsequent deformation of originally stagnated slabs, which can retain flat morphologies in the top of the lower mantle, fold as they sink deeper, and eventually form bulky shapes in the deep mantle.
DS201901-0085
2018
van Hunen, J.Wang, H., van Hunen, J., Pearson, D.G.Making Archean cratonic roots by lateral compression: a two stage thickening and stabilization model.Tectonophysics, Vol. 746, pp. 562-571.Mantlemelting

Abstract: Archean tectonics was capable of producing virtually indestructible cratonic mantle lithosphere, but the dominant mechanism of this process remains a topic of considerable discussion. Recent geophysical and petrological studies have refuelled the debate by suggesting that thickening and associated vertical movement of the cratonic mantle lithosphere after its formation are essential ingredients of the cratonization process. Here we present a geodynamical study that focuses on how the thick stable cratonic lithospheric roots can be made in a thermally evolving mantle. Our numerical experiments explore the viability of a cratonization process in which depleted mantle lithosphere grows via lateral compression into a > 200-km thick, stable cratonic root and on what timescales this may happen. Successful scenarios for craton formation, within the bounds of our models, are found to be composed of two stages: an initial phase of tectonic shortening and a later phase of gravitational self-thickening. The initial tectonic shortening of previously depleted mantle material is essential to initiate the cratonization process, while the subsequent gravitational self-thickening contributes to a second thickening phase that is comparable in magnitude to the initial tectonic phase. Our results show that a combination of intrinsic compositional buoyancy of the cratonic root, rapid cooling of the root after shortening, and the long-term secular cooling of the mantle prevents a Rayleigh-Taylor type collapse, and will stabilize the thick cratonic root for future preservation. This two-stage thickening model provides a geodynamically viable cratonization scenario that is consistent with petrological and geophysical constraints.
DS201610-1840
2016
van Kann, F.Aravanis, T., Chen, J., Fuechsle, M., Grujic, M., Johnston, P., Kok, Y., Magaraggia, R., Mann, A., Mann, L., McIntoshm S., Rheinberger, G., Saxey, D., Smalley, M., van Kann, F., Walker, G., Winterflood, J.VK1 tm - a next generation airborne gravity gradiometer.ASEG-PESA-AIG 2016 25th Geophysical Conference, Abstract 5p.TechnologyGradiometer

Abstract: The minerals exploration industry’s demand for a highly precise airborne gravity gradiometer has driven development of the VK1TM Airborne Gravity Gradiometer, a collaborative effort by Rio Tinto and the University of Western Australia. VK1TM aims to provide gravity gradient data with lower uncertainty and higher spatial resolution than current commercial systems. In the recent years of VK1TM development, there have been significant improvements in hardware, signal processing and data processing which have combined to result in a complete AGG system that is approaching competitive survey-ready status. This paper focuses on recent improvements. Milestone-achieving data from recent lab-based and moving-platform trials will be presented and discussed, along with details of some advanced data processing techniques that are required to make the most use of the data.
DS1994-0451
1994
Van Kann, F.J.Dransfield, M.H., Buckingham, M.J., Van Kann, F.J.Lithological mapping by correlating magnetic and gravity gradient airbornemeasurementsExploration Geophysics, Australian Bulletin, Vol. 25, No. 1, March pp. 25-30GlobalGeophysics -gravity, Lithology
DS1994-1864
1994
Van Keken, .E.Vlaar, N.J., Van Keken, .E., Van den Berg, A.P.Cooling of the Earth in the Archean: consequences of pressure release melting in a hotter mantleEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 121, No. 1-2, January pp. 1-18MantleArchean, Melting
DS1997-1194
1997
Van Keken, P.Van Keken, P.Evolution of starting mantle plumes: a comparison between numerical and laboratory models.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 148, No. 1-2, Apr. 1, pp. 1-12.MantlePlumes
DS2001-1185
2001
Van Keken, P.Van Keken, P.Cylindrical scaling for dynamical cooling models of the EarthPhysics Earth Plan. International, Vol. 124, No. 1-2, pp. 119-30.MantleConvection, modeling, heat flow
DS1994-1829
1994
Van Keken, P.E.Van Keken, P.E., et al.Implications for mantle dynamics from the high melting temperature ofperovskite.Science, Vol. 264, No. 5164, June 3, pp. 1437-1438.MantlePerovskite
DS1994-1865
1994
Van Keken, P.E.Vlaar, N.J., Van Keken, P.E., Van den Berg, A.P.Cooling of the earth in thr Archean: consequences of pressure release melting in a hotter mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 121, No. 1/2, January pp. 1-18.MantleArchean, Hot spots
DS1998-0071
1998
Van Keken, P.E.Ballentine, C.J., Van Keken, P.E.Dynamical models of mantle 3 He 4 He evolutionMineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 104-5.MantleGeodynamics, Helium, Degassing, volatiles
DS1998-1517
1998
Van Keken, P.E.Van Keken, P.E., Ballentine, C.J.Whole mantle versus layered mantle convection and the role of high viscosity lower mantle in terrestrial vol.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 156, No. 1-2, Mar. 15, pp. 19-32.MantleConvection, melt, Volatile evolution
DS1999-0763
1999
Van Keken, P.E.Van Keken, P.E., Ballentine, C.J.Dynamical models of mantle volatile evolution and the role of phase transitions and temperature dependent...Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 104, No. 4, Apr. 10, pp. 7137-52.MantleRheology, Geodynamics
DS2001-0762
2001
Van Keken, P.E.McNamara, A.K., Karato, S.I., Van Keken, P.E.Localization of dislocation creep in the lower mantle: implications for origin of seismic anisotropy.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 191, No. 2, pp. 85-99.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS2001-1297
2001
Van Keken, P.E.Zegers, T., Van Keken, P.E.Middle Archean continent formation by crustal delaminationGeology, Vol. 29, No. 12, Dec. pp. 1083-6.AustraliaPilbara Craton, eclogite
DS2002-0098
2002
Van Keken, P.E.Ballentine, C.J., Van Keken, P.E., Porcelli, D., Hauri, E.H.Numerical models, geochemistry and the zero-paradox noble gas mantlePhilosophical Transactions, Royal Society of London Series A Mathematical, Vol.1800, pp. 2611-32.MantleGeochemistry - model
DS2002-1036
2002
Van Keken, P.E.McNamara, A.K., Van Keken, P.E., Karoto, S.I.Development of anisotropic structure in the Earth's lower mantle by solid state convection.Nature, No. 6878, March 21, pp. 310-13.MantleGeochemistry, Tectonics
DS2002-1645
2002
Van Keken, P.E.Van Keken, P.E., Hauri, E.H., Ballentine, C.J.Mantle mixing: the generation, preservation and destruction of chemical heterogeneityAnnual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol.30,pp. 493-525.mantleGeochemistry
DS2002-1646
2002
Van Keken, P.E.Van Keken, P.E., Hauri, E.H., Ballentine, C.J.Mantle mixing: the generation, preservation and destruction of chemical heterogeneityAnnual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol.30,pp. 493-525.mantleGeochemistry
DS2003-0922
2003
Van Keken, P.E.McNamara, A.K., Van Keken, P.E., Karato, S.I.Development of finite strain in the convecting lower mantle and its implications forJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, 5, ETG3 DOI 10.1029/2002JB001970MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS2003-0923
2003
Van Keken, P.E.McNamara, A.K., Van Keken, P.E., Karato, S.I.Development of finite strain in the convecting lower mantle and its implications forJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B5, May 1, 10.1029/2002JB001970.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS2003-1413
2003
Van Keken, P.E.Van Keken, P.E.The structure and dynamics of the mantle wedgeEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 215, 3-4, pp. 323-338.MantleSubduction, tectonics
DS200412-1281
2003
Van Keken, P.E.McNamara, A.K., Van Keken, P.E., Karato, S.I.Development of finite strain in the convecting lower mantle and its implications for seismic anisotropy.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B5, May 1, 10.1029/2002 JB001970.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-2040
2003
Van Keken, P.E.Van Keken, P.E.The structure and dynamics of the mantle wedge.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 215, 3-4, pp. 323-338.MantleSubduction, tectonics
DS200512-0639
2005
Van Keken, P.E.Lin, S.C., Van Keken, P.E.Multiple volcanic episodes of flood basalts caused by thermochemical mantle plumes.Nature, No. 7048, July 14, pp. 250-252.MantlePlume, geothermometry
DS200512-0640
2005
Van Keken, P.E.Lin, S-C., Kuo, B-Y., Chiao, L-Y., Van Keken, P.E.Thermal plume models and melt generation in East Africa: a dynamic modeling approach.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 237, 1-2, Aug, 30, pp. 175-192.Africa, Tanzania, KenyaCraton, magmatism, mantle convection, geodynamics
DS200512-1121
2005
Van Keken, P.E.Van Keken, P.E., King, S.D.Thermal structure and dynamics of subduction zones: insights from observation and modeling.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 149, 1-2, March 15, pp. 1-6.MantleGeothermometry
DS200612-0820
2006
Van Keken, P.E.Lin, S-C., Van Keken, P.E.Dynamics of thermochemical plumes: 1. plume formation and entrainment of a dense layer.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 7, Q02006MantleMineral chemistry - bulk. geodynamics, convection
DS200712-0049
2007
Van Keken, P.E.Ballentine, C.J., Brandenburg, J.P., Van Keken, P.E., Holland, G.Seawater recycling into the deep mantle - and the source of 3He.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A56.MantleNoble gases
DS200712-0099
2007
Van Keken, P.E.Brandenburg, J.P., Van Keken, P.E.Deep storage of oceanic crust in a vigourously convecting mantle.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 112, B 6, B06403MantleConvection
DS200712-0100
2007
Van Keken, P.E.Brandenburg, J.P., Van Keken, P.E.Deep storage of oceanic crust in a vigorously convecting mantle.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 112, B6 B06403MantleConvection
DS200712-0338
2007
Van Keken, P.E.Furman, T., Van Keken, P.E., Bryce, J., Lin, S-C.Thermochemical coupling in deep mantle plumes: a case study of Turkana Northern Kenya.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A300.Africa, KenyaAlkaline rocks, picrites
DS200712-0422
2007
Van Keken, P.E.Hauri, E.H., Brandenburg, J.P., Van Keken, P.E.What comes around goes around: mantle convection and the meaning of mantle isochrons.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A385.MantleGeochronology
DS201112-1014
2011
Van Keken, P.E.Styles, E., Goes, S., Van Keken, P.E., Ritsema, J., Smith, H.Synthetic images of dynamically predicted plumes and comparison with a global tomographic model.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 311, 3-4, pp. 351-363.MantleTomography
DS201112-1076
2011
Van Keken, P.E.Van Keken, P.E., Hacker, B.R., Syracuse, E.M.,Abers, G.A.Subduction factory: 4. Depth dependent flux of H2O from subducting slabs worldwide.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 116, B01401.MantleSubduction
DS201212-0516
2012
Van Keken, P.E.Nelson, W.R., Furman, T., Van Keken, P.E., Shirey, S.B., Hanan, B.B.Os Hf isotopic insight into mantle plume dynamics beneath the East African Rift system.Chemical Geology, Vol. 320-321 pp. 66-79.Africa, KenyaPicrite
DS201706-1062
2017
van Keken, P.E.Albers, G.A., van Keken, P.E., Hacker, B.R.The cold and relatively dry nature of mantle forearcs in subduction zones.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 10, 5, pp. 333-337.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: Some of Earth's coldest mantle is found in subduction zones at the tip of the mantle wedge that lies between the subducting and overriding plates. This forearc mantle is isolated from the flow of hot material beneath the volcanic arc, and so is inferred to reach temperatures no more than 600 to 800 °C — conditions at which hydrous mantle minerals should be stable. The forearc mantle could therefore constitute a significant reservoir for water if sufficient water is released from the subducting slab into the mantle wedge. Such a reservoir could hydrate the plate interface and has been invoked to aid the genesis of megathrust earthquakes and slow slip events. Our synthesis of results from thermal models that simulate the conditions for subduction zones globally, however, indicates that dehydration of subducting plates is too slow over the life span of a typical subduction zone to hydrate the forearc mantle. Hot subduction zones, where slabs dehydrate rapidly, are an exception. The hottest, most buoyant forearcs are most likely to survive plate collisions and be exhumed to the surface, so probably dominate the metamorphic rock record. Analysis of global seismic data confirms the generally dry nature of mantle forearcs. We conclude that many subduction zones probably liberate insufficient water to hydrate the shallower plate boundary where great earthquakes and slow slip events nucleate. Thus, we suggest that it is solid-state processes and not hydration that leads to weakening of the plate interface in cold subduction zones.
DS201707-1298
2017
van Keken, P.E.Abers, G.A., van Keken, P.E., Hacker, B.R.The cold and relatively dry nature of mantle forearcs in subduction zones.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 10, pp. 333-337.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: Some of Earth's coldest mantle is found in subduction zones at the tip of the mantle wedge that lies between the subducting and overriding plates. This forearc mantle is isolated from the flow of hot material beneath the volcanic arc, and so is inferred to reach temperatures no more than 600 to 800 °C - conditions at which hydrous mantle minerals should be stable. The forearc mantle could therefore constitute a significant reservoir for water if sufficient water is released from the subducting slab into the mantle wedge. Such a reservoir could hydrate the plate interface and has been invoked to aid the genesis of megathrust earthquakes and slow slip events. Our synthesis of results from thermal models that simulate the conditions for subduction zones globally, however, indicates that dehydration of subducting plates is too slow over the life span of a typical subduction zone to hydrate the forearc mantle. Hot subduction zones, where slabs dehydrate rapidly, are an exception. The hottest, most buoyant forearcs are most likely to survive plate collisions and be exhumed to the surface, so probably dominate the metamorphic rock record. Analysis of global seismic data confirms the generally dry nature of mantle forearcs. We conclude that many subduction zones probably liberate insufficient water to hydrate the shallower plate boundary where great earthquakes and slow slip events nucleate. Thus, we suggest that it is solid-state processes and not hydration that leads to weakening of the plate interface in cold subduction zones.
DS201806-1234
2018
van Keken, P.E.Maquire, R., Ritsema, J., Bonnin, M., van Keken, P.E., Goes, S.Evaluating the resolution of deep mantle plumes in teleseismic traveltime tomography.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 123, 1. pp. 384-400.Mantlegeophysics - seismic

Abstract: The strongest evidence to support the classical plume hypothesis comes from seismic imaging of the mantle beneath hot spots. However, imaging results are often ambiguous and it is questionable whether narrow plume tails can be detected by present-day seismological techniques. Here we carry out synthetic tomography experiments based on spectral element method simulations of seismic waves with period T > 10 s propagating through geodynamically derived plume structures. We vary the source-receiver geometry in order to explore the conditions under which lower mantle plume tails may be detected seismically. We determine that wide-aperture (4,000-6,000 km) networks with dense station coverage (<100-200 km station spacing) are necessary to image narrow (<500 km wide) thermal plume tails. We find that if uncertainties on traveltime measurements exceed delay times imparted by plume tails (typically <1 s), the plume tails are concealed in seismic images. Vertically propagating SKS waves enhance plume tail recovery but lack vertical resolution in regions that are not independently constrained by direct S paths. We demonstrate how vertical smearing of an upper mantle low-velocity anomaly can appear as a plume originating in the deep mantle. Our results are useful for interpreting previous plume imaging experiments and guide the design of future experiments.
DS201912-2832
2019
van Keken, P.E.van Keken, P.E., Wada, I., Sime, N., Abers, G.A.Thermal structure of the forearc in subduction zones: a comparison of methodologies.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 20, pp. 3268-3288.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: Molnar and England (1990, https://doi.org/10.1029/JB095iB04p04833) introduced equations using a semianalytical approach that approximate the thermal structure of the forearc regions in subduction zones. A detailed new comparison with high-resolution finite element models shows that the original equations provide robust predictions and can be improved by a few modifications that follow from the theoretical derivation. The updated approximate equations are shown to be quite accurate for a straight-dipping slab that is warmed by heat flowing from its base and by shear heating at its top. The approximation of radiogenic heating in the crust of the overriding plate is less accurate but the overall effect of this heating mode is small. It is shown that the previous and updated approximate equations become increasingly inaccurate with decreasing thermal parameter and increasing variability of slab dip. It is also shown that the approximate equations cannot be extrapolated accurately past the brittle-ductile transition. Conclusions in a recent paper (Kohn et al., 2018, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1809962115) that modest amount of shear heating can explain the thermal conditions of past subduction from the exhumed metamorphic rock record are invalid due to a number of compounding errors in the application of the Molnar and England (1990, https://doi.org/10.1029/JB095iB04p04833) equations past the brittle-ductile transition. The use of the improved approximate equations is highly recommended provided their limitations are taken into account. For subduction zones with variable dip and/or low thermal parameter finite element modeling is recommended.
DS202005-0733
2020
van Keken, P.E.Geballe, Z.M., Sime, N., Badro, J., van Keken, P.E., Goncharov, A.F.Thermal conductivity near the bottom of the Earth's lower mantle: measurements of pyrolite up to 120 Gpa and 2500 K.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 536, 116161, 11p. PdfMantlegeothermometry

Abstract: Knowledge of thermal conductivity of mantle minerals is crucial for understanding heat transport from the Earth's core to mantle. At the pressure-temperature conditions of the Earth's core-mantle boundary, calculations of lattice thermal conductivity based on atomistic models have determined values ranging from 1 to 14 W/m/K for bridgmanite and bridgmanite-rich mineral assemblages. Previous studies have been performed at room temperature up to the pressures of the core-mantle boundary, but correcting these to geotherm temperatures may introduce large errors. Here we present the first measurements of lattice thermal conductivity of mantle minerals up to pressures and temperatures near the base of the mantle, 120 GPa and 2500 K. We use a combination of continuous and pulsed laser heating in a diamond anvil cell to measure the lattice thermal conductivity of pyrolite, the assemblage of minerals expected to make up the lower mantle. We find a value of W/m/K at 80 GPa and 2000 to 2500 K and 5.9 W/m/K at 124 GPa and 2000 to 3000 K. These values rule out the highest calculations of thermal conductivity of the Earth's mid-lower mantle (i.e. W/m/K at 80 GPa), and are consistent with both the high and low calculations of thermal conductivity near the base of the lower mantle.
DS202006-0924
2020
van Keken, P.E.Jones, T.D., Maguire, R.R., van Keken, P.E., Ritsema, J., Koelemeijer, P.Subducted oceanic crust as the origin of seismically slow lower-mantle structures.Progress in Earth and Planetary Science , Vol. 7, 16p. PdfMantlegeophysics - seismics

Abstract: Mantle tomography reveals the existence of two large low-shear-velocity provinces (LLSVPs) at the base of the mantle. We examine here the hypothesis that they are piles of oceanic crust that have steadily accumulated and warmed over billions of years. We use existing global geodynamic models in which dense oceanic crust forms at divergent plate boundaries and subducts at convergent ones. The model suite covers the predicted density range for oceanic crust over lower mantle conditions. To meaningfully compare our geodynamic models to tomographic structures, we convert them into models of seismic wavespeed and explicitly account for the limited resolving power of tomography. Our results demonstrate that long-term recycling of dense oceanic crust naturally leads to the formation of thermochemical piles with seismic characteristics similar to the LLSVPs. The extent to which oceanic crust contributes to the LLSVPs depends upon its density in the lower mantle for which accurate data is lacking. We find that the LLSVPs are not composed solely of oceanic crust. Rather, they are basalt rich at their base (bottom 100-200 km) and grade into peridotite toward their sides and top with the strength of their seismic signature arising from the dominant role of temperature. We conclude that recycling of oceanic crust, if sufficiently dense, has a strong influence on the thermal and chemical evolution of Earth’s mantle.
DS200812-1204
2008
Van Kekn, P.E.Van Hunen, J., Van Kekn, P.E., Hynes, A., Davies, G.F.Tectonics of early Earth: some geodynamic considerations.Geological Society of America Special Paper, 440, pp. 157-198.MantleTectonics
DS202004-0514
2020
van Kekn, P.E.Gebralle, Z.M., Sime, N., Badro, J., van Kekn, P.E.Thermal conductivity near the bottom of the Earth's lower mantle: mesurements of pyrolite up to 120 GPa and 2500 K. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 536, 116161 7p. PdfMantlegeothermometry

Abstract: Knowledge of thermal conductivity of mantle minerals is crucial for understanding heat transport from the Earth's core to mantle. At the pressure-temperature conditions of the Earth's core-mantle boundary, calculations of lattice thermal conductivity based on atomistic models have determined values ranging from 1 to 14 W/m/K for bridgmanite and bridgmanite-rich mineral assemblages. Previous studies have been performed at room temperature up to the pressures of the core-mantle boundary, but correcting these to geotherm temperatures may introduce large errors. Here we present the first measurements of lattice thermal conductivity of mantle minerals up to pressures and temperatures near the base of the mantle, 120 GPa and 2500 K. We use a combination of continuous and pulsed laser heating in a diamond anvil cell to measure the lattice thermal conductivity of pyrolite, the assemblage of minerals expected to make up the lower mantle. We find a value of W/m/K at 80 GPa and 2000 to 2500 K and 5.9 W/m/K at 124 GPa and 2000 to 3000 K. These values rule out the highest calculations of thermal conductivity of the Earth's mid-lower mantle (i.e. W/m/K at 80 GPa), and are consistent with both the high and low calculations of thermal conductivity near the base of the lower mantle.
DS202008-1462
2020
van Konstantin, V.Zubkova, N.V., Chukanov, N.V., Schafer, C., van Konstantin, V., Pekov,I.V., Pushcharovsky, D. Yu.Al analogue of chayvesite from a lamproite of Cancarix, SE Spain, and its crystal structure.Neues Jahbuch fur Mineralogie, Vol. 196, 3, pp. 193-196.Europe, Spainlamproite

Abstract: Al analogue of chayesite (with Al > Fe3+) was found in a lamproite from Cancarix, SE Spain. The mineral forms green thick-tabular crystals up to 0.4 mm across in cavities. The empirical formula derived from EMP measurements and calculated on the basis of 17 Mg + Fe + Al + Si apfu is (K0.75 Na0.20 Ca0.11)Mg3.04 Fe0.99 Al1.18 Si11.80 O30. The crystal structure was determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data ( R = 2.38%). The mineral is hexagonal, space group P 6/ mcc, a = 10.09199(12), c = 14.35079(19) Å, V = 1265.78(3) Å3, Z = 2. Fe is predominantly divalent. Al is mainly distributed between the octahedral A site and the tetrahedral T 2 site. The crystal chemical formula derived from the structure refinement is C (K0.73 Na0.16 Ca0.11) B (Na0.02)4 A (Mg0.42 Al0.29 Fe0.29)2 T 2(Mg0.71 Fe0.16 Al0.13)3 T 1(Si0.985 Al0.015)12 O30.
DS1980-0334
1980
Van kooten, G.K.Van kooten, G.K.An Ultrapotassic Basaltic Suite from the Central Sierra Nevada, California: a Study of the Mineralogy, Petrology, Geochemistry and Isotopic Composition.Ph.d. Thesis, University California, Santa Barbara., 100P.United States, California, West CoastBasanite, Whole Rock Geochemistry, Isotope, Geothermometry
DS1950-0194
1954
Van kooten, I.C.Van kooten, I.C.Eerste Onderzoek Op DiamantMeddelingen Van De Geol. Mijnbouwkundige Dienst Van Suriname, No. 11, SEPT. 61P.Suriname, Brazil, Gold Coast, GuyanaBlank
DS200612-1108
2006
Van Koppen, B.Prasad, K.C., Van Koppen, B., Strzepek, K.Equity and productivity in the Olifants River Basin, South Africa.Natural Resources Forum, Vol. 30, 1, Feb pp. 63-75.Africa, South AfricaSocial responsibility
DS200812-0871
2008
Van Kramendonk, M.Pease, V., Percival, J., Smithies, H., Stevens, G., Van Kramendonk, M.When did plate tectonics begin? Evidence from the orogenic record.Geological Society of America Special Paper, 440, pp. 199-228.MantleTectonics
DS201503-0172
2015
Van Kranendonk, J.Roberts, N.M.W., Van Kranendonk, J., Parman, S., Clift, P.D.Continent formation through time.Geological Society of London Special Publication: Continent formation through time., No. 389, pp. 1-16.GlobalGeotectonics
DS201112-0951
2011
Van Kranendonk, M.Shire, S.B., Van Kranendonk, M., Richardson, S.H.SCLM and crustal evidence for 3 GA onset of plate tectonics with implications for the Superior Province.Geological Society of America, Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, Oct. 9-12, abstractCanada, Europe, GreenlandMelting
DS1995-1967
1995
Van Kranendonk, M.J.Van Kranendonk, M.J., Wardle, R.J.Geology of the Archean Nain Province and Paleoproterozoic Torngat OrogenNewfoundland/LabradorGeological Survey of Canada Open File, No. 2927, $ 78.00Labrador, Ungava, QuebecNain Province - Torngat Orogeny, Map -ad
DS1995-1968
1995
Van Kranendonk, M.J.Van Kranendonk, M.J., Wardle, R.J.Geology of the Archean Nain Province and paleoproterozoic Torngat OrogenGeological Survey of Canada (GSC) Open File, No. 2927, 1: 100, 000Quebec, Ungava, Labrador, Northwest territoriesMap, Tectonics - Orogeny
DS1996-1463
1996
Van Kranendonk, M.J.Van Kranendonk, M.J.Tectonic evolution of the Paleoproterozoic Torngat Orogen: evidence from pressure temperature time paths....Tectonics, Vol. 15, No. 4, Aug. pp. 843-69.Quebec, Labrador, UngavaTectonics, Torngat Orogeny
DS1997-1195
1997
Van Kranendonk, M.J.Van Kranendonk, M.J., Wardle, R.J.Crustal scale felxural slip folding during late tectonic amplification of an orogenic boundary....Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 34, pp. 1545-65.Quebec, Labrador, UngavaTectonics, Torngat Orogen
DS200512-1010
2005
Van Kranendonk, M.J.Smithies, R.H., Van Kranendonk, M.J., Champion, D.C.It started with a plume - early Archean basaltic proto-continental crust.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, In Press,AustraliaPilbara, high Ti, geochemistry, SCLM
DS200712-1109
2007
Van Kranendonk, M.J.Van Kranendonk, M.J., Hugh Smithies, R., Hickman, A.H., Champion, D.C.Review: secular tectonic evolution of Archean continental crust: interplay between horizontal and vertical processes in the formation of the Pilbara Craton, Australia.Terra Nova, Vol. 19, 1, Feb. pp. 1-38.AustraliaTectonics
DS200912-0704
2009
Van Kranendonk, M.J.Smithies, R.H., Champion, D.C., Van Kranendonk, M.J.Formation of Paleoarchaen continental crust through infracrustal melting of enriched basalt.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 281, 3-4, May 15, pp. 298-306.MantleMelting
DS201112-0953
2011
Van Kranendonk, M.J.Shirey, S.B., Richardson, S.H., Van Kranendonk, M.J.3 Ga onset of the supercontinent cycle: SCLM and crustal evidence.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1863.Europe, GreenlandCraton, subduction
DS201503-0181
2015
Van Kranendonk, M.J.Van Kranendonk, M.J., Smithies, R.H., Griffin, W.L., Huston, D.L., Hickman, A.H., Champion, D.C., Anhaeusser, C.R., Pirajno, F.Making it thick: a volcanic plateau origin of Paleoarchean continental lithosphere of the Pilbara and Kaapvaal cratons.Geological Society of London Special Publication: Continent formation through time., No. 389, pp. 83-111.Australia, Africa, South AfricaGeotectonics
DS1987-0003
1987
Van Landewijk, J.E.J.M.Agyei, E.K., Van Landewijk, J.E.J.M., Armstrong, R.L., Harakal, J.E.Rubidium-strontium and potassium-argon geochronometry of southeasternGhanaJournal of African Earth Science, Vol. 6, No. 2, pp. 153-161GhanaCarbonatite
DS201502-0119
2014
Van Leeuwen, T.Van Leeuwen, T.The enigmatic Sundaland diamonds - a review.Proceedings of Sundaland Resources 2014 MGEI Annual Convention held Nov. 17-18, Palembang, South Sumatra, Indonesia, 28p. Available pdfIndonesia, Kalimantan, MyanmarSundaland diamonds
DS200612-1375
2006
Van Loggerenberg, B.Steward, N.R., Van Loggerenberg, B.The design of a single aggregate concrete on Culli nan diamond mine.Journal of the South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 106, 3, pp. 213-220.Africa, South AfricaMining
DS200512-1122
2005
Van Lohuizen, K.Van Lohuizen, K.A trail of diamonds.Foreign Policy, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Vol. 150, pp. 84-91.AfricaHistory
DS200612-0761
2006
Van lOng, T.Lan, C.Y., Izuka,T., Usuki, T., Wang, K.L., Anh, T.T., Van lOng ,T., O'Reilly, S.Y.Petrology and geochemistry of peridotite xenoliths from Vietnam Indochin a block.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 2. abstract only.ChinaXenolith - geochemistry
DS2001-1186
2001
Van Loon, A.J.Van Loon, A.J.Changing the face of the earthEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 52, No. 4, Feb. 1, pp. 371-GlobalGeomorphology - brief review
DS2002-1647
2002
Van Loon, A.J.Van Loon, A.J.The complexity of simple geologyEarth Science Reviews, Vol. 59, 1-4, Nov. pp. 287-95.GlobalStructure
DS200812-1205
2008
Van Loon, A.J.Van Loon, A.J.Could snowball Earth have left thick glaciomarine deposits?Gondwana Research, Vol. 14, 1-2, August pp. 73-81.MantleGeomorphology
DS1993-0079
1993
Van Loon, J.C.Barefoot, R.R., Van Loon, J.C., Hall, G.E.M.Analytical methods: field and remote locationsAnalysis of geological materials, editor C. Riddle, pp. 221-261GlobalGeochemistry, Analysis -techniques -general
DS1994-1830
1994
Van Muijen, Ir.H.Van Muijen, Ir.H.Offshore dredge miningSnowden Mining Forum May 18, Perth, 10p. text 10 figuresSouth Africa, NamibiaMarine placers, Dredging
DS1986-0674
1986
Van Niekerk, A.Robinson, D.N., Scott, J.A., Van Niekerk, A., Anderson, V.G.Events reflected in the diamonds of some southern African kimberlitesProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 421-423South AfricaDiamond morphology
DS1989-1285
1989
Van Niekerk, A.Robinson, D.N., Scott, J.A., Van Niekerk, A., Anderson, V.G.The sequence of events reflected in the diamonds of some southern AfricankimberlitesGeological Society of Australia Inc. Blackwell Scientific Publishing, Special, No. 14, Vol. 2, pp. 990-1000South AfricaDiamond morphology, Diamond characteristics
DS1990-1522
1990
Van Niekerk, A.Vogel, K.R., Slingerland, R.L., Van Niekerk, A.Factors controlling the location of gold placers in alluvial fans: anumerical studyGeological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting, Abstracts, Vol. 22, No. 7, p. A319GlobalAlluvial, Placers -gold
DS201605-0912
2016
Van Niekerk, L.M.Van Niekerk, L.M., Oliver, A., Armstrong, J., Sikwa, N.A.Pioneering large diamond recovery at Karowe diamond mineDiamonds Still Sparkling SAIMM 2016 Conference, Mar. 14-17, pp. 15-26.Africa, BotswanaDeposit - Karowe
DS1970-0206
1970
Van niekirk, A.A.J.Van niekirk, A.A.J.Optelgoed Diamantsmokkelstories Uit die NoordwesteKaapstad: Reijgeruitgewers, 104P.South AfricaKimberley, Fiction, Diamond Smuggling
DS201709-2069
2016
Van Niekirk, L.M.Van Niekirk, L.M., Olivier, A., Armstrong, J., Sikwa, N.A.Pioneering large diamond recovery at Karowe diamond mine.South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 116, 8, pp. 709-714.Africa, Botswanadeposit - Karowe

Abstract: Historically, the recovery of large diamonds in conventional treatment plant flow sheets has been associated with dense media separation (DMS). This is attributed mainly to DMS's highly efficient and proven track record in the concentration and separation of ores with variable solids densities. In most instances, DMS has been utilized as a pre-concentration step ahead of any recovery plant, due to its ability and versatility in reducing feed within a specific size range to manageable volumes for downstream X-ray processing and subsequent diamond recovery. The benefit of using carbon-signature-based detection equipment for retrieving large stones upfront in the flow sheet not only equates to earlier recovery of diamonds from the system, but also lessens the exposure of diamond-bearing ore to additional materials handling, pumping, and/or crushing, which has been known to damage or even break diamonds and decrease revenue.
DS1980-0335
1980
Van noord, C.Van noord, C.Northern Cape TripSth. Afr. Lapidary Journal, Vol. 14, No. 3, PP. 87-89.South AfricaTravelogue, Diamond
DS1990-0838
1990
Van Nostrand, T.King, J.E., Davis, W.J., Relf, C., Van Nostrand, T.Geology of the Contwyoto Lake Nose Lake area, central Slave ProvinceGeological Survey of Canada (GSC) Paper, No. 1990-1C, pp. 177-87.Northwest TerritoriesGeology
DS201804-0701
2018
Van Oman, J.A.Huguet, L., Van Oman, J.A., Hauck, S.A., Willard, M.A.Earth's inner core nucleation paradox.Earth and Planteray Science Letters, Vol. 487, pp. 1-17.MantleCore

Abstract: The conventional view of Earth's inner core is that it began to crystallize at Earth's center when the temperature dropped below the melting point of the iron alloy and has grown steadily since that time as the core continued to cool. However, this model neglects the energy barrier to the formation of the first stable crystal nucleus, which is commonly represented in terms of the critical supercooling required to overcome the barrier. Using constraints from experiments, simulations, and theory, we show that spontaneous crystallization in a homogeneous liquid iron alloy at Earth's core pressures requires a critical supercooling of order 1000 K, which is too large to be a plausible mechanism for the origin of Earth's inner core. We consider mechanisms that can lower the nucleation barrier substantially. Each has caveats, yet the inner core exists: this is the nucleation paradox. Heterogeneous nucleation on a solid metallic substrate tends to have a low energy barrier and offers the most straightforward solution to the paradox, but solid metal would probably have to be delivered from the mantle and such events are unlikely to have been common. A delay in nucleation, whether due to a substantial nucleation energy barrier, or late introduction of a low energy substrate, would lead to an initial phase of rapid inner core growth from a supercooled state. Such rapid growth may lead to distinctive crystallization texturing that might be observable seismically. It would also generate a spike in chemical and thermal buoyancy that could affect the geomagnetic field significantly. Solid metal introduced to Earth's center before it reached saturation could also provide a nucleation substrate, if large enough to escape complete dissolution. Inner core growth, in this case, could begin earlier and start more slowly than standard thermal models predict.
DS200612-0155
2006
Van Orman, J.Bourdon, B., Van Orman, J.236 Ra deficits in OIB: a key to the rate of melt extraction in ther mantle.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 1, abstract only.Europe, Cape Verde IslandsMelting
DS201904-0771
2019
Van Orman, J.Reali, R., Jackson, J.M., Van Orman, J., Bower, D.J., Carrez, P., Cordier, P.Modeling viscosity of ( Mg, Fe)O at lowermost mantle conditions.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 287, pp. 65-75.Mantlecore-mantle boundary

Abstract: The viscosity of the lower mantle results from the rheological behavior of its two main constituent minerals, aluminous (Mg,Fe)SiO3 bridgmanite and (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase. Understanding the transport properties of lower mantle aggregates is of primary importance in geophysics and it is a challenging task, due to the extreme time-varying conditions to which such aggregates are subjected. In particular, viscosity is a crucial transport property that can vary over several orders of magnitude. It thus has a first-order control on the structure and dynamics of the mantle. Here we focus on the creep behavior of (Mg,Fe)O at the bottom of the lower mantle, where the presence of thermo-chemical anomalies such as ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZ) may significantly alter the viscosity contrast characterizing this region. Two different iron concentrations of (Mg1-xFex)O are considered: one mirroring the average composition of ferropericlase throughout most of the lower mantle (x?=?0.20) and another representing a candidate magnesiowüstite component of ULVZs near the base of the mantle (x?=?0.84). The investigated pressure-temperature conditions span from 120?GPa and 2800?K, corresponding to the average geotherm at this depth, to core-mantle boundary conditions of 135?GPa and 3800?K. In this study, dislocation creep of (Mg,Fe)O is investigated by dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations, a modeling tool which considers the collective motion and interactions of dislocations. To model their behavior, a 2.5 dimensional dislocation dynamics approach is employed. Within this method, both glide and climb mechanisms can be taken into account, and the interplay of these features results in a steady-state condition. This allows the retrieval of the creep strain rates at different temperatures, pressures, applied stresses and iron concentrations across the (Mg,Fe)O solid solution, providing information on the viscosity for these materials. A particularly low viscosity is obtained for magnesiowüstite with respect to ferropericlase, the difference being around 10 orders of magnitude. Thus, the final section of this work is devoted to the assessment of the dynamic implications of such a weak phase within ULVZs, in terms of the viscosity contrast with respect to the surrounding lowermost mantle.
DS2001-1187
2001
Van Orman, J.A.Van Orman, J.A., Grove, T.L., Shimizu, N.Rare earth element diffusion in diopside: influence of temperature, pressure and ionic radius and model...Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 141, pp. 687-703.mantleModel - elastic model for diffusion in silicates
DS2002-1648
2002
Van Orman, J.A.Van Orman, J.A., Grove, T.L., Shimizu, N.Diffusive fractionation of trace elements during production and transport of melt Earth's upper mantleEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.198,1-2,pp.93-112., Vol.198,1-2,pp.93-112.MantleMineralogy - trace elements
DS2002-1649
2002
Van Orman, J.A.Van Orman, J.A., Grove, T.L., Shimizu, N.Diffusive fractionation of trace elements during production and transport of melt Earth's upper mantleEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.198,1-2,pp.93-112., Vol.198,1-2,pp.93-112.MantleMineralogy - trace elements
DS2002-1650
2002
Van Orman, J.A.Van Orman, J.A., Grove, T.L., Shimizu, N., Layne, G.D.Rare earth element diffusion in a natural pyrope single crystal at 2.8 GPaContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 142, No. 4, pp. 416-25.GlobalPetrology - garnet not specific to diamond
DS2003-0734
2003
Van Orman, J.A.Koga, K.T., Van Orman, J.A., Walter, M.J.Diffusive relaxation of carbon and nitrogen isotope heterogeneity in diamond: a newPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 139, 1-2, Sept. 30, pp. 35-43.GlobalPetrology, experimental, geothermometry, zoning
DS2003-1414
2003
Van Orman, J.A.Van Orman, J.A., Fei, Y., Hauri, E.H., Wang, J.Diffusion in MgO at high pressures: constraints on deformation mechanisms andGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 2, Jan. 15. p. 28.MantleGeochemistry
DS200412-1026
2003
Van Orman, J.A.Koga, K.T., Van Orman, J.A., Walter, M.J.Diffusive relaxation of carbon and nitrogen isotope heterogeneity in diamond: a new thermochronometer.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 139, 1-2, Sept. 30, pp. 35-43.TechnologyPetrology, experimental, geothermometry, zoning
DS200412-2041
2003
Van Orman, J.A.Van Orman, J.A., Fei, Y., Hauri, E.H., Wang, J.Diffusion in MgO at high pressures: constraints on deformation mechanisms and chemical transport at the core mantle boundary.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 2, Jan. 15. p. 28.MantleGeochemistry
DS200512-0518
2005
Van Orman, J.A.Keshav, S., Van Orman, J.A.Re Os Pt partitioning in sulfur bearing solid/molten iron metals at 3-22 GPa and 1300-1775 C: is the Earth's outer core so giving?Chapman Conference held in Scotland August 28-Sept. 1 2005, 1p. abstractMantleMantle plume, core-mantle boundary
DS200512-1123
2004
Van Orman, J.A.Van Orman, J.A.On the viscosity and creep mechanism of Earth's inner core.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 31, 20, Oct. 28, DOI 10.1029/2004 GLO21209MantleMelting
DS200812-0251
2008
Van Orman, J.A.Crispin, K.L., Van Orman, J.A.Diffusion of trivalent cations in MgO: implications for diffusion in Earth's lower mantle.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A189.MantlePericlase
DS202007-1172
2020
Van Orman, J.A.Prissel, K.B., Krawcznski, M.J., Van Orman, J.A.Fe-Mg and Fe-Mn interdiffusion in ilmenite with implications for geospeedometry using oxides. ( mentions kimberlites)Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 175, 62 17p. PdfMantleilmenite

Abstract: The Fe-Mg and Fe-Mn interdiffusion coefficients for ilmenite have been determined as a function of temperature and crystallographic orientation. Diffusion annealing experiments were conducted at 1.5 GPa between 800 and 1100 °C. For Fe-Mg interdiffusion, each diffusion couple consisted of an ilmenite polycrystal and an oriented single crystal of geikielite. The activation energy (Q) and pre-exponential factor (D0) for Fe-Mg diffusion in the ilmenite polycrystal were found to be Q = 188±15 kJ mol-1 and logD0 = -6.0±0.6 m2 s-1. For the geikielite single crystal, Fe-Mg interdiffusion has Q=220±16 kJ mol-1 and logD0=-4.6±0.7 m2 s-1. Our results indicate that crystallographic orientation did not significantly affect diffusion rates. For Fe-Mn interdiffusion, each diffusion couple consisted of one ilmenite polycrystal and one Mn-bearing ilmenite polycrystal. For Fe-Mn interdiffusion, Q = 264±30 kJ mol-1 and logD0 = -2.9±1.3 m2 s-1 in the ilmenite. We did not find a significant concentration dependence for the Fe-Mg and Fe-Mn interdiffusion coefficients. In comparing our experimental results for cation diffusion in ilmenite with those previously reported for hematite, we have determined that cation diffusion is faster in ilmenite than in hematite at temperatures <1100 °C. At oxygen fugacities near the wüstite-magnetite buffer, Fe and Mn diffusion rates are similar for ilmenite and titanomagnetite. We apply these experimentally determined cation diffusion rates to disequilibrium observed in ilmenites from natural volcanic samples to estimate the time between perturbation and eruption for the Bishop Tuff, Fish Canyon Tuff, Mt. Unzen, Mt. St. Helens, and kimberlites. When integrated with natural observations of chemically zoned ilmenite and constraints on pre-eruptive temperature and grain size, our experimentally determined diffusivities for ilmenite can be used to estimate a minimum time between magmatic perturbation and eruption on the timescale of hours to months.
DS201112-0286
2010
Van Orman, J.A.editors.Dosseto, A., Turner, S.P., Van Orman, J.A.editors.Timescales of magmatic processes: from core to atmosphere.Wiley Blackwell, 272p. $ 99.95MantleBook - geochronology, magmatism
DS1993-1648
1993
Van Overbeke, A.C.Van Overbeke, A.C., Verkaeren, J.neodymium-bearing feldspathic nodules associated with sovite in the Lueshe carbonatite-syenite complex (N-Kivu, Zaire).Terra Abstracts, IAGOD International Symposium on mineralization related to mafic, Vol. 5, No. 3, abstract supplement p. 54.Democratic Republic of CongoCarbonatite, Lueshe complex
DS1995-1969
1995
Van Overbeke, A.C.Van Overbeke, A.C.Mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry of metasomatic and hydrothermal processes (fenitization) Lueshe Zaire #1University of Louvain, Ph.d. thesisDemocratic Republic of CongoCarbonatite, Thesis
DS1997-1196
1997
Van Overbeke, A.C.Van Overbeke, A.C., Verkaeren, J., Demaiffe, D.The Luesche alkaline complex: petrogenesis of igneous rocks and geochemical characterization of the metasom..Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstracts, Democratic Republic of CongoAlkaline rocks, Metasomatism, fenitisation
DS1995-1970
1995
Van Overbeke, A-C.Van Overbeke, A-C.Mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry of metasomatic and hydrothermalprocesses, fenitization Lueshe...(in French) #2Thesis, University of Louvain-La Neve, Belgique (in French)., Democratic Republic of CongoCarbonatite, Deposit -Lueshe, Kivu area
DS1995-1773
1995
Van Reenan, D.D.Smit, C.A., Van Reenan, D.D.The exhumation of the southern marginal zone of the Limpopo BeltGeological Society of South Africa, Cent. Geocrongress, Guide B2, 48p.South AfricaCrustal processes, Granulite facies metamorphism, Structure, shear zones, faulting
DS2001-1092
2001
Van Reenan, D.D.Smit, C.A., Van Reenan, D.D., Perchuck, L.L.P T conditions of decompression of the Limpopo high grade terrane: record of shear zones.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 19, No. 3, pp. 249-68.South Africametamorphism, Limpopo Terrain
DS2002-0556
2002
Van ReenenGerya, T.V., Perchuk, L.L., Maresch, W.V., Willner, A.P., Van ReenenThermal regime and gravitational instability of multi layered continental crust:European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 14,4,pp. 687-700.MantleUHP - not specific to diamonds
DS1990-0171
1990
Van Reenen, D.D.Barton, J.M., Van Reenen, D.D., Roering, C.The significance of 3000 Ma granulite facies mafic dikes in the central zone of the Limpopo Belt.Precambrian Research, Vol. 48, pp. 299-308.Southern Africa, ZimbabweDikes, Limpopo Orogeny
DS1992-0093
1992
Van Reenen, D.D.Barton, J.M.Jr., Van Reenen, D.D.When was the Limpopo Orogeny?Precambrian Research, Vol. 55, pp. 7-16South AfricaOrogeny, Limpopo
DS1992-1287
1992
Van Reenen, D.D.Roering, C., Van Reenen, D.D., Smit, C.A., Barton, J.M.Jr., De Beer, J.H.Tectonic model for the evolution of the Limpopo BeltPrecambrian Research, Vol. 55, pp. 539-552South AfricaTectonics, Limpopo Belt
DS1992-1593
1992
Van Reenen, D.D.Van Reenen, D.D., Roering, C., Ashwal, L.D., De Wit, M.J.Regional geological setting of the Limpopo beltPrecambrian Research, Vol. 55, pp. 1-5South AfricaLimpopo Belt, Granulite terrane, craton
DS1993-1649
1993
Van Reenen, D.D.Van Schalkwyk, J.F., De Wit, M.J., Roering, C., Van Reenen, D.D.Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the simatic basement of the Pietersburg greenstone belt relative to the Limpopo Orogeny: evidence from serpentinitePrecambrian Research, Vol. 61, No. 1-2, February pp. 67-88South AfricaTectonics, metamorphism, Greenstone belt
DS1995-1589
1995
Van Reenen, D.D.Roering, C., Van Reenen, D.D., Smit, C.A., Du Toit, R.Deep crustal embrittlement and fluid flow during granulite metamorphism in Limpopo Belt, South AfricaJournal of Geology, Vol. 103, No. 6, pp. 673-686South AfricaTectonics, metamorphism,, Limpopo Belt
DS1995-1971
1995
Van Reenen, D.D.Van Reenen, D.D., McCourt, S., Smit, C.A.Are the Southern and Northern marginal zones of Limpopo belt related to a single continental collisional event. #1South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 98, No. 4, pp. 498-504.South Africa, ZimbabweLimpopo Belt, Kaapvaal craton, Zimbabwe craton
DS1996-1108
1996
Van Reenen, D.D.Perchuk, L.L., Gerya, T.V., Van Reenen, D.D., Safonov, SmitThe Limpopo metamorphic belt, South Africa: decompression and cooling regimes of granulites...Petrology, Vol. 4, No. 6, Nov-Dec. pp. 571-599.South AfricaCraton - Kaapvaal, Limpopo metamorphic belt
DS1996-1464
1996
Van Reenen, D.D.Van Reenen, D.D., McCourt, S., Smit, C.A.Are the southern and northern marginal zones of Limpopo Belt related to a single continental collisional event #2South Africa Journal of Geology, Vol. 95, No. 4, pp. 498-504South AfricaTectonics, Craton, Limpopo Belt
DS1996-1465
1996
Van Reenen, D.D.Van Reenen, D.D., Smit, C.A.The Limpopo metamorphic belt, South Africa: geological setting and relationship of granulite complex....Petrology, Vol. 4, No. 6, Nov-Dec. pp. 562-570.South AfricaCraton - Kaapvaal, Zimbabwe, Limpopo metamorphic belt
DS201707-1356
2016
van Reenen, D.D.Perchuk, A.L., Safonov, O.G., Smit, C.A., van Reenen, D.D., Zkharov, V.S., Gerya, T.V.Precambrian ultra hot orogenic factory: making and reworking of continental crust.Tectonophysics, in press availableMantleUHP

Abstract: Mechanisms of Precambrian orogeny and their contribution to the origin of ultrahigh temperature granulites, granite-greenstone terranes and net crustal growth remain debatable. Here, we use 2D numerical models with 150 °C higher mantle temperatures compared to present day conditions to investigate physical and petrological controls of Precambrian orogeny during forced continental plates convergence. Numerical experiments show that convergence between two relatively thin blocks of continental lithosphere with fertile mantle creates a short-lived cold collisional belt that later becomes absorbed by a long-lived thick and flat ultra-hot accretionary orogen with Moho temperatures of 700–1100 °C. The orogen underlain by hot partially molten depleted asthenospheric mantle spreads with plate tectonic rates towards the incoming lithospheric block. The accretionary orogeny is driven by delamination of incoming lithospheric mantle with attached mafic lower crust and invasion of the hot partially molten asthenospheric wedge under the accreted crust. A very fast convective cell forms atop the subducting slab, in which hot asthenospheric mantle rises against the motion of the slab and transports heat towards the moving orogenic front. Juvenile crustal growth during the orogeny is accompanied by net crustal loss due to the lower crust subduction. Stability of an ultra-hot orogeny is critically dependent on the presence of relatively thin and warm continental lithosphere with thin crust and dense fertile mantle roots subjected to plate convergence. Increased thickness of the continental crust and subcontinental lithospheric mantle, pronounced buoyancy of the lithospheric roots, and decreased mantle and continental Moho temperature favor colder and more collision-like orogenic styles with thick crust, reduced magmatic activity, lowered metamorphic temperatures, and decreased degree of crustal modification. Our numerical modeling results thus indicate that different types of orogens (cold, mixed-hot and ultra-hot) could be created at the same time in the Early Earth, depending on compositional and thermal structures of interacting continental blocks.
DS201901-0055
2018
van Reenen, D.D.Perchuk, A.L., Safonov, O.G., Smit, C.A., van Reenen, D.D., Zakharov, V.S., Gerya, T.V.Precambrian ultra-hot orogenic factory: making and reworking of continental crust.Tectonophysics, Vol. 746, pp. 572-586.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: Mechanisms of Precambrian orogeny and their contribution to the origin of ultrahigh temperature granulites, granite-greenstone terranes and net crustal growth remain debatable. Here, we use 2D numerical models with 150 °C higher mantle temperatures compared to present day conditions to investigate physical and petrological controls of Precambrian orogeny during forced continental plates convergence. Numerical experiments show that convergence between two relatively thin blocks of continental lithosphere with fertile mantle creates a short-lived cold collisional belt that later becomes absorbed by a long-lived thick and flat ultra-hot accretionary orogen with Moho temperatures of 700-1100 °C. The orogen underlain by hot partially molten depleted asthenospheric mantle spreads with plate tectonic rates towards the incoming lithospheric block. The accretionary orogeny is driven by delamination of incoming lithospheric mantle with attached mafic lower crust and invasion of the hot partially molten asthenospheric wedge under the accreted crust. A very fast convective cell forms atop the subducting slab, in which hot asthenospheric mantle rises against the motion of the slab and transports heat towards the moving orogenic front. Juvenile crustal growth during the orogeny is accompanied by net crustal loss due to the lower crust subduction. Stability of an ultra-hot orogeny is critically dependent on the presence of relatively thin and warm continental lithosphere with thin crust and dense fertile mantle roots subjected to plate convergence. Increased thickness of the continental crust and subcontinental lithospheric mantle, pronounced buoyancy of the lithospheric roots, and decreased mantle and continental Moho temperature favor colder and more collision-like orogenic styles with thick crust, reduced magmatic activity, lowered metamorphic temperatures, and decreased degree of crustal modification. Our numerical modeling results thus indicate that different types of orogens (cold, mixed-hot and ultra-hot) could be created at the same time in the Early Earth, depending on compositional and thermal structures of interacting continental blocks.
DS200412-2042
2004
Van Rensburg, L.Van Rensburg, L., Moboeta, M.S., Morgenthal, T.L.Rehabilitation of Co-disposed diamond tailings: growth medium rectification procedures and indigenous grass establishment.Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, Vol. 154, 1-4, May, pp. 101-113. Kluwer Publishing//klTechnologyMining - environmental
DS1982-0614
1982
Van rensburg, W.C.J.Van rensburg, W.C.J.South African Minerals and World DemandInternational Minerals, A National Perspective, Agnew, A.f., Symposium AAAS 90, PP. 97-113.South AfricaDiamonds, Politics, Economics, Ussr
DS1986-0491
1986
Van Riessen, A.Lee, D.C., Van Riessen, A., Terry, K.W.Trace element detection in individual mineral grainsProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 475-477GlobalDiamond exploration
DS1989-0870
1989
Van Riessen, A.Lee, D.C., Van Riessen, A., Terry, K.W.Trace elements in mineral grains from kimberlitic and non-kimberlitic sources using X-ray excited XRF in a scanning electron microscope (SEM)Geological Society of Australia Inc. Blackwell Scientific Publishing, Special, No. 14, Vol. 2, pp. 1146-1153GlobalTrace elements, XRF.
DS1995-0644
1995
Van Roemund, H.L.M.Godard, G., Van Roemund, H.L.M.Deformation induced clinopyroxene fabrics from eclogitesJournal of Structural Geol., Vol. 17, No. 10, pp. 1425-1444.GlobalEclogites, Not specific to diamond exploration
DS200512-0238
2004
Van Roemund, H.L.M.Dobrzhinetskaya, L.F., Green, H.W., Renfro, A.P., Bozhilov, K.N., Spengler, D., Van Roemund, H.L.M.Precipitation of pyroxenes and Mg2SiO4 from majorite garnet: simulation of peridotite exhumation from great depth.Terra Nova, Vol. 16, 6, pp. 325-330.MantlePetrology - peridotite
DS202002-0171
2019
van Roermind, H.Cutts, J.A., Smit, M., Spengler, D., van Roermind, H., Kooijman, E.Punctuated evolution of the Archean SCLM in sync with the supercontinent cycle. Western Gneiss ComplexAmericam Geophysical Union Fall meeting, 1p. AbstractEurope, Norwayeclogites, peridotites

Abstract: The preservation of Archean cratons is typically attributed to the presence of a highly-depleted and buoyant sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) that is equally old or older than its overlying crust. Time constraints on the formation and petrological evolution of the SCLM are key to investigating its long-term evolution and role in the formation and preservation of the continental crust. Nevertheless, such constraints are difficult to obtain as well-preserved samples of the SCLM are rare and typically lack conventional chronometric minerals. The history of SCLM rocks is typically inferred on the basis of model ages, many of which indicate an Archean origin; however, these dates are difficult to link to specific mineral assemblages or chemical signatures, and the petrological and dynamic processes that these represent. Garnet Lu-Hf geochronology is one of the few chronometers that could overcome this limitation. In this study, a refined method in Lu-Hf garnet chronology was applied to fragments of the Laurentian SCLM that are now exposed as orogenic peridotites in the ultrahigh-pressure domains of the Western Gneiss Complex, Norway. The peridotite bodies comprise a variety of unusually well-preserved rock types-from dunites that record decompression and melting at >350 km depth to fertile lithologies produced by melting and fluid metasomatism. Our internal isochron results from pyrope (after exsolution from majorite) in dunite samples yielded identical Neoarchean ages; these are the first-ever obtained for mantle garnet. The ages coincide with a time interval during which there was voluminous juvenile crust formation, indicating a link between this global process and the deeply sourced mantle upwellings that these samples represent. Internal isochrons from websterite-and clinopyroxenite-hosted pyrope yielded Meso-to Neoproterozoic ages that exactly match two distinct supercontinent break-up events in the overlying continental crust. Together, the new Lu-Hf results indicate that since its extraction during a period of widespread Archean crustal growth, the Laurentian SCLM appears to have largely been at petro-physical and chemical stasis and evolved only during short pulses that ran in sync with the supercontinent cycle.
DS200912-0721
2009
Van RoermundSpengler, D., Brueckner, H.K., Herman, L.M., Van Roermund, Drury, MasonLong lived, cold burial of Baltica to 200 km depth.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 281, 1-2, April 30, pp. 27-35.Europe, Baltic ShieldSubduction
DS201112-1160
2011
Van Roermund, H.Zhang, C., Zhang, L., Van Roermund, H., Song, S., Zhang, G.Petrology and SHRIMP U-Pb dating of Xitieshan eclogite, North Quidam, UHP metamorphic belt, NW China.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, 4, pp. 752-767.ChinaUHP
DS2001-1188
2001
Van Roermund, H.L.Van Roermund, H.L., Drury, M.R., Barnhoorn, De RondeRelict majoritic garnet microstructures from ultra deep peridotites in western Norway.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 42, No. 1, Jan. pp. 117-58.NorwayPeridotites, Petrology
DS200612-1493
2006
Van Roermund, H.L.Vrijmoed, J.C., Van Roermund, H.L., Davies, G.R.Evidence for diamond grade ultra high pressure metamorphism and fluid interaction in the Svartberget Fe Ti garnet peridotite websterite body, western Gneiss region, Norway.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 88, 1-2, pp. 381-405.Europe, NorwayUHP
DS1988-0179
1988
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Drury, M.R., Van Roermund, H.L.M.Metasomatic origin for iron titanium rich multiphase inclusions in olivine from kimberlite xenolithsGeology, Vol. 16, No. 11, pp. 1035-1088South AfricaMineralogy, Kimberlite xenoliths
DS1989-0371
1989
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Drury, M.R., Van Roermund, H.L.M.Fluid assisted recrystallization in upper mantle peridotite xenoliths fromkimberlitesJournal of Petrology, Vol. 30, No. 1, pp. 133-152South AfricaThaba Putsoa, Xenoliths
DS1992-1192
1992
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Philippot, P., Van Roermund, H.L.M.Deformation processes in eclogitic rocks: evidence for the rheological delamination of the oceanic crust in deeper levels of subduction zones.Journal of Structural Geology, Vol. 14, No. 89, pp. 1059-1077.GlobalEclogites, Crust
DS1995-0645
1995
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Godard, G., Van Roermund, H.L.M.Deformation induced clinopyroxene fabrics from eclogitesJournal of Structural Geology, Vol. 17, No. 10, pp. 1425-1444GlobalTectonics - deformation
DS1999-0764
1999
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Van Roermund, H.L.M., Drury, M.R.Ultra high pressure ( P>6GPa) garnet peridotites in western Norway:exhumation of mantle rocks from 185kM.Terra Nova, Vol. 10, pp. 295-301.NorwayGarnet - majoritic, Mineral chemistry
DS2002-1651
2002
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Van Roermund, H.L.M., Carswell, D.A., Drury, M.R., Heijboer, T.C.Microdiamonds in a megacrystic garnet websterite pod from Bardane on the island ofGeology, Vol. 30, 11, Nov. pp. 959-62.NorwaySubduction - deep continental, diamond genesis
DS200412-0228
2004
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Brueckner, H.K., Van Roermund, H.L.M.Dunk tectonics: a multiple subduction/education model for the evolution of the Scandinavian Caledonides.Tectonics, Vol. 23, 2, 10.1029/2003TC001502Europe, ScandinaviaSubduction
DS200412-0532
2004
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Falus, G., Druru, M.R., Van Roermund, H.L.M., Szabo, C.Magmatism related localized deformation in the mantle: a case study.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 146, no. 4, pp. 493-505.MantleMagmatism
DS200512-0142
2005
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Carswell, D.A., Van Roermund, H.L.M.On multiphase mineral inclusions associated with microdiamond formation in mantle derived peridotite lens at Bardane on Fjortoft, west Norway.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 17, 1, pp. 31-42.Europe, NorwayMicrodiamonds
DS200612-0226
2006
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Carswell, D.A., Van Roermund, H.L.M., De Vries, D.F., WiggersScandian ultrahigh pressure metamorphism of Protereozoic basement rocks on Fjortoft and Otroy, western Gneiss region, Norway.International Geology Review, Vol. 48, 11, pp. 957-977.Europe, NorwayUHP
DS200612-1494
2006
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Vrijmoed, J.C., Van Roermund, H.L.M., Davies, G.R.Evidence for diamond grade ultra high pressure metamorphism and fluid interaction in the Svartberget Fe Ti garnet peridotite websterite body, Western GneissMineralogy and Petrology., Vol. 88, 1-2, pp. 381-Europe, NorwayUHP
DS200812-1221
2008
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Vrijmoed, J.C., Smith, D.C., Van Roermund, H.L.M.Raman confirmation of microdiamond in the Svartberget Fe Ti type garnet peridotite, Western Gneiss Region, Western Norway.Terra Nova, Vol. 20, 4, August pp. 295-301.Europe, NorwayMicrodiamonds
DS200812-1222
2008
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Vrijmoed, J.C., Smith, D.C., Van Roermund, H.L.M.Raman confirmation of microdiamond in the Svartberget Fe Ti type garnet peridotite, western Gneiss region, western Norway.Terra Nova, in press availableEurope, NorwayMicrodiamonds
DS200912-0671
2009
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Scamelluri, M., Pettke, T., Van Roermund, H.L.M.Deep subduction fluids and their interaction with the mantle wedge.Goldschmidt Conference 2009, p. A1165 Abstract.MantleSubduction
DS201012-0038
2010
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Barnhoorn, A., Drury, M.R., Van Roermund, H.L.M.Evidence for low viscosity garnet rich layers in the upper mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 289, pp. 54-67.MantleRheology, peridotite, UHP
DS201112-0635
2010
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Malaspina, N., Scambelluri, M., Poli, S., Van Roermund, H.L.M., Langenhorst, F.The oxidation state of mantle wedge majoritic garnet websterites metasomatised by C-bearing subduction fluids.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 298, 3-4, pp. 417-426.MantleMetasomatism
DS201507-0313
2015
Van Roermund, H.L.M.Gilio, M., Clos, F., Van Roermund, H.L.M.The Frimingen garnet peridotite ( central Swedish Caledonides). A good example of the characteristic PTt path of a cold mantle wedge garnet peridotite.Lithos, Vol. 230, pp. 1-16.Europe, SwedenPeridotite
DS201804-0741
2018
van Roermund, H.L.M.Spengler, D., van Roermund, H.L.M., Drury, M.R.Deep komatiite signature in cratonic mantle pyroxenite… websterite/Rae cratonJournal of Metamorphic Geology, in press availableEurope, Greenland, Norwaymineral chemistry

Abstract: We present new and compiled whole rock modal mineral, major and trace element data from extremely melt depleted but pyroxenite and garnet(-ite) bearing Palaeoarchaean East Greenland cratonic mantle, exposed as three isolated, tectonically strained orogenic peridotite bodies (Ugelvik, Raudhaugene, Midsundvatnet) in western Norway. The studied lithologies comprise besides spinel- and/or garnet-bearing peridotite (dunite, harzburgite, lherzolite) garnet-clinopyroxenite and partially olivine-bearing garnet-orthopyroxenite and -websterite. Chemical and modal data and spatial relationships between different rock types suggest deformation to have triggered mechanical mixing of garnet-free dunite with garnet-bearing enclosures that formed garnet-peridotite. Inclusions of olivine in porphyroclastic minerals of pyroxenite show a primary origin of olivine in olivine-bearing variants. Major element oxide abundances and ratios of websterite differ to those in rocks expected to form by reaction of peridotite with basaltic melts or silica-rich fluids, but resemble those of Archaean Al-enriched komatiite (AEK) flows from Barberton and Commondale greenstone belts, South Africa. Websterite GdN/YbN, 0.49-0.65 (olivine-free) and 0.73-0.85 (olivine-bearing), overlaps that of two subgroups of AEK, GdN/YbN 0.25-0.55 and 0.77-0.90, with each of them being nearly indistinguishable from one another in rare earth element fractionation but also concentration. Websterite MgO content is high, 22.7-29.0 wt.%, and Zr/Y is very low, 0.1-1.0. The other, non-websteritic pyroxenites overlap - when mechanically mixed together with garnetite - in chemistry with that of AEK. It follows an origin of websterite and likely all pyroxenite that involves melting of a garnet-bearing depleted mantle source. Pyroxene exsolution lamellae in the inferred solidus garnet in all lithological varieties require the pyroxenites to have crystallised in the majorite garnet stability field, at 3-4 GPa (90-120 km depth) at minimum 1600 °C. Consequently, we interpret the websterites to represent the first recognised deep plutonic crystallisation products that formed from komatiite melts. The other pyroxenitic rocks are likely fragments of such crystallisation products. An implication is that a mantle plume environment contributed to the formation of (one of) the worldwide oldest lithospheric mantle underneath the eastern Rae craton.
DS201807-1528
2018
van Roermund, H.L.M.Spengler, D., van Roermund, H.L.M., Drury, M.R.Deep komatiite signature in cratonic mantle pryoxenite.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 36, 5, pp. 591-602.Mantlecraton

Abstract: We present new and compiled whole-rock modal mineral, major and trace element data from extremely melt depleted but pyroxenite and garnet(-ite)-bearing Palaeoarchean East Greenland cratonic mantle, exposed as three isolated, tectonically strained orogenic peridotite bodies (Ugelvik, Raudhaugene and Midsundvatnet) in western Norway. The studied lithologies comprise besides spinel- and/or garnet-bearing peridotite (dunite, harzburgite, lherzolite) garnet-clinopyroxenite and partially olivine-bearing garnet-orthopyroxenite and -websterite. Chemical and modal data and spatial relationships between different rock types suggest deformation to have triggered mechanical mixing of garnet-free dunite with garnet-bearing enclosures that formed garnet-peridotite. Inclusions of olivine in porphyroclastic minerals of pyroxenite show a primary origin of olivine in olivine-bearing variants. Major element oxide abundances and ratios of websterite differ to those in rocks expected to form by reaction of peridotite with basaltic melts or silica-rich fluids, but resemble those of Archean Al-enriched komatiite (AEK) flows from Barberton and Commondale greenstone belts, South Africa. Websterite GdN/YbN, 0.49-0.65 (olivine-free) and 0.73-0.85 (olivine-bearing), overlaps that of two subgroups of AEK, GdN/YbN 0.25-0.55 and 0.77-0.90, with each of them being nearly indistinguishable from one another in not only rare earth element fractionation but also concentration. Websterite MgO content is high, 22.7-29.0 wt%, and Zr/Y is very low, 0.1-1.0. The other, non-websteritic pyroxenites overlap—when mechanically mixed together with garnetite—in chemistry with that of AEK. It follows an origin of websterite and likely all pyroxenite that involves melting of a garnet-bearing depleted mantle source. Pyroxene exsolution lamellae in the inferred solidus garnet in all lithological varieties require the pyroxenites to have crystallized in the majorite garnet stability field, at 3-4 GPa (90-120 km depth) at minimum 1,600°C. Consequently, we interpret the websterites to represent the first recognized deep plutonic crystallization products that formed from komatiite melts. The other pyroxenitic rocks are likely fragments of such crystallization products. An implication is that a mantle plume environment contributed to the formation of (one of) the worldwide oldest lithospheric mantle underneath the eastern Rae craton.
DS201910-2251
2019
van Roermund, H.L.M.Cutts, J.A., Smit, M.A., Spengler, D., Kooijman, E., van Roermund, H.L.M.Two billion years of mantle evolution in sync with global tectonic cycles.Earth and Planetary Science letters, Vol. 528, 115820 11p.Mantlecraton

Abstract: The continental crust and sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) are co-dependent reservoirs in terms of their geochemistry, tectonics, and long-term evolution. Obtaining insight into the mechanisms of lithosphere formation and differentiation requires robust constraint on the complex petrological history of mantle rocks. This has proven difficult as samples from the deep mantle are rare and, although many may have formed in the Archean, no such age has been obtained directly from mantle-derived silicate minerals. Lutetium-hafnium geochronology of garnet has the potential of overcoming this limitation. In this study, this technique was applied on fragments of the SCLM exposed in the Norwegian Caledonides. The chronologic record of these rocks is rich and extensive, yet it is difficult to interpret and is, in part, inconsistent. Our Lu-Hf results from supersilicic pyrope in dunite provide the first Archean internal isochron ages for mantle rocks. These ages are consistent with a period of juvenile crust formation worldwide and provide a record of deeply sourced mantle upwellings from >350 km depth. Results from fertile rock types indicate that melting and isotope re-equilibration occurred in sync with two Proterozoic supercontinent break-up events that are recorded in the Laurentian and Baltic lithospheres. Together, the results indicate that since its extraction during a period of rapid Archean crustal growth, the SCLM appears to have largely been at petro-physical and chemical stasis, with the exception of major episodes of continental break-up. The evolution of the SCLM is thus, highly punctuated and ultimately controlled by the Wilson cycle.
DS200812-1013
2008
Van Rosemund, H.L.M.Scambelluri, M., Petke, T., Van Rosemund, H.L.M.Majoritic garnets monitor deep subsduction fluid flow and mantle dynamics.Geology, Vol. 36, 1, pp.MantleGeodynamics
DS200612-1466
2006
Van Royan, J.Van Royan, J., De Weedt, F., De Gryse, O.HPHT treatment of Type Ia brown diamonds.GIA Gemological Research Conference abstract volume, Held August 26-27, p. 37. 1/2p.TechnologyHPHT
DS200512-0222
2005
Van Royen, J.De Corte, K., Kerremans, Y., Nouwen, B., Van Royen, J.Characterization of carbonado used as a gem.Gemmologie: Zeitschrift der Deutschen Gemmologischen Gesellschaft ** In GERMAN, Vol. 53, 1, pp. 5-22.Diamond - carbonado
DS200712-0225
2006
Van Royen, J.De Corte, K., Anthonis, A., Van Royen, J., Blancaert, M., Barjon, J., Willems, B.Overview of dislocation networks in natural type IIa diamonds.Gems & Gemology, 4th International Symposium abstracts, Fall 2006, p.122-3. abstract onlyTechnologyDiamond Type IIa
DS201212-0123
2012
Van Royen, J.Chapman, J., De Corte, K., Van Royen, J., Willems, B.FTIR features in Argyle, Diavik and Murowa diamonds.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractAfrica, ZimbabweDeposit - Murowa
DS202006-0953
2020
Van Rytheoven, A.D.Van Rytheoven, A.D., Schulze, D.J., Davis, D.W.Ultramafic xenoliths from the 1.15 Ga Certac kimberlite, eastern Superior craton.The Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 56, pp. 267-286. pdfCanada, Quebecdeposit - Certac

Abstract: Xenoliths and xenocrysts of mantle material from kimberlite dikes located underground at the Certac Au mine, Québec, in the eastern Superior Craton, were studied in terms of the major element composition of their constituent minerals. The kimberlite was dated at 1151 ± 46 Ma by the U-Pb perovskite method. This suite thus provides a rare glimpse into the Mesoproterozoic mantle of the Superior Craton. Two parageneses of mantle material unrelated to the kimberlite magmatism occur: (1) an olivine + ilmenite ± magnetite association characterized by relatively Fe-rich olivine (Mg# = 0.68-0.84) and ilmenite enriched in Mg and Cr (4-13 wt.% MgO, Cr2O3 up to 3 wt.%), and (2) spinel peridotite characterized by Mg-rich olivine (Mg# = 0.91-0.94). The Fe-rich association is interpreted as a magmatic cumulate likely unrelated to the kimberlite. No mantle-derived garnet occurs in the xenoliths or as xenocrysts. The presence of Cr-rich spinel (Cr# = 0.84-0.98) in high temperature (860-953 °C) chromite peridotite indicates bulk compositions too depleted in Al for garnet to be stable, although geothermometry suggests they equilibrated at depths corresponding to garnet stability (90-131 km, depending on the geothermal gradient). Alternatively, the presence of phlogopite in two of the three high temperature (i.e., deepest) chromite peridotites suggests the absence of garnet and presence of low-Al chromite may have been caused by metasomatism from a K-rich fluid that replaced garnet with phlogopite + clinopyroxene ± chromite. Less depletion at shallower depths is indicated by a chromite (Cr# = 0.60) dunite that equilibrated at 831 °C and a low temperature (752 °C) Mg-Al-spinel lherzolite.
DS200712-1110
2007
Van Rythoven, A.Van Rythoven, A., Schulze, D.J., Davis, D.W.Upper mantle xenoliths from the Certac kimberlite eastern Superior province.Geological Association of Canada, Gac-Mac Yellowknife 2007, May 23-25, Volume 32, 1 pg. abstract p.84.Canada, QuebecGeochronology, mineralogy
DS200912-0786
2009
Van Rythoven, A.Van Rythoven, A., McCandless, T.E., Schulze, D.J.,Bellis, A., Taylor, I.A., Liu, Y.In-situ analysis of diamonds and their mineral inclusions from the Lynx kimberlite dyke complex, central Quebec.GAC/MAC/AGU Meeting held May 23-27 Toronto, Abstract onlyCanada, QuebecDeposit - Lynx
DS200412-2043
2004
Van Rythoven, A.D.Van Rythoven, A.D., Schulze, D.J.Megacrysts and pyroxenites from the Muskox kimberlite, Slave Craton, Nunavut.Geological Association of Canada Abstract Volume, May 12-14, SS14-09 p. 268.abstractCanada, NunavutXenoliths, Jericho
DS200912-0787
2009
Van Rythoven, A.D.Van Rythoven, A.D., Schulze, D.J.In-situ analysis of diamonds and their inclusions from the Diavik mine, Northwest Territories, Canada: mapping diamond growth.Lithos, In press available 44p.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS201112-1077
2011
Van Rythoven, A.D.Van Rythoven, A.D., McCandless, T.E., Schulze, D.J., Bellis, A., Taylor, L.A., Liu, Y.Diamond crystals and their mineral inclusions from the Lynx kimberlite dyke complex, central Quebec.The Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 49, 3, pp. 691-706.Canada, QuebecDiamond morphology - Lynx dyke
DS201708-1581
2017
Van Rythoven, A.D.Van Rythoven, A.D., Schulze, D.J., Hauri, E.H., Wang, J., Shirey, S.Intra-crystal co-variations of carbon isotopes and nitrogen contents in diamond from three north american cratons. A54 south ( Diavik) Slave craton; Lynx dike Superior craton ; Kelsey Lake Wyoming cratonChemical Geology, in press available 54p.Canada, Northwest Territories, Quebec, United States, Coloradodeposit, A54, Lynx, Kelsey Lake

Abstract: Eighteen diamond samples from the A154 South kimberlite pipe (Diavik Mine), Slave Craton, Northwest Territories (Canada); sixteen diamond samples from the Lynx kimberlite dyke, Superior Craton, Quebec (Canada) and twelve diamond samples from the Kelsey Lake kimberlite pipe, Wyoming Craton, Colorado (USA), were cut through the core-zones, polished, imaged by cathodoluminescence (CL), and analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for carbon isotope composition and nitrogen abundance. Twenty Kelsey Lake diamond plates, including the twelve crystals analyzed by SIMS, were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) for nitrogen concentration and aggregation state. Diamond samples from Diavik and Kelsey Lake have average d13CPDB and nitrogen contents (atomic ppm) similar to those found by earlier studies: averaging between - 3.9‰ and 486 ppm, and - 7‰ and 308 ppm, respectively. Samples from the Lynx dyke, investigated for the first time, are substantially different, having d13C = -1.2‰ and nitrogen content = 32 ppm (averages). All three localities have examples of significant variations in nitrogen content (> 100 ppm) within single stones. Carbon isotope variation within individual stones is relatively minor (< 2‰). In terms of nitrogen aggregation, samples from the Kelsey Lake kimberlite are dominated by zones of Type IaA, but mixed-type and Type IaB (less common) stones also occur. For the majority of samples, overall intra-diamond zonations of nitrogen abundances and carbon isotope ratios are not in agreement with modeled trends for single-event Rayleigh fractionation of diamond from fluid under nitrogen-compatible conditions at 1100 °C. The involvement of fluids from subducted crustal reservoirs with exceptionally light, and in the case of Lynx samples, exceptionally heavy d13CPDB values is necessary to explain the observed growth histories of all the samples studied here.
DS2003-0659
2003
Van Schaack, M.Johansen, T.A., Digranes, P., Van Schaack, M., Lonne, I.Seismic mapping and modeling of near surface sediments in polar areasGeophysics, Vol. 68, 2, pp. 566-73.GlobalGeophysics - seismics - not specific to diamonds
DS200412-0918
2003
Van Schaack, M.Johansen, T.A.,Digranes, P., Van Schaack, M., Lonne, I.Seismic mapping and modeling of near surface sediments in polar areas,Geophysics, Vol. 68, 2, pp. 566-73.TechnologyGeophysics - seismics - not specific to diamonds
DS1995-1800
1995
Van Schahlkwyk, J.Solomon, M.H., Van Schahlkwyk, J.Privitization in the minerals sector in South AfricaRaw Materials Report, Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 14-24.South AfricaEconomics, legal privitization, Alexcor
DS1993-1649
1993
Van Schalkwyk, J.F.Van Schalkwyk, J.F., De Wit, M.J., Roering, C., Van Reenen, D.D.Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the simatic basement of the Pietersburg greenstone belt relative to the Limpopo Orogeny: evidence from serpentinitePrecambrian Research, Vol. 61, No. 1-2, February pp. 67-88South AfricaTectonics, metamorphism, Greenstone belt
DS200712-0241
2006
Van Schalkwyk, L.Dewey, J.F., Robb, L., Van Schalkwyk, L.Did Bushmanland extensionally unroof Namaqualand?Precambrian Research, Vol. Nov. pp. 173-182.Africa, South AfricaUHT metamorphism
DS201112-1078
2011
Van Schijndel, V.Van Schijndel, V., Cornell, D.H., Hoffman, K.H., Frei, D.Three episodes of crustal development in the Rehoboth Province, Namibia.The Formation and Evolution of Africa: A synopsis of 3.8 Ga of Earth History, Geol. Soc. London Special Publ., 357, pp. 27-47.Africa, NamibiaTectonics
DS1986-0492
1986
Van SchmusLewry, J.F., Collerson, Bickford, Van SchmusAn evolutionary model of the Western Churchill Province and western Margin of the Superior Province and north central United States.Tectonophysics, Vol. 131, pp. 183-97.Saskatchewan, Alberta, MontanaTectonics
DS1992-1594
1992
Van Schmus, W.E.Van Schmus, W.E.Precambrian evolution of the Midcontinent: what to do about Iowa?Geological Society of America (GSA) Abstract Volume, Vol. 24, No. 4, April p. 69. abstract onlyIowaCentral Plains Orogen, Tectonics
DS1975-0462
1977
Van schmus, W.R.Bickford, M.E., Van schmus, W.R.Chronology of Middle and Late Precambrian Crustal Evolution in the Midcontinent Region of North America.Eos, Vol. 59, No. 4, P. 227. (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent
DS1975-1101
1979
Van schmus, W.R.Klasner, J.S., Cannon, W.F., Van schmus, W.R.Lineaments in the Pre Keweenawan Crust and Formation of The keweenawan Rift.Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 11, No. 5, P. 233. (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent
DS1981-0084
1981
Van schmus, W.R.Bickford, M.E., Van schmus, W.R.Origin of Middle Proterozoic Granitic and Rhyolitic Rocks In the Mid- Continent Region of North America.Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 13, No. 7, P. 410. (abstract.).Wisconsin, Illinois, KansasMid-continent
DS1981-0417
1981
Van schmus, W.R.Van schmus, W.R., Bickford, M.E.Proterozoic Chronology and Evolution of the Midcontinent Region, North America.In: Precambrian Plate Tectonics, PP. 261-296.GlobalMid-continent
DS1982-0336
1982
Van schmus, W.R.Klasner, J.S., Cannon, W.F., Van schmus, W.R.The Pre Keweenawan Tectonic History of Southern Canadian Shield and its Influence on Formation of the Midcontinent Rift.Geological Society of America (GSA) MEMOIR., No. 156, PP. 27-46.GlobalMid-continent
DS1982-0615
1982
Van schmus, W.R.Van schmus, W.R., Bickford, M.E.Delineation of Boundaries Within the Midcontinent Proterozoic Terranes Using Aeromagnetic Mapping.Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 14, No. 7, P. 636. (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent
DS1983-0178
1983
Van schmus, W.R.Coates, M.S., Haimson, B.C., Hinze, W.J., Van schmus, W.R.Introduction to the Illinois Deep Hole Project/Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 88, No. B9 SEPT. 10, PP. 7267-7750GlobalMid Continent
DS1984-0166
1984
Van schmus, W.R.Bowring, S.A., Van schmus, W.R., Hoffman, P.F.uranium-lead (U-Pb) zircon ages from Athapuscow aulacogen, East Arm of Great Slave @northwest Territories.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 21, pp. 1315-24.Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology, Alkaline Rocks
DS1984-0355
1984
Van schmus, W.R.Hinze, W.J., Van schmus, W.R.Targeting Deep Scientific Drilling in the MidcontinentGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 16, No. 3, P. 146. (abstract.).MichiganMid-continent
DS1985-0691
1985
Van schmus, W.R.Van schmus, W.R., Bickford, M.E.Extension of Early Proterozoic Orogenic Belts Into Midcontinent United States (us)6th. International Conference Basement Tectonics, Held Sante Fe, Septem, P. 38. (abstract.).United States, Central States, Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska, Colorado Plateau, WyomingGeotectonics
DS1985-0692
1985
Van schmus, W.R.Van schmus, W.R., Hinze, W.J.The Mid Continent Rift System (review)Annual Review Earth Science., Vol. 13, PP. 345-383.United StatesMid-continent
DS1986-0074
1986
Van Schmus, W.R.Bickford, M.E., Van Schmus, W.R., Zeitz, I.Proterozoic history of the mid-continent region of North AmericaGeology, Vol. 14, No. 6, June pp. 492-496MidcontinentTectonics
DS1987-0760
1987
Van Schmus, W.R.Van Schmus, W.R., Bickford, M.E., Lewry, J.F.uranium-lead (U-Pb) geochronology in the Trans Hudson Orogen, northern Canada.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 24, pp. 407-424.SaskatchewanTrans Hudson Orogeny, Geochronology
DS1987-0761
1987
Van Schmus, W.R.Van Schmus, W.R., Bickford, M.E., Lewry, Macdonalduranium-lead (U-Pb) geochronology in the Trans Hudson Orogen, northern SaskatchewanProg. in Phys. Geography, Vol. 24, pp. 407=24.SaskatchewanGeochronology
DS1988-0485
1988
Van Schmus, W.R.Morey, G.B., Van Schmus, W.R.Correlation of Precambrian rocks of the Lake Superiorregion, UnitedStatesUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Prof. Paper, No. 1241-F, F1-F31, $ 2.00Minnesota, Wisconsin, MichiganArchean basement
DS1988-0747
1988
Van Schmus, W.R.Wallin, E.T., Van Schmus, W.R.Geochronological studies of the Archean Proterozoic transition North central United StatesGeological Society of America Abstracts with Program, Vol. 20, No. 2, January p. 131. Sth. Central, LawrenceIowa, South DakotaMid continent
DS1989-1395
1989
Van Schmus, W.R.Sims, P.K., Van Schmus, W.R., Schulz, K.J., Peterman, Z.E.Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the early Proterozoic Wisconsin magmatic terranes of the Penokean OrogenCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 26, No. 10, October pp. 2145-2158WisconsinStratigraphy, Orogeny -Penokean
DS1989-1396
1989
Van Schmus, W.R.Sims, P.K., Van Schmus, W.R., Schulz, K.J., Peterman, Z.E.Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Early Proterozoic Wisconsin magmatic terranes of the Penokean OrogenCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 26, No. 10, October pp. 2145-2158WisconsinTectonics
DS1990-0201
1990
Van Schmus, W.R.Bickford, M.E., Collerson, K.D., Lewry, J.F., Van Schmus, W.R.Proterozoic collisional tectonism in the Trans-Hudsonorogen, SaskatchewanGeology, Vol. 18, No. 1, January pp. 14-18SaskatchewanProterozoic, Tectonics
DS1990-0202
1990
Van Schmus, W.R.Bickford, M.E., Collerson, K.D., Lewry, J.F., Van Schmus, W.R.Proterozoic collisional tectonism in the Trans-Hudson orogen SaskatchewanGeology, Vol. 18, No. 1, January pp. 14-18SaskatchewanTectonics, Craton, orogeny
DS1990-0345
1990
Van Schmus, W.R.Collerson, K.D., Lewry, J.F., Bickford, M.E., Van Schmus, W.R.Crustal evolution of the buried Precambrian of southern Saskatchewan:implications for diamond explorationModern Exploration Techniques, editors L.S. Beck, C.T. Harper, Saskatchewan, pp. 150-165SaskatchewanGeochronology, Alkaline rocks -potassic suites
DS1990-1498
1990
Van Schmus, W.R.Van Schmus, W.R., Martin, M.W., Sprowl, D.R., Geissman, J.Age, neodymium and lead isotopic composition and magnetic polarity for subsurface samples of the 1100 Ma midcontinent riftGeological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting, Abstracts, Vol. 22, No. 7, p. A174GlobalGeochronology, Geophysics -magnetics
DS1991-1659
1991
Van Schmus, W.R.Stern, R.J., Van Schmus, W.R.Crustal evolution in the Late ProterozoicPrecambrian Research, special issue, Vol. 53, No. 1/2, pp. 1-160Brazil, South America, Nova Scotia, Morocco, SudanCrustal evolution, Paleomagnetism
DS1991-1780
1991
Van Schmus, W.R.Van Schmus, W.R.Age and crustal history of the Midcontinent region in the United StatesEos, Spring Meeting Program And Abstracts, Vol. 72, No. 17, April 23, p. 297MidcontinentGeochronology, Crust
DS1992-1595
1992
Van Schmus, W.R.Van Schmus, W.R.Tectonic setting of the Midcontinent Rift systemTectonophysics, Vol. 213, No. 1-2, special issue, pp. 1-15.MidcontinentTectonics, Rift -overview
DS1992-1596
1992
Van Schmus, W.R.Van Schmus, W.R., Toteu, S.P.Were the Congo Craton and the Sao Francisco joined during the fusion ofGondwanalandEos Transactions, Vol. 73, No. 14, April 7, supplement abstracts p.365Brazil, Southern AfricaCraton, Supercontinent
DS1992-1681
1992
Van Schmus, W.R.Windom, K.E., Seifert, K.E., Van Schmus, W.R., Wallin, E.T.Archean and Proterozoic rocks from northwestern IowaGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstract Volume, Vol. 24, No. 4, April p. 71. abstract onlyIowaGeneral geology, Precambrian
DS1993-1745
1993
Van Schmus, W.R.Windom, K.E., Van Schmus, W.R., Seifert, K.E., Wallin, E.T., Anderson, R.R.Archean and Proterozoic tectono-magmatic activity along the southern Margin of the Superior Province in northwestern Iowa, United States.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 30, No. 6, June pp. 1275-1285.IowaTectonics
DS1994-1831
1994
Van Schmus, W.R.Van Schmus, W.R.Identification of lithospheric domains in northeast Brasil and relevance to the ancestry and assembly west Gondwana.International Symposium Upper Mantle, Aug. 14-19, 1994, Extended abstracts pp. 79-81.BrazilGondwanaland, Geodynamics
DS1996-1466
1996
Van Schmus, W.R.Van Schmus, W.R., Bickford, M.E., Turek, A.Proterozoic geology of the east central midcontinent basementGeological Society of America (GSA) Special Paper, No. 308, pp. 7-32.MidcontinentProterozoic geology
DS1999-0035
1999
Van Schmus, W.R.Babinski, M., Van Schmus, W.R., Chemale, F.lead lead dating and lead isotope geochemistry of Neoproterozoic carbonate rocks-Sao Francisco CratonChemical Geology, Vol. 160, No. 3, Aug. 10, pp. 175-201.BrazilTectonics, metamorphism
DS2000-0334
2000
Van Schmus, W.R.Geraldes, M.C., Van Schmus, W.R., Teixeria, W.Three parallel crystal accretionary arcs (1.79-1.3 Ga) in the southwest Amazon Craton, State of Mato Grosso Brasil.Igc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.Brazil, Mato GrossoGeochronology, Craton - alkaline magmatism
DS2002-0169
2002
Van Schmus, W.R.Bley de Brito Neves, B., Van Schmus, W.R., Fetter, A.Northwestern Africa North eastern Brasil. Major tectonic links and correlation problems.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol.34, No.3-4,April-May pp. 275-8.Brazil, AfricaTectonics
DS2002-1354
2002
Van Schmus, W.R.Rohs, C.R., Van Schmus, W.R.Continentl growth along the southern margin of Laurentia during Late Paleoproterozoic and early Meso16th. International Conference On Basement Tectonics '02, Abstracts, 1p., 1p.OklahomaTectonics
DS2003-1079
2003
Van Schmus, W.R.Pinho, M.A., Chemale, F., Van Schmus, W.R., Pinho, F.E.U Pb and Sm Nd evidence for 1.76 - 1.77 Ha magmatism in the Moriru region, MatoPrecambrian Research, Vol. 126, 1-2, pp. 1-25.BrazilCraton - geochronology
DS200412-0394
2004
Van Schmus, W.R.Da Silva Schmitt, R., Trouw, R.A.J., Van Schmus, W.R., Pimentel, M.M.Late amalgamation in the central part of West Gondwana: new geochronological dat a and the characterization of a Cambrian collisiPrecambrian Research, Vol. 133, 1-2, August 5, pp. 29-61.South America, BrazilGeochronology, metamorphism
DS200412-0405
2004
Van Schmus, W.R.Dantas, E.L., Van Schmus, W.R., Hackspacher, P.C., Fetter, A.H., De Brito Neves, B.B., Cordani, U., Nutman, A.The 3.4 3.5 Ga Sao Jose do Campestre Massif, NE Brazil: remnants of the oldest crust in South America.Precambrian Research, Vol. 130, 1-4, April 20, pp. 113-137.South America, BrazilGeochronology, Borborema
DS200412-1549
2003
Van Schmus, W.R.Pinho, M.A., Chemale, F., Van Schmus, W.R., Pinho, F.E.U Pb and Sm Nd evidence for 1.76 - 1.77 Ha magmatism in the Moriru region, Mato Grosso, Brazil: implications for province boundaPrecambrian Research, Vol. 126, 1-2, pp. 1-25.South America, BrazilCraton, geochronology
DS1989-1539
1989
Van Schmus. W.R.Van Schmus. W.R., Bickford, M.E., Anderson, R.R., Shearer, C.K.Quimby, Iowa scientific drill hole: definition of Precambrian crustal features in northwestern IowaGeology, Vol. 17, No. 6, June pp. 536-539IowaMidcontinent, Drilling
DS1997-1197
1997
Van Sickle, J.Van Sickle, J.GPS for land surveyorsEarth Observation Magazine books, $ 55.00GlobalBook - ad, GPS
DS200812-0553
2007
Van Soest, M.C.Kennedy, B.M., Van Soest, M.C.Flow of mantle fluids through the ductile lower crust: Helium isotope trends.Science, Vol. 318 No. 5855 Nov. 30, p. 1433-1436.MantleGeochronology
DS200412-1524
2004
Van Staal, C.Percival, J.A., Bleeker, W., Cook, E.A., Rivers, T., Ross, G., Van Staal, C.PanLithoprobe Workshop IV: intra orogen correlations and comparative orogenic anatomy.Geoscience Canada, Vol. 31, 1, pp. 23-39.Canada, United StatesTectonics, Precambrian, geochronology, orogens
DS1991-1781
1991
Van Staal, C.R.Van Staal, C.R., Fyffe, L.R.Dunnage and Gander zones, New Brunswick: Canadian Appalachian regionNew Brunswick Mineral Resources, Publishing No. GR91-2, 39p. $ 5.00New BrunswickTectonics, Dunnage Zone
DS1994-1832
1994
Van Staal, C.R.Van Staal, C.R.Brunswick subduction complex in the Canadian Appalachians: record of Late Ordovician to SilurianTectonics, Vol. 13, No. 4, August pp. 946-962New BrunswickSubduction complex, Laurentia and Gander margin
DS1999-0498
1999
Van Staal, C.R.Murphy, J.B., Van Staal, C.R., Keppie, J.D.Middle to late Paleozoic Acadian orogeny in the northern Appalachians: a Laramide style plume modifiedGeology, Vol. 27, No. 7, July pp. 653-6.AppalachiaLaramide Orogeny, Tectonics - plume
DS200612-0577
2006
Van Staal, C.R.Hibbard, J.P., Van Staal, C.R., Rankin, D.W., Williams, H.Lithotectonic map of the Appalachian orogen, Canada-United States of America.Geological Survey of Canada, Map 2096A 1: 1,500,000 $ 30.00Canada, United StatesMap - tectonics
DS200912-0867
2009
Van StadenZimmermann, U., Foruie, Naidoo, Van Staden, Chemalle, Nakamura, Koyayashi, Kosler, Beukes, Tait.Unroofing the Kalahari craton: provenance dat a from neoproterozoic to Paleozoic successions.Goldschmidt Conference 2009, p. A1536 Abstract.Africa, South AfricaTectonics
DS1988-0724
1988
Van Stall, C.R.Van Stall, C.R., Williams, P.F.Collision along an irregular margin: a regional plate tectonic interpretation of the Canadian Appalachians: discussionCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 25, No. 11, November pp. 1912-1916AppalachiaTectonics
DS200612-1467
2006
Van Straaten, B.Van Straaten, B., Kopylova, M., Russell, K., Webb, K., Scott Smith, B.Victor North pyroclastic kimberlite, Ontario: resource vs non-resource distinguished.Emplacement Workshop held September, 5p. abstractCanada, OntarioDeposit - Victor, geology, mineral compositions
DS200612-1468
2006
Van Straaten, B.Van Straaten, B., Kopylova, M., Russell, K., Webb, K., Scott Smith, B.Victor Northwest kimberlite pipe, Ontario: alternating volcaniclastic and apparent coherent extrusive rocks.Emplacement Workshop held September, 5p. abstractCanada, OntarioDeposit - Victor, pipe morphology, lithologies
DS200812-1206
2008
Van Straaten, B.I.Van Straaten, B.I., Kopylova, M.G., Russell, J.K., Webb, K.J., Scott Smith, B.H.Discrimination of a diamond resource and non-resource domains in the Victor North pyroclastic kimberlite, Canada.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, Vol. 174, 1-3, pp. 128-138.Canada, Ontario, AttawapiskatPetrography, fugacity, spinel group
DS201112-1079
2011
Van Straaten, B.I.Van Straaten, B.I.,Kopylova, M.G., Russeell, J.K., Scott Smith, B.H.A rare occurrence of a crater filling clastogenic extrusive coherent kimberlite, Victor Northwest, ( Ontario, Canada).Bulletin Volcanology, In press available, 18p.Canada, Ontario, AttawapiskatGeology - Victor Northwest
DS200912-0788
2009
Van Straaten, B.J.Van Straaten, B.J., Kopylova, M.G., Russell, J.K., Webb, K.J., Scott Smith, B.H.Stratigraphy of the intra crater volcaniclastic deposits of the Victor northwest kimberlite, northern Ontario, Canada.Lithos, In press - available 30p.Canada, Ontario, AttawapiskatDeposit - Victor
DS1985-0072
1985
Van straaten, J.Boppart, H., Van straaten, J., Silvera, I.F.Raman Spectra of Diamond at High PressuresPhysical Review B: Condensed Matter., Vol. 32, No. 2, JULY 15TH. PP. 1423-1425.GlobalBlank
DS1986-0828
1986
Van Straaten, P.Van Straaten, P.Some aspects of the geology of carbonatites in southwest TanzaniaGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting, Vol. 11, p. 140. (abstract.)Tanzania, East AfricaCarbonatite
DS1989-1540
1989
Van Straaten, P.Van Straaten, P.Nature and structural relationships of carbonatites from southwest and west TanzaniaCarbonatites -Genesis and Evolution, Ed. K. Bell Unwin Hyman Publ, pp. 177-199TanzaniaCarbonatite
DS1960-0220
1962
Van straten, O.J.Boocock, C., Van straten, O.J.Notes on the Geology and the Hydrogeology of the Central Kalahari Region, Bechuana land Protectorate.Geological Society of South Africa Transactions, Vol. 65, PP. 125-171.BotswanaGeology
DS201112-1080
2010
Van Stratten, B.Van Stratten, B.The eruption of kimberlite: insights from the Victor North kimberlite pipes, northern Ontario.University of British Columbia, Phd Thesis, 193p.Canada, Ontario, James bay Lowlands, AttawapiskatThesis - note availability based on request via author
DS200912-0789
2009
Van Stratten, B.I.Van Stratten, B.I., Kopylova, M.B., Russell, J.K., Scott Smith, B.H.Welded kimberlite?GAC/MAC/AGU Meeting held May 23-27 Toronto, Abstract onlyCanada, OntarioDeposit - Victor
DS201605-0852
2016
Van Strijp, T.Judeel, G., Swaneoel, T., Holder, A., Swarts, B., Van Strijp, T., Cloete, A.Extension of the Culli nan diamond mine No. 1 shaft underneath the existing operating shaft.Diamonds Still Sparkling SAIMM 2016 Conference, Mar. 14-17, pp. 301-316.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Cullinan
DS201605-0910
2016
Van Strijp, T.Tukker, H., Holder, A., Swarts, B., Van Strijp, T., Grober, E.The CCUT black cave design for the Culli nan diamond mine.Diamonds Still Sparkling SAIMM 2016 Conference, Mar. 14-17, pp. 57-70.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Cullinan
DS201605-0911
2016
Van Strijp, T.Tukker, H., Marsden, H., Holder, A., Swarts, B., Van Strijp, T., Grobler, E., Engelbrecht, F.Koffiefontein diamond mine sublevel cave design.Diamonds Still Sparkling SAIMM 2016 Conference, Mar. 14-17, pp. 129-142.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Koffiefontein
DS201605-0913
2016
Van Strijp, T.Van Strijp, T., Boshoff, P., du Toit, R.How the mining design evolved through stress and deformation modelling at Finsch diamond mine.Diamonds Still Sparkling SAIMM 2016 Conference, Mar. 14-17, pp. 251-262.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Finsch
DS201612-2308
2016
van Strijp, T.Judeel, G., Swanepoel, T., Holder, A., Swarts, B., van Strijp, T., Cloete, A.Extension of the Culli nan diamond mine no. 1 shaft underneath the existing operating shaft, with emphasis on rock engineering considerations.Journal of South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 116, Aug. pp. 745-753.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Cullinan

Abstract: In 2012, Cullinan Diamond Mine began an expansion programme with the shaft deepening and development of access to the C-Cut 1 block at approximately 839 m below surface. The expansion programme is funded by a combination of bank loans and retained operating profit generated by the mine. Continuous production during deepening of the No. 1 Shaft, which is the rock hoisting shaft, was therefore critical for sustainability and efficiency as well as overall funding of the project. The deepening method, support design and verification, as well as learning outcomes pertaining to the extension of the No. 1 Shaft underneath the existing operating shaft are summarized, with emphasis on the importance of gaining some understanding of the shaft's host rock mass.
DS201709-2007
2016
van Strijp, T.Judeel, G., Swanepoel, T., Holder, A., Swarts, B., van Strijp, T., Cloete, A.Extension of the Culli nan diamond mine No. 1 shaft underneath the existing operating shaft, with emphasis on rock engineering considerations.South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 116, 8, pp. 745-752.Africa, South Africadeposit - Cullinan

Abstract: In 2012, Cullinan Diamond Mine began an expansion programme with the shaft deepening and development of access to the C-Cut 1 block at approximately 839 m below surface. The expansion programme is funded by a combination of bank loans and retained operating profit generated by the mine. Continuous production during deepening of the No. 1 Shaft, which is the rock hoisting shaft, was therefore critical for sustainability and efficiency as well as overall funding of the project. The deepening method, support design and verification, as well as learning outcomes pertaining to the extension of the No. 1 Shaft underneath the existing operating shaft are summarized, with emphasis on the importance of gaining some understanding of the shaft's host rock mass.
DS201709-2066
2016
van Strijp, T.Tukker, H., Holder, A., Swarts, B., van Strijp, T., Grobler, E.The CCUT block cave design for Culli nan diamond mine.South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 116, 8, pp. 715-723.Africa, South Africadeposit - Cullinan
DS200912-0790
2009
Van Summeren, J.R.Van Summeren, J.R., Vandenberg, A.P., Van der Hilst, R.D.Upwellings from a deep mantle reservoir filtered at the 660 km phase transition in thermochemical convection models and implications for intra-plate volcanism.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 172, 3-4, pp. 210-224.MantleGeothermometry
DS1990-1499
1990
Van Tendeloo, G.Van Tendeloo, G., Luyten, W., Woods, G.S.Voidites in pure type 1AB diamondsPhilosophical Magazine Letters, Vol. 61, No. 6, June pp. 343-348GlobalExperimental mineralogy, Diamond morphology -Type IAB.
DS200612-1469
2005
Van Thielen, P.Van Thielen, P., VanSummeren, J., VanderHilst, R.D., VandenBerg, A.P., Vlaar, N.J.Numerical study of the origin and stability of chemically distinct reservoirs deep in the Earth's mantle.American Geophysical Union, Geophysical Monograph, Ed. Van der Hilst, Earth's Deep Mantle, structure ...., No. 160, pp. 117-136.MantleGeochemistry
DS200512-1124
2004
Van Thiemen, P.Van Thiemen, P., Van den Berg, A.P., Vlaar, N.J.On the formation of continental silicic melts in thermochemical mantle convection models: implications for early Earth.Tectonophysics, Vol. 394, 1-2, pp. 111-138.MantleGeothermometry
DS2001-0651
2001
Van ToanLan, C.Y., Chung, S.L., Lo, Lee, Wang, Li, Van ToanFirst evidence for Archean continental crust in northern Vietnam and its implications for crustal ...Geology, Vol. 29, No. 3, Mar. pp.219-22.GlobalTectonic evolution, Geochronology, Yangtze Craton
DS201605-0859
2016
Van Tongeren, J.A.Levin, V., Van Tongeren, J.A., Servali, A.How sharp is the sharp Archean Moho? Example from eastern Superior Province.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 43, 5, pp. 1928-1933.Canada, OntarioGeophysics - seismics

Abstract: The Superior Province of North America has not experienced major internal deformation for nearly 2.8?Gyr, preserving the Archean crust in its likely original state. We present seismological evidence for a sharp (less than 1?km) crust-mantle boundary beneath three distinct Archean terranes and for a more vertically extensive boundary at sites likely affected by the 1.2-0.9?Ga Grenville orogeny. At all sites crustal thickness is smaller than expected for the primary crust produced by melting under higher mantle potential temperature conditions of Archean time. Reduced thickness and an abrupt contrast in seismic properties at the base of the undisturbed Archean crust are consistent with density sorting and loss of the residues through gravitational instability facilitated by higher temperatures in the upper mantle at the time of formation. Similar sharpness of crust-mantle boundary in disparate Archean terranes suggests that it is a universal feature of the Archean crustal evolution.
DS201811-2565
2018
Van Tongeren, J.A.Dasgupta, R., Van Tongeren, J.A., Watson, E.B., Ghiorso, M.Volatile bearing partial