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SDLRC - Scientific Articles all years by Author - Kr+


The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation
The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation is compiled by Patricia Sheahan who publishes on a monthly basis a list of new scientific articles related to diamonds as well as media coverage and corporate announcementscalled the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service that is distributed as a free pdf to a list of followers. Pat has kindly agreed to allow her work to be made available as an online digital resource at Kaiser Research Online so that a broader community interested in diamonds and related geology can benefit. The references are for personal use information purposes only; when available a link is provided to an online location where the full article can be accessed or purchased directly. Reproduction of this compilation in part or in whole without permission from the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is strictly prohibited. Return to Diamond Resource Center
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Media/Corporate References by Name for all years
A B C D-Diam Diamonds Diamr+ E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Tips for Users
Posted/Published Reference CodesThe SDLRC provides 3 types of references identified in the reference code. DS for scientific article, DM for a media article, and DC for a corporate announcement. Consider DS0512-0001. The DS stands for "diamond scientific". 05 stands for 2005, the year the reference was posted. 12 represents the month the reference was posted. For all years prior to 2015 the default month is 12. -0001 is the reference's identifier and it does not mean anything. The number below the refence code, ie 2015, is the year the article was published. Note that the posted year may sometimes be later than the published year.
Sort OrderReferences are sorted by the "author" name and when the reference was posted to the compilation.
Most RecentIf the reference code is highlighted yellow, the reference was made available through the most recent monthly compilation of new literature. Use this to check out new references. When new references are posted, we make it our priority to track down an online link and obtain an abstract. With regard to older references, tracking down an abstract and an online link is a work in progress.
Link to external location of article: If the title has a link, it means we have found a location online where you can either retrieve the full article free, or purchase access to it. The Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is not a technical article procurement service; if you want a restricted article, you must deal directly with the vendor who controls the copyright to the article.
Searching this page for a specific term or authorIn your Firefox browser click Edit in the menu bar and then Find. In the Find box that shows up at the bottom of the web page enter your search term. Firefox will highlight all occurrences. This is particularly helpful when the author you are seeking was not the lead author by whom the compilation is sorted.
Sending or sharing a referenceThe left column (Posted/Published) has an embedded hyperlink for each reference. In Firefox, if you right click on it, you can obtain the link url for that reference's location within the page, which you can copy and paste into an email or any other document. You can also use the "share this link" option to tweet, facebook etc the link.
Author Index
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years - Kr+
Posted/
Published
AuthorTitleSourceRegionKeywords
DS1992-1526
1992
Kra, R.S.Taylor, R.E., Long, A., Kra, R.S.Radiocarbon after four decadesSpringer Verlag, 616pGlobalBook -ad, Radiocarbon, age determination, age dating
DS201212-0745
2012
Kraal, E.Van Dijk, M., Kleinhans, M.G., Postma, G., Kraal, E.Contrasting morphodynamics in alluvial fans and fan deltas: effect of the Down stream boundary.Sedimentology, in press availableGlobalGeomorphology
DS201212-0746
2012
Kraal, E.Van Dijk, M., Kleinhans, M.G., Postma, G., Kraal, E.Contrasting morphodynamics in alluvial fans and fan deltas: effect of the Down stream boundary.Sedimentology, Vol. 59, 7, Dec. pp. 2125-2145.TechnologyGeomorphology - fans
DS1998-0800
1998
Krabbendam, M.Krabbendam, M.Sites of rifting of Gondwana and the relative importance of hot spots and pre-existing structures.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, 1A, p. 127. AbstractGondwanaPlumes, Tectonics
DS2000-0532
2000
Krabbendam, M.Krabbendam, M., Barr, T.D.Proterozoic orogens and the break-up of Gondwana: why did some orogens notrift?Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol.31, No.1, July, pp.35-49.GondwanaRifting, hot spots, orogeny, Tectonics
DS200712-0157
2007
Krabbendam, M.Cawood, P.A., Nemchin, A.A., Strachan, R., Prave, T., Krabbendam, M.Sedimentary basin and detrital zircon record along East Laurentia and Baltica during assembly and breakup of Rodinia.Journal of the Geological Society, Vol. 164, pp. 257-275.Gondwana, Rodinia, BalticaRift basins
DS1991-0940
1991
Kracher, A.Kurat, G., Embeyisz.., A., Kracher, A., Scharber, H.G.The upper mantle beneath Kapenstein and the Transdanubian volcanic E. Austria and W. Hungary - a comparisonMineral. Petrol, Vol. 44, No. 1-2, pp. 21-38Austria, HungaryMantle, Volcanics
DS201909-2022
2019
Kraemer, D.Benaouda, R., Kraemer, D., Sitnikova, M., Goldmann, S., Freitag, R., Bouali, A., Mouttaqi, A., El Haloui, R., Essaadaoui, M., Bau, M.Thorium-poor monazite and columbite-(Fe) mineralization in the Gleibat Lafhouda carbonatite and its associated iron-oxide-apatite deposit of the Ouled Dlim Massif, South Morocco.Gondwana Research, Vol. 77, pp. 19-39.Africa, MoroccoREE

Abstract: Recent exploration work in South Morocco revealed the occurrence of several carbonatite bodies, including the Paleoproterozoic Gleibat Lafhouda magnesiocarbonatite and its associated iron oxide mineralization, recognized here as iron-oxide-apatite (IOA) deposit type. The Gleibat Lafhouda intrusion is hosted by Archean gneiss and schist and not visibly associated with alkaline rocks. Metasomatized micaceous rocks occur locally at the margins of the carbonatite outcrop and were identified as glimmerite fenite type. Rare earth element (REE) and Nb mineralization is mainly linked to the associated IOA mineralization and is represented by monazite-(Ce) and columbite-(Fe) as major ore minerals. The IOA mineralization mainly consists of magnetite and hematite that usually contain large apatite crystals, quartz and some dolomite. Monazite-(Ce) is closely associated with fluorapatite and occurs as inclusions within the altered parts of apatite and along cracks or as separate phases near apatite. Monazite shows no zonation patterns and very low Th contents (<0.4?wt%), which would be beneficial for commercial extraction of the REE and which indicates monazite formation from apatite as a result of hydrothermal volatile-rich fluids. Similar monazite-apatite mineralization and chemistry also occurs at depth within the carbonatite, although the outcropping carbonatite is barren, suggesting an irregular REE ore distribution within the carbonatite body. The barren carbonatite contains some tiny unidentified secondary Nb-Ta-U phases, synchysite and monazite. Niobium mineralization is commonly represented by anhedral minerals of columbite-(Fe) which occur closely associated with magnetite-hematite and host up to 78?wt% Nb2O5, 7?wt% Ta2O5 and 1.6?wt% Sc2O3. This association may suggest that columbite-(Fe) precipitated by an interaction of Nb-rich fluids with pre-existing Fe-rich minerals or as pseudomorphs after pre-existing Nb minerals like pyrochlore. Our results most strongly suggest that the studied mineralization is economically important and warrants both, further research and exploration with the ultimate goal of mineral extraction.
DS201911-2511
2019
Kraemer, D.Benaouda, R., Kraemer, D., Sitnikova, M., Goldmann, S., Bau, M.Thorium poor monzonite and columbite (Fe) mineralization in the Giebat Lafhouda carbonatite and its associated iron-oxide deposit of the Ouled Dlim Massif, south Morocco.Gondwana Research, Vol. 77, pp. 19-39.Africa, Moroccocarbonatite

Abstract: Recent exploration work in South Morocco revealed the occurrence of several carbonatite bodies, including the Paleoproterozoic Gleibat Lafhouda magnesiocarbonatite and its associated iron oxide mineralization, recognized here as iron-oxide-apatite (IOA) deposit type. The Gleibat Lafhouda intrusion is hosted by Archean gneiss and schist and not visibly associated with alkaline rocks. Metasomatized micaceous rocks occur locally at the margins of the carbonatite outcrop and were identified as glimmerite fenite type. Rare earth element (REE) and Nb mineralization is mainly linked to the associated IOA mineralization and is represented by monazite-(Ce) and columbite-(Fe) as major ore minerals. The IOA mineralization mainly consists of magnetite and hematite that usually contain large apatite crystals, quartz and some dolomite. Monazite-(Ce) is closely associated with fluorapatite and occurs as inclusions within the altered parts of apatite and along cracks or as separate phases near apatite. Monazite shows no zonation patterns and very low Th contents (<0.4?wt%), which would be beneficial for commercial extraction of the REE and which indicates monazite formation from apatite as a result of hydrothermal volatile-rich fluids. Similar monazite-apatite mineralization and chemistry also occurs at depth within the carbonatite, although the outcropping carbonatite is barren, suggesting an irregular REE ore distribution within the carbonatite body. The barren carbonatite contains some tiny unidentified secondary Nb-Ta-U phases, synchysite and monazite. Niobium mineralization is commonly represented by anhedral minerals of columbite-(Fe) which occur closely associated with magnetite-hematite and host up to 78?wt% Nb2O5, 7?wt% Ta2O5 and 1.6?wt% Sc2O3. This association may suggest that columbite-(Fe) precipitated by an interaction of Nb-rich fluids with pre-existing Fe-rich minerals or as pseudomorphs after pre-existing Nb minerals like pyrochlore. Our results most strongly suggest that the studied mineralization is economically important and warrants both, further research and exploration with the ultimate goal of mineral extraction.
DS202008-1369
2020
Kraemer, D.Benoaouda, R., Kraemer, D., Sitnikova, M., Goldmann, S., Schwarz-Schampera, U., Errami, A., Mouttaqi, A., Bau, M.Discovery of high grade REE-Nb-Fe mineralization associated with calcio-carbonatite in south Morocco.Ore Geology Reviews, in press available, 43p. PdfAfrica, Moroccocarbonatite

Abstract: The recently discovered REE and Nb mineralization in the Twihinat area in the western part of the Oulad Dlim Massif (Adrar Souttouf) in South Morocco is linked to a Cretaceous calciocarbonatite intrusion which was likely formed in an intracontinental rift setting and crops out locally within a ring structure that mainly consists of massive Fe-oxide mineralization and silica breccia. The carbonatite shows intensively metasomatized zones, which contain bastnaesite and pyrochlore-group minerals as the main REE and Nb ore minerals. They are usually associated with apatite, quartz and Fe-oxides, or trapped in calcite voids, suggesting a secondary ore formation. Within the associated Fe-oxide mineralization, pyrochlore and monazite-(Ce) are the main ore minerals occurring closely associated with quartz and magnetite or hematite. The silica breccia also shows significant subsequent infill of barite, bastnaesite-(Ce) and hydrated ceriopyrochlore, which was identified by EPMA and Raman spectroscopy. Bastnaesite commonly forms prismatic aggregates whereas pyrochlore and ceriopyrochlore usually display subhedral grains along tiny fractures. Structural and textural relationships clearly indicate epigenetic ore formation induced by multiple stages of hydrothermal fluid flow and fracturing. Ore precipitation likely resulted from interaction between low-pH mineralizing hydrothermal fluids and the wall-rock. The latter efficiently buffered the acidity of the fluids and allowed significant amounts of REE and Nb ore minerals to precipitate. Trace element ICP-MS analyses show very high REE and Nb concentrations of up to 0.76 wt% SREE and 0.21 wt% Nb in carbonatite and up to 3 wt% SREE and 1.3 wt% Nb in the associated silica and Fe-oxide mineralization. The results clearly demonstrate that the Twihinat REE-Nb deposits are significant and represent a potential new high-grade resource for these critical metals.
DS1989-0827
1989
Krafft, M.Krafft, M., Keller, J.Temperature measurements in carbonatite lava lakes and flows from OldoinyoLengai, TanzaniaScience, Vol. 245, No. 4914, July 14, pp. 168-170TanzaniaCarbonatite-lava
DS201809-2051
2018
Kraft, H.A.Kraft, H.A., Vinnik, L., Thybo, H.Mantle transition zone beneath central eastern Greenland: possible evidence for a deep tectonosphere from receiver functions.Tectonophysics, Vol. 728, 1, pp. 34-40.Europe, Greenlandgeophysics - seismic

Abstract: We investigate the mantle of central-eastern Greenland by using recordings with data from 24 local broad-band seismograph stations. We apply P wave receiver function technique and evaluate the difference in the arrival times of seismic phases that are formed by P to SV mode conversion at the 410-km and 660-km seismic discontinuities. These boundaries mark the top and bottom of the mantle transition zone (MTZ). The difference in the arrival time of the phases from the 410-km and 660-km discontinuities is sensitive to the thickness of the MTZ and relatively insensitive to volumetric velocity anomalies above the 410-km discontinuity. Near the east coast of Greenland in the region of the Skaergaard basalt intrusions we find two regions where the differential time is reduced by more than 2 s. The 410-km discontinuity in these regions is depressed by more than 20 km. The depression may be explained by a temperature elevation of 150 °C. We hypothesize that the basaltic intrusions and the temperature anomalies at a depth of 400 km are, at least partly, effects of the passage of Greenland over the Iceland hotspot at about 55 Ma. This explanation is consistent with the concept of tectosphere and implies that the upper mantle to a depth of 400 km translates coherently with the Greenland plate.
DS1930-0196
1935
Krahmann, R.Krahmann, R.Report on the Results of Magnetic Surveys Over a Kimberlite pipe in the Southwest Transvaal.Mining And Metallurgy, No. 342.South Africa, TransvaalKimberlite, Geophysics
DS1988-0372
1988
Krahmann, R.Krahmann, R.Magnetometric survey of a kimberlite pipe in SouthwesternTransvaal.Archive - briefGeoBulletin, Vol. 31, No. 1, pp. 32-33South AfricaBlank
DS1995-1015
1995
Krajeck, K.Krajeck, K.Digging frozen carats... a diamond rush is on in the ArcticNewsweek, August 21, pp. 36-37.Northwest TerritoriesNews item, BHP Dia Met
DS1991-0569
1991
Krajewski, S.Gibbs, B., Krajewski, S.Directory of mining programs and public domain software for earthGibbs Associates, Directory $ 75.00 United States Software handbook $ 25.00 United StatesGlobalComputer, Program -directory
DS1991-0570
1991
Krajewski, S.Gibbs, B., Krajewski, S.Public domain software for earth scientists: handbook of public domain and inexpensive softwareGibbs and Associates, 189p. $ 40.00United StatesComputer programs, Lists
DS1990-0884
1990
Krajewski, S.A.Krajewski, S.A.Creating geologic databasesComputers and Mining, Vol. 6, No. 2, October pp. 1-6GlobalOverview of database requirements, Database
DS1991-0571
1991
Krajewski, S.A.Gibbs, B., Krajewski, S.A.Workshop attendees compare ore modeling and mine planning softwaresystemsMining Engineering, Vol. 43, No. 7, July pp. 732-737GlobalGeostatistics, Computer -programs for ore modeling comparisons
DS1992-0564
1992
Krajewski, S.A.Gibbs, B.L., Krajewski, S.A.Surface and underground mine modelling with computersMining Engineering, Vol. 44, No. 7, July pp. 689-693GlobalComputers, Program -Mine modelling
DS1994-0944
1994
Krajewski, S.A.Krajewski, S.A., Gibbs, B.L.Computers contouring generates artifactsGeotimes, Vol. 39, No. 4, April pp. 15-19GlobalComputer programs, Applications - artifacts
DS1994-0945
1994
Krajick, K.Krajick, K.The great Canadian diamond rushDiscovery, Vol. 15, No. 12, December pp. 70-79.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDiamond exploration overview
DS2001-0630
2001
Krajick, K.Krajick, K.Barren Lands: an epic search for diamonds in the North American ArcticW.h. Freeman Pub., ISBN 0-7167-4026-5Northwest TerritoriesBook - history
DS1995-1016
1995
Krajick, S.Krajick, S.The rich barrens... mining threatens Canada's Northwest TerritoriesAudubon, Jan-Feb. pp. 18, 20, 21.Northwest TerritoriesEnvironmental, Mining
DS1993-0848
1993
Kral, S.Kral, S.Risk assessment/management in the environmental planning of MinesMining Engineering, Vol. 45, No. 2, February pp. 151-154United StatesEconomics, Environmental, legal
DS1997-0627
1997
Kral, S.Kral, S.Mining industry beginning to rediscover AlaskaMining Engineering, Vol. 49, No. 1, Jan. pp. 45-50AlaskaMining, Review
DS1997-0628
1997
Kral, S.Kral, S.Minerals processing meeting focuses on commoditiesMining Engineering, Vol. 49. No. 8, August p. 51-56GlobalEconomics, bismuth, silver, gold, diamonds
DS1997-0629
1997
Kral, S.Kral, S.Two page extract on diamonds and demand... from overview on commodities conference held Denver May.Mining Engineering, Vol. 49, No. 8, August pp. 54-55.GlobalEconomics, Diamond demand and supply
DS1998-0801
1998
Kral, S.Kral, S.Argentin a seeks foreign investment for its mining industryMining Eng, Vol. 50, No. 3, March pp. 55-58ArgentinaEconomics, Mining - projects
DS1998-0802
1998
Kral, S.Kral, S.Risk management important to miningMining Eng, Vol. 50, No. 3, March pp. 59-60Brazil, ChinaEconomics, discoveries, success, Mining - privitization
DS1998-0803
1998
Kral, S.Kral, S.MEMS meeting focuses on economic globalization of mining ( Mineral Economics and Management Society)Mining Eng, Vol. 50, No. 10, Oct. pp. 56-60GlobalMining - technology, Markets, finance, economics, discoveries, success
DS2001-0613
2001
KramaskovKlishin, V.I., Sher, E.N., Kramaskov, Vlasov, BasheevUnderground mining of kimberlite pipes under alluviaJournal of Mining Science, Vol.37,4,pp. 421-6.RussiaMining
DS201809-2036
2018
Krambock, K.Hoover, D.B., Karfunkel, J., Walde, D., Moraes, R.A.V., Michelfelder, G., Henger, F.E., Ribeira, L.C., Krambock, K.The Alto Paranaiba region, Brazil: a continuing source for pink diamonds?The Australian Gemmologist, Vol. 26, 9-10, pp. 196-204.South America, Brazildeposit - Alto Paranaiba
DS201510-1788
2015
Krambrock, K.Michelfelder, G.S., Karfunkel, J., Fernandes, A.F., Sgarbi, N.C., Hoover, D.B., Krambrock, K., Walde, D.Surface source of Coromandel diamonds ( Minas Gerais State), Brazil) and their possible origin from the Serra Negra/Salitre supervolcano.GSA Annual Meeting, Paper 300-1, 1p. Abstract only BoothSouth America, Brazil, Minas GeraisDeposit - Coromandel

Abstract: The origin of diamonds in the Coromandel area has been an enigma for many years, in spite of high investment in conventional and high tech prospecting methods by major mining companies for over half a century. The authors review the history, and then discuss the two principal hypotheses to explain the source of these alluvial diamonds. After mapping the headwater region of one of the richest alluvial diamond rivers, the Santo Antônio do Bonito River, they reject both principal hypotheses and conclude that the surficial source can be only the Upper Cretaceous Capacete Formation, composed of pyroclastics and epiclastics. Based on geophysical data from the literature, combined with field observations the authors suggest that the largest alkaline complex, situated within the diamond producing area, the Serra Negra/Salitre Complex has been the primary source for those pyroclastics of the Capacete Formation and the diamonds. The plugs of this complex are 15-30 times deeper than average kimberlites and other alkaline complexes in the region, and its excess of volume of the intrusive is three orders of magnitude larger than a typical kimberlite. With an intrusive volume of over 1000 km3 the complex is suggested to be a possible supervolcano. This explains the vast areal distribution of the pyroclastics and diamonds. This new hypothesis has advantages and disadvantages, some of them discussed in the paper and leading to the conclusion that further research is needed.
DS201710-2233
2017
Krambrock, K.Hoover, D.B., Karfunkel, J., Ribeiro, L.C.B., Michelfelder, G.., Moraes, R.A.V., Krambrock, K., Quintao, D., Walde, D.Diamonds of the Alto Paranaiba, Brazil: Nixon's prediction verified?The Australian Gemmologist, Vol. 26, 5&6, pp. 88-99.South America, Brazil, Minas Geraisdeposit - Alto Paranaiba

Abstract: The authors, in a paper in this journal in 2009, note a puzzle, that in spite of extensive exploration for diamonds by major producers in the Alto Paranaiba region of West Minas Gerais State, Brazil, no primary source, such as kimberlites, for the many diamonds produced since their discovery over 250 years has been found. To answer this puzzle we propose that the diamonds are present within a large extrusive volcanic unit probably derived from the Serra Negra alkaline-carbonatitic complex which comprises a super volcano. This origin fits with the 1995 prediction of Nixon on the future direction of diamona-exploration that extrusive units may contain very large volumes of ore, and that carbonatitic emplacement sources need to be considered. The authors argue, based on available evidence from geology and geophysics, that such an origin is compatible with the known data, but that much additional information is needed to substantiate these ideas. Diamonds of the Alto Paraniaba, Brazil: Nixon's prediction verified?
DS201112-0734
2010
Krambrock, K.W.H.Newman, J.A., Teixeira Carvalho de Newman, D., Gandini, A.L., Souza Gomes, N., Krambrock, K.W.H., Pimenta, M.A.Caracterizacao mineralogica dos diamantes policristalinos (carbonados) da regiao de Santa Elena de Uairen, estado Bolivar, Venezuela.5th Brasilian Symposium on Diamond Geology, Nov. 6-12, abstract p. 46-47.South America, VenezuelaCarbonado
DS1985-0366
1985
Kramer, E.Kramer, H., Seifert, W., Kramer, E., Volger, P.Regional variability of peridotitic xenolith associations of the Saxothuringian zone and substantial differentiation of The upper mantle.(in German)Gerl. Beitr., (in German), Vol. 94, No. 4-6, pp. 308-326GermanyMantle
DS1985-0366
1985
Kramer, H.Kramer, H., Seifert, W., Kramer, E., Volger, P.Regional variability of peridotitic xenolith associations of the Saxothuringian zone and substantial differentiation of The upper mantle.(in German)Gerl. Beitr., (in German), Vol. 94, No. 4-6, pp. 308-326GermanyMantle
DS1975-0629
1977
Kramer, M.Stauder, W., Kramer, M., Fischer, G., Schaeffer, S., Morrissey.Seismic Characteristics of Southeast Missouri As Indicated By a Regional Telemetered Microearthquake Array.Seismol. Soc. American Bulletin., Vol. 66, PP. 1953-1964.GlobalMid Continent
DS1988-0373
1988
Kramer, M.J.Kramer, M.J.GENPLOT: a formula based Pascal program for dat a manipulationandplottingComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 14, No. 5, pp. 645-658. Database # 17355GlobalComputers, Program - GENPLOT.
DS201602-0215
2016
Kramer, S.C.Jones, T.D., Davies, D.R., Campbell, I.H., Wilson, C.R., Kramer, S.C.Do mantle plumes preserve the heterogeneous structure of their deep mantle source?Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 434, pp. 10-17.MantleTectonics

Abstract: It has been proposed that the spatial variations recorded in the geochemistry of hotspot lavas, such as the bilateral asymmetry recorded at Hawaii, can be directly mapped as the heterogeneous structure and composition of their deep-mantle source. This would imply that source-region heterogeneities are transported into, and preserved within, a plume conduit, as the plume rises from the deep-mantle to Earth's surface. Previous laboratory and numerical studies, which neglect density and rheological variations between different chemical components, support this view. However, in this paper, we demonstrate that this interpretation cannot be extended to distinct chemical domains that differ from surrounding mantle in their density and viscosity. By numerically simulating thermo-chemical mantle plumes across a broad parameter space, in 2-D and 3-D, we identify two conduit structures: (i) bilaterally asymmetric conduits, which occur exclusively for cases where the chemical effect on buoyancy is negligible, in which the spatial distribution of deep-mantle heterogeneities is preserved during plume ascent; and (ii) concentric conduits, which occur for all other cases, with dense material preferentially sampled within the conduit's centre. In the latter regime, the spatial distribution of geochemical domains in the lowermost mantle is not preserved during plume ascent. Our results imply that the heterogeneous structure and composition of Earth's lowermost mantle can only be mapped from geochemical observations at Earth's surface if chemical heterogeneity is a passive component of lowermost mantle dynamics (i.e. its effect on density is outweighed by, or is secondary to, the effect of temperature). The implications of our results for: (i) why oceanic crust should be the prevalent component of ocean island basalts; and (ii) how we interpret the geochemical evolution of Earth's deep-mantle are also discussed.
DS201911-2517
2019
Kramer, S.C.Davies, D.R., Valentine, A.P., Kramer, S.C., Rawlinson, N., Hoggard, M.J., Eakin, C.M., Wilson, C.R.Earth's multi-scale topographic response to global mantle flow.Nature Geosciences, Vol. 12, pp. 845-850.Mantlegeodynamics

Abstract: Earth’s surface topography is a direct physical expression of our planet’s dynamics. Most is isostatic, controlled by thickness and density variations within the crust and lithosphere, but a substantial proportion arises from forces exerted by underlying mantle convection. This dynamic topography directly connects the evolution of surface environments to Earth’s deep interior, but predictions from mantle flow simulations are often inconsistent with inferences from the geological record, with little consensus about its spatial pattern, wavelength and amplitude. Here, we demonstrate that previous comparisons between predictive models and observational constraints have been biased by subjective choices. Using measurements of residual topography beneath the oceans, and a hierarchical Bayesian approach to performing spherical harmonic analyses, we generate a robust estimate of Earth’s oceanic residual topography power spectrum. This indicates water-loaded power of 0.5?±?0.35?km2 and peak amplitudes of up to ~0.8?±?0.1?km at long wavelengths (~104?km), decreasing by roughly one order of magnitude at shorter wavelengths (~103?km). We show that geodynamical simulations can be reconciled with observational constraints only if they incorporate lithospheric structure and its impact on mantle flow. This demonstrates that both deep (long-wavelength) and shallow (shorter-wavelength) processes are crucial, and implies that dynamic topography is intimately connected to the structure and evolution of Earth’s lithosphere.
DS1984-0430
1984
Kramer, W.Kramer, W., Seifert, W.Xenolithe, Lamprophyre und Kruste Mantel BeziehungenFreiberger Forshungshefte Geowissen. Min. Geochem., Vol. C389, No. 2, PP. 38-49.GermanyInclusions, Rare Earth Elements (ree), Geochemistry
DS1994-0946
1994
Kramer, W.Kramer, W., Seifert, W.Mica -lamprophyres and related volcanics of the Erzgebirge and metallogenicaspects.Seltman, Metallogeny Collisional Orogens, pp. 159-165.Europe, GermanyLamprophyres
DS2002-0478
2002
Kramer, W.Franz, L., Becker, K.P., Kramer, W., Herzig, P.M.Metasomatic mantle xenoliths from the Bismarck microplate - thermal evolution, geochemistry...Journal of Petrology, Vol. 43, No. 2, pp. 315-44.Papua New GuineaSlab induced metasomatism - not specific to diamond, Xenoliths
DS2003-1246
2003
Kramer, W.Seifert, W., Kramer, W.Accessory titanite: an important carrier of zirconium in lamprophyresLithos, Vol. 71, 1, Nov. pp. 81-98.GermanyKersantite, minette
DS200412-1782
2003
Kramer, W.Seifert, W., Kramer, W.Accessory titanite: an important carrier of zirconium in lamprophyres.Lithos, Vol. 71, 1, Nov. pp. 81-98.Europe, GermanyKersantite, minette
DS201709-1982
2017
Kramers, J.Elburg, M.A., Andersen, T., Mahlaku, S.M., Cawthorn, R.G., Kramers, J.A potassic magma series in the Pilanesberg alkaline complex.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Africa, South Africaalkaline rocks

Abstract: The Pilanesberg Alkaline Complex (South Africa) consists of a partially eroded phonolitic-trachytic package of lavas and tuffs, intruded by consanguinous syenites and nepheline syenites (foyaites). The latter have been divided in several units, based on their colour and mineralogy. Most of the foyaitic units are sodic in composition, but whole rock analyses show that some samples are more potassic, with Na2O/K2O<0.8. This observation, together with old reports of leucite-bearing lavas [1], could suggest the existence of a second, potassic magmatic lineage. To investigate whether the observed potassium-enrichment is a primary feature, or the result of deuteric alteration, the mineralogical distinction between sodic and potassic samples was investigated. The mineralogy of the sodic samples is dominated by nepheline, alkali-feldspar and aegirine, ± titanite, amphibole, biotite, and late agpaitic phases [2]. Within the potassic samples, the main primary ferromagnesian mineral is biotite, which shows conspicuous zoning in thin section; nepheline has been extensively replaced by sodalite and cancrinite, but alkali-feldspar appears relatively unaltered. No agpaitic minerals were observed. U-Pb isotope systematics of titanite are similar for sodic and potassic samples in terms of the age (ca. 1.4 Ga) and composion of common Pb; Ar-Ar dating of biotite also gives ca. 1.4 Ga, showing that biotite is a primary magmatic phase. Compositions of the biotite in sodic and potassic samples are similar, with the sodic samples having slightly higher Fe# (independent of whole rock Fe#), higher Na, but lower (Na+K) and Ba. Zoning in biotite from potassic samples is related to a decrease in Mg, Ti and F in the rim of the crystals. Despite the primary character of the biotite, the question whether the potassic samples reflect a combination of alteration and perhaps minor crustal contamination, or a separate mag
DS1975-0545
1977
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D.Lead and Strontium Isotopes in Inclusions in Diamonds and In Mantle Derived Xenoliths from Southern Africa.Proceedings of Second International Kimberlite Conference, EXTENDED ABSTRACT VOLUME.South AfricaIsotope
DS1975-0546
1977
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D.Lead and Strontium Isotopes in Cretaceous Kimberlites and Mantle Derived Xenoliths from Southern Africa.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 34, No. 3, PP. 419-431.South AfricaIsotope
DS1975-1104
1979
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D.Lead, Uranium, Strontium, Potassium and Rubidium in Inclusion-bearing Diamonds and Mantle Derived Xenoliths from Southern Africa.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 42, No. 1, PP. 58-70.South AfricaPetrography
DS1980-0194
1980
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D., Roddick, J.C.Isotopic and Trace Element Studies on Vein Fillings and Metasomatic Zones in the Mantle: Xenoliths from Bultfontein Kimberlite, South Africa.Eos, Vol. 61, No. 17, P. 414. (abstract.).South AfricaIsotope
DS1981-0252
1981
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D., Smith, C.B., et al.Can Kimberlites Be Generated from an Ordinary Mantle?Nature., Vol. 291, No. 5810, PP. 53-56.GlobalKimberlite, Genesis
DS1981-0253
1981
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D., Smith, C.B., Lock, N.P., et al.Can Kimberlites Be Generated from an Ordinary MantleNature., Vol. 291, No. 5810, MAY 7, PP. 53-56.GlobalKimberlite, Genesis
DS1983-0374
1983
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D., Roddick, J.C.M., Dawson, J.B.Trace Element and Isotope Studies on Veined Metasomatic And marid Xenoliths from Bultfontein South Africa.Earth Plan. Sci. Letters, Vol. 65, No. 1, OCTOBER, PP. 90-106.South AfricaIsotope, Rare Earth Elements (ree)
DS1983-0375
1983
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D., Smith, C.B.A Feasibility Study of Uranium-lead and Lead-lead Dating of Kimberlites using Groundmass Mineral Fractions and Whole Rock Samples.Isotope Geology, Vol. 1, No. 1, PP. 23-38.South AfricaKimberley, De Beers, Bultfontein, Wesselton, Dutoitspan
DS1986-0016
1986
Kramers, J.D.Allsopp, H.L., Smith, C.B., Bristow, J.W., Brown, R., Kramers, J.D.A review of radiometric dating methods applicable to kimberlites And related rocksProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 109-111South AfricaGeochronology
DS1986-0751
1986
Kramers, J.D.Smith, C.B., Allsopp, H.L., Kramers, J.D., Gurney, J.J., JagoutzIsotopic and geochemical studies of kimberlitic and included xenolithsProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 329-331South Africa, BotswanaBlank
DS1986-0752
1986
Kramers, J.D.Smith, C.B., Allsopp, H.L., Kramers, J.D., Hutchinson, G., Roddick, J.C.Emplacement ages of Jurassic Cretaceous South African kimberlites by the RbSR method on phlogopite and whole rocksamplesTransactions Geological Society of South Africa, Vol. 88, pt. 2, May-August pp. 249-266South AfricaGeochronology
DS1987-0373
1987
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D.Link bewteen Archean continent formation and anomaloussubcontinentalmantleNature, Vol.325, January 1, pp.47-50GlobalMantle Genesis
DS1987-0689
1987
Kramers, J.D.Smith, C.B., Kramers, J.D., Jagoutz, E.Subcalcic megacrysts in kimberlite: deep lithosphere orasthenosphereorigins?Terra Cognita, Conference abstracts Oceanic and Continental Lithosphere:, Vol. 7, No. 4, Autumn, abstract only p. 624South AfricaBlank
DS1989-0828
1989
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D., Ridley, J.R.Can Archean granulites be direct crystallization products from a sialicmagma layerGeology, Vol. 17, No. 5, May pp. 442-445GlobalMagma, Granulites
DS1989-1406
1989
Kramers, J.D.Smith, C.B., Allsopp, H.L., Garvie, O.G., Kramers, J.D., JacksonNote on the uranium-lead (U-Pb) (U-Pb) perovskite method for dating kimberlites: examples fromChemical Geology, Vol. 79, pp. 137-145South Africa, Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology, Perovskite
DS1990-1229
1990
Kramers, J.D.Ridley, J.R., Kramers, J.D.The evolution and tectonic consequence of a tonalitic magma layer withIn the Archean continentsCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, No. 2, February pp. 219-228Ontario, Southern AfricaTectonics, Craton
DS1991-0926
1991
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D.Paradoxes of the mantle lithosphere underneath Archean continents and models for its originSchweiz. Mineral. Petrogr. Mitt, Vol. 71, pp. 175-186GlobalCraton, Harzburgite
DS1991-1699
1991
Kramers, J.D.Taylor, P.N., Kramers, J.D., Moorbath, S., Wilson, J.F., Orpenlead/lead samarium-neodymium (Sm-Nd) and rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) geochronology in the Archean craton of ZimbabweChemical Geology, Vol. 87, No. 3-4, October 10, pp. 175-196ZimbabweGeochronology, Craton
DS1991-1700
1991
Kramers, J.D.Taylor, P.N., Kramers, J.D., Moorbath, S., Wilson, J.F., Orpenlead/lead, samarium-neodymium (Sm-Nd) and Rubidium-Strontium geochronology in the Archean craton of ZimbabweChemical Geology, Vol. 87, No. 3-4, October 10, pp. 175-196ZimbabweGeochronology, Craton
DS1995-0145
1995
Kramers, J.D.Berger, M., Kramers, J.D., Nagler, T.F.Geochemistry and geochronology of charnoender bites in the northern Marginal Zone of the Limpopo Belt.-genesisSchweiz. Mineral. Petrog. Mitt, Vol. 75, pp. 17-42South Africa, ZimbabweGeochemistry, Limpopo Belt -Northern Marginal Zone
DS1995-0907
1995
Kramers, J.D.Kamber, B.S., Kramers, J.D., Napier, R., Cliff, R.A.The Triangle shearzone, Zimbabwe revisited: new dat a on event at 2.0 Ga in Limpopo Belt.Precambrian Research, Vol. 70, No. 3-4, Jan. pp. 191-214.ZimbabweGeochronology, Limpopo Belt
DS1995-0908
1995
Kramers, J.D.Kamber, B.S., Kramers, J.D., Napier, R., et al.The Triangle shear zone, Zimbabwe: revisited: new dat a document event at2.0 Ga in Limpopo BeltPrecambrian Research, Vol. 70, No. 3-4, Jan. pp. 191-214ZimbabweGeochronology, Limpopo Belt
DS1997-0630
1997
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D., Tolstikhin, I.N.Two terrestrial lead isotope paradoxes, forward transport modelling, coreformation... history crustChemical Geology, Vol. 139, pp. 75-110MantleAccretion, crustal growth, Core formation continental crust
DS1997-0832
1997
Kramers, J.D.Nagler, Th. F., Kramers, J.D., Kamber, B.S., Frei, R.Growth of subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath Zimbabwe started at or before 3.8 Ga: Re -Os studyGeology, Vol. 25, No. 11, Nov. pp. 983-986.ZimbabweMantle, Geochronology, chromites
DS1998-0809
1998
Kramers, J.D.Kreissig, K., Nagler, T.F., Kramers, J.D.Are Archean provinces juxtaposed terranes? Isotope and trace element geochemical considerations.Mineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 813-4.South Africa, Montana, GreenlandCraton, Geochronology - rare earth elements (REE) patterns
DS1998-1060
1998
Kramers, J.D.Nagler, T.F., Kramers, J.D.neodymium isotopic evolution of the upper mantle during the Precambrian: dat a and the uncertainty of both.Precambrian Research, Vol. 91, No. 3-4, Aug. pp. 233-253.MantlePrecambrian, Geochronology
DS2003-0747
2003
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D.Volatile element abundance patterns and an early liquid water ocean on EarthPrecambrian Research, Vol. 126, 3-4, Oct. pp. 379-94.GlobalGeochemistry - water
DS200412-1052
2003
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D.Volatile element abundance patterns and an early liquid water ocean on Earth.Precambrian Research, Vol. 126, 3-4, Oct. pp. 379-94.GlobalGeochemistry - water
DS200612-1433
2005
Kramers, J.D.Tolstikhin, I.N., Kramers, J.D., Hofmann, A.W.A chemical Earth model with whole mantle convection: the importance of a core mantle boundary layer 'D' and its early formation.Chemical Geology, Vol. 226, 3-4, pp. 79-99.MantleConvection, model
DS200712-0579
2007
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D.Heirarchical Earth accretion and the Hadean Eon.Journal of the Geological Society, Vol. 164, 1, pp. 3-18.MantleAccretion
DS201112-0865
2011
Kramers, J.D.Rigby, M.J., Basson, I.J., Kramers, J.D., Mavimbela, P.K.The structural, metamorphic and temporal evolution of the country rocks surrounding Venetia mine, Limpopo belt: evidence for a single paleoproterozoic eventPrecambrian Research, Vol. 186, 1-4, pp. 51-69.Africa, South AfricaTectonometamorphic - implications for a tectonic model
DS201312-0513
2013
Kramers, J.D.Kramers, J.D., Andreoli, M.A.G., Atanasova, M., Belyanin, G.A., Block, D.L., Franklyn, C., Harris, C., Lekgoathi, M., Montross, C.S., Ntsoane, T., Pischedda, V., Segonyane, P., Viljoen, K.S., Westraadt, J.E.Unique chemistry of a diamond bearing pebble from the Libyan desert glass strewnfield, SW Egypt: evidence for a shocked comet fragment.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.382, pp. 21-31.Africa, EgyptShock diamonds
DS201512-1965
2015
Kramers, P.Schmidt, N., Kramers, P.The Gahcho Kue mine dewatering experience, winter 2014-2015.43rd Annual Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts, abstract p. 93.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Gahcho Kue

Abstract: Construction of the De Beers Gahcho Kué Mine required that a portion of Kennady Lake be dewatered to provide access to kimberlite pipes on the lakebed. The Construction Water Management Plan considered an initial dewatering volume of approximately 18.7 Mm3, to be discharged to two downstream waterbodies (Lake N11 and Kennady Lake Area 8). This dewatering was originally planned to occur during the open water season, after the spring freshet peak. The project received its Type A Water Licence from the Mackenzie Valley Land and Water Board on September 24, 2014, and before that date it had become apparent that winter dewatering would be required to prevent a significant delay in the project development. Potential adverse impacts related to winter dewatering were identified and were primarily related to aufeis development. Aufeis is defined as an ice deposit, formed by vertical growth of layers as thin flows of water are exposed to freezing temperatures. These may have adverse effects on erosion, fish and fish habitat. Action levels for winter dewatering were developed, based on site-specific hydrological characteristics, and were included in the Aquatic Effects Monitoring Program for the Mine. This allowed field measurements to be compared to action levels during the dewatering program. Field measurements included telemetry to monitor lake hydrostatic water surface elevations, as well as periodic visits to the receiving lake outlets and downstream areas to examine ice and flow conditions. Winter dewatering commenced on December 20, 2014, with pumping to Kennady Lake Area 8. Pumping was suspended on January 4, 2015, as the action level for that location was approached. Approximately 779,000 m3 of water was released over 16 days. Dewatering discharges were then pumped to Lake N11, with pumping commencing on February 1, 2015 and continuing through the winter period, as the action level for that location was not exceeded. Over the 103 day period through May 14, 2015, approximately 6,021,000 m3 of water was released. A total of 6,800,000 m3 of water was discharged from Kennady Lake over the winter dewatering period, or about 36% of the planned initial dewatering volume. Winter and subsequent open-water season reconnaissance did not identify any adverse effects due to winter dewatering. This presentation will discuss winter dewatering risks, action level development, field program observations, and factors contributing to the overall success of the program.
DS1988-0364
1988
Kramm, U.Kogarko, L.N., Kramm, U., Dudkin, O.B., Minakov, F.V.Age and genesis of carbonatites of the Khibiny alkalic pluton as inferred from rubidium-strontium isotope dataDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 289, No. 1-6, January pp. 196-198RussiaBlank
DS1989-1355
1989
Kramm, U.Schleicher, H., Keller, J., Kramm, U.U-Sr, neodymium and lead isotope studies on alkaline volcanicsandcarbonatites from the Kaiserstuhl Federal Republic of GermanyNew Mexico Bureau of Mines Bulletin., Continental Magmatism Abstract Volume, Held, Bulletin. No. 131, p. 235 Abstract held June 25-July 1GermanyCarbonatite
DS1990-1312
1990
Kramm, U.Schleicher, H., Keller, J., Kramm, U.Isotope studies on alkaline volcanics and carbonatites from theKaiserstuhl, Federal Republic of GermanyLithos, Special Issue, Vol. 25, No. 4, pp. 21-36GermanyGeochronology, Carbonatite
DS1993-0849
1993
Kramm, U.Kramm, U., Kogarko, L.N., Kononova, V.A., Vartiainen, H.The Kola alkaline province of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) and Finland: precise rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) agesLithos, Vol. 30, No. 1, April pp. 33-44Russia, Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), FinlandAlkaline rocks, Geochronology
DS1993-1800
1993
Kramm, U.Yeremeyv, N.V., Zhuravlev, .Z., Kononova, V.A., Pervov, V.A., Kramm, U.Source and age of the potassic rocks in the Ryabinov intrusion, centralAldan.Geochemistry International, Vol. 30, No. 6, pp. 105-112.Russia, AldanAlkaline rocks
DS1994-0232
1994
Kramm, U.Buhn, B., Haussinger, H., Kramm, U., et al.Tectonometamorphic patterns developed during Pan-African continental collision in Damara In land BeltChemie der Erde, Vol. 54, pp. 329-354Namibiametamorphism, Orogeny -Pan African, Congo Craton, Tectonics
DS1994-0947
1994
Kramm, U.Kramm, U.Isotope evidence for ijolite formation by fenitization - SR-Md dat a of ijolites from the type locality Iivaara, Finland.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 115, No.3, January pp. 279-286.FinlandIjolite, Geochronology
DS1994-0948
1994
Kramm, U.Kramm, U.Isotope evidence for ijolite formation by fenitization: Sr-neodymium dat a of ijolites from the type locality Livara, Finland.Contr. Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 116, No. 3, pp. 279-286.FinlandIjolites
DS1994-0949
1994
Kramm, U.Kramm, U., Kogarko, L.N.neodymium and Strontium isotope signatures of the Khibin a and Lovozero agpaitic Kola alkaline province.Lithos, Vol. 32, No. 3-4, July pp. 225-242.Russia, Kola PeninsulaGeochronology, alkaline rocks
DS1997-0631
1997
Kramm, U.Kramm, U., Maravic, H.V., Morteani, G.Neodynium and Strontium isotopic constraints on the petrogenetic relationships between carbonatites...Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 25, No. 1, July pp. 55-76.Democratic Republic of CongoCarbonatite, Cancrinite syenites, Lueshe alkaline complex
DS1997-0632
1997
Kramm, U.Kramm, U., Sindern, S.neodymium Strontium isotope signatures of fenites from Oldoinyo Langai - a contribution to the discussion -genesisGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstracts, TanzaniaCarbonatite, nephelinites, phonolites, Deposit - Oldoinyo Lengai
DS1997-1050
1997
Kramm, U.Sindern, S., Kramm, U.Cancrinite in ultrafenites: a critical mineral for rheomorphic formation of alkaline melts in Iivaara...Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstracts, FinlandAlkaline rocks, Deposit - Iivaara
DS1998-0804
1998
Kramm, U.Kramm, U., Sindern, S.neodymium and Strontium isotope signatures of fenites from Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania and the genetic relationship ...Journal of Petrology, Vol. 39, No. 11-12, Nov-Dec. pp. 1997-2004TanzaniaCarbonatite, nephelinites, phonolites, genesis, Deposit - Oldoinyo Lengai
DS1998-1292
1998
Kramm, U.Schleicher, H., Kramm, U., Viladkar, S.G.Enriched subcontinental Upper Mantle beneath southern India: evidence from lead neodymium Sr Co isotopic studies...Journal of Petrology, Vol. 39, No. 10, Oct. pp. 1765-86.IndiaCarbonatite, geochronology, Deposit - Tamil Nadu
DS2001-0615
2001
Kramm, U.Koerner, T., Sinden, S., Kramm, U.Mineral chemistry in fenites of Kalk field carbonatite Complex and bearing on composition of fenitising fluid.Journal of South African Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 1, p. A 23 (abs)NamibiaCarbonatite, Kalkfield Complex
DS2001-0631
2001
Kramm, U.Kramm, U., Sindern, S., Downes, H.Timing of magmatism in the Kola alkaline province and the translation of isotope dates - geological processesJournal of South African Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 1, p. A 23 (abs)Russia, Kola Peninsula, Baltic ShieldCarbonatite, Kola
DS2001-1082
2001
Kramm, U.Sindern, S., Kramm, U.Is there a Strontium and neodymium isotopic fingerprint of alkaline metasomatism?Journal of South African Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 1, p. A 33.(abs)GlobalCarbonatite, Magmatism, geochronology - data
DS201705-0843
2017
Kramm, U.Kramm, U., Korner, T., Kittel, M., Baier, H., Sindern, S.Triassic emplacement age of the Kalkfeld complex, NW Namibia: implications for carbonatite magmatism and its relationship to the Tristan Plume.International Journal of Earth Sciences, in press available 17p.Africa, NamibiaAlkaline rocks

Abstract: Rb-Sr whole-rock and mineral isotope data from nepheline syenite, tinguaite, and carbonatite samples of the Kalkfeld Complex within the Damaraland Alkaline Province, NW Namibia, indicate a date of 242?±?6.5 Ma. This is interpreted as the age of final magmatic crystallization in the complex. The geological position of the complex and the spatially close relationship to the Lower Cretaceous Etaneno Alkaline Complex document a repeated channeling of small-scale alkaline to carbonatite melt fractions along crustal fractures that served as pathways for the mantle-derived melts. This is in line with Triassic extensional tectonic activity described for the nearby Omaruru Lineament-Waterberg Fault system. The emplacement of the Kalkfeld Complex more than 100 Ma prior to the Paraná-Etendeka event and the emplacement of the Early Cretaceous Damaraland intrusive complexes excludes a genetic relationship to the Tristan Plume. The initial eSr-eNd pairs of the Kalkfeld rocks are typical of younger African carbonatites and suggest a melt source, in which EM I and HIMU represent dominant components.
DS201711-2523
2017
Kramm, U.Kramm, U., Korner, T., Kittel, M., Baier, H., Sindern, S.Triassic emplacement age of the Kalkfeld complex, NW Namibia: implications for carbonatite magmatism and its relationship to the Tristan Plume.International Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 106, pp. 2797-2813.Africa, Namibiacarbonatites

Abstract: Rb-Sr whole-rock and mineral isotope data from nepheline syenite, tinguaite, and carbonatite samples of the Kalkfeld Complex within the Damaraland Alkaline Province, NW Namibia, indicate a date of 242?±?6.5 Ma. This is interpreted as the age of final magmatic crystallization in the complex. The geological position of the complex and the spatially close relationship to the Lower Cretaceous Etaneno Alkaline Complex document a repeated channeling of small-scale alkaline to carbonatite melt fractions along crustal fractures that served as pathways for the mantle-derived melts. This is in line with Triassic extensional tectonic activity described for the nearby Omaruru Lineament-Waterberg Fault system. The emplacement of the Kalkfeld Complex more than 100 Ma prior to the Paraná-Etendeka event and the emplacement of the Early Cretaceous Damaraland intrusive complexes excludes a genetic relationship to the Tristan Plume. The initial eSr-eNd pairs of the Kalkfeld rocks are typical of younger African carbonatites and suggest a melt source, in which EM I and HIMU represent dominant components.
DS201803-0459
2018
Kramm, U.Kramm, U., Korner, T., Kittel, M., Baier, H., Sindern, S.Triassic emplacement age of Kakfeld complex, NW Namibia: implications for carbonatite magmatism and its relationship to the Tristan plume.International Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 106, 8, pp. 2797-2813.Africa, Namibiacarbonatite

Abstract: Rb-Sr whole-rock and mineral isotope data from nepheline syenite, tinguaite, and carbonatite samples of the Kalkfeld Complex within the Damaraland Alkaline Province, NW Namibia, indicate a date of 242 ± 6.5 Ma. This is interpreted as the age of final magmatic crystallization in the complex. The geological position of the complex and the spatially close relationship to the Lower Cretaceous Etaneno Alkaline Complex document a repeated channeling of small-scale alkaline to carbonatite melt fractions along crustal fractures that served as pathways for the mantle-derived melts. This is in line with Triassic extensional tectonic activity described for the nearby Omaruru Lineament-Waterberg Fault system. The emplacement of the Kalkfeld Complex more than 100 Ma prior to the Paraná-Etendeka event and the emplacement of the Early Cretaceous Damaraland intrusive complexes excludes a genetic relationship to the Tristan Plume. The initial ?Sr-?Nd pairs of the Kalkfeld rocks are typical of younger African carbonatites and suggest a melt source, in which EM I and HIMU represent dominant components.
DS1987-0108
1987
Kramm, W.Chernyshev, I.V., Kononova, V.A., Kramm, W., Grauert, B.Isotopic geochronology of Ural alkaline rocks based ion zircon uranium leaddata.(Russian)Geochemiya, (Russian), No. 3, pp. 323-338GlobalBlank
DS1995-0138
1995
Kramshov, N.P.Beloborodov, V.H., Isakov, A.L., Kramshov, N.P., Sher, E.N.Behaviour of crystals in kimberlite and ice under the action of shockwaves.Journal of Min. Science, Vol. 31, No. 2, Mar-Apr. pp. 109-113. #TB408RussiaKimberlite petrography
DS1993-0022
1993
Kramskov, N.Alepilov, V.D., Kramskov, N.The development and underground mining at the International pipeDiamonds of Yakutia, pp. 159-160.Russia, YakutiaMining, Deposit -International
DS1994-1122
1994
Kramskov, N.P.Mashukov, V.I., Pirlya, K.V., Kramskov, N.P.Substaniation of a geomechanical concept for working out the kimberlite deposits of south Yakutia.Russian Journal of Mining Science, *ENG, Vol. 30, No. 4, pp. 355-361.Russia, YakutiaMining, Deposit -Mir
DS2003-1038
2003
Kramskov, N.P.Ovcharenko, O.V., Ainbinder, H., Shilin, K.Y., Kramskov, N.P.Geomechanical substantiation of the parameters for underground mining of MirJournal of Mining Science, ( Kluwer Academic), Vol. 38, 6, pp. 528-33.Russia, Siberia, YakutiaMining, Deposit - Mir
DS200412-1485
2003
Kramskov, N.P.Ovcharenko, O.V., Ainbinder, H., Shilin, K.Y., Kramskov, N.P.Geomechanical substantiation of the parameters for underground mining of Mir kimberlite pipe.Journal of Mining Science, Vol. 38, 6, pp. 528-33.Russia, Siberia, YakutiaMining Deposit - Mir
DS200512-0068
2001
Kramskov, N.P.Baryshnikov, V.D., Gakhova, L.N., Kramskov, N.P.Stress state of the rock mass in the vicinity of underground mining workings, pit edges, and below its bottom.Journal of Mining Science, Vol. 37, 5, pp. 462-465.RussiaMining - Aikhal
DS200512-0069
2002
Kramskov, N.P.Baryshnikov, V.D., Gakhova, L.N., Kramskov, N.P.Stress state of ore mass in the ascending slice system.Journal of Mining Science, Vol. 38, 6, pp. 608-611.RussiaMining - International
DS200512-0546
2001
Kramskov, N.P.Klishin, V.I., Sher, E.N., Kramskov, N.P., et al.Underground mining of kimberlite pipes under alluvia.Journal of Mining Science, Vol. 37, 4, pp. 421-426.RussiaOverburden - depth 80-100m
DS1960-0809
1967
Kranck, E.H.Clark, T.H., Kranck, E.H., Philpotts, A.R.Ile Ronde Breccia, MontrealCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 4, PP. 507-513.Canada, QuebecBlank
DS1991-0927
1991
Krantz, R.W.Krantz, R.W.Normal fault geometry and fault reactivation in tectonic inversion experiments #1The geometry of normal faults, editors Roberts, A.M., Yielding, G., No. 56, pp. 219-229GlobalStructure -faults, Fault geometry -tectonics
DS1991-0928
1991
Krantz, R.W.Krantz, R.W.Normal fault geometry and fault reactivation in tectonic inversion experiments #2Geological Society of London Special Paper, Roberts, No. 56, pp. 219-29.GlobalTectonics - faukting, rifting
DS1988-0374
1988
Krantz, W.B.Krantz, W.B., Gleason, K.J., Caine, N.Patterned ground. a commmon physical phenomena shapes these uncommon manifestations of natural geometryScientific American, Vol. 259, No. 6, December pp. 68-76. Database # 17356Montana, ColoradoGeomorphology
DS1994-0494
1994
Krapez, B.Eriksson, K.A., Krapez, B., Fralick, P.W.Sedimentology of Archean greenstone belts: signatures of tectonicevolutionEarth Science Reviews, Vol. 37, pp. 1-88South Africa, Canada, Ontario, Zimbabwe, AustraliaCraton -greenstone belts, Kaapvaal, Superior, Zimbabwe, Pilbara
DS1996-0781
1996
Krapez, B.Krapez, B.Sequence stratigraphic concepts applied -identification of basin-filling rhythms in Prec. successionsAustralian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 43, No. 4, Aug. pp. 355-380AustraliaPrecambrian stratigraphy, Geometry of basins
DS1996-0782
1996
Krapez, B.Krapez, B.Sequence stratigraphic concepts applied to the identification of basin filling rhythms in PrecambrianAustralian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 43, No. 4, Aug. 1, pp. 355-380AustraliaStratigraphy, Precambrian
DS1997-0633
1997
Krapez, B.Krapez, B.Sequence stratigraphic conscepts applied to identifi- cation of depositional basins and global tectonics.Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 44, No. 1, Feb. pp. 1-36AustraliaGlobal tectonic cycles, Basin stratigraphy
DS1998-0079
1998
Krapez, B.Barley, M.E., Krapez, B., Kerrich, R.The Late Archean bonanza: metallogenic and environmental consequences Of the interaction... plumesPrecambrian Research, Vol. 91, No. 1-2, Aug. 1, pp. 65-90MantlePlumes, lithospheric tectonics, Mantle plumes, lithosphere tectonics, Global cyclicity - not specific to diamonds
DS1998-0805
1998
Krapez, B.Krapez, B., Eisenlohr, B.Tectonic settings of Archean ( 3325-2775 Ma) crustal supracrustal belts inwest Pilbara BlockPrec. Research, Vol. 88, No. 1-4, Mar. pp. 173-207AustraliaPilbara Craton, Tectonics
DS1998-0948
1998
Krapez, B.Martin, D. McB., Clendenin, C.W., Krapez, B., McNaughtonTectonic and geochronological constraints on late Archean and Paleoproterozoic stratigraphic correlationJournal of the Geological Society of London, Vol. 155, pp. 311-22.South Africa, AustraliaCraton - Kaapvaal, Pilbara, Geochronology - SHRIMP
DS2000-0058
2000
Krapez, B.Barley, M.E., Krapez, B., Pickard, A.L.Late Archean 2.72 to 2.83 and early paleoproterozoic 2.47 to 2.45 Ga breakout events.Geological Society of America (GSA) Abstracts, Vol. 32, No. 7, p.A-315.AustraliaGeochronology - Proterozoic not specific to diamonds
DS2000-0533
2000
Krapez, B.Krapez, B., Brown, S.J.A., Hand, J., Barley, M., Cas, R.Age constraints on recycled crustal and supracrustal sources of Archean metasedimentary sequences.Tectonophysics, Vol. 322, No. 1-2, pp.89-133.Australia, Eastern GoldfieldsGeochronology, Subduction
DS2002-0361
2002
Krapez, B.Dawson, G.C., Krapez, B., Fletcher, I.R., McNaughton, N.J., Rasmussen, B.Did late Paleoproterozoic assembly of proto Australia involve collision between thePrecambrian Research, Vol. 118, No. 3-4, pp. 195-220.Australia, Western AustraliaTectonics, Orogeny - Albany - Fraser
DS2003-0321
2003
Krapez, B.Dawson, G.C., Krapez, B., Fletcher, I.R., McNaughton, N.J., Rasmussen, B.1.2 Ga thermal metamorphism in the Albany Fraser Orogen of western Australia:Journal of the Geological Society of London, Vol. 160, 1, pp. 29-38.AustraliaGeothermometry
DS2002-1634
2002
Krasavchikov, V.G.Valislenko, V.B., Zinchuk, N.N., Krasavchikov, V.G., Kuznetsova, L.G.Diamond potential estimation based on kimberlite major element chemistryJournal of Geochemical Exploration, Vol. 76, 2, pp. 93-112.Russia, YakutiaChemistry, diamond grade, whole rock composition, Exploration - techniques
DS201605-0903
2016
Krasheninnikov, S.P.Sobolev, A.V., Asafov, E.V., Gurenko, A.A., Arndt, N.T., Batanova, V.G., Portnyagin, M.V., Garbe-Schonberg, D., Krasheninnikov, S.P.Komatites reveal a hydrous Archaen deep mantle reservoir.Nature, Vol. 531, Mar. 31, pp. 628-632.MantleMelting

Abstract: Archaean komatiites (ultramafic lavas) result from melting under extreme conditions of the Earth’s mantle. Their chemical compositions evoke very high eruption temperatures, up to 1,600 degrees Celsius, which suggests even higher temperatures in their mantle source1, 2. This message is clouded, however, by uncertainty about the water content in komatiite magmas. One school of thought holds that komatiites were essentially dry and originated in mantle plumes3, 4, 5, 6 while another argues that these magmas contained several per cent water, which drastically reduced their eruption temperature and links them to subduction processes7, 8, 9. Here we report measurements of the content of water and other volatile components, and of major and trace elements in melt inclusions in exceptionally magnesian olivine (up to 94.5?mole per cent forsterite). This information provides direct estimates of the composition and crystallization temperature of the parental melts of Archaean komatiites. We show that the parental melt for 2.7-billion-year-old komatiites from the Abitibi greenstone belt in Canada contained 30 per cent magnesium oxide and 0.6 per cent water by weight, and was depleted in highly incompatible elements. This melt began to crystallize at around 1,530 degrees Celsius at shallow depth and under reducing conditions, and it evolved via fractional crystallization of olivine, accompanied by minor crustal assimilation. As its major- and trace-element composition and low oxygen fugacities are inconsistent with a subduction setting, we propose that its high H2O/Ce ratio (over 6,000) resulted from entrainment into the komatiite source of hydrous material from the mantle transition zone10. These results confirm a plume origin for komatiites and high Archaean mantle temperatures, and evoke a hydrous reservoir in the deep mantle early in Earth’s history.
DS202006-0914
2020
Krasheninnikov, S.P.Chayka, I.F., Sobolev, A.V., Izokh, A.E., Batanova, V.G., Krasheninnikov, S.P., Chervyakovskaya, M.V., Kontonikas-Charos, A., Kutyrev, A.V., Lobastov, B.M., Chervyakovskiy, V.S.Fingerprints of kamafugite-like magmas in Mesozoic lamproites of the Aldan Shield: evidence from olivine and olivine-hosted inclusions.Minerals, Vol. 10, 4, 30p.Russia, Siberiadeposit - Ryabinoviy

Abstract: Mesozoic (125-135 Ma) cratonic low-Ti lamproites from the northern part of the Aldan Shield do not conform to typical classification schemes of ultrapotassic anorogenic rocks. Here we investigate their origins by analyzing olivine and olivine-hosted inclusions from the Ryabinoviy pipe, a well preserved lamproite intrusion within the Aldan Shield. Four types of olivine are identified: (1) zoned phenocrysts, (2) high-Mg, high-Ni homogeneous macrocrysts, (3) high-Ca and low-Ni olivine and (4) mantle xenocrysts. Olivine compositions are comparable to those from the Mediterranean Belt lamproites (Olivine-1 and -2), kamafugites (Olivine-3) and leucitites. Homogenized melt inclusions (MIs) within olivine-1 phenocrysts have lamproitic compositions and are similar to the host rocks, whereas kamafugite-like compositions are obtained for melt inclusions within olivine-3. Estimates of redox conditions indicate that “lamproitic” olivine crystallized from anomalously oxidized magma (?NNO +3 to +4 log units.). Crystallization of "kamafugitic" olivine occurred under even more oxidized conditions, supported by low V/Sc ratios. We consider high-Ca olivine (3) to be a fingerprint of kamafugite-like magmatism, which also occurred during the Mesozoic and slightly preceded lamproitic magmatism. Our preliminary genetic model suggests that low-temperature, extension-triggered melting of mica- and carbonate-rich veined subcontitental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) generated the kamafugite-like melts. This process exhausted carbonate and affected the silicate assemblage of the veins. Subsequent and more extensive melting of the modified SCLM produced volumetrically larger lamproitic magmas. This newly recognized kamafugitic "fingerprint" further highlights similarities between the Aldan Shield potassic province and the Mediterranean Belt, and provides evidence of an overlap between "orogenic" and "anorogenic" varieties of low-Ti potassic magmatism. Moreover, our study also demonstrates that recycled subduction components are not an essential factor in the petrogenesis of low-Ti lamproites, kamafugites and leucitites.
DS202008-1411
2020
Krasheninnikov, S.P.Korneeva, A.A., Nikolai, N.A., Kamenetsky, V.S., Portnyagin, M.V., Savelyev, D.P., Krasheninnikov, S.P., Abersteiner, A., Kamenetsky, M.B., Zelenski, M.E., Shcherbakov, V.D., Botcharnikov, R.E.Composition, crystallization conditions and genesis of sulfide saturated parental melts of olivine-phyric rocks from Kamchatsky Mys ( Kamchatka, Russia).Lithos, 10.1016/j.lithos.2020.105657Russia, Kamchatkapicrites

Abstract: Sulfide liquids that immiscibly separate from silicate melts in different magmatic processes accumulate chalcophile metals and may represent important sources of the metals in Earth's crust for the formation of ore deposits. Sulfide phases commonly found in some primitive mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) may support the occurrence of sulfide immiscibility in the crust without requiring magma contamination and/or extensive fractionation. However, the records of incipient sulfide melts in equilibrium with primitive high-Mg olivine and Cr-spinel are scarce. Sulfide globules in olivine phenocrysts in picritic rocks of MORB-affinity at Kamchatsky Mys (Eastern Kamchatka, Russia) represent a well-documented example of natural immiscibility in primitive oceanic magmas. Our study examines the conditions of silicate-sulfide immiscibility in these magmas by reporting high precision data on the compositions of Cr-spinel and silicate melt inclusions, hosted in Mg-rich olivine (86.9-90 mol% Fo), which also contain globules of magmatic sulfide melt. Major and trace element contents of reconstructed parental silicate melts, redox conditions (?QFM = +0.1 ± 0.16 (1s) log. units) and crystallization temperature (1200-1285 °C), as well as mantle potential temperatures (~1350 °C), correspond to typical MORB values. We show that nearly 50% of sulfur could be captured in daughter sulfide globules even in reheated melt inclusions, which could lead to a significant underestimation of sulfur content in reconstructed silicate melts. The saturation of these melts in sulfur appears to be unrelated to the effects of melt crystallization and crustal assimilation, so we discuss the reasons for the S variations in reconstructed melts and the influence of pressure and other parameters on the SCSS (Sulfur Content at Sulfide Saturation).
DS1982-0345
1982
Krashes, B.Krashes, B.The Gemological Institute of America (gia) and the Diamond TradeIn: International Gemological Symposium Held 1982, Proceedin, PP. 27-28.GlobalProduction
DS1987-0374
1987
Krashes, L.Krashes, L.Harry Winston, the ultimate jeweler. Second editionGemological Institute of America (GIA) Publ, 218p. $ 75.00 United StatesGlobalBook review in Gems and Gemology Vol. 23, No. 3, Fall p
DS1983-0376
1983
Krashes, L.S.Krashes, L.S.Harry Winston: a Story Told in DiamondsGems And Gemology, Vol. 19, No. 1, SPRING, PP. 21-29.United StatesHistory, Biography
DS1984-0431
1984
Krashes, L.S.Krashes, L.S.Harry Winston the Ultimate JewelerGemological Institute of America (GIA) DISTRIBUTOR., United StatesBiography, Kimberley
DS1983-0382
1983
Krashnova, N.I.Landa, E.A., Krashnova, N.I., Tarhovskaya, A.N., Shergina, Y.P.The distribution of rare earths and yttrium in apatite from alkali-ultrabasic and carbonatite intrusions and the origin ofapatitemineralizationGeochemistry International, Vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 77-87Russia, FennoscandiaCarbonatite, Rare Earth
DS1997-0636
1997
Krasilnikova, I.G.Kravechenko, S.M., Laputina, I.P., Krasilnikova, I.G.Geochemistry and genesis of rich scandium (Sc) rare earth elements (REE) yttrium niobium ores at the Tomtor deposit, northern Siberian PlatformGeochemistry International, Vol. 34, No. 10, pp. 847-63.Russia, SiberiaCarbonatite, Deposit - Tomtor
DS1991-0935
1991
Krasinets, S.S.Kryuchokov, A.I., Nikulin, V.I., Krasinets, S.S., Lelyukh, M.I.Conditions of localization and structure of a new kimberlite body in the Aikhal area (Siberian platform)Soviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 32, No. 5, pp. 52-58Russia, SiberiaKimberlite, structure, Aikhal area
DS1994-0957
1994
Krasinets, S.S.Kryuchkov, A.I., Leliukh, M.J., Krasinets, S.S., Afansiev, V.P.Two unusual Paleozoic kimberlite diatremes in the Daldyn-Alakit region Of the Siberian PlatformProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 1, pp. 34-39.Russia, SiberiaDaldyn-Alakit, Kimberlite diatremes
DS2003-1256
2003
Krasivskaya, I.S.Sharkov, E.V., Trubkin, N.V., Krasivskaya, I.S., Bogatikov, O.A., Mokhov, A.V.The oldest volcanic glass in the Early Paleoproterozoic boninite type lavas, KarelianDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 390, 4, May-June pp. 580-4.Russia, KareliaBoninite
DS200412-1794
2003
Krasivskaya, I.S.Sharkov, E.V., Trubkin, N.V., Krasivskaya, I.S., Bogatikov, O.A., Mokhov, A.V.The oldest volcanic glass in the Early Paleoproterozoic boninite type lavas, Karelian craton: results of instrumental investigatDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 390, 4, May-June pp. 580-4.Russia, KareliaBoninites
DS201312-0539
2013
Krasnicki, S.Liang, Q., Meng, Y., Yan, C., Krasnicki, S., Lai, J., Hemawan, K., Shu,H., Popov, D., Yu,T., Yang, W., Mao, H., Hemley, R.Developments in synthesis, characterization, and application of large high-quality CVD single crystal diamond.Journal of Superhard Materials, Vol. 35, 4, pp. 195-213.TechnologyDiamond synthetics
DS1989-1566
1989
Krasnobaev, A.A.Votyakov, S.L., Ilupin, I.P., Krasnobaev, A.A., Krokhalev, V.Ya.ESR and luminescence of zircons and apatites from kimberlites of SiberiaGeochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), No. 1, pp. 29-35RussiaLuminescence, Zircons, apatite
DS200412-0541
2004
Krasnobaev, A.A.Fedorov, Y.N., Krinochkin, V.G., Ivanov, K.S., Krasnobaev, A.A., Kaleganov, B.A.Stages of tectonic reactivation of the west Siberian platform ( based on K Ar dating).Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 397, 5, pp. 628-631.Russia, SiberiaTectonics
DS201012-0412
2010
Krasnobaev, A.A.Krasnobaev, A.A., Rusin, A.I., Valizer, P.M., Busharina, S.V.Zirconology of calcite carbonatite of the Vishnevogorsk massif, southern Urals.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 431, 1, pp. 390-393.Russia, UralsCarbonatite
DS201312-0515
2013
Krasnobaev, A.A.Krasnobaev, A.A., Valizer, P.M., Cherednichenko, S.V., Busharina, S.V., Medvedeva, E.V., Presyakov, S.L.Zirconology of carbonate rocks ( marbles-carbonatites) of the Ilmeno-Visnevogorskii complex, southern Urals.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 450, 1, pp. 504-508.Russia, UralsCarbonatite
DS201412-0571
2014
Krasnobaev, A.A.Medvedeva, E.V., Rusin, A.I., Krasnobaev, A.A., Baneva, N.N., Valizer, P.M.Structural compositional evolution and isotopic age of Ilmeny Vishnevogorsky complex, south urals, Russia.30th. International Conference on Ore Potential of alkaline, kimberlite and carbonatite magmatism. Sept. 29-, Russia, UralsCarbonatite
DS1975-1105
1979
Krasnobayev, A.A.Krasnobayev, A.A.(mineralogical and Geochemical Pecularities of Kimberlite Zircons, and Problems of Their Genesis.)Akad. Nauk Sssr Izv. Ser. Geol., Vol. 1979, No. 8, PP. 85-96.RussiaKimberlite
DS1989-1567
1989
Krasnobayev, A.A.Votyakov, S.L., Ilupin, I.P., Krasnobayev, A.A., Krokhalev, V.Ya.ESR and luminescence of Siberian kimberlite zircon and apatiteGeochemistry International, Vol. 26, No. 8, pp. 26-32RussiaSpectroscopy -luminesence, Zircon/apatite
DS201604-0590
2015
Krasnoperov, A.V.Alexakhin, V.Yu., Bystritsky, V.M., Zamyatin, N.I., Zubarev, E.V., Krasnoperov, A.V., Rapatsky, V.L., Rogov, Yu.N., Sadovsky, A.B., Salamatin, A.V., Salmin, R.A., Sapozhnikov, M.G., Slepnev, V.M., Khabarov, S.V., Razinkov,E.A., Tarasov, O.G., Nikitin,G.M.Detection of diamonds in kimberlite by the tagged neutron method.Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A., A785, pp. 9-13.TechnologyMethodology

Abstract: A new technology for diamond detection in kimberlite based on the tagged neutron method is proposed. The results of experimental researches on irradiation of kimberlite samples with 14.1-MeV tagged neutrons are discussed. The source of the tagged neutron flux is a portable neutron generator with a built-in 64-pixel silicon alpha-detector with double-sided stripped readout. Characteristic gamma rays resulting from inelastic neutron scattering on nuclei of elements included in the composition of kimberlite are registered by six gamma-detectors based on BGO crystals. The criterion for diamond presence in kimberlite is an increased carbon concentration within a certain volume of the kimberlite sample.
DS201012-0559
2010
Krasnoshchekov, D.N.Ovtchimnikov, V.M., Kaazik, P.B., Krasnoshchekov, D.N.The velocity anomaly in the Earth's outer core.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 433, 2, pp. 1127-1131.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS1975-0028
1975
Krasnov, A.A.Bazarova, T. YU., Krasnov, A.A.Temperature and Sequence of Crystallization of Some Leucite bearing Basaltoids.Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk SSSR., Vol. 222, No. 4, PP. 935-938.RussiaLeucite
DS200512-0577
2003
Krasnova, N.Krasnova, N., Petrov, T.A new rock classification system applied to ultrabasic alkaline and phoscorite carbonatite rocks.Periodico di Mineralogia, (in english), Vol. LXX11, 1. April, pp. 115-123.Classifcation - RHA rank formula
DS201112-0551
2011
Krasnova, N.Krasnova, N., Petrov, T., Korolev, N.The RHA coding of mineral compositions of alkaline rocks exemplified by the nepheline syenite family.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., pp. 234-TechnologyNomenclature - rank, entropy,purity
DS1983-0384
1983
KRASNOVA, N.i.Landa, E.A., Murina, G.A, SHERAGINA, Yu.p., KRASNOVA, N.i.Isotopic Composition of Strontium in Apatite and Apatite Bearing Rocks of Carbonatite Complexes.Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), Vol. 20, No. 3, PP. 214-216.RussiaRelated Rocks
DS1988-0375
1988
Krasnova, N.I.Krasnova, N.I.Diagnostic features of MetasomatismInternational Geology Review, Vol. 30, No. 10, October pp. 1070-1083. Database # 1787RussiaMetsomatisM., Structure
DS1996-0783
1996
Krasnova, N.I.Krasnova, N.I.Distribution of major ore types at the Kovdor carbonatite Massif, Kola peninsula Russia.International Geological Congress 30th Session Beijing, Abstracts, Vol. 2, p. 382.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite, Deposit -Kovdor
DS1997-0634
1997
Krasnova, N.I.Krasnova, N.I.The role of metasomatism in the formation of carbonatite massifs:geological, mineralogical, geocheM.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstracts, POSTER.GlobalCarbonatite
DS1997-0981
1997
Krasnova, N.I.Rudashevsky, N.B., Krasnova, N.I.Sulphide and noble metal mineralization in the Kovdor Massif KolaPeninsula: heterogeneity in carbonatite...Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstracts, POSTER.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite, Sulphides, precious metals
DS2001-0632
2001
Krasnova, N.I.Krasnova, N.I.The Kovdor phlogopite deposit, Kola Peninsula, RussiaCan. Mineralog., Vol. 39, No. 1, Feb. No. 33-44.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite, alkaline, Deposit - Kovdor
DS2001-0633
2001
Krasnova, N.I.Krasnova, N.I.Calcite carbonatite pegmatite with perovskite from the Kovdor Massif, KolaPeninsula, Russia.Journal of South African Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 1, p. A 24 (abs)Russia, Kola Peninsula, Baltic ShieldCarbonatite, Kovdor Massif
DS200512-0578
2003
Krasnova, N.I.Krasnova, N.I.Kovdor apatite francolite deposit as an example of explosive and phreatomagmatic endogeneous activity in the ultramafic alkaline and carbonatite complex Kola.Plumes and problems of deep sources of alkaline magmatism, pp. 155-170.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite, Kovdor
DS200612-0449
2006
Krasnova, T.S.Gertner, I.F., Glazunov, O.M., Vrublevskii, V.V., Krasnova, T.S., Tishin, P.A.Geochemical and isotopic constraints for the formation model of the Kingash ultramafic and mafic complex, eastern Sayan ridge, central Siberia.Vladykin: VI International Workshop, held Mirny, Deep seated magmatism, its sources and plumes, pp. 188-206.Russia, SiberiaGeochronology
DS1995-1017
1995
Krasnyi, L.I.Krasnyi, L.I., Shcheglov, A.D.Pacific mobile belt as a unique ore heterogeneity of the GlobeGeology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 37, No. 4, July-August, pp. 252-259RussiaMetallogeny, Tectonics, mobile belt
DS1998-0806
1998
Krasnyi, L.I.Krasnyi, L.I.The Earth's superstructures: geostructural features and relatedmineragenesis.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 361, No. 5, pp. 629-31.MantleTectonics, Metallogeny
DS200412-1795
2004
Krassivskaya, I.S.Sharkov, E.V., Trubkin, N.V., Krassivskaya, I.S., Bogatikov, O.A., Mokhov, A.V., Chistyakov, EvseevaStructural and compositional characteristics of the oldest volcanic glass in the early paleoproterozoic boninite like lavas of sPetrology, Vol.12, 3, pp. 227-244.Russia, KareliaBoninites
DS201707-1300
2017
Kratky, O.Ackerman, L., Magna, T., Rapprich, V., Upadhyay, D., Kratky, O., Cejkova, B., Erban, V., Kochergina, Y.V., Hrstka, T.Contrasting petrogenesis of spatially related carbonatites from Samalpatti and Sevattur, Tamil Nadu, India.Lithos, Vol. 284-285, pp. 257-275.Indiacarbonatite - Samalpatti, Sevattur

Abstract: Two Neoproterozoic carbonatite suites of spatially related carbonatites and associated silicate alkaline rocks from Sevattur and Samalpatti, south India, have been investigated in terms of petrography, chemistry and radiogenic–stable isotopic compositions in order to provide further constraints on their genesis. The cumulative evidence indicates that the Sevattur suite is derived from an enriched mantle source without significant post-emplacement modifications through crustal contamination and hydrothermal overprint. The stable (C, O) isotopic compositions confirm mantle origin of Sevattur carbonatites with only a modest difference to Paleoproterozoic Hogenakal carbonatite, emplaced in the same tectonic setting. On the contrary, multiple processes have shaped the petrography, chemistry and isotopic systematics of the Samalpatti suite. These include pre-emplacement interaction with the ambient crustal materials with more pronounced signatures of such a process in silicocarbonatites. Calc-silicate marbles present in the Samalpatti area could represent a possible evolved end member due to the inability of common silicate rocks (pyroxenites, granites, diorites) to comply with radiogenic isotopic constraints. In addition, Samalpatti carbonatites show a range of C–O isotopic compositions, and d13CV-PDB values between + 1.8 and + 4.1‰ found for a sub-suite of Samalpatti carbonatites belong to the highest values ever reported for magmatic carbonates. These heavy C–O isotopic signatures in Samalpatti carbonatites could be indicative of massive hydrothermal interaction with carbonated fluids. Unusual high-Cr silicocarbonatites, discovered at Samalpatti, seek their origin in the reaction of pyroxenites with enriched mantle-derived alkali-CO2-rich melts, as also evidenced by mantle-like O isotopic compositions. Field and petrographic observations as well as isotopic constraints must, however, be combined with the complex chemistry of incompatible trace elements as indicated from their non-uniform systematics in carbonatites and their individual fractions. We emphasise that, beside common carriers of REE like apatite, other phases may be important for incompatible element budgets, such as mckelveyite–(Nd) and kosmochlor, found in these carbonatites. Future targeted studies, including in-situ techniques, could help further constrain temporal and petrologic conditions of formation of Sevattur and Samalpatti carbonatite bodies.
DS201709-2025
2017
Kratky, O.Magalhaes, N., Magna, T., Rapprich, V., Kratky, O., Farquhar, J.Sulfur isotope systematics in carbonatites from Sevattur and Samalpatti, S India.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Indiacarbonatites, Sevattur, Samalpatti

Abstract: We report preliminary data for sulfur isotopes from two spatially related Neoproterozoic carbonatite complexes in Tamil Nadu, S India, with the aim of getting further insights into their magmatic and/or post-emplacement histories [1]. The major sulfide phase in these rocks is pyrite, with minor chalcopyrite, whereas sulfate occurs as barite. A bimodal distribution of G34Ssulfide is found for Samalpatti (13.5 to 14.0‰), and Sevattur (-2.1 to 1.4‰) carbonatites. A significantly larger range of G34Ssulfide values is found for the associated Samalpatti silicate rocks (-5.2 to 7.4‰) relative to Sevattur pyroxenites and gabbros (-1.1 to 2.1‰). High G34Ssulfide values for Samalpatti carbonatites are unsual [2,3] but could reflect hydrothermal post-emplacement modification [1] of S isotopes. The low G34Ssulfide values for Sevattur may represent a mantle source signature. The G34Ssulfate is uniformly positive for both complexes, with most data falling in a narrow range (5.7 to 7.8‰) and one datum for a pyroxenite yielding more positive G34Ssulfate = 13.3‰. Data for '33S varies outside of analytical uncertainty (-0.07 to 0.04‰), indicating contribution from a source with a surface-derrived component. The small range of '33S values does not allow us to determine whether these sources contain S fractionated by biogeochemical (mass-dependent) or photochemical (mass-independent, pre GOE) processes. Data for '36S is positive, and varies within uncertainty (0.28 ± 0.15‰). Variations of this magnitude have been observed in other localities, and are not diagnostic of any unique source or process. The sulfur isotope data imply addition of crustal sulfur to Samalpatti. In contrast, sulfur from Sevattur has a mantle-like G34S but '33S with anomalous character. These observations support the idea of a different evolutionary story for these complexes, possibly more complex than previously thought.
DS201801-0001
2017
Kratky, O.Ackerman, L., Magna, T., Rapprich, V., Upadhyay, D., Kratky, O., Cejkova, B., Erban, V., Kochergina, Y.V., Hrstka, T.Contrasting petrogenesis of spatially related carbonatites from Samalpatti and Sevattur, Tamil Nadu, India: insights from trace element and isotopic geochemistry.Carbonatite-alkaline rocks and associated mineral deposits , Dec. 8-11, abstract p. 31-33.Indiadeposit - Samalpatti, Sevattur

Abstract: The Tamil Nadu region in southern India hosts several carbonatite bodies (e.g., Hogenakal, Samalpatti, Sevattur, Pakkanadu-Mulakkadu) which are closely associated with alkaline silicate rocks such as syenites, pyroxenites or dunites (e.g, Kumar et al., 1998; Schleicher et al., 1998; Srivastava, 1998). This is in contrast to the carbonatite occurrences in north-western India associated with the Deccan Trap basalts (e.g., Amba Dongar) or Proterozoic Newania dolomitic carbonatites. We have studied two, spatially related, Neoproterozoic carbonatite-silico(carbonatite) suites in association with alkaline silicate rocks (e.g., pyroxenite, gabbro) from Sevattur and Samalpatti in terms of petrography, chemistry and radiogenic-stable isotopic compositions in order to provide constraints on their genesis and evolution. In these two bodies, several different carbonatite types have been reported previously with striking differences in their trace element and isotopic compositions (Srivastava, 1998; Viladkar and Subramanian, 1995; Schleicher et al., 1998; Pandit et al., 2002). Collected data for previously poorly studied calcite carbonatites from the Sevattur representing the first carbonatite magmas on this locality, indicate similar geochemical characteristics to those of dolomitic carbonatites, such as high LREE/HREE ratios, very high Sr and Ba contents, large amounts of apatite and magnetite, identical Sr-Nd-C-O isotopic compositions. Thus, they were derived from an enriched mantle source without significant post-emplacement modifications through crustal contamination and hydrothermal overprint, in agreement with previous studies (e.g., Schleicher et al., 1998). Detailed microprobe analyses revealed that high levels of some incompatible elements (e.g., REE, Y, Sr, Ba) cannot be accounted by matrix calcite hosting only significant amounts of SrO (~0.6-1.2 wt.%). On the other hand, abundant micro- to nano-scale exsolution lamellae and/or inclusions of mckelveyite-(Nd) appear to host a significant fraction of LREE in parallel with apatite. Distribution of Sr is most likely influenced also by common but heterogeneously dispersed barite and strontianite. Newly acquired as well as detailed inspection of available geochemical data permits distinguish two different types of carbonatites in Samalpatti: (1) Type I similar to Sevattur carbonatites in terms of mineralogy, trace element and radiogenic-stable isotopic compositions and (2) Type II with remarkably low concentrations of REE and other incompatible trace elements, more radiogenic Sr isotopic compositions and extremely variable C–O isotopic values. The petrogenesis of the Type II seems to be intimately associated with the presence of silicocarbonatites and abundant silicate mineral domains. Instead of liquid immiscible separation from a silicate magma, elevated SiO2 contents observed in silico-carbonatites may have resulted from the interaction of primary carbonatitic melts and crustal rocks prior to and/or during magma emplacement. Arguments for such hypothesis include variable, but radiogenic Sr isotopic compositions correlated with SiO2 and other lithophile elements (e.g., Ti, Y, Zr, REE). Calc-silicate marbles present in the Samalpatti area could represent a possible evolved crustal end member for such process due to the inability of common silicate rocks (pyroxenites, granites, diorites) to comply with radiogenic isotopic constraints. The wide range of C-O isotopic compositions found in Samalpatti carbonatites belong to the highest values ever reported for magmatic carbonates and can be best explained by massive hydrothermal interaction with carbonated fluids. Unusual high-Cr silicocarbonatites were discovered at Samalpatti forming centimetre to decimetre-sized enclaves enclosed in pyroxenites with sharp contacts at hand specimen scale. Detailed microprobe analyses revealed peculiar chemical compositions of the Mgamphibole with predominantly sodic composition embaying and replacing Na-Cr-rich pyroxene (kosmochlor), accompanied by the common presence of Cr-spinel and titanite. Such association have been reported for hydrous metasomatism by Na-rich carbonatitic melts at upper mantle conditions (Ali and Arai, 2013). However, the mineralogy and the mode of occurrence of Samalpatti Mg–-r-rich silicocarbonatites argue against such origin. We explain the petrogenesis of these rocks through the reaction of pyroxenites with enriched mantle-derived alkali-CO2-rich melts, as also evidenced by mantle-like O and Hf isotopic compositions.
DS1982-0346
1982
Kratos uranium nl., MINATOME AUSTRALIA PTY. LTD.Kratos uranium nl., MINATOME AUSTRALIA PTY. LTD., Wyoming mine.El 1016 Pandanus Creek Exploration Programme, Relinquishment Report, 1976-1982.Northern Territory Geological Survey Open File Report, No. CR 82-213, 25P.Australia, Northern TerritoryDiamond Prospecting
DS201704-0628
2017
Kratschell, A.Hannington, M., Petersen, S., Kratschell, A.Subsea mining moves closer to shore.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 10, 3, pp. 158-159.TechnologyMining - seabed

Abstract: Mining the deep seabed is fraught with challenges. Untapped mineral potential under the shallow, more accessible continental shelf could add a new dimension to offshore mining and help meet future mineral demand.
DS1990-0885
1990
Kratschmer, W.Kratschmer, W., Lamb, L.D., Fostiropoulos, K., Huffman, D.R.Solid C 60: a new form of carbonNature, Vol. 347, No. 6291, September 27, pp. 354-358GlobalExperimental petrology, Carbon- Solid C 60
DS1975-0547
1977
Kratsov, A.I.Kratsov, A.I., Kroptova, O.I., Voytov, G.I., Ivanov, V.A.Isotopic Composition of Carbon of Diamonds and Carbon Compounds in Pipes of the East Siberian Diamond Province.Dokl. Academy of Science Ussr, Earth Sci. Section., Vol. 223, No. 1-6, PP. 206-208.RussiaGeochronology
DS2003-1228
2003
Kratz, K.L.Schmidt, G., Witt Eiscksen, G., Palme, H., Seek, H., Spettel, B., Kratz, K.L.Highly siderophile elements ( PGE Re and Au) in mantle xenoliths from the west EiffelChemical Geology, Vol. 196, No. 1-4, pp. 77-105.GermanyXenoliths
DS200412-1757
2003
Kratz, K.L.Schmidt, G., Witt Eiscksen, G., Palme, H., Seek, H., Spettel, B., Kratz, K.L.Highly siderophile elements ( PGE Re and Au) in mantle xenoliths from the west Eiffel volcanic field, Germany.Chemical Geology, Vol. 196, no. 1-4, pp. 77-105.Europe, GermanyXenoliths
DS1983-0377
1983
Kratz, K.O.Kratz, K.O.Dike Swarms in the Crustal StructureDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 273, Nov-Dec, pp. 72-74RussiaDyke
DS2001-0634
2001
Kratz, O.Kratz, O.The rocky road to literary fame: Marcel Proust and the diamond synthesis of Professor Moissan.Angewandte Chemie, Vol. 40, No. 24, pp. 4604-10.UNC1016851246HistoryMoissanite
DS1996-0444
1996
Kratzing, D.C.Farrell, T.P., Kratzing, D.C.Environmental effectsEnvironmental Management in Australia Minerals and Energy, UNSW Press, pp. 14-45AustraliaExploration phase, mining phase, Environmental - exploration
DS1900-0259
1904
Kraus, E.H.Kraus, E.H.A New Exposure of Serpentine at Syracuse New YorkAmerican Geologist., Vol. 25, PP. 330-332.United States, Appalachia, New YorkGeology, Petrography
DS1930-0069
1931
Kraus, E.H.Kraus, E.H., Holden, E.F.Gems and Gem Materials. #2New York: Mcgraw Hill, 260P.GlobalDiamond Morphology, Crystallography, Kimberley
DS1930-0303
1939
Kraus, E.H.Kraus, E.H., Slawson, C.B.Variation of Hardness of DiamondAmerican Mineralogist., Vol. 24, PP. 661-676.GlobalDiamond Morphology
DS1930-0304
1939
Kraus, E.H.Kraus, E.H., Slwason, C.B.Variation of Hardness in the DiamondAmerican MINERALOGIST., Vol. 24, No. 11, PP. 661-676.GlobalDiamond Morphology
DS1940-0050
1942
Kraus, E.H.Kraus, E.H., et al.Second Symposium on DiamondsAmerican MINERALOGIST., Vol. 27, No. 3, PP. 162-191.GlobalBlank
DS1940-0051
1942
Kraus, E.H.Kraus, E.H., et al.Symposium on DiamondsAmerican MINERALOGIST., Vol. 27, No. 3, PP. 162-191.South Africa, GlobalGeology, Mineralogy
DS1940-0119
1946
Kraus, E.H.Kraus, E.H., et al.Third Symposium on DiamondsAmerican MINERALOGIST., Vol. 31, No. 3-4, PP. 135-167.GlobalBlank
DS1940-0154
1947
Kraus, E.H.Kraus, E.H., Slawson, C.B.Gems and Gem Materials. #1New York: Mcgraw Hill, UNKNOWN.GlobalKimberley, Gemology
DS1975-0310
1976
Kraus, P. D.Kraus, P. D.Diamond: Birthstone for MayLapidary Journal, Vol. 30, No. 1, PP. 480-482; 484; 486.GlobalBlank
DS201903-0532
2019
Krause, A.J.Mills, B.J.W., Krause, A.J., Scotese, C.R., Hill, D.J., Shields, G.A., Lenton, T.M.Modelling the long term carbon cycle, atmospheric CO2, and Earth surface temperature from late Neoproterozoic to present day.Gondwana Research, Vol. 67, pp. 172-186.Mantlecarbon

Abstract: Over geological timescales, CO2 levels are determined by the operation of the long term carbon cycle, and it is generally thought that changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration have controlled variations in Earth's surface temperature over the Phanerozoic Eon. Here we compile independent estimates for global average surface temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration, and compare these to the predictions of box models of the long term carbon cycle COPSE and GEOCARBSULF. We find a strong relationship between CO2 forcing and temperature from the proxy data, for times where data is available, and we find that current published models reproduce many aspects of CO2 change, but compare poorly to temperature estimates. Models are then modified in line with recent advances in understanding the tectonic controls on carbon cycle source and sink processes, with these changes constrained by modelling 87Sr/86Sr ratios. We estimate CO2 degassing rates from the lengths of subduction zones and rifts, add differential effects of erosion rates on the weathering of silicates and carbonates, and revise the relationship between global average temperature changes and the temperature change in key weathering zones. Under these modifications, models produce combined records of CO2 and temperature change that are reasonably in line with geological and geochemical proxies (e.g. central model predictions are within the proxy windows for >~75% of the time covered by data). However, whilst broad long-term changes are reconstructed, the models still do not adequately predict the timing of glacial periods. We show that the 87Sr/86Sr record is largely influenced by the weathering contributions of different lithologies, and is strongly controlled by erosion rates, rather than being a good indicator of overall silicate chemical weathering rates. We also confirm that a combination of increasing erosion rates and decreasing degassing rates over the Neogene can cause the observed cooling and Sr isotope changes without requiring an overall increase in silicate weathering rates. On the question of a source or sink dominated carbon cycle, we find that neither alone can adequately reconstruct the combination of CO2, temperature and strontium isotope dynamics over Phanerozoic time, necessitating a combination of changes to sources and sinks. Further progress in this field relies on >108?year dynamic spatial reconstructions of ancient tectonics, paleogeography and hydrology. Whilst this is a significant challenge, the latest reconstruction techniques, proxy records and modelling advances make this an achievable target.
DS1910-0067
1910
Krause, C.Krause, C.Notess on the German Southwest Africa DiamondsGeological Society of South Africa Transactions, Vol. 13, PP. 61-64.Southwest Africa, NamibiaGeology, Littoral Diamond Placers
DS1900-0678
1908
Krause, H.L.Krause, H.L.Discussion on the Paper by Voit Entitled Kimberlite Dykes and Pipes. #1Geological Society of South Africa Proceedings, Vol. 10, PP. XLIX-LIII.South Africa, Griqualand West, TransvaalPetrology, Kimberlite Mines And Pipes
DS2002-0604
2002
Krause, S.Gotze, H.J.,Krause, S.The Central Andean gravity high, a relic of an old subduction complex?Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol.14,8,March pp. 799-811.AndesTectonics - subduction
DS200512-0579
2004
Krauss, C.Krauss, C., Chacko, T., Heaman, L., Whiteford, S.Lower crustal xenoliths from the Diavik mine - a preliminary examination of pressure - temperature conditions.32nd Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, Nov. 16-18, p.44. (poster)Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology
DS200712-0580
2007
Krauss, C.Krauss, C., Chacko, T., Heaman, L.M.Petrological and geochronological investigation of lower crustal xenoliths from the Diavik diamond mine, Slave Craton NWT.Geological Association of Canada, Gac-Mac Yellowknife 2007, May 23-25, Volume 32, 1 pg. abstract p.45.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDiavik - geochronology
DS1920-0450
1929
Krauss, F.Krauss, F.Synthetische EdelsteineBerlin: Verlag Von Georg Stilke., 133P.GlobalKimberlite
DS1987-0375
1987
Kravcehnko, S.M.Kravcehnko, S.M., Bagdasraov, Yu.A.Geochemistry, mineralogy and genesis of apatitecontainingmassifs(Maimecha-Kotui carbonatiteprovince) USSR.(Russian)Nauka Moscow, (Russian), 129pRussiaCarbonatite
DS1986-0689
1986
Kravchenko, G.L.Rusakov, N.F., Kravchenko, G.L.The structure of the Chernigov carbonatite massif, the Azov searegion.(Russian)Geol. Zhurn. (Russian), Vol. 46, No. 4, pp. 112-118RussiaPetrology, Carbonatite
DS1997-0635
1997
Kravchenko, S.Kravchenko, S., Schachotko, L.I., Rass, I.T.Moho discontinuity relief and the distribution of kimberlites and carbonatites in the northern SiberianGlobal Tectonics and Metallogeny, Vol. 6, No. 2, March pp. 137-140.Russia, SiberiaMantle - MOHO, Platform
DS1998-0807
1998
Kravchenko, S.Kravchenko, S.Giant carbonatite nepheline syenite concentric massifs with the largest rare earth elements (REE),niobium, phosphate deposits.Global Tectonics and Metallogeny, Vol. 6, 3-4, Apr. pp. 191-194.RussiaCarbonatite, Structure
DS2001-0296
2001
Kravchenko, S.Elming, S.A., Mikhalova, N.P., Kravchenko, S.Paleomagnetism of Proterozoic rocks from the Ukrainian Shield: new tectonic reconstructions of the Shields.Tectonophysics, Vol. 339, No. 1-2, pp. 19-38.Ukraine, Europe, FennoscandiaTectonics - paleomagnetics
DS1980-0195
1980
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., Yegorov, I.S., et al.Rare Earths and Strontium in Apatites As Indicators of Rock genesis for the Ultramafic Alkaline Formation of the Maymecha-kotny Province.Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya)., 1980, No. 12, PP. 1835-1843.RussiaRare Earth Elements (ree)
DS1984-0432
1984
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., Katayeva, Z.T., Serdobova, L.I., Lyapunov, S.M.Lateral zoning of alkalic ultramafic provinces, as expressed in the distribution of mean trace element concentrations in like rocks and mineralsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 274, Jan-Feb. pp. 200-204RussiaCarbonatite, Odikhincha, Rare Earth
DS1985-0367
1985
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., Rass, I.T.Alkaline Ultrabasic Formation- the Paragenesis of 2 Comagmatic Series.Doklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 283, No. 4, PP. 973-978.RussiaBlank
DS1986-0462
1986
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., Bagdasarov, Yu.A., Kirichenko, V.T.Geochemistry of barium bearing weathering crusts in the Yesseymassif, Maymecha Kotuy Province North SiberiaGeochem. Internat, Vol. No. 2, pp. 17-27RussiaGeochemistry, Carbonatite
DS1986-0662
1986
Kravchenko, S.M.Rass, I.T., Kravchenko, S.M., Laputina, I.P.Pyroxene zoning and the genesis of alkalic ultramafic rocksDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 280, No. 1-6, October pp. 117-122RussiaAlkaline rocks
DS1988-0376
1988
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., Bagdasarov, Yu.A., Lapin, A.V.Geological and mineral genetic new dat a on carbonatite formations.(Russian)Geologii i Geofiziki, (Russian), No. 11, PP. 22-31RussiaCarbonatite
DS1990-0886
1990
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., Belyakov, A.Yu., Kubyshev, A.I., Tolstov, A.V.Scandium rare earth yttrium niobium ores - a new economic resourceInternational Geology Review, Vol. 32, No. 3, March pp. 280-284BrazilCarbonatite, Rare earths Araxa
DS1991-1362
1991
Kravchenko, S.M.Pokrovskiy, B.G., Belyakov, A.Yu., Kravchenko, S.M., GryaznovaIsotope dat a on the origin of carbonatites and mineralized strat a in the Tomtor intrusion, northwest YakutiaGeochemistry International, Vol. 28, No. 4, pp. 93-101RussiaCarbonatite, Geochronology
DS1992-0891
1992
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., et al.Calcium content increasing in mantle alkaline-ultrabasic melts by increasing of melting depthsProceedings of the 29th International Geological Congress. Held Japan, Vol. 2, abstract p. 539MantleModel,mantle, Kimberlites
DS1992-0892
1992
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., Belyakov, A.Yu., et al.Khibiny Massif sodic nepheline syenites as likely derivatives of a high Calcium alkali ultrabasic magmaGeochemistry International, Vol. 29, No. 12, pp. 75-86RussiaAlkaline rocks
DS1993-0850
1993
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M.Evolution of igneous activity of the mantleDoklady Academy of Sciences USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 319, No. 5, April 1993 pp. 116-122MantleCrust
DS1993-0851
1993
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M.Evolution of igneous activity of the mantleDoklady Academy of Sciences USSR, Vol. 318, pp. 116-122.MantleKimberlite
DS1993-0852
1993
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M.Kimberlites -different deep mantle magmas differentiated series...(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR*(in Russian), Vol. 332, No. 2, Sept. pp. 209-213.RussiaMantle magmas, Kimberlites
DS1993-0853
1993
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., Belyakov, A.Yu., Pokrovskiy, B.G.Geochemistry and origin of the Tomtor massif in the North SiberianPlatformGeochemistry International, Vol. 30, No. 3, pp. 20-36.RussiaAlkali ultrabasic complex, Rare earth
DS1994-0950
1994
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., Belyakov, A.Yu., Pokrovskiy, B.G.Geochemistry and origin of the Tomtor Massif (North Siberian Platform)Doklady Academy of Sciences Acad. Science, Vol. 322, pp. 170-176.Russia, SiberiaCarbonatite, Tomtor Massif
DS1995-1018
1995
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M.Giant carbonatite nepheline syenite concentric massifs with the biggest rare earth elements (REE),niobium, phosphorus deposits.Iagod Giant Ore Deposits Workshop, J. Kutina, 9p.RussiaCarbonatite, Deposit -Tomtor, Khibina, Lovozero
DS1995-1019
1995
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M.The Tomtor alkaline ultrabasic massif and related rare earth elements (REE)-Nb deposits NorthernSiberia.Economic Geology, Vol. 90, No. 3, May pp. 676-689.Russia, SiberiaAlkaline rocks, Carbonatite
DS1995-1020
1995
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., Schachoto, L.I., Rass, I.T.The MOHO discontinuity relief and the distribution of kimberlites and carbonatites over the northern craton.Iagod Giant Ore Deposits Workshop, J. Kutina, 10p.RussiaSiberian Platform, Distribution -kimberlites
DS1996-0784
1996
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M.The discovery of the Tomtor Massif in northern part of the SiberianPlatform. comparison with Khibina, KolaGlobal Tectonics and Metallogeny, Vol. 6, No. 1, pp. 41-55Russia, Anabar ShieldCarbonatite, alkaline, Tomtor Massif
DS1996-0785
1996
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M.The discovery of the Tomtor Massif in the northern part of Siberian Platform and comparison to Khibin a MassifGlobal Tectonics and Metallogeny, Vol. 6, No. 1, pp. 41-54.Russia, SiberiaCarbonatite, Deposit -Tomtor, Khibina
DS1996-1222
1996
Kravchenko, S.M.Rundquist, D.V., Kravchenko, S.M.Economic superaccumulations of metals in the lithosphereGeology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 38, No. 3, pp. 265-270RussiaGiant ore deposits -concepts, brief overview, Economics
DS1996-1223
1996
Kravchenko, S.M.Rundquist, D.V., Kravchenko, S.M.Economic superaccumulations of metals in the lithosphereGeology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 38, No. 3, pp. 265-270.Russia, GlobalDiamonds, Giant ore deposits
DS1998-0808
1998
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M.Kimberlite types 1A, 1B and II as series from different mantle depths7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 471-2.South Africa, Russia, AustraliaClassification, Deposit - Gros Brukkaros, Monastery
DS1998-1216
1998
Kravchenko, S.M.Rass, I.T., Kravchenko, S.M.Melilite bearing rocks within alkaline ultrabasic complexes: derivatives from SiO2 poor, Ca rich mantle..7th. Kimberlite Conference abstract, pp. 725-6.Russia, Kola, KareolMelilite
DS2000-0738
2000
Kravchenko, S.M.Osokin, E.D., Altukhov, E.N., Kravchenko, S.M.Criteria and formation and localization conditions of giant rare element deposits.Geol. Ore Dep., Vol. 42, No. 4, pp. 351-7.RussiaCarbonatite
DS2001-0938
2001
Kravchenko, S.M.Pokrovskii, B.G., Kravchenko, S.M.Stable isotopes in the Khibiny and Lovozero Massifs: magma sources and conditions postmagmatic alterationsGeochem, International, Vol. 39, No. S1 S88-98.RussiaGeochronology
DS2002-0897
2002
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M.Lower ore horizon of the Tomtor Massif, Polar Siberia: carbonatized volcanic rocks (lamproites).Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 386, 7, Sept-Oct, pp. 757-62.Russia, SiberiaLamproites
DS2003-0748
2003
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., et al.Porphyritic potassium-rich alkaline-ultrabasic rocks of the Central Tomtor massif arcticRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 44, No. 9, pp. 906-918Siberiaalkaline rocks
DS2003-0749
2003
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., Czamanske, G., Fedorenko, V.A.Geochemistry of carbonatites of the Tomtor MassifGeochemistry International, Vol. 41, 6, pp. 545-58.RussiaCarbonatite
DS2003-0750
2003
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., Czamanske, G., Fedorenko, V.A.Geochemistry of carbonatites of the Tomtor MassifGeochemistry International, Vol. 41, 6, pp. 545-59.RussiaCarbonatite
DS200412-1053
2003
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M., Czamanske, G., Fedorenko, V.A.Geochemistry of carbonatites of the Tomtor Massif.Geochemistry International, Vol. 41, 6, pp. 545-58.RussiaCarbonatite
DS200512-0580
2003
Kravchenko, S.M.Kravchenko, S.M.Porphyritic potassium rich alkaline ultrabasic rocks of the Central Tomtor massif ( Arctic Siberia) carbonatized lamproites.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 44, 9, pp. 870-883.Russia, SiberiaLamproite
DS1997-0619
1997
Kravchenko, V.M.Korbeinikov, A.F., Kravchenko, V.M., Prokopchuk, S.I.Geochemical background and anomalies of noble metals in Upper Archean volcanic Terrigenous formations...Geochemistry International, Vol. 34, No. 12, pp. 1032-40Russia, UkraineGreenstone belts, Aldan, Ukrainian shields
DS201112-0563
2011
Kravchiniski, V.A.Kuzmin, M.I., Yarmolyuk, V.V., Kravchiniski, V.A.Absolute paleogeographic reconstructions of the Siberian Craton in the Phanerozoic: a problem of time estimation of superplumes.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 437, 1, pp. 311-315.Russia, SiberiaMagmatism - age, hot spots, African comparison
DS1998-0561
1998
Kravchinsky, V.Halim, N., Kravchinsky, V., et al.A paleomagnetic study from the Mongol - Okhotsk region: rotated early Cretaceous volcanics and remagnetized..Earth and Plan. Sci. Lett, Vol. 159, pp. 133-45GlobalOkhotsk region, suture zones, tectonics, Fold belts
DS2002-0898
2002
Kravchinsky, V.A.Kravchinsky, V.A., Konstantinov, K.M., Courtillot, V.Paleomagnetism of East Siberian traps and kimberlites: two new poles and paleogeographic reconstructions...Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 148, No. 1, pp. 1-33.Russia, SiberiaPaleomagnetics - geochronology 360-250 Ma, Geophysics - magnetics
DS200612-0744
2006
Kravchinsky, V.A.Kravchinsky, V.A., Konstantinov, Courtillot, Savrasov, Valet, Cherniy, Mishenin, ParasotkaPaleomagnetism of East Siberian traps and kimberlites: two new poles and paleogeographic reconstructions at about 360 and 250 Ma.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 148, 1, pp. 1-33.Russia, SiberiaMaleomagnetics
DS200912-0414
2009
Kravchinsky, V.A.Kravchinsky, V.A., Eccles, D.R., Zhang, R., Cannon, M.Paleomagnetic dating of the northern Alberta kimberlites. K5, K6Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 46, pp. 231-245.Canada, AlbertaDeposit - Buffalo Head Hills - geochronology
DS201012-0419
2010
Kravchinsky, V.A.Kuzmin, M.I., Yarmolyuk, V.V., Kravchinsky, V.A.Phanerozoic hot spot traces and paleogeographic reconstructions of the Siberian continent based on interaction with the Africa large low shear velocity province.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 102, 2, pp. 29-59.AfricaPaleowandering
DS1995-1021
1995
Kravchuk, I.F.Kravchuk, I.F., Ivanova, G.F., Malinin, S.D.rare earth elements (REE) fractionation in acid fluid magma systemsGeochemistry International, Vol. 32, No. 11, Nov. 1, pp. 60-68RussiaMagma, Rare earths
DS1987-0376
1987
Kravechencko, S.M.Kravechencko, S.M., Rass, I.T.The alkalic ultramafic rock association. a 'paragenesis' of two comagmaticseriesDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol.283, No. 1-6, pp. 111-116RussiaAlkalic rocks, Genesis
DS1995-1022
1995
Kravechenko, S.M.Kravechenko, S.M.Kimberlites: combination of differentiated series of mantle magmas from various depths.Doklady Academy of Sciences USSR, Vol. 333, No. 8, August, pp. 46-52.RussiaKimberlites, Petrology
DS1997-0636
1997
Kravechenko, S.M.Kravechenko, S.M., Laputina, I.P., Krasilnikova, I.G.Geochemistry and genesis of rich scandium (Sc) rare earth elements (REE) yttrium niobium ores at the Tomtor deposit, northern Siberian PlatformGeochemistry International, Vol. 34, No. 10, pp. 847-63.Russia, SiberiaCarbonatite, Deposit - Tomtor
DS1975-1106
1979
Kravtsov, A.I.Kravtsov, A.I., et al.Composition and Isotopes of Gases in the Mir Kimberlite PipeDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 245, No. 1-6, PP. 214-216.RussiaBlank
DS200712-0581
2007
Kravtsov, T.Kravtsov, T., Woodard, J.Petrology of shoshonitic lamprophyres and related carbonatites in the Svecofennian Domain.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A521.Europe, FinlandLake Syvari
DS201312-0340
2013
Krawcznski, M.J.Grove, T.L., Till, C.B., Krawcznski, M.J.The role of H2O in subduction zone magmatism.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 40, pp. 413-439.MantleMagmatism, water
DS202007-1172
2020
Krawcznski, M.J.Prissel, K.B., Krawcznski, M.J., Van Orman, J.A.Fe-Mg and Fe-Mn interdiffusion in ilmenite with implications for geospeedometry using oxides. ( mentions kimberlites)Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 175, 62 17p. PdfMantleilmenite

Abstract: The Fe-Mg and Fe-Mn interdiffusion coefficients for ilmenite have been determined as a function of temperature and crystallographic orientation. Diffusion annealing experiments were conducted at 1.5 GPa between 800 and 1100 °C. For Fe-Mg interdiffusion, each diffusion couple consisted of an ilmenite polycrystal and an oriented single crystal of geikielite. The activation energy (Q) and pre-exponential factor (D0) for Fe-Mg diffusion in the ilmenite polycrystal were found to be Q = 188±15 kJ mol-1 and logD0 = -6.0±0.6 m2 s-1. For the geikielite single crystal, Fe-Mg interdiffusion has Q=220±16 kJ mol-1 and logD0=-4.6±0.7 m2 s-1. Our results indicate that crystallographic orientation did not significantly affect diffusion rates. For Fe-Mn interdiffusion, each diffusion couple consisted of one ilmenite polycrystal and one Mn-bearing ilmenite polycrystal. For Fe-Mn interdiffusion, Q = 264±30 kJ mol-1 and logD0 = -2.9±1.3 m2 s-1 in the ilmenite. We did not find a significant concentration dependence for the Fe-Mg and Fe-Mn interdiffusion coefficients. In comparing our experimental results for cation diffusion in ilmenite with those previously reported for hematite, we have determined that cation diffusion is faster in ilmenite than in hematite at temperatures <1100 °C. At oxygen fugacities near the wüstite-magnetite buffer, Fe and Mn diffusion rates are similar for ilmenite and titanomagnetite. We apply these experimentally determined cation diffusion rates to disequilibrium observed in ilmenites from natural volcanic samples to estimate the time between perturbation and eruption for the Bishop Tuff, Fish Canyon Tuff, Mt. Unzen, Mt. St. Helens, and kimberlites. When integrated with natural observations of chemically zoned ilmenite and constraints on pre-eruptive temperature and grain size, our experimentally determined diffusivities for ilmenite can be used to estimate a minimum time between magmatic perturbation and eruption on the timescale of hours to months.
DS2002-0899
2002
Krawczyk, C.M.Krawczyk, C.M., Eilts, F., Lassen, A., Thybo, H.Seismic evidence of Caledonian deformed crust and uppermost mantle structures in the northern part of the Trans European Suture Zone, SW Baltic Sea.Tectonophysics, Vol. 360, 1-4, pp. 215-44.Europe, Baltic SeaTectonics
DS201212-0264
2012
Krawczynski, M.J.Grove, T.L., Till, C.B., Krawczynski, M.J.The role of H2O in subduction zone magmatism.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 40, pp. 413-439.MantleSubduction
DS201312-0339
2013
Krawczynski, M.J.Grove, T.L., Holbig, E.S., Barr, J.A., Till, C.B., Krawczynski, M.J.Inclusions in halite - evidence of mixing of evaporite xenoliths and kimberlites of Udachnaya -East pipe (Siberia).Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 166, pp. 887-910.MantleMelting
DS201312-0342
2013
Krawczynski, M.J.Grove, T.L., Holbig, E.S., Barr, J.A., Till, C.B., Krawczynski, M.J.Melts of garnet lherzolite: experiments, models and comparison to melts of pyroxenite and carbonated lherzolite.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 166, pp. 887-910.South America, BrazilGeochronology (~91to 78)
DS200612-0270
2006
Krawiec, A.W.Connelly, J.N., Thrane, K., Krawiec, A.W., Garde, A.A.Linking the Paleoproterozoic Nagssugtoqidian and Rinkian orogens through Disko Bugt region of West Greenland.Journal of the Geological Society, Vol. 163, 2, pp. 319-335.Europe, GreenlandOrogen - not specific to diamonds
DS2002-1740
2002
Krawinkel, H.Wozazek, S., Krawinkel, H.Development of the Cote d'Ivorie Basin: reading provenance, sediment dispersal and geodynamic implications from heavy minerals.International Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 91, No. 5, Oct. pp. 906-21.Ivory CoastGeomorphology - sedimenology - not specific to diamonds
DS201212-0014
2012
Kraych, A.Amodeo, J., Carrez, Ph., Cordier, P., Gouriet, K., Kraych, A.Modelling dislocation and plasticity in MgO and MgSiO3 perovskite under lower mantle conditions.emc2012 @ uni-frankfurt.de, 1p. AbstractMantlePerovskite
DS2003-0655
2003
Krebs, J.D.Jensen, S.M., Secher, K., Rasmussen, T.M., Tukiainen, T., Krebs, J.D., Schifth, F.Distribution and magnetic signatures of kimberlitic rocks in the Sarfartoq region8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 8, POSTER abstractGreenlandBlank
DS200412-0914
2003
Krebs, J.D.Jensen, S.M., Secher, K., Rasmussen, T.M., Tukiainen, T., Krebs, J.D., Schifth, F.Distribution and magnetic signatures of kimberlitic rocks in the Sarfartoq region, southern West Greenland.8 IKC Program, Session 8, POSTER abstractEurope, GreenlandDiamond exploration
DS201605-0857
2016
Krebs, M.Krebs, M.The geochemical link between micro-and macro-diamonds, an example from Misery, NWT.DCO Edmonton Diamond Workshop, June 8-10Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Misery, microdiamonds
DS201705-0870
2017
Krebs, M.Pearson, G., Krebs, M., Stachel. T., Woodland, S., Chinn, I., Kong, J.Trace elements in gem-quality diamonds: origin and evolution of diamond-forming fluid inclusions.European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2017, Vienna April 23-28, 1p. 19281 AbstractTechnologyDiamond inclusions
DS201312-0516
2013
Krebs, M.Y.Krebs, M.Y., Pearson, D.G., Stachel, T., Stern, R.A., Nowicki, T., Cairns, S.Variability in diamond population characteristics across the size range 0.2- 2-4 mm - a case study based on diamonds from Misery ( Ekati mine).2013 Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts, p. 34-35.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Misery
DS201412-0479
2014
Krebs, M.Y.Krebs, M.Y., Pearson, D.G., Stachel, T., Stern, R.A., Nowicki, T., Cairns, S.Variability in diamond population characteristics across the size range 0.2-3.4 MM - a case study based on diamonds from Misery ( Ekati mine).Geological Society of America Conference Vancouver Oct. 19-22, 1p. AbstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDiavik mine - Misery
DS201604-0616
2016
Krebs, M.Y.Krebs, M.Y., Pearson, D.G., Stachel, T., Stern, R.A., Nowicki, T., Cairns, S.Using microdiamonds in kimberlite diamond grade prediction: a case study of the variability in diamond population characteristics across the size range 0.2 to 3.4 mm in Misery kimberlite, Ekati mine, NWT, Canada.Economic Geology, Vol. 111, 2, pp. 503-525.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMicrodiamonds - Misery

Abstract: First predictions of the macrodiamond grade of newly discovered kimberlites are commonly obtained using size frequency distributions of microdiamonds. The success of this approach suggests a common origin of microdiamonds and macrodiamonds, an implication not yet conclusively established or disproved. In contrast to previous comparative studies on microdiamonds and macrodiamonds from single deposits, here all diamonds analyzed originate from the same microdiamond samples (558 diamonds, ranging from 0.212 to 3.35 mm). The diamonds were analyzed for their carbon isotope compositions and nitrogen characteristics, and, based on this dataset, statistical comparisons were conducted across the size range to assess cogenesis. As a whole, the Misery diamond suite shows high nitrogen contents (median = 850 at. ppm), a bimodal distribution in time-averaged mantle residence temperatures (two distinct subpopulations in mantle residence temperatures: =1,125° and =1,175°C), a high degree of platelet degradation, and d13C compositions that are isotopically slightly heavier (median = -4.4‰) than the global median. Statistical comparisons of the various size classes indicate the presence of subtly different subpopulations at Misery; however, the nature and magnitude of these geochemical differences are very small in the context of the global diamond database and are viewed as petrogenetically insignificant. The general geochemical similarity of diamonds from different size fractions at Misery reinforces the use of size-frequency analysis to predict diamond grade in kimberlite diamond deposits.
DS201611-2095
2016
Krebs, M.Y.Anzolini, C., Angel, R.J., Merlini, M., Derzsi, M., Tokar, K., Milani, S., Krebs, M.Y., Brenker, F.E., Nestola, F., Harris, J.W.Depth of formation of CaSi)3 - walstromite included in super -deep diamonds.Lithos, in press available 43p.South America, Brazil, Mato GrossoDeposit - Juina

Abstract: "Super-deep" diamonds are thought to crystallize between 300 and 800 km depth because some of the inclusions trapped within them are considered to be the products of retrograde transformation from lower mantle or transition zone precursors. In particular, single inclusion CaSiO3-walstromite is believed to derive from CaSiO3-perovskite, although its real depth of origin has never been proven. Our aim is therefore to determine for the first time the pressure of formation of the diamond-CaSiO3-walstromite pair by “single-inclusion elastic barometry” and to determine whether CaSiO3-walstromite derives from CaSiO3-perovskite or not. We investigated several single phases and assemblages of Ca-silicate inclusions still trapped in a diamond coming from Juina (Brazil) by in-situ analyses (single-crystal X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopy) and we obtained a minimum entrapment pressure of ~ 5.7 GPa (~ 180 km) at 1500 K. However, the observed coexistence of CaSiO3-walstromite, larnite (ß-Ca2SiO4) and CaSi2O5-titanite in one multiphase inclusion within the same diamond indicates that the sample investigated is sub-lithospheric with entrapment pressure between ~ 9.5 and ~ 11.5 GPa at 1500 K, based on experimentally-determined phase equilibria. In addition, thermodynamic calculations suggested that, within a diamond, single inclusions of CaSiO3-walstromite cannot derive from CaSiO3-perovskite, unless the diamond around the inclusion expands by ~ 30% in volume.
DS201812-2831
2018
Krebs, M.Y.Krebs, M.Y., Pearson, D.G., Stachel, T., Laiginhas, F., Woodland, S., Chinn, I., Kong, J.A common parentage - Low abundance trace element data of gem diamonds reveals similar fluids to fibrous diamonds. ( silicate/sulphide)Lithos, doi.org/10.1016/ jlithos.2018.11.025 49p.Canada, Ontario, Attawapiskat, Africa, South Africadeposit - Victor, Finsch, Newlands

Abstract: Quantitative trace element data from high-purity gem diamonds from the Victor Mine, Ontario, Canada as well as near-gem diamonds from peridotite and eclogite xenoliths from the Finsch and Newlands mines, South Africa, acquired using an off-line laser ablation method show that we see the same spectrum of fluids in both high-purity gem and near-gem diamonds that was previously documented in fibrous diamonds. “Planed” and “ribbed” trace element patterns characterize not only the high-density fluid (HDF) inclusions in fibrous diamonds but also in gem diamonds. Two diamonds from two Finsch harzburgite xenoliths show trace element patterns similar to those of saline fluids, documenting the involvement of saline fluids in the precipitation of gem diamonds, further strengthening the link between the parental fluids of both gem and fibrous diamonds. Differences in trace element characteristics are evident between Victor diamonds containing silicate inclusions compared with Victor diamonds containing sulphide inclusions. The sulphide-bearing diamonds show lower levels of inter-element fractionation and more widely varying siderophile element concentrations - indicating that the silicate and sulphide-bearing diamonds likely formed by gradations of the same processes, via melt-rock reaction or from a subtly different fluid source. The shallow negative LREEN-HREEN slopes displayed by the Victor diamonds establish a signature indicative of original derivation of the diamond forming agent during major melting (~10% melt). Consequently, this signature must have been passed on to HDFs separating from such silicate melts.
DS201812-2860
2018
Krebs, M.Y.Pearson, D.G., Liu, J., Smith, C.B., Mather, K.A., Krebs, M.Y., Bulanova, G.P., Kobussen, A.F.Murowa deposit: Characteristics and origin of the mantle root beneath the Murowa diamond mine: implications for craton and diamond formation.Society of Economic Geology Geoscience and Exploration of the Argyle, Bunder, Diavik, and Murowa Diamond Deposits, Special Publication no. 20, pp. 403-424.Africa, Zimbabwedeposit - Murowa
DS201902-0288
2019
Krebs, M.Y.Krebs, M.Y., Pearson, D.G., Stachel, T., Laiginhas, F., Woodland, S., Chinn, I., Kong, J.A common parentage low abundance trace element data of gem diamonds reveals similar fluids to fibrous diamonds.Lithos, Vol. 324, 1, pp. 356-370.Canada, Ontario, Africa, South Africadeposit - Victor, Finsch, Newlands

Abstract: Quantitative trace element data from high-purity gem diamonds from the Victor Mine, Ontario, Canada as well as near-gem diamonds from peridotite and eclogite xenoliths from the Finsch and Newlands mines, South Africa, acquired using an off-line laser ablation method show that we see the same spectrum of fluids in both high-purity gem and near-gem diamonds that was previously documented in fibrous diamonds. "Planed" and "ribbed" trace element patterns characterize not only the high-density fluid (HDF) inclusions in fibrous diamonds but also in gem diamonds. Two diamonds from two Finsch harzburgite xenoliths show trace element patterns similar to those of saline fluids, documenting the involvement of saline fluids in the precipitation of gem diamonds, further strengthening the link between the parental fluids of both gem and fibrous diamonds. Differences in trace element characteristics are evident between Victor diamonds containing silicate inclusions compared with Victor diamonds containing sulphide inclusions. The sulphide-bearing diamonds show lower levels of inter-element fractionation and more widely varying siderophile element concentrations - indicating that the silicate and sulphide-bearing diamonds likely formed by gradations of the same processes, via melt-rock reaction or from a subtly different fluid source. The shallow negative LREEN-HREEN slopes displayed by the Victor diamonds establish a signature indicative of original derivation of the diamond forming agent during major melting (~10% melt). Consequently, this signature must have been passed on to HDFs separating from such silicate melts.
DS201906-1354
2019
Krebs, M.Y.Timmerman, S., Krebs, M.Y., Pearson, D.G., Honda, M.Diamond forming media through time - trace element and noble gas systematics of diamonds formed over 3 billion years of Earth's history.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, in press available 29p.Africa, South Africa, Botswanadeposit - Koffiefontein, Letlhakane, Orapa, Finsch, De Beers Pool

Abstract: Ten individual gem-quality monocrystalline diamonds of known peridotite/eclogite paragenesis from Southern Africa (Koffiefontein, Letlhakane, Orapa) were studied for trace element concentrations and He and Ar abundances and isotopic compositions. In addition, two samples, consisting of pooled fragments of gem-quality peridotitic diamonds from Finsch and DeBeers Pool respectively, were analysed for noble gases. Previous studies (Richardson et al., 1984; Pearson et al., 1998; Gress et al., 2017; Timmerman et al., 2017) provided age constraints of 0.09, 1.0-1.1, 1.7, 2.3, and 3.2-3.4?Ga on mineral inclusions in the studied diamonds, allowing us to study trace elements and noble gases over 3 Gyr of geological time. Concentrations of trace elements in the diamonds are very low - a few hundred ppt to several tens of ppbs - and are likely dependent on the amount of sub-micron inclusions present. Trace element patterns and trace element/3He ratios of the studied monocrystalline diamonds are similar to those in fibrous diamonds, suggesting that trace elements and stable noble gas isotopes reside within the same locations in diamond and track the same processes that are reflected in the trace element patterns. We cannot discern any temporal differences in these geochemical tracers, suggesting that the processes generating them have been occurring over at least the past 2.3?Ga. 3He/4He ratios decrease and 4He and 40Ar* contents increase with increasing age of peridotitic and some eclogitic diamonds, showing the importance of in-situ radiogenic 4He and 40Ar ingrowth by the decay of U-Th-Sm and K respectively. For most gem-quality monocrystalline diamonds, uncertainties in the 3He/4He evolution of the continental lithospheric mantle combined with large analytical uncertainties and possible spatial variability in U-Th-Sm concentrations limit our ability to provide estimates of diamond formation ages using 4He ingrowth. However, the limited observed 4He ingrowth (low U?+?Th/3He) together with a R/Ra value of 5.3 for peridotitic diamond K306 is comparable to the present-day sub-continental lithospheric mantle value and supports the young diamond formation age found by Re-Os dating of sulphides in the same diamond by Pearson et al. (1998). After correction for in-situ radiogenic 4He produced since diamond formation a large variation in 3He/4He remains in ~1?Ga old eclogitic diamonds that is suggested to result from the variable influence of subducted altered oceanic crust that has low 3He/4He. Hence, the 3He/4He isotope tracer supports an origin of the diamond-forming fluids from recycled oceanic crust for eclogitic diamonds, as indicated by other geochemical proxies.
DS201906-1355
2019
Krebs, M.Y.Timmerman, S., Yeow, H., Honda, M., Howell, D., Jaques, A.L., Krebs, M.Y., Woodland, S., Pearson, D.G., Avila, J.N., Ireland, T.R.U-Th/He systematics of fluid rich 'fibrous' diamonds - evidence for pre- and syn-kimberlite eruption ages.Chemical Geology, Vol. 515, pp. 22-36.Africa, Democratic Republic of Congo, Botswanadeposit - Jwaneng

Abstract: The physical characteristics and impermeability of diamonds allow them to retain radiogenic 4He produced in-situ from radioactive decay of U, Th and Sm. This study investigates the U-Th/He systematics of fibrous diamonds and provides a first step in quantification of the uncertainties associated with determining the in-situ produced radiogenic 4He concentration. Factors determining the total amount of measured helium in a diamond are the initial trapped 4He, the in-situ produced radiogenic 4He, a-implantation, a-ejection, diffusion, and cosmogenic 3He production. Alpha implantation is negligible, and diffusion is slow, but the cosmogenic 3He component can be significant for alluvial diamonds as the recovery depth is unknown. Therefore, samples were grouped based on similar major and trace element compositions to determine possible genetically related samples. A correlation between the 4He and U-Th concentrations approximates the initial 4He concentration at the axis-intersect and age as the slope. In this study, the corrections were applied to eight fibrous cubic diamonds from the Democratic Republic of the Congo and two diamonds from the Jwaneng kimberlite in Botswana. A correlation exists between the 4He and U-Th concentrations of the group ZRC2, 3, and 6, and of the group CNG2, 3, and 4 and both correlations deviate significantly from a 71?Ma kimberlite eruption isochron. The U-Th/He dating method appears a promising new approach to date metasomatic fluid events that result in fibrous diamond formation and this is the first evidence that some fibrous diamonds can be formed 10s to 100s Myr before the kimberlite eruption.
DS201908-1783
2019
Krebs, M.Y.Krebs, M.Y., Pearson, D.G.Determining the provenance pf coloured gemstones.www.minsocam.org/ MSA/Centennial/ MSA_Centennial _Symposium.html The next 100 years of mineral science, June 20-21, p. 36. AbstractAsia, Pakistan, Kashmir, South America, Colombiasapphire, emerald

Abstract: The geographic origin of gemstones has emerged as one of the major factors affecting their sale on the colored stone market, in large part due to the prestige attributed to certain regions (e.g. sapphires from Kashmir or emeralds from Colombia) but also because of political, environmental and ethical considerations. Identifying the geographic provenance of a colored stone has, therefore, developed into one of the main tasks for gem-testing laboratories, providing a strong motivation to establish accurate scientific methods. The properties and features of individual gemstones reflect the specific geological conditions of their formation and the main challenge of origin determination is to find the link between the two. In addition, access to a complete collection of authentic reference samples and analytical data for all economically relevant mining areas worldwide is key. Different techniques have been developed for determining gemstone provenance, including a range of gemological observations, and spectroscopic, chemical, and isotopic analyses[1]. These have proven useful in distinguishing the origin of gemstones from different geological settings but for many gemstones (including ruby and sapphire) to reliably distinguish between gems from different geographic regions that share a similar geological setting is not always possible. So far, no unique fingerprint exists, and the geographic origin remains a challenge, especially for high-clarity stones, emphasizing the need for a more powerful tool. Here we will give an overview of the current techniques, and outline some of the challenges and limitations of geographical origin determination of colored gemstones. In addition, we present new trace element data and the first radiogenic isotope compositions (Sr and Pb) obtained for ruby and sapphire from several different localities of geologically similar deposits. The acquisition of quantitative data of a range of ultra-trace elements along with the most commonly observed elements in ruby and sapphire (Mg, Fe, Ti, Ca, Ga, V and Cr) makes it possible to explore new elements as potential provenance discriminators. Among the elements consistently above the limits of quantification (Zn, Nb, Ni, and Pb), Ni in particular shows promise as a discriminator for amphibolite-type ruby. Measured 87Sr/86Sr and Pb isotope ratios clearly show distinct ranges for the different localities of amphibolitetype ruby, ranges for marble-related ruby and metamorphic blue sapphires from different geographic regions overlap. These results suggest that radiogenic isotopes potentially offer a powerful means of provenance discrimination for different localities of amphibolite-type ruby, their potential for geographical origin determination among marble-hosted ruby and metamorphic sapphire, however, appears to be limited.
DS202002-0197
2019
Krebs, M.Y.Krebs, M.Y., Pearson, D.G., Fagan, A.J., Bussweiler, Y., Sarkar, C.The application of trace elements and Sr-Pb isotopes to dating and tracing ruby formation: the Aappaluttoq deposit, SW Greenland.Chemical Geology, Vol. 523, pp. 42-58.Europe, Greenlandruby

Abstract: Trace element characteristics of rubies from the Aappaluttoq deposit, SW Greenland, were measured using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), laser ablation - inductively coupled plasma-time of flight-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-TOF-MS) and offline laser ablation followed by solution ICP-MS. LA-ICP-TOF-MS - applied to rubies for the first time - effectively maps trace element spatial variation in these gems. With the exception of a small number of elements that can substitute for Al3+ in the crystal structure (e.g., Ti, Fe, V, Cr, Mg), trace element mapping clearly demonstrates that most elements such as Th, U, Sr and Rb are hosted in mineral and fluid inclusions or are present along fractures. Primitive mantle normalized trace element patterns show characteristics that are broadly correlative to mineral inclusions within the analysed rubies. These minerals include rutile (enrichment of HFSE over LREE, high Ta/Nb and Hf/Zr ratios and low Th/U ratios), phlogopite (enrichment in Rb and Ba and positive Sr anomalies), and zircon (extreme enrichment in Zr-Hf, U and Th, HREE enrichment over LREE and positive Ce anomalies). The sample suite analysed here is derived from a bulk sample of ore composed of three different rock types (sapphirine-gedrite, leucogabbro and phlogopitite). Two different populations of ruby were identified at Aappaluttoq; these can be defined on the basis of their different V content within the corundum lattice. Therefore, V content may be able to geochemically define rubies from different host rocks within the same deposit. Using offline laser ablation followed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) we measured the radiogenic isotope compositions in ruby for the first time. A Pb-Pb isochron age of 2686 +300/-74?Ma, was defined for gem formation at Aappaluttoq. We believe that this is the first ever direct age determined on a ruby suite, independent of associated minerals, derived by bulk sampling sub-micron to micron sized inclusions in the corundum lattice. This age likely reflects the re-crystallization and re-setting of the ruby (and its U-Pb system) during the Neoarchean in SW Greenland, due to regional granulite to upper-amphibolite facies metamorphism.
DS202008-1444
2020
Krebs, M.Y.Smit, K.V., Pearson, D.G., Krebs, M.Y., Woodland, S.Trace elements of rare CH4-bearing fluids in Zimbabwe diamonds.Goldschmidt 2020, 1p. AbstractAfrica, Zimbabwedeposit - Marange

Abstract: Marange diamonds (Zimbabwe) contain both fluid-poor (gem-quality) and fluid-bearing growth zones with abundant CH4. As such, they provide the unique opportunity to compare trace element compositions of CH4-bearing diamonds with those of carbonatitic and saline high density fluid (HDF)-bearing diamonds (gem-quality and fibrous) to obtain an overview of mantle source fluids for diamond growth. HDF’s in fibrous diamonds and some gem-quality diamonds have been linked to subduction of surficial material, consistent with the global link between diamond age and collisional tectonic events. Even though Marange diamonds have +d15N indicative of surficial recycling, they do not display the expected Eu or Sr anomalies. Fibrous diamonds have the most fractionated REE patterns, with negligible HREE and high (La/Yb)N ˜ 100- 10000. Gem-quality diamonds have highly variable (La/Yb)N; the most unfractionated HDF’s are in Victor and Cullinan diamonds with low (La/Yb)N <76. HDF’s in Marange diamonds are intermediate between these two extremes, with (La/Yb)N = 23-240. Differences in (La/Yb)N between different diamond suites relate either to varying initial compositions (where low (La/Yb)N reflects derivation during higher degrees of melting) or to the increasing interaction of HDF’s in fibrous diamonds with mantle rocks during fluid infiltration. Marange diamonds have rare +Ce anomalies, that have so far only been reported for Victor and Brazil (sub-lithospheric) gem-quality diamonds. The oxidation state of Ce (Ce4+ vs Ce3+) and development of Ce anomalies could be attributed to ƒO2, melt/fluid composition, and PT conditions. In Marange, Victor and Brazil diamonds, Ce4+ substitution for Zr4+ does not appear to be a factor since we find no correlation between Zr content and Ce anomalies. However, in Marange diamonds, CH4-bearing zones have less variable Ce anomalies compared to the CH4-free zones, which may suggest Ce anomalies are indicative of fluid oxidation state.
DS1900-0418
1906
Krebs, W.Krebs, W.Die Frage der Naturlichen Herkunft der Diamanten Besonders In Suedafrika.Weltall, Vol. 6, SEPT. 15TH. PP. 411-413.Africa, South AfricaDiamond Genesis
DS1900-0567
1907
Krebs, W.Krebs, W.Zur Frage der Herkunft der Sued afrikanischen BodenschaetseWeltall, Vol. 7, Feb. 1ST. PP. 149-151.Africa, South AfricaGenesis, Kimberlite
DS200712-0989
2006
Kreemer, C.Silver, P.G., Hahn, B.C., Kreemer, C., Holt, W.E., Haines, J.Convergent margins, growing and shrinking continents, and the Wilson cycle.Geological Society of America Annual Meeting, Vol. 38, 7, Nov. p. 212 abstractUnited StatesBasin and Range, Wilson Cycle
DS1993-0854
1993
Krehbiel, S.Krehbiel, S.Cluster analysis applied to low relief structural interpretations. PLEASE NOTE THIS IS SPECIFIC to OIL but may have some interest!Society of Exploration Geophysics, The Leading Edge, August pp. 831-836GlobalGeophysics -seismic, Structure
DS200612-1174
2006
Kreidie, N.Romano, C., Poe, B.T., Kreidie, N., McCammon, C.A.Electrical conductivities of pyrope almandine garnets up to 19 GPa and 1700 C.American Mineralogist, Vol. 91, 9, pp. 1371-1377.MantleDiscontinuity
DS1960-0565
1965
Kreiger, M.H.Kreiger, M.H.Geology of the Prescott and Paulden Quadrangles, ArizonaUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) PROF. PAPER., No. 467, 127P.United States, Arizona, Colorado PlateauBlank
DS202009-1645
2020
Kreigsman, L.M.Naipal, R., Zwaan, J.C.(Hanco),, Kroonenberg, S.B., Kreigsman, L.M., Mason, P.R.D.Diamonds from the Nassau Mountains, Suriname.Journal of Gemmology, Vol. 37, 2, pp. 180-191. pdfSouth America, Surinamedeposit - Paramaka Creek

Abstract: Alluvial diamonds have been found in Suriname since the late 19th century, but to date the details of their origin remain unclear. Here we describe diamonds from Paramaka Creek (Nassau Mountains area) in the Marowijne greenstone belt, Guiana Shield, north-eastern Suriname. Thirteen samples were studied, consisting mainly of euhedral crystals with dominant octahedral and dodecahe-dral habits. They had colourless to brown to slightly greenish body colours, and some showed green or (less commonly) brown irradiation spots. Surface features showed evidence of late-stage resorption that occurred during their transport to the earth’s surface. The studied diamonds were predominantly type IaAB, with nitrogen as both A and B aggregates. In the DiamondView most samples displayed blue and/or green luminescence and concentric growth patterns. Their mineral inclusion assemblages (forsterite and enstatite) indicate a peridotitic (possibly harzburgitic) paragenesis.
DS1990-0887
1990
Kreimeyer, R.Kreimeyer, R.Industrial minerals of BotswanaErzmetall, Vol. 43, No. 6, June pp. 248-256BotswanaIndustrial minerals, Diamonds
DS1986-0793
1986
Kreinin, A.B.Suvorov, V.D., Kreinin, A.B., Kreynin, A.B., et al.Subsurface seismic studies at depth along the Tas-Yuryakh-Amlaznyi-Malykai profile ( Western Yakutia)Soviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 27, No. 11, pp. 70-75RussiaGeophysics, Kimberlite, Mirny field
DS1992-0553
1992
Kreis, L.K.Gent, M.R., Kreis, L.K., Gendzwill, D.The Maple Creek structure, southwestern SaskatchewanSaskatchewan Report Summary of Investigations 1992, miscellaneous Report No. 92-4, pp. 204-208SaskatchewanGeophysics -seismics, magnetics, gravity, Structure
DS1998-0809
1998
Kreissig, K.Kreissig, K., Nagler, T.F., Kramers, J.D.Are Archean provinces juxtaposed terranes? Isotope and trace element geochemical considerations.Mineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 813-4.South Africa, Montana, GreenlandCraton, Geochronology - rare earth elements (REE) patterns
DS1991-0929
1991
Krejci, D.Krejci, D., Richter, C.SPLIT: a Turbo-C program for the graphical representation and seperation of fault slip dat a setsComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 17, No. 6, pp. 801-812GlobalComputers, Program -SPLIT.
DS1994-1459
1994
Krejci, D.Richter, C., Krejci, D.The representation of directional geological data: TEC-hardware independent high quality graphicsComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 23-30GlobalComputer Program, Graphics
DS202012-2246
2020
Kremenets, V.Rogov, Y., Kremenets, V., Sapozhnikov, M., Sebele, M.Application of tagged neutron method for detecting diamonds in kimberlite.Instruments, Vol. 4, 4, doi.org/103390/ instruments4040033Globalneutron technology

Abstract: The results of testing a prototype of a separator for detecting diamonds in kimberlite ore using tagged neutron method are discussed. Kimberlite ore was irradiated with fast tagged neutrons with an energy of 14.1 MeV. The elemental content of the tray with kimberlite ore was determined. The criterion for detecting diamond was the presence of excess carbon concentration in a certain region of a kimberlite sample.
DS1998-0657
1998
Kremenetsky, A.A.Iouchko, N.A., Kremenetsky, A.A., Kouznetsov, I.I.Nature of diamonds, melts and fluids in the ring structures: endogeneous explosion vs impact process.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 342-5.Russia, Siberia, Yakutiavolcanism., Impact structures
DS201904-0795
2018
Kremenetsky, A.A.Vetrin, V.R., Belousova, E.A., Kremenetsky, A.A.Lu-Hf isotopic systematics of zircon from lower crustal xenoliths in the Belomorian mobile belt.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 60, 7, pp. 568-577.Russia, Kola Peninsulageochronology

Abstract: The structure, geochemistry, and U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic composition of zircon crystals from garnet granulite xenoliths of the lower crust in the Belomorian mobile belt have been studied. It has been established that Early Paleoproterozoic zircon, 2.47 Ga in age, is primary magmatic and formed during crystallization of mafic rocks in the lower crust. Meso- and Neoarchean zircons are xenogenic crystals trapped by mafic melt during its contamination with older crustal sialic rocks. Metamorphic zircon grains have yielded a Late Paleoproterozoic age (1.75 Ga). A Paleozoic age has been established for a magmatic crystal formed due to interaction of xenoliths with an alkaline ultramafic melt, which delivered xenoliths to surface. The U-Pb datings and Lu-Hf systematics of crystals have been used to delineate the stages of formation and transformation of the lower crust in this region.
DS201912-2784
2019
Kremer, Y.Gilfillan, S.M.V., Gyore, D., Flude, S., Johnson, G., Bond, C.E., Hicks, N., Lister, R., Jones, D.G., Kremer, Y., Hazeldine, R.S., Stuart, F.M.Noble gases confirm plume related mantle degassing beneath southern Africa.Nature Communications, Vol. 10, 1, 10.1038/s41467-019-1244-6Africa, South Africaplumes

Abstract: Southern Africa is characterised by unusually elevated topography and abnormal heat flow. This can be explained by thermal perturbation of the mantle, but the origin of this is unclear. Geophysics has not detected a thermal anomaly in the upper mantle and there is no geochemical evidence of an asthenosphere mantle contribution to the Cenozoic volcanic record of the region. Here we show that natural CO2 seeps along the Ntlakwe-Bongwan fault within KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, have C-He isotope systematics that support an origin from degassing mantle melts. Neon isotopes indicate that the melts originate from a deep mantle source that is similar to the mantle plume beneath Réunion, rather than the convecting upper mantle or sub-continental lithosphere. This confirms the existence of the Quathlamba mantle plume and importantly provides the first evidence in support of upwelling deep mantle beneath Southern Africa, helping to explain the regions elevation and abnormal heat flow.
DS1920-0237
1925
Krenkel, E.Krenkel, E.Die Geologie Afrikas, Part 1Berlin:, 461P.South Africa, Southwest Africa, East Africa, West Africa, NamibiaRegional Geology, Tectonics, Kimberley
DS1920-0341
1927
Krenkel, E.Krenkel, E.Der Diamant, 1927Naturwissen., Vol. 15, No. 27. PP. 549-558.South Africa, GlobalGemology
DS1920-0451
1929
Krenkel, E.Krenkel, E.Der Diamant und Seine GewinnungBergtech, Vol. 22, APRIL 3RD. PP. 108-113.South AfricaMining
DS201012-0601
2010
Krenn, K.Proyer,A., Krenn, K., Hoinkes, G.Open system precipitation - a new way to explain crystallographically oriented precipitates/exsolutions in mineral from high-T/high-P rocks.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 211.Europe, Greece, BulgariaUHP Rhodope Mountains
DS1980-0196
1980
Krenov, A.Y.Krenov, A.Y.Instrumental Diagnosis of Small Diamonds with the Application of Luminescence Spectra.Academy of Science UKR. SSSR, SER. B GEOL. CHEM. BIOL., No. 2, PP. 40-43.RussiaMicrodiamonds, Diamond Mining Recovery, Kimberlite Pipes
DS1989-0558
1989
Krentz, et al.Gupta, J.C., Jones, Kerr, Krentz, et al.Elecromagnetic sounding and crustal electrical conductivity in the region of the Wopmay Orogen.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 26, pp. 2385-95.Northwest TerritoriesGeophysics - magnetics, Tectonics
DS1996-0254
1996
Kresl, M.Cermak, V., Safanda, J., Kresl, M., Kucerova, L.Heat flow studies in central Europe with special emphasis on dat a from former CzechoslovakiaGlobal Tectonics and Metallogeny, Vol. 5, No. 3-4, p. 109-123GlobalHeat Flow project, volcanism.
DS201412-0112
2014
Kressal, R.D.Chakhmouradian, A.R., Reguir, E.P., Kressal, R.D., Crozier, J., Pisiak, L.K., Sidhu, R., Yang, P.Carbonatite hosted niobium deposit at Aley, northern British Columbia ( Canada): mineralogy, geochemistry and petrogenesis.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 64, pp. 642-666.Canada, British ColumbiaCarbonatite
DS201112-0160
2011
KressallChakmouradian, A.R., Bohm, Coeslan, Mumin, Reguir, Demeny, Simonetti, Kressall, Martins, Kamenov, Creaser, LepekhinaPostorogenic carbonatites: more abundant than we realize and more important than given credit for.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.17-19.Canada, ManitobaCinder Lake, Eden Lake, Paint Lake
DS201112-0161
2011
KressallChakmouradian, A.R., Bohm, Coeslan, Mumin, Reguir, Demeny, Simonetti, Kressall, Martins, Kamenov, Creaser, LepekhinaPostorogenic carbonatites: more abundant than we realize and more important than given credit for.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.17-19.Canada, ManitobaCinder Lake, Eden Lake, Paint Lake
DS201012-0413
2010
Kressall, R.Kressall, R., McLeish, D.F., Crozier, Chakhmouradian, A.The Aley carbonatite complex - part 2 petrogenesis of a Cordilleran niobium deposit mine.International Workshop Geology of Rare Metals, held Nov9-10, Victoria BC, Open file 2010-10, extended abstract pp. 25-26.Canada, British ColumbiaCarbonatite
DS201012-0485
2010
Kressall, R.McLeish, D.F., Kressall, R., Crozier, J., Johnston, S.T., Chakhmouradian, A., Mortensen, J.K.The Aley carbonatite complex - part 1 structural evolution of a Cordilleran niobium deposit mine.International Workshop Geology of Rare Metals, held Nov9-10, Victoria BC, Open file 2010-10, extended abstract pp. 21-24.Canada, British ColumbiaCarbonatite
DS201312-0517
2013
Kressall, R.D.Kressall, R.D., Fedortchouk, Y.Major and trace element composition of Fe-Ti oxides from the Lac de Gras kimberlites.GAC-MAC 2013 SS4: Diamond: from birth to the mantle emplacement in kimberlite., abstract onlyCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Lac de Gras
DS201412-0480
2014
Kressall, R.D.Kressall, R.D., Fedortchouk, Y., McCammon, C., Elliott, B.Fe-Ti oxides in kimberlites: implications for kimberlites from the Ekati diamond mine, Northwest Territories.2014 Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Poster, p. 87, abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Ekati
DS201412-0832
2014
Kressall, R.D.Simandl, G.J., Paradis, S., Stone, R.S., Fajber, R., Kressall, R.D., Grattan, K., Crozier, J., Simandl, L.J.Applicablity of handheld X-ray fluroescence spectrometry in the exploration and development of carbonatite related niobium deposits: a case study of the Aley carbonatite, British Columbia, Canada.Geochemistry: Exploration, Environment, Analysis, Vol. 14, 3, pp. 211-221.Canada, British ColumbiaCarbonatite
DS201112-0433
2011
Kressing, K.Hettmann, K., Marks, M., Kressing, K., Zack, T., Wenzel, T., Rehkamper, M., Jacob, D., Markl, G.The geochemistry of thallium and its isotopes in a peralkaline magmatic system.Peralk-Carb 2011, workshop held Tubingen Germany June 16-18, PosterTechnologyMagmatism
DS1970-0549
1972
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.Heavy Mineral Survey and Kimberlite Occurrences in the Area west of Butha Buthe (leribe District).Maseru Department of Mines Geol. Spec. Report, No. PK/1.LesothoGeochemistry
DS1970-0737
1973
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.The Coating of Kimberlitic Zircons- a Preliminary StudyMaseru: Lesotho Nat. Dev. Corp. Lesotho Kimberlites Editor N, PP. 220- 223.LesothoButha Buthe, X-ray Patterns
DS1970-0738
1973
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.The Geology of the Lemphane Pipes and Neighbouring IntrusionMaseru: Lesotho Nat. Dev. Corp. Lesotho Kimberlites Editor N, PP. 159-167.LesothoMineral Chemistry
DS1970-0739
1973
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.Differential Thermal Analysis of KimberlitesMaseru: Lesotho Nat. Dev. Corp. Lesotho Kimberlites Editor N, PP. 269-279.LesothoMineral Chemistry, X-ray Patterns
DS1970-0740
1973
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.Kimberlitic Zircons1st International Kimberlite Conference, EXTENDED ABSTRACT VOLUME, PP. 191-194.South AfricaMineral Chemistry
DS1970-0741
1973
Kresten, P.Kresten, P., Dempster, A.N.The Geology of the Pipe 200 and the Malibamatso Dyke SwarmMaseru: Lesotho Nat. Dev. Corp. Lesotho Kimberlites Editor N, PP. 172-179.LesothoMineral Chemistry, Heavy Minerals
DS1970-0795
1973
Kresten, P.Nixon, P.H., Kresten, P.Butha Buthe Dyke Swarms and Associated Kimberlite BlowsMaseru: Lesotho Nat. Dev. Corp. Lesotho Kimberlites Editor N, PP. 197-206.LesothoGeology
DS1970-0796
1973
Kresten, P.Nixon, P.H., Kresten, P.Chromium and Nickel in Kimberlite IlmenitesMaseru: Lesotho Nat. Dev. Corp. Lesotho Kimberlites Editor N, PP. 235-237.Lesotho, South AfricaKao, Mothae, Monastery, Liquobong, Mineral Chemistry
DS1970-0947
1974
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.Uranium in Kimberlites and Associated Rocks with Special Reference to Lesotho Occurrences.Lithos, Vol. 7, No. 3, PP. 171-180.LesothoGeology
DS1975-0117
1975
Kresten, P.Kresten, P., Fels, P., Berggren , G.Kimberlitic Zircons- a Possible Aid in Prospecting for Kimberlites.Mineralium Deposita., Vol. 10, PP. 47-56.Lesotho, South Africa, Tanzania, East AfricaMorphology, Inclusions, Mineral Chemistry, Alteration
DS1975-0118
1975
Kresten, P.Kresten, P., Fels, P., Berggren, G.Kimberlitic Zircons- a Possible Aid in Prospecting for KimbeMineralium Deposita., Vol. 10, No. 1, PP. 47-56.Lesotho, Tanzania, South Africa, East AfricaProspecting
DS1975-0119
1975
Kresten, P.Kresten, P., Persson, L.Discrete Diopside in Alnoite from Alno IslandContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 39, PP. 103-116.Sweden, ScandinaviaAlnoite, Pyroxene, Mineralogy
DS1975-0311
1976
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.Chrome Pyrope from the Alno ComplexGeol. Foren. Forhandl., Vol. 98, PT. 2, No. 565, JUNE 15TH. PP. 179-180.Norway, Scandinavia, SwedenGarnet, Mineralogy
DS1975-0312
1976
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.Scandium in Alnoites and Carbonatites from Central SwedenGeol. Foren. Forhandl., Vol. 98, PP. 364-365.Sweden, ScandinaviaAlnoite, Carbonatite, Scandium
DS1975-0313
1976
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.A Magnetometric Survey of the Alno ComplexGeol. Foren. Forhandl., Vol. 98, PP. 361-362.Sweden, ScandinaviaCarbonatite, Geophysics
DS1975-0314
1976
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.A Spinel Apatite Phlogopite Dyke Near Vastervik, South Eastern Sweden.Geol. Foren. Forhandl., Vol. 98, PP. 175-179.Sweden, ScandinaviaUltramafic, Lamprophyre, Glimmerite
DS1975-0315
1976
Kresten, P.Kresten, P., Berggren, G.The Thermal Decomposition of Thaumasite from Mothae Kimberlite Pipe, Lesotho.Journal of THERM. ANAL., Vol. 9, No. 1, PP. 23-28.LesothoGeothermometry
DS1975-0316
1976
Kresten, P.Kresten, P., Fels, P.Kimberlite Zircons- a Possible Aid in Prospecting for Kimberlites.German Association of African Geol. Inform. Liaison Bulletin., Vol. 1, No. 1, PP. 47-56.Lesotho, South AfricaProspecting
DS1975-0317
1976
Kresten, P.Kresten, P., Paul, D.K.Mineralogy of Indian Kimberlites: a Thermal and X-ray StudyCanadian Mineralogist., Vol. 14, PT. 4, PP. 487-490.IndiaMineralogy
DS1975-0548
1977
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.Potassium, Rubidium, and Cesium in Carbonatites and Associated Rocks from Central Sweden.Geol. Foren. Forhandl., Vol. 99, PP. 377-383.Sweden, ScandinaviaCarbonatite, Rock Chemistry
DS1975-0549
1977
Kresten, P.Kresten, P., Printzlau, I., Rex, D., Vartiainen, H., Woolley, A.New Ages of Carbonatite and Alkaline Ultramafic Rock from Southwest eden and Finland.Geol. Foren. Forhandl., Vol. 99, PP. 62-65.Sweden, Finland, ScandinaviaCarbonatite, Alnoite, Geochronology
DS1975-0884
1978
Kresten, P.Vartiainen, H., Kresten, P., Kafkas, Y.Alkaline Lamprophyres from the Sokli Complex, Northern Finland.Comptes Rendus Geol. De la Soc. Finlande., Vol. 50, PP. 59-68.GlobalCarbonatite, Petrology, Alnoite, Damkjernite
DS1975-1107
1979
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.The Alno ComplexNordic Carbonatite Symposium Guide., 67P.Sweden, Scandinavia, Alno IslandCarbonatite, Alnoite, Kimberlite, Mineralogy, Geology
DS1980-0197
1980
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.The Alno Complex: Tectonics of Dyke EmplacementLithos, Vol. 13, No. 2, PP. 153-158.Scandinavia, SwedenStructural Geology, Alnoite
DS1980-0198
1980
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.Introduktion Till Alnoomradets GeologiSver. Geol. Undersokn., SPECIAL ISSUE 50P.Sweden, ScandinaviaCarbonatite, Alnoite, Kimberlite
DS1981-0254
1981
Kresten, P.Kresten, P., Ahman, E., Brunfelt, A.O.Alkaline Ultramafic Lamprophyres and Associated Carbonatite dykes from the Kalix Area, Northern Sweden.Geologische Rundschau, Vol. 70, No. 3, PP. 1215-1231.Sweden, ScandinaviaAlnoite
DS1982-0134
1982
Kresten, P.Carswell, D.A., Griffin, W.L., Kresten, P.Peridotite Nodules from the Nogpetseu and Lipelaneng Kimberlites, Lesotho: a Crustal Origin or Mantle Origin.Proceedings of Third International Kimberlite Conference, TERRA COGNITA, ABSTRACT VOLUME., Vol. 2, No. 3, P. 235, (abstract.).LesothoKimberlite, Genesis
DS1982-0347
1982
Kresten, P.Kresten, P., Nairis, H.J.Alno DiamondsGeol. Foren. Forhandl., Vol. 104, P. 210.Scandinavia, SwedenAlnoite, Diamond Discovery, Crystallography
DS1983-0168
1983
Kresten, P.Carswell, D.A., Griffin, W.L., Kresten, P.Peridotite Nodules from the Ngopetsoeu and Lipelaneng Kimberlites, Lesotho: a Crustal or Mantle Origin- Appendix.Annales Scientifiques De L' Universite De Clermont-ferrand Ii, No. 74, PP. 167-178.LesothoAnalyses, Petrography
DS1983-0378
1983
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.Carbonatite NomenclatureGeologische Rundschau, Vol. 72, No. 1, PP. 389-395.Norway, Sweden, ScandinaviaClassification, Petrology
DS1984-0181
1984
Kresten, P.Carswell, D.A., Griffin, W.L., Kresten, P.Peridotite Nocules from the Ngopetsoeu and Lipelangene Kimberlites, Lesotho a Crustal or Mantle Origin.Thrid Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, PP. 229-243.Lesotho, Butha Buthe, RomaPetrography, Mineral Chemistry, Whole Rock
DS1986-0463
1986
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.Comment on an occurrence of apatite rich rocks of carbonatitic affinity near the Jotnian Graben structure Gavle,Central SwedenGeol. Forens I Stock Forhandl, Vol. 108, pp. 251-255SwedenCarbonatite, Apatite
DS1986-0464
1986
Kresten, P.Kresten, P., Morogan, V.Fenitization at the Fen complex, Southern NorwayLithos, Vol. 19, No. 1, pp. 27-42Norway, ScandinaviaCarbonatite
DS1987-0255
1987
Kresten, P.Griffin, W.L., Kresten, P.Scandinavia-the carbonatite connectionin: Nixon, P.H. ed. Mantle xenoliths, J. Wiley, pp. 101-106ScandinaviaCarbonatite, p. 102 analyses Scandina
DS1988-0377
1988
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.Granitization- fact or fiction?Geol. Foreningens I Stockholm Forhand, Vol. 110, pt. 4, pp. 335-340GlobalGranite, Overview
DS1988-0378
1988
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.The chemistry of fenitization: examples from Fen, NorwayChemical Geology, Vol. 68, No. 3-4, pp. 329-349NorwaySovite, ijolite, Fen
DS1992-0893
1992
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.Late stage evolution of the Alno alkaline carbonatitic complex, SwedenProceedings of the 29th International Geological Congress. Held Japan August 1992, Vol. 2, abstract p. 572SwedenCarbonatite
DS1992-0894
1992
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.Evolution of sovites in the Alno area, SwedenProceedings of the 29th International Geological Congress. Held Japan August 1992, Vol. 2, abstract p. 572SwedenSovites, Carbonatite
DS1994-0951
1994
Kresten, P.Kresten, P.Chemistry of fenitization at Fen, Norway and Alno, SwedenProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 1, pp. 252-262.Norway, SwedenAlnoite
DS1998-0840
1998
KretschmarLeCheminant, A.N., Heaman, L.M., Kretschmar, LeCouteurComplex origins and multiple ages of mantle zircon megacrysts from Canadian and South African kimberlites.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 486-8.Northwest Territories, South Africascanning electron microscope (SEM) and backscatter electron (BSE) imaging on zircons, Deposit - Drybones Bay, Kaalvallei, Leceister
DS1996-0786
1996
Kretschmar, U.Kretschmar, U.Geology and diamond potential of the Drybones Bay kimberlitenorthwest Territories Exploration overview 1995, March pp. 3-23. abstractNorthwest TerritoriesHistory, Deposit -Drybones Bay
DS1996-0787
1996
Kretschmer, U.Kretschmer, U.Drybones Bay kimberlite... exploration updateNorthwest Territories Exploration Overview, Nov. 26, p. 4p. addedNorthwest TerritoriesGeochronology, Mineral chemistry
DS2001-0989
2001
KretserRudashevsky, N.S., Kretser, Bulakh, RudashevskyTwo types of platinum group elements (PGE) mineralization in carbonatite deposits Phalaborwa Kovdor Massif.Journal of South African Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 1, p. A 30.(abs)South Africa, RussiaCarbonatite, Palaborwa, Kovdor
DS2000-0844
2000
Kretser, Y.Rudahevsky, N., Kretser, Y., Rudashevsky, V., BulakhNoble metal mineralization in carbonatites from Kovdor, Kola Peninsula, and Phalabora, South Africa.Igc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.Russia, Kola Peninsula, South AfricaCarbonatite - mineralogy, Deposit - Kovdor, Phalabora
DS1999-0613
1999
Kretser, Y.L.Rudashevsky, N.S., Kretser, Y.L., Bulakh, A.G.platinum group elements (PGE) mineralization of carbonatite depositsStanley, SGA Fifth Biennial Symposium, pp. 675-8.South Africa, Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite, Loolecop, Phalabora, Kovdor
DS1975-0550
1977
Kretz, R.Kretz, R.Fort Coulonge Otter Lake, Kazabazua AreaQuebec Department of Mines, DPV 514, 309p.QuebecGeology
DS1989-0829
1989
Kretz, R.Kretz, R., Loop, J., Hartree, R.Petrology and Li-Be-B geochemistry of muscovite-biotite granite and associated pegmatite near Yellowknife, CanadaContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 102, No. 2, pp. 174-190Northwest TerritoriesRare earths, Geochemistry
DS1960-0448
1964
Kreuger, H.W.Ferris, C.S.JR., Kreuger, H.W.New Radiogenic Ages on Igneous Rocks from the Southern Laramie Range, Wyoming.Geological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 75, PP. 1051-1054.United States, Wyoming, State Line, Rocky MountainsBlank
DS1992-1598
1992
Kreulen, R.Varekamp, J.C., Kreulen, R., Poorter, R.P.E., Van bergen, M.J.Carbon sources in arc volcanism, with implications for the carbon cycleTerra Nova, Vol. 4, pp. 363-373GlobalArc volcanism., Carbon cycle
DS201902-0314
2019
Kreuzer, O.Roshanravan, B., Aghajani, H., Yousefi, M., Kreuzer, O.An improved prediction-area plot for prospectivity analysis of mineral deposits ( not specific to diamonds).Natural Resources Research, doi.org/10.1007/s11053-018-9439-7 17p.Iranchromite

Abstract: In this paper an improved prediction-area plot has been developed. This type of plot includes performance measures similar to other existing methods (receiver operating characteristics, success-rate curves and ordinary prediction-area plots) and, therefore, offers a reliable method for evaluating the performance of spatial evidence maps and prospectivity models. To demonstrate the reliability of the improved prediction-area plot proposed, we investigated the benefits of augmented targeting criteria through remotely sensed exploration features, compared to only geological map-derived criteria, for mineral prospectivity analysis using as an example the podiform chromite deposits of the Sabzevar Ophiolite Belt, Iran. The application of the newly developed improved prediction-area plot to the prospectivity models generated in this study indicated that the augmented targeting criteria by using remote sensing data perform better than non-updated geological map-derived criteria, and that model effectiveness can be improved by using an integrated approach that entails geologic remote sensing.
DS1986-0793
1986
Kreynin, A.B.Suvorov, V.D., Kreinin, A.B., Kreynin, A.B., et al.Subsurface seismic studies at depth along the Tas-Yuryakh-Amlaznyi-Malykai profile ( Western Yakutia)Soviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 27, No. 11, pp. 70-75RussiaGeophysics, Kimberlite, Mirny field
DS1995-1443
1995
Kribek, B.Pasava, J., Kribek, B., Zak, K.Mineral deposits: from their origin to their environmental impactsProceedings Third Biennial SGA Meeting, Balkema Publ, 1100p. approx. 250.00GlobalGranitoid related deposits, Gold, Metamorphism and mineralizations, Industrial minerals, Metallogeny evolution of orogenic belts, Sedex -
DS1970-0550
1972
Kridelbaugh, S.J.Kridelbaugh, S.J., Hobbitt, R.P., Kellogg, K., Larson, E.E.Petrologic and Paleomagnetic Implication of the Green Mountain Diatreme.Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 4, No. 6, P. 386, (abstract.).United States, Colorado, Rocky Mountains, VermontRelated Rocks
DS1970-0742
1973
Kridelbaugh, S.J.Kridelbaugh, S.J., Meyer, H.O.A.Kimberlite from Green Mountain ColoradoEos, Vol. 54, No. 11, P. 1224, (abstract.).United States, Colorado, Rocky MountainsKimberlite, Geophysics
DS1975-0571
1977
Kridelbaugh, S.J.Meyer, H.O.A., Kridelbaugh, S.J.Green Mountain Kimberlite, Colorado: Mineralogy and PetrologInternational Kimberlite Conference SECOND, EXTENDED ABSTRACT VOLUME., 3P.United States, Colorado, Rocky Mountains, VermontBlank
DS1981-0182
1981
Kridvik, S.G.Glevasskiy, E.B., Kridvik, S.G.Precambrian Carbonatite Complex of the Azov Region. (russian)Izd. Nauk Dumka Kiev Ukrainian SSR, (Russian), 228pRussiaCarbonatite
DS201904-0753
2019
Kriegsman, L. de RoeverKroonenberg, S., Mason, P.R.D., Kriegsman, L. de Roever, E.W.F., Wong, T.E.Geology and mineral deposits of the Guiana Shield.SAXI-XI Inter Guiana Geological Conferene 2019: Paramaribo, Suriname, 6p. PdfSouth America, Brazil, VenezuelaGuiana shield

Abstract: The Guiana Shield records a long history that starts in the Archean, but culminates in the Trans-Amazonian Orogeny between 2.26-2.09 Ga as a result of an Amazonian-West-Africa collision. This event is responsible for the emplacement of a major part of its mineralisations, especially gold, iron and manganese. The diamondiferous Roraima Supergroup represents its molasse. Between 1.86 and 1.72 Ga the Rio Negro Block accreted in the west. The Grenvillian Orogeny caused shearing and mineral resetting between 1.3 and 1.1 Ga when Amazonia collided with Laurentia. Younger platform covers contain placer gold mineralisation. Several suits of dolerite dykes record short-lived periods of crustal extension. Bauxite plateaus cover various rock units.
DS2000-0970
2000
Kriegsman, L.M.Vaisanen, M., Mantarri, I., Kriegsman, L.M., Holtta, P.Tectonic setting of post collisional magmatism in the Paleoproterozoic Svecofennian Orogen, southwest Finland.Lithos, Vol. 54, No. 1-2, Oct. pp. 63-81.FinlandTectonics, mantle enrichment, magmatism
DS2001-0635
2001
Kriegsman, L.M.Kriegsman, L.M.Prograde and retrograde processes in crustal melting. Introduction to special issue.Lithos, Vol. 56, No. 1, Feb. 3p. (ix-xi)MantleMelting
DS200712-1136
2007
Kriel, L.Ward, J., Spaggiari, S., Kriel, L.Digging in the DRC: shades of Ye olde Kimberley?Diamonds in Kimberley Symposium & Trade Show, Bristow and De Wit held August 23-24, Kimberley, South Africa, GSSA Diamond Workshop CD slides 40Africa, Democratic Republic of CongoHistory, locals! Mbelenge
DS200812-0602
2008
Krien, Y.Krien, Y., Fleitout, L.Gravity above subduction zones and forces controlling plate motions.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 113, B9407.MantleGeophysics - gravity
DS200812-0603
2008
Krien, Y.Krien,Y., Fleitout, L.Gravity above subduction zones and forces controlling plate motions.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 112, B9407.MantleSubduction
DS200612-0745
2006
Krienitz, M.S.Krienitz, M.S., Haase, K.M., Mezger, K., Eckardt, V., Shaikh Mashail, M.A.Magma genesis and crustal contamination of continental intraplate lavas in northwestern Syria.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 151, 6, pp. 698-716.Africa, SyriaMagmatism - not specific to diamonds
DS201112-0552
2011
Krienitz, M-S.Krienitz, M-S., Haase, K.M.The evolution of the Arabian lower crust and lithospheric mantle - geochemical constraints from southern Syrian mafic and ultramafic xenoliths.Chemical Geology, Vol. 280, 3-4, pp. 271-283.Asia, ArabiaSubduction
DS1995-1023
1995
Krige, B.Krige, B.Uneasy lies the road aheadSouth African Institute Min., Dec. pp. 4-6.South Africa, RussiaEconomics, CSO
DS1991-1255
1991
Krige, D.G.Olea, R.A., Christakos, G., David, M., Journel, A.G., Krige, D.G.Geostatistical glossary and multilingual dictionaryOxford University of Press, 288p. $ 55.95 approxGlobalGeostatistics -glossary
DS1982-0342
1982
Krigman, L.D.Kogarko, L.N., Petrova, YE.N., Krigman, L.D.Strontium Fractionation During Melilite Crystallization in The System Nepheline-diopside-apatite.Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 153, No. 1-6, PP. 210-212.RussiaIsotope, Crystallography
DS1995-1024
1995
Krigman, L.D.Krigman, L.D., Kogarko, L.N., Vekster, I.V.Melilite melt equilibrium and the role of melilite in the evolution of ultralkaline magmas.Geochemistry International, Vol. 32, No. 8, Aug. 1, pp. 91-101.GlobalMelilites
DS1997-0506
1997
Krijgsman, W.Hilgen, F.J., Krijgsman, W., Langereis, C.G., Lourens, L.Breakthrough made in dating of the geological recordEos, Vol. 78, No. 28, July 15, p. 285, 288, 289GlobalTimescale, Sedimentary cycles
DS200612-0748
2006
Krijgsman, W.Kuiper, K.F., Krijgsman, W., Garces, M., Wijbrans, J.R.Revised isotopic (40 Ar 29 Ar) age for the lamproite volcano of Cabezos Negros, Fortuna Basin, eastern Beltics, SE Spain).Paleogeography Paleoclimatology Paleoecology, Vol. 238, 1-4, pp. 53-63.Europe, SpainLamproite
DS202006-0942
2020
Krimsky, R.Sh.Nikitina, L.P., Goncharov, A.G., Bogomolov, E.S., Beliatsky, B.V., Krimsky, R.Sh., Prichodko, V.S., Babushkina, M.S., Karaman, A.A.HFSE and REE geochemistry and Nd-Sr-Os systematics of peridotites in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle of the Siberian craton and central Asian fold belt junction area: data on mantle xenoliths.Petrology, Vol. 28, 2, pp. 207-219.RussiaREE

Abstract: Mantle xenoliths were found in alkaline basalts of Tokinsky Stanovik (TSt) in the Dzhugdzhur-Stanovoy superterrane (DS) and Vitim plateau (VP) in the Barguzin-Vitim superterrane (BV) (Stanovoy suture area) at junction of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) and the Siberian craton (SC). Xenoliths from TSt basalts are represented by spinel lherzolites, harzburgites, wehrlites; while VP basalts frequently contain spinel-garnet and garnet peridotites lherzolites, and pyroxenites. Xenoliths in kimberlites of the Siberian craton are mainly represented by garnet-bearing lherzolites with abundant eclogite xenoliths (age of 2.7-3.1 Ga), which were not found in mantle of superterranes. The Re-Os determinations point to the Early Archean age of peridotites and eclogites from mantle beneath the Siberian craton. The major and trace (rare-earth and high-filed strength) elements and Nd-Sr-Os composition were analyzed in the peridotites (predominant rocks) of lithospheric mantle at junction of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt and Siberian Craton. The degree of rock depletion in CaO and Al2O3 and enrichment in MgO relative to the primitive mantle in the peridotites of the Dzhugdzhur-Stanovoy superterrane is close to that of the Siberian craton. The peridotites of the Barguzin-Vitim superterrane are characterized by much lower degree of depletion and have mainly a primitive composition. Mantle melting degree reaches up to 45-50% in the Siberian Craton and Dzhugdzhur-Stanovoy superterrane, and is less than 25% in the Barguzin-Vitim terrane. The mantle peridotites of the craton as compared to those of adjacent superterranes are enriched in Ba, Rb, Th, Nb, and Ta and depleted in Y and REE from Sm to Lu. However, all studied peridotites are characterized by mainly superchondritic values of Nb/Ta (>17.4), Zr/Hf (>36.1), Nb/Y (>0.158), and Zr/Y (>2.474). The Nb/Y ratio is predominantly >1.0 in SC peridotites and < 1.0 in the superterrane peridotites. The Nd and Sr isotopic compositions in the latter correspond to those of oceanic basalts. The 187Os/188Os ratio is low (0.108-0.115) in the peridotites of the Siberian Craton and > 0.115 but usually lower than 0.1296 (primitive upper mantle value) in the peridotites of the Dzhugdzhur-Stanovoy and Barguzin-Vitim superterranes. Thus, the geochemical and isotopic composition of peridotites indicates different compositions and types of mantle beneath the Siberian craton and adjacent superterranes of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt in the Early Archean, prior to the formation of 2.7-3.1 Ga eclogites in the cratonic mantle.
DS201412-0549
2014
Kring, D.A.Marchi, S., Bottke, W.F., Elkins-Tanton, M., Bierhaus, K., Wuennemann, A., Morbidelli, Kring, D.A.Wide spread mixing and burial of Earth's Hadean crust by asteroid impacts.Nature, Vol. 511, July 31, pp. 578-582.GlobalGeochronology - zircons
DS200412-0541
2004
Krinochkin, V.G.Fedorov, Y.N., Krinochkin, V.G., Ivanov, K.S., Krasnobaev, A.A., Kaleganov, B.A.Stages of tectonic reactivation of the west Siberian platform ( based on K Ar dating).Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 397, 5, pp. 628-631.Russia, SiberiaTectonics
DS1989-0830
1989
Krinsley, D.H.Krinsley, D.H., Manley, C.R.back scattered electron microscopy as an advanced technique in petrographyJournal of Geology Education, Vol. 37, No. 3, May pp. 202-210GlobalPetrography, Overview
DS1991-1744
1991
Krinsley, D.H.Tovey, N.K., Krinsley, D.H.Mineralogical mapping of scanning electron micrographsSedimentary Geology, Vol. 75, pp. 109-123GlobalSediments, Micro-mineralogy
DS201412-0481
2014
Krippner, A.Krippner, A., Meinhold, G., Morton, A.C., Von Eynatten, H.Evaluation of garnet discrimination diagrams using geochemical dat a of garnets from various host rocks.Sedimentology, Vol. 306, pp. 36-42.Europe, Austria, NorwayMineral chemistry - garnets
DS201812-2892
2018
Krippner, A.Tolosana-Delgado, R., von Eynatten, H., Krippner, A., Meinhold, G.A multivariate discrimination scheme of detrital garnet chemistry for use in sedimentary provenance analysis.Sedimentary Geology, Vol. 375, pp. 14-26.Europe, Norway, Austria, Africa, Ugandamineral chemistry

Abstract: Garnet chemistry provides a well-established tool in the discrimination and interpretation of sediment provenance. Current discrimination approaches, however, (i) suffer from using less variables than available, (ii) subjective determination of discrimination fields with strict boundaries suggesting clear separations where in fact probabilities are converging, and (iii) significant overlap of compositional fields of garnet from different host-rock groups. The new multivariate discrimination scheme is based on a large database, a hierarchical discrimination approach involving three steps, linear discriminant analysis at each step, and the five major host-rock groups to be discriminated: eclogite- (A), amphibolite- (B) and granulite- (C) facies metamorphic rocks as well as ultramafic (D) and igneous rocks (E). The successful application of statistical discrimination approaches requires consideration of the a priori knowledge of the respective geologic setting. This is accounted for by the use of prior probabilities. Three sets of prior probabilities (priors) are introduced and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The user is free to choose among these priors, which can be further modified according to the specific geologic problem and the level of a priori knowledge. The discrimination results are provided as integrated probabilities of belonging to the five major host-rock groups. For performing calculations and results a supplementary Excel® spreadsheet is provided. The discrimination scheme has been tested for a large variety of examples of crystalline rocks covering all of the five major groups and several subgroups from various geologic settings. In most cases, garnets are assigned correctly to the respective group. Exceptions typically reflect the peculiarities of the regional geologic situation. Evaluation of detrital garnets from modern and ancient sedimentary settings of the Western Gneiss Region (Norway), Eastern Alps (Austria) and Albertine Rift (Uganda) demonstrates the power to reflect the respective geologic situations and corroborates previous results. As most garnet is derived from metamorphic rocks and many provenance studies aim at reconstructing the tectonic and geodynamic evolution in the source area, the approach and the examples emphasize discrimination of metamorphic facies (i.e., temperature-pressure conditions) rather than protolith composition.
DS1989-0920
1989
KrishnaMadhaven, V., Mallikharjuna Rao, J., Subrahmanyam, K., KrishnaBedrock geology of the Elchuru alkaline pluton,Prakasam District, AndhraPradeshGeological Society of India, Memoir, Editor C. LeelanandaM., No. 15, pp. 189-206IndiaAlkaline rocks, Lamprophyres
DS201712-2699
2017
Krishna, A.K.Khanna, T.C., Subba Rao, D.V., Bizimis, M., Satyanarayanan, M., Krishna, A.K., SeshaSai, V.V.~2.1 Ga intraoceanic magmatism in the central India tectonic zone: constraints from the petrogenesis of ferropicrites in the Mahakoshal suprarcustal belt.Precambrian Research, Vol. 302, pp. 1-17.Indiapicrites
DS1986-0703
1986
Krishna, C.Sarma, S.V.S., Harinarayana, T., Venogopala, Krishna, C., SankerTellurics in the exploration of kimberlite pipes- an experimental studyCurrent Science, Vol. 55, No. 3, pp. 133-136IndiaWajrakarur, LattavaraM., Geophysics
DS200912-0478
2009
Krishna, C.Masun, K., Sthapak, A.V., Singh, A., Vaidya, A., Krishna, C.Exploration history and geology of the Diamondiferous ultramafic Saptarshi intrusions, Madhya Pradesh, India.Lithos, In press available, 37p.IndiaBunder project area
DS201812-2832
2018
Krishna, C.Krishna, C., Pande, L., Norris, R., Howell, D., Burgess, J.Bunder deposit: The Bunder diamond project, India: discovery of the Saptarshi lamproite pipes.Society of Economic Geology Geoscience and Exploration of the Argyle, Bunder, Diavik, and Murowa Diamond Deposits, Special Publication no. 20, pp. 191-200.Indiadeposit - Bunder
DS1996-1166
1996
Krishna, D.V. RamaRatnaker, J., Krishna, D.V. Rama, Kumar, K.V.Geochemistry and origin of the Kellampalle lamprophyre, Prakesam Andhra Pradesh.Journal of Geological Society India, Vol. 48, No. 6, Dec. 1, pp. 697-702.IndiaLamprophyre
DS201312-0470
2013
Krishna, K.A.Khanna, T.C., Sesha Sai, V.V., Zhao, G.C., Subba Rao, D.V., Krishna, K.A., Sawant, S.S., Charan, .N.Petrogenesis of mafic alkaline dikes from Mahbubnagar large igneous province, eastern Dharwar craton, India: geochemical evidence for uncontaminated intracontinental mantle derived magmatism.Lithos, Vol. 179, pp. 84-98.IndiaAlkaline rocks, dykes
DS200412-1622
2004
Krishna, K.S.Rao, D.G., Krishna, K.S., Neprochnov, Yu.P., Grinko, B.N.Satellite gravity anomalies and crustal features of the central Indian Ocean basin.Current Science, Vol. 86, 7, April 10, pp. 948-957.IndiaTectonics, crustal, lineaments
DS200412-1054
2004
Krishna, V.G.Krishna, V.G.Propagation of regional seismic phases in the Indian Shield: constraints on crustal and upper mantle velocity models.Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 94, 1, Feb. pp. 29-43.IndiaGeophysics - seismics, tectonics
DS1992-0988
1992
Krishna Deb, S.Mandal, N., Khan, D., Krishna Deb, S.An experimental approach to wide necked pinch and swell structuresJournal of Structural Geology, Vol. 14, No. 4, pp. 395-403GlobalStructure, Pinch and swell
DS200412-1055
2004
KrishnakantaKrishnakanta, Singh, A.Geochemistry and petrogenesis of granite in Kundal area, Malani igneous suite, western Rajasthan.Journal Geological Society of India, Vol. 60, 2, pp. 183-192.IndiaTectonics
DS1985-0368
1985
Krishnam, P.Krishnam, P.Petrology of the Carbonatites and Associated Rocks of Sung Valley, Jaintia Hills District Meghalaya India.Geological Society INDIA Journal, Vol. 26, No. 6, PP. 361-379.India, Meghalaya, Jaintia HillsCarbonatite
DS1993-1096
1993
Krishnam, P.Murari, R., Krishnam, P., Tikhonen, P.I., Gopalan, K.Magnesian ilmenites in picrite basalts from Siberian and Deccan traps-additional mineralogical evidence for primary melt compositions.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 57, No. 389, December pp. 733-735.Russia, IndiaPicrite basalts
DS1990-1209
1990
Krishnamacharyulu, S.K.G.Radhakrishna Murthy, I.V., Krishnamacharyulu, S.K.G.Automatic inversion of gravity anomalies of faultsComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 16, No. 4, pp. 539-548GlobalComputer, Program -faults/gravity
DS1960-0974
1968
Krishnamurthy, K.V.Krishnamurthy, K.V., Ballal, N.R.R.Investigation of Ultrabasic Pipes and Other Basic Rocks in Anantapur District.India Geological Survey Progr, Report, FOR 1965-1966, UNPUBL. ReportIndia, Andhra PradeshProspecting
DS1988-0379
1988
Krishnamurthy, P.Krishnamurthy, P.Carbonatites in IndiaExploration and research for atomic minerals, Publishing Department of Atomic Energy, pp. 81-115IndiaCarbonatite, Review
DS1992-0895
1992
Krishnamurthy, P.Krishnamurthy, P., Kaul, R.Ore deposits related to carbonatite and alkaline magmatism in India:exploration and genesisProceedings of the 29th International Geological Congress. Held Japan August 1992, Vol. 2, abstract p. 576IndiaCarbonatite
DS2000-0534
2000
Krishnamurthy, P.Krishnamurthy, P., Gopalan, K., MacDougall, J.D.Olivine compositions in picrite basalts and the Deccan volcanic cycleJournal of Petrology, Vol. 41, No. 7, July, pp. 1057-70.IndiaPicrites
DS201801-0031
2017
Krishnamurthy, P.Krishnamurthy, P.Carbonatites of India: part 1. Field relations, petrology, mineralogy and economic aspects.Carbonatite-alkaline rocks and associated mineral deposits , Dec. 8-11, abstract p. 1-2.Indiacarbonatites

Abstract: Carbonatites of India have been reviewed by Krishnamurthy (1988; 2008) and Viladkar (2001). The present review in two parts incorporates all the developments in the field of carbonatites from India since 1963. Carbonatites of India occur in some well-defined geological environments and structural set-ups, and belong to four age groups namely, Palaeoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic, Cretaceous and Palaeocene. The Proterozoic ones are found in the three shield areas, namely southern (e.g., Hogenakal, Sevathur, Samalpatti, Pakkanadu, Khambammettu and Munnar), eastern (e.g. Beldi-Kutni and others) and north-western (e.g., Newania) India, often associated with deep faults and shear zones that may define terrain boundaries (e.g. carbonatites of Tamil Nadu between the Dharwar granite-greenstone schist belt and the southern Indian granulite zone). The Cretaceous and Palaeocene ones (e.g., Amba Dongar, Sirivasan, Sung Valley, Samchampi, Sarnu-Dandali-Kamthai and others) have been found to be related to the flood basalt provinces of Rajmahal, Sylhet (eastern and north-eastern India) and the Deccan (western India). Based on the field relations and associated rock types, the carbonatite-alkaline rock complexes can be grouped into four major types, namely: (a) syenite-dominated complexes with subordinate pyroxenites ± dunites (e.g. Sevathur, Samalpatti, Pakkanadu, and Samchampi); (b) pyroxenite/gabbro dominated ± dunite, ijolite, melteigite with minor syenite (e.g. Sung Valley, Swangre; Mer-Mundwara); (c) carbonatite dominated ringcomplexes or dykes with minor nephelinite and phonolite (e.g. Amba Dongar, Sarnu- Dandali, Kamthai); (d) Sheet-like, minor dykes and veins of carbonatites either alone or with syenites (e.g., Newania, Kunavaram, Eichuru, Munnar and others). Carbonatitekimberlite- lamproite-lamprophyre association has been clearly seen in the Precambrian Wajrakarur kimberlite field (e.g. Chelima dykes and Khaderpet cluster, Andhra Pradesh) and in the Jungal Valley (Mahakhoshal Group, Uttar Pradesh). Such an association from the Cretaceous Deccan basalt province has been shown to exist from Kutch, Gujarat and the Chhatishgargh-Odhisha areas. A wide variety of fenites, notably the syenitic types comprising sodic, sodic-potassic, and potassic variants have been noticed from several complexes, such as Amba Dongar, Newania, Sevattur, Samchampi, and Sung Valley. Fenitisation is attributed to both carbonatite and alkaline rocks as at Amba Dongar, Sevattur, Sung Valley, and Samchampi or to carbonatite alone (e.g. Newania and others).Among the carbonatite types, sovites (calcitic types) are the most common in most of the localities. Beforsitic (dolomitic) and ankeritic/sideritic types occur in complexes which manifest well developed differentiation trends that range from sovite to beforsite or to ankeritic and sideritic types, as exemplified by complexes such as Amba Dongar, Sevattur, Samalpatti, Newania and Sung Valley. Associated alkaline rocks, as mentioned above, enable the grouping of the complexes into four types. Heterogeneity in terms of structures, mineralogy, and chemistry is characteristic of many carbonatite bodies. Apart from the dominant carbonate-minerals such as calcite, dolomite, ankerite and siderite in the major carbonatite types, a variety of minor minerals have also been found in them. Early phase apatite-magnetite and silicate minerals (olivine, aegirineaugite, ritcherite, riebeckite, phlogopite and others) are well-developed in deep-seated plutonic complexes such as Sevattur, Newania, Sung Valley, Samalpatti, Pakkanadu, and Hogenekal. Some uncommon carbonatite types include those containing Fe-Nb rutile and benstonite from Samalpatti and eschynite, monazite, cerianite, celestite, and allanitebearing types from Pakkanadu, and magnesite from Newania. Minerals of economic importance, often in workable concentrations, occur in several complexes. These include: 1. REE minerals consisting of bastnaesite-(La) and daqingshanite-(Ce), bastnaesite-(Ce), ancylite and synchysite occur at Kamthai; bastnaesite and parasite from ankeritic carbonatites at Amba Dongar; bastnaesite-(Ce), ancylite-(Ce), belovite-(Ce), and britholite-(Ce) at Sung Valley. REE also occur as substituted elements in apatite in many complexes. 2. Pyrochlore - often uraniferous, occur at Sevathur, Sung Valley, Newania and Samchampi; 3. Apatite and/or phosphatic rocks (e.g. Beldih-Kutni, Samchampi, Sung, Sevathur and Newania). 4. Ti-magnetite/ hematite deposit at Samchampi. In addition a large fluorite deposit occurs at Amba Dongar and both vermiculite and apatite are mined from the fenitised-pyroxenite envelope to the north of the Sevathur carbonatite-complex. Evaluation of field association of pyroxenite-fenites in carbonatite-syenite association along with development of carbo-thermal and/or pegmatitic and skarn-rock facies in some complexes such as Samalpatti and Pakkanadu in Tamil Nadu suggests strong possibilities of Sc mineralization in some (e.g. 0.02% Sc from Pakkanadu pyroxenite) or Sc along with possible HREE associations.
DS201801-0032
2017
Krishnamurthy, P.Krishnamurthy, P., VeenakrishnaCarbonatites of India: part 2. Geochemistry, stable and unstable isotopes and petrogenesis.Carbonatite-alkaline rocks and associated mineral deposits , Dec. 8-11, abstract p. 26-28.Indiacarbonatites

Abstract: Geochemically carbonatites and genetically associated alkaline rocks represent an anomalous association of both large-ion lithophile (LIL) elements including the highfield strength (HFS) elements group such as Sr, Ba, Zr, Nb, REE, Y, Sc, Th, and U (excluding Rb) often from trace (< 0.1%) to minor/major components (> 0.1-1%) besides Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Si, Ti, Al, P, Na, K and CO2 in major components. Extreme heterogeneity in terms of elemental abundances is in fact a characteristic feature, often at a single outcrop level, in many carbonatite complexes (e.g. Amba Dongar, Sevathur, Sung Valley). Such apparent chemical diversity is related to the mineralogical heterogeneity that is not uncommon in many carbonatite complexes, leading to diverse mineral prefixes in carbonatite types such as apatite-sovite, apatite-magnetite soviet, riebeckite beforsite, silico-carbonatite and numerous other types (e.g. Sevathur, Samalpatti and Pakkanadu). The most diagnostic geochemical character of carbonatites stem from their geochemical features, especially the higher abundances of LIL and HFS elements, often the highest among the diverse igneous rock types as also compared to the primitive mantle or sedimentary or metamorphosed limestone/or marble or calc-silicate rocks. This has been shown from several studies of Indian carbonatites (Krishnamurthy, 1988; Schleicher et. al. 1998 and others). Radiogenic and stable isotopic ratios have been used since the mid 1990’s on Indian carbonatites which range in age from mid Proterozoic to Cretaceous in both rift related settings and associated with large igneous provinces, apparently related to deep mantleplumes, to provide constraints on the evolution of the sub-continental mantle through time. Various mantle reservoirs like HIMU (A mantle source enriched in U and Th believed to be due to recycling of ancient altered oceanic crust into the mantle), DMM (Depleted MORB mantle), EM1 (Enriched Mantle 1, generated either by recycling of lower crustal material or enrichment by mantle metasomatism) and EM2 (Enriched Mantle 2, possibly formed by recycling of continentally derived sediment, or ocean island crust into the mantle by subduction processes) with distinct isotopic signatures in the Sr- Nd-Pb isotopic space have been invoked to explain the observed variations in isotopic ratios in carbonatites worldwide (Zindler and Hart, 1984 and others). Stable isotopes of Indian carbonatites have been comprehensively reviewed by Ray and Ramesh (2009). Based on d13C and d18O variations, carbonatites have been grouped by them into: 1. Primary, unaltered d18O values (5.3-7.5‰) which indicate mantle signatures that ensue from batch crystallization under plutonic conditions, as observed at Hogenakal, Sung Valley and Samchampi. d13C values, however, appear to be more enriched (-6 to - 3.1‰) than expected for the mantle. Such a feature of enrichment probably happened sometime around ~2.4 Ga, as a sequel to metasomatism by fluids derived from recycled oceanic crust through subduction that carried enriched carbon of lithospheric mantle. 2. Secondary, altered carbonatites’ (e.g. mainly Amba Dongar and others) showing wide variations in d13C and d18 O values apparently results from low temperature alteration by either meteoric water or CO2-bearing aqueous fluids. The values of ??Sr (+5.3 to +7.8), ??Nd ( +1.7 to + 2.3) and initial Pb ratios (19.02, 15.67 and 39.0) for the Sung Valley complex and ?Sr (+3.0 to + 9.3) and ?Nd (+0.45 to +2.3) and initial Pb ratios ( 206Pb/204Pb= 19.12, 207Pb/204Pb= 15.66 and 208Pb/204Pb= 39.56) for the Samchampi alkaline complex are well constrained and indicate that they have originated from isotopically similar source regions that are characterised by somewhat higher Rb/Sr ratio relative to bulk earth, minor LREE depletion with respect to CHUR and time integrated enhancement of the U/Pb ratio relative to bulk earth. However, carbonatites from Sirivasan and Amba Dongar (Srivatsava and Taylor, 1996, Simonetti et al., 1995, Ray and Ramesh, 2006) indicate higher values with ?Sr = +14.6 to +21.8, ?Nd = -0.6 to -1.84 and measured 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb ratios of 19.0, 15.6 and 39.3 and indicate greater enrichment in terms of higher Rb/Sr ratios and LREE enrichment with respect to CHUR. Differences in the north eastern complexes and western complexes are also seen in the stable isotopic data wherein, data for both Sung Valley and Samchampi are constrained with average values of -3.1 ± 0.1‰ for ?13C and 6.33 ± 0.2‰ and -3.1 ± 0.2‰ for ?13C and 7.34 ± 0.7‰ for ?18O respectively whereas data from Amba Dongar and Sirivasan have ?13C of -2.6 to -8.6 ‰ and ?18O of 7.62 to 26.8 ‰. Heterogeneous mantle source has been proposed for the Hogenakal carbonatites with two groups one having high ??Nd and low ??Sr and the other having low ??Nd and high ??Sr. Carbonatites from Sevattur are more enriched with ??Sr (22 to 23), ??Nd ( -5.1 to -5.7) and ?13C ( -4.8 to -6.2‰) and ?18O (6.7 to 7.6 ‰) (Schleicher et.al., 1996, Pandit., et al. 2016). Petrogenetic models of the different carbonatite complexes are reviewed in the light of geochemical and isotopic characteristics. These include models that invoke mantle plumes of both the Kerguelen (e.g. Sung Valley and Samchampi) and Reunion (e.g. Amba Dongar, Sarnu-Dandali and others related to the Deccan volcanism) and their influence on the subcontinental lithosphere. Enriched mantle sources have been indicated for many of the Proterozoic complexes of Tamil Nadu. Evaluations of the different carbonatite complexes in terms of the three known genetic models, listed as follows, have also been elucidated. These include: (a) Direct partial melts from enriched, carbonatedperidotitic sources; (b. Immiscible carbonate and silicate magma after differentiation of the primary, carbonated peridotitic magma; (c) Extreme stage of differentiation of the ultra-alkaline, nephelinite magma. Such approaches also lead us to understand the temporal evolution of the mantle source regions of carbonatites of India since Palaeoproterozoic times. The petrogenetic link between carbonatite-kimberlite-lamproitelamprophyre in the Indian scenario is also briefly reviewed.
DS201906-1306
2019
Krishnamurthy, P.Krishnamurthy, P.Carbonatites: enigmatic magmatic rocks, with special reference to India.Journal of the Geological Society of India, extended abstract of Monthly Scientific Lecture March 12, 1p.Indiacarbonatites

Abstract: Carbonatites, defined as carbonate-rich rocks of igneous origin, pose considerable challenges in understanding their genesis and evolution. These mantle-derived, rare, magmatic rocks are enigmatic in many facets compared to their associated co-magmatic rocks. These include: (a) The very-low viscous, water-soluble, Na- and K-carbonate (nyererieite and gregoryite respectively)-bearing lavas with low temperature (500-600°C) of eruption with only one active volcano as an example (e.g. Ol Doinyo Lengai, Tanzania) in contrast to the numerous acid and basic lava eruptive centres that are well-known around the world. (b). Carbonatites show very high solubilities of many elements considered rare in silicate magmas, and they have the highest known melt capacities for dissolving water and other volatile species like halogens at crustal pressures. With such ‘fluxing and fusing’ characters, carbonatite magma, actively reacts and ‘fenitises’ the country rocks through Na and K metasomatism when they get emplaced. Thus the carbonatite magma loses its Na and K, a feature rare to other magmatic rocks. (c) Primary mineralogy is highly variable from simple carbonate species to a variety of silicate, oxide, phosphate, niobates, rare-earth carbonates and others not found in more common igneous rocks. This feature, unlike other magmatic rocks, influences the variety and size of mineral deposits including the formation of ‘super-giant’ resources such as Nb (Araxa, Brazil) and rare-earths (Bayan Obo, China). (d) They can be direct partial melts or comagmatic with a variety of mantle-derived silicate magmas such as nephelinite, melilitite, kimberlite, phonolite, trachyte, basanite, alkali pyroxenite, ijolite and others from which they can form through liquidimmiscibility or through crystal-liquid differentiation. (e) Carbonatites can also be formed as low-temperature, carbo-thermal residual fluids rich in CO2, H2O and fluorine forming calcite-barite-fluorite veins which may lack the higher abundances of some trace elements. Carbonatites of India, found in some twenty four (24) localities, are associated with a variety of rocks as mentioned above and range in age from late Achaean (e.g. Hogenakal and Khambamettu, Tamil Nadu) to late Cretaceous (e.g. Amba Dongar, Gujarat). These are briefly reviewed with regard to their anomalous features.
DS201909-2053
2019
Krishnamurthy, P.Krishnamurthy, P.Carbonatites of IndiaJournal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 94, 2, pp. 117-138.Indiacarbonatite

Abstract: Based on the field relations, associated rock types and age, the carbonatite-alkaline rock complexes of India, that are spatially related to deep main faults, rifts and shear zones, have been classified in to two major groups, namely: 1. Middle — late Cretaceous, subvolcanic -volcanic complexes (Amba Dongar, Siriwasan, Swangkre, Mer-Mundwara, Sarnu-Dandali-Kamthai) and 2. Paleo-Neoproterozoic plutonic complexes (Newania, Sevathur, Samalpatti, Hogenakal, Kollegal, Pakkanadu, Udaiyapatti, Munnar, and Khambamettu). The middle Cretaceous Sung Valley and Samchampi complexes also belong to this plutonic group. Three minor associations, belonging to these two age groups include, the Neoproterzoic, late stage veins of carbonatites in peralkaline syenite complexes (e.g., Kunavaram, Elchuru), the diamond-bearing carbonatite and kimberlite at Khaderpet and the lamprophyre-lamproite association (e.g., Pachcham Is. Upper Cretaceous, Deccan Volcanic Province, and the Proterozoic Chitrangi Group). Petrological associations include carbonatite-nephelinite-phonolite (e.g. Amba Dongar, Sarnu-Dandali-Kamthai), dunite-peridotite-pyroxenite-ijolitemelilitite (e.g. Sung Valley), miaskitic syenite-pyroxenite ± dunite (e.g. Sevathur, Samalpatti, Pakkanadu), carbonatite alone with fenites (e.g. Newania), besides those minor associations mentioned above. Sovites (calico-carbonatites) occur as the most dominant type in some ten (10) complexes. Beforsite (magnesio-carbonatite) is the dominant type at Newania and ankeritic-sideritic types are mainly found at Amba Dongar, Siriwasan and Newania. The rare benstonite-bearing carbonatites are found at Jokkipatti and Udaiyapatti in Tamil Nadu. Mineralogically and chemically the carbonatites show considerable diversity. Fenitised zones and types of fenites (Na, K and mixed) vary widely since the carbonatites are emplaced in a variety of hostrocks ranging from granitic, mafic, ultramafic, charnockitic types besides basalts and sandstones. Stable (d13C and d18O) and radiogenic (Sr, Nd and Pb) isotopes clearly indicate their mantle origin and also the diverse types of sources (both depleted HIMU and enriched EM 1 and 2). Petrogenetic considerations reveal three types of carbonatites, namely direct partial melts from metasomatised mantle (e.g. Newania), liquid immiscibility from carbonatite-nephelinite association (e.g. Amba Dongar) and through fractionation of ultra-alkaline ultramafic and mafic association (e.g. Sung Valley). Carbonatites of India that host significant resources include Amba Dongar (Fluorite, REE, Nb, P, Ba, Sr), Kamthai (REE), Sevathur (Nb, P, vermiculite), Beldih (P, Fe), Sung Valley (P, Nb, REE, Fe) and Samchampi (P, Nb, Fe, REE).
DS202006-0929
2020
Krishnamurthy, P.Krishnamurthy, P.Rare metal (RM) and rare earth element ( REE) resources: world scenario with special reference to India.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 95, pp. 464-474.India, globalREE

Abstract: The RM (Li, Be, Ti, Zr, Nb, Ta, Th and U) and REE (Light Rare Earths and Heavy Rare Earths including Yttrium) are strategic and critical for sustaining a variety of industries such as nuclear, defence, information technology (IT) and green energy options (wind, solar, electric vehicles and others). The 2010 ‘Rare Earth’ crisis of the world, following China’s monopoly with over 80% share and export restrictions in the REE market, led to an exploration boom for REE all over the world including India. This led to a substantial increase in REE mineral resources (98 Mt of contained REO in 2015) outside China located in Canada (38 Mt), Greenland (39 Mt) and Africa (10.3 Mt) that represents a fivefold increase in resources (c.f. Paulick and Machacek, 2017). As per the 2019, USGS commodity survey, the world reserves of REE have been estimated at 120 Mt in countries such as China (44Mt), Brazil (22Mt), Vietnam (22 Mt), Russia (12 Mt), India (6.9 Mt) and others (13 Mt). At present world resources of RM and REE are adequate to cater the demands of the different industries. The constraints, however, appear to be not technical but mainly environmental and social issues.
DS2000-0535
2000
Krishnamuthry, P.Krishnamuthry, P., Hoda, S.Q., Sinha, R.P., BanerjeeEconomic aspects of carbonatites in IndiaJournal of Asian Earth Science, Vol. 18, No.2, Apr. pp.229-35.IndiaCarbonatite, Economics
DS1950-0075
1951
Krishnan, M.S.Krishnan, M.S.Diamonds; India Geological Survey, 1951India Geological Survey Memoir., Vol. 80, CHAPTER XVI, PP. 99-105.IndiaLocalities, Description, History
DS1950-0405
1958
Krishnan, M.S.Krishnan, M.S.General Report for 1953: DiamondsIndia Geological Survey Records, Vol. 87, PT. 1, P. 84.India, Madras, Vindhya PradeshAnantapur, Krishna, Diamond Occurrences
DS1970-0328
1971
Krishnan, M.S.Krishnan, M.S.The Distribution of Diamond Deposits in IndiaIndia Geological Survey Miscellaneous Publishing, No. 19, PP. 1-6.India, Panna, Andhra Pradesh, OrissaKimberlite Pipes And Deposits, Alluvial Placer Deposits
DS1940-0120
1946
Krishnan, R.S.Krishnan, R.S.Temperature Variations of the Raman Frequences in DiamondProceedings Indian Acad. Sciences, Vol 24, No. A, No. 1, July pp. 45-64IndiaDiamond, Raman Spectroscopy
DS201212-0339
2012
Krishnan, S.U.Jelsma, H.,Krishnan, S.U., Perritt, S.,Kumar, M., Preston, R., Winter, F., Lemotlo, L., Costa, J., Van der Linde, G., Facatino, M., Posser, A., Wallace, C., Henning, A., Joy, S., Chinn, I., Armstrong, R., Phillips, D.Kimberlites from central Angola: a case stidy of exploration findings.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractAfrica, AngolaOverview of kimberlites
DS201312-0439
2013
Krishnan, U.Jelsma, H., Krishnan, U.Kimberlites from central Angola: a case study of exploration findings.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, Special Issue of the Journal of the Geological Society of India,, Vol. 2, pp. 173-190.Africa, AngolaDeposit - Dando-Kwanza
DS201412-0427
2013
Krishnan, U.Jelsma, H., Krishnan, U., Perritt, S., Preston, R., Winter, F., Lemotlo, L., van der Linde, G., Armstrong, R., Phillips, D., Joy, S., Costa, J., Facatino, M., Posser, A., Kumar, M., Wallace, C., Chinn, I., Henning, A.Kimberlites from central Angola: a case study of exploration findings.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, pp. 173-190.Africa, AngolaExploration - kimberlites
DS1975-0120
1975
Krishnaswamy, V.S.Krishnaswamy, V.S.The Jungel Integrated Exploration Project in Search of Diamondiferous Kimberlite.Geological Survey INDIA UNPUBL. REPORT FOR 1973-1974, India, Uttar PradeshProspecting
DS1975-0318
1976
Krishnaswamy, V.S. ET. AL.Krishnaswamy, V.S. ET. AL.Progress Report No. 2 on the Jungel Integrated Exploration Project in Search of Diamondiferous Kimberlite, Mirzapur District, U.p.India Geological Survey Program Report, FOR 1974-1975India, Uttar PradeshDiamond Prospecting
DS2003-1122
2003
Krishnendu, N.R.Radhakrishna, T., Joseph, M., Krishnendu, N.R., Balasubramonian, G.Paleomagnetism of mafic dykes in Dharwar Craton: possible geodynamic implicationsGeological Society of India Memoir, No. 50, pp. 193-224.IndiaGeophysics - magnetics
DS200412-1608
2003
Krishnendu, N.R.Radhakrishna, T., Joseph, M., Krishnendu, N.R., Balasubramonian, G.Paleomagnetism of mafic dykes in Dharwar Craton: possible geodynamic implications.Geological Society of India Memoir, No. 50, pp. 193-224.IndiaGeophysics - magnetics
DS201312-0727
2013
Krishnendu, N.R.Radhakrishna, T., Krishnendu, N.R., Balasubramonian, G.Nd-Hf isotope systematics of megacrysts from the Mbuji-Mayi kimberlites, D.R. Congo: evidence for a metasomatic origin related to kimberlite interaction with the cratonic lithosphere mantle.Earth Science Reviews, in press availableIndiaGondwana
DS201312-0728
2013
Krishnendu, N.R.Radhakrishna, T., Krishnendu, N.R., Balasubramonian, G.Paleoproterozoic Indian shield in the global continental assembly: evidence from the paleomagnetism of mafic dyke swarms.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 126, pp. 370-389.IndiaDykes
DS1991-1729
1991
Krisjansson, F.J.Thorleifson, L.H., Krisjansson, F.J.Drift prospecting studies in support of mineral exploration: an example from the Beardmore-Geraldton area, OntarioG.s.c. Current Activites Forum, Program With Abstracts, January 22-23, 1991, p. 3. AbstractOntarioKimberlite indicator minerals -slides, No mention in abstract -talk with slides of indicators
DS1996-0788
1996
Krisna, V.G.Krisna, V.G., Ramesh, D.S.A discussion on 410 km depth discontinuity: a sharpness estimate for near vertical reflection Vidale.Geophysical research Letters, Vol. 23, No. 18, Sept. 1, pp. 2573-MantleGeophysics -seismics, Discontinuity
DS1995-1025
1995
KRISP working groupKRISP working groupGroup takes a fresh look at the lithosphere underneath southern KenyaEos, Vol. 76, No. 8, Feb. 21, p. 73, 81, 82.KenyaLithosphere, Tectonics, rifting
DS1990-0888
1990
KristenesenKrogh, E.T., Andresen, A., Bryhni, I., Broks, T.M., KristenesenEclogites and polyphase P-T cycling in the Caledonian uppermost allochthonin Troms, northern NorwayJournal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 8, No. 3, May pp. 289-310NorwayEclogites
DS1989-0635
1989
Kristjansson, F.J.Hicock, S.R., Kristjansson, F.J.Gold exploration using tills of the Beardmore-Geraldton area, northernOntarioThe Canadian Mining and Metallurgical Bulletin (CIM Bulletin), Vol. 82, No. 922, February pp. 50-54OntarioGeochemistry -Till, Gold -Beardmore Geraldton
DS1989-0636
1989
Kristjansson, F.J.Hicock, S.R., Kristjansson, F.J., Sharpe, D.R.Carbonate till as a soft bed for Pleistocene ice streams on the Canadian Shield north of Lake SuperiorCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 26, No. November pp. 2249-2254OntarioGeomorphology, Ice flow indicators
DS1990-1460
1990
Kristjansson, F.J.Thorleifson, L.H., Kristjansson, F.J.Geochemical, mineralogical and lithological analyses of glacial sediments for gold, base metals and kimberlite exploration Beardmore-Geraldton area, Thunder Bay OntGeological Survey of Canada Open File, No. 2266, 442p. $54.50 Geological Society of Canada (GSC) and (disk. from Ashley $ 25.00OntarioGeochemistry, Kimberlite indicator mine
DS201609-1697
2016
Kristoffersen, M.Andersen, T., Kristoffersen, M., Elburg, M.A.How far can we trust provenance and crustal evolution information from detrital zircons? A South African case study.Gondwana Research, Vol. 34, pp. 129-148.Africa, South AfricaGeochronology

Abstract: U-Pb and Lu-Hf data are routinely used to trace detrital zircon in clastic sediments to their original source in crystalline bedrock (the protosource), to map out paths of sediment transport, and characterize large-scale processes of crustal evolution. For such data to have a provenance significance, a simple transport route from the protosource in which the zircon formed to its final site of deposition is needed. However, detrital zircon data from Phanerozoic sedimentary cover sequences in South Africa suggest that this “source to sink” relationship has been obscured by repeated events of sedimentary recycling. Phanerozoic sandstones (Cape Supergroup, Karoo Supergroup, Natal Group, Msikaba Formation) and unconsolidated, Cenozoic sands in South Africa share major detrital zircon fractions of late Mesoproterozoic (940-1120 Ma, eHf ˜ 0 to + 15) and Neoproterozoic age (470-720 Ma, eHf ˜ - 10 to + 8). A Permian age fraction (240-280 Ma, eHf ˜ - 8 to + 5) is prominent in sandstones from the upper part of the Karoo Supergroup. All of these sequences are dominated by material derived by recycling of older sedimentary rocks, and only the youngest, late Palaeozoic fraction has a clear provenance significance (Gondwanide orogen). The virtual absence of Archaean zircon is a striking feature in nearly all suites of detrital zircon studied in the region. This indicates that significant events in the crustal evolution history of southern African and western Gondwana are not represented in the detrital zircon record. South Africa provides us with a record of recycling of cover sequences throughout the Phanerozoic, and probably back into the Neoproterozoic, in which the “sink” of one sedimentary cycle will act as the “source” in subsequent cycles. In such a setting, detrital zircon may give information on sedimentary processes rather than on provenance.
DS201905-1082
2019
Kristoffersen, M.van der Meer, Q.H.A., Scott, J.M., Serre, S.H., Whitehouse, M.J., Kristoffersen, M., Le Roux, P.J., Pope, E.C.Low delta 18 O zircon xenocrysts in alkaline basalts; a window into the complex carbonatite-metasomatic history of the Zealandia lithospheric mantle.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 254, pp. 21-39.New Zealandmetasomatism

Abstract: Megacrystic zircon grains from alkaline basaltic fields are rare but can provide fundamental insights into mantle metasomatic processes. Here, we report in-situ U-Pb ages, trace element concentrations and hafnium and oxygen isotopes for fourteen zircon megacrysts from two intraplate alkaline basalt locations in New Zealand. U-Pb ages indicate the zircons crystallised between 12.1 and 19.8 Ma. Zircon oxygen isotopic compositions range from low to mantle-like compositions (grain average d ¹8 O = 3.8-5.1‰). Hafnium isotopes (eHf (t) = +3.3 to +10.4) mostly overlap with intraplate mafic rocks and clinopyroxene in metasomatized peridotitic mantle xenoliths but show no correlation with most trace element parameters or oxygen isotopes. The zircons are interpreted to have formed by the reaction between low-degree melts derived from pre-existing mantle metasomes and the depleted mantle lithosphere prior to eruption and transport to the surface. The low Hf concentration, an absence of Eu anomalies, and elevated U/Yb compared to Nb/Yb in the megacrystic zircons are interpreted to show that the source metasomes comprised subduction- and carbonatite-metasomatised lithospheric mantle. As these trace element characteristics are common for megacrystic zircon in intra-plate basaltic fields globally, they suggest the prevalence of subduction- and carbonatite-metsasomatised mantle under these intraplate volcanic regions. The unusually low d ¹8 O was likely present prior to metasomatic enrichment and may have resulted from high-temperature hydrothermal alteration during initial mantle lithosphere formation at a mid ocean ridge or, possibly, during subduction-related processes associated with continent formation. The combination of proportionally varied contributions from carbonatite- and subduction-metasomatised lithospheric melts with asthenospheric melts may explain the variety of primitive intraplate basalt compositions, including low d ¹8 O reported for some local intraplate lavas.
DS1989-1684
1989
Kriuchkovalski, A.I.Zinchuk, N.N., Kriuchkovalski, A.I., Melnik, I.M.Change of kimberlites at the contact with dolerites(exemplified byYakutia).(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 307, No. 4, pp. 954-957RussiaAlteration
DS201708-1698
2017
Kriulina, G.Kriulina, G.Micro inclusions in diamonds from deposits of different genetic kimberlite types.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, PosterRussiadiamond inclusions
DS201708-1699
2017
Kriulina, G.Kriulina, G.Forecast diamond quality in the deposit.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, PosterRussiadiamond resource
DS202008-1454
2020
Kriulina, G.Vasilev, E., Kriulina, G., Klepikov, I.Luminescence of natural diamond in the NIR range.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 47, 31 6p. PdfRussialuminesence

Abstract: Natural diamond remains the source of many interesting effects and finds that are difficult to reproduce or detect in synthetic crystals. Herein, we investigate the photoluminescence (PL) of more than 2000 natural diamonds in the range 800-1050 nm. PL spectra were registered with excitation at 405, 450, 488 (Ar+), and 787 nm. The investigation revealed several systems that were not previously described. Some new dislocation-related systems were discovered in the spectra of crystals with signs of plastic deformation. They are four sets of doublets 890/900.3 nm, 918/930 nm, 946.5/961.5 nm, and 981/994 nm; four lines at 946, 961.5, 986, and 1020 nm. In low-nitrogen diamonds, they are accompanied by a line at 921 nm. Unreported vibronic systems with zero-phonon lines at 799.5, 819.6, 869.5, and 930 nm were revealed. In most cases, the systems were accompanied with doublet 883/885 of the simplest Ni-related center. We assigned these systems to Ni-related centers of different complexity. The results expand opportunities to restore growth conditions and thermal history of diamond crystals. The detection of new shallow centers expands the prospects of diamond as an optic and semiconductor material for applications in the NIR range.
DS201212-0381
2012
Kriulina, G.Y.Kriulina, G.Y., Kyazimov, V.O., Vasillev, E.A., Matveeva, O.P.New dat a on the structure of the cubic habit diamonds from the M.V. Lomonosov diamond deposit. Archangelsk Diamondiferous Province, Russia.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractRussia, Archangel, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Lomonosov
DS201212-0713
2012
Kriulina, G.Y.Svortsova, V.L., Petrovskiy, V.A.,Kriulina, G.Y.Shells (imprints) of diamond in kimberlite10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractRussiaDeposit - Mir, Udachnaya
DS201312-0568
2012
Kriulina, G.Y.Makeev, A.B., Kriulina, G.Y.Metal films on the surfaces and within diamond crystals from Arkangelskaya and Yakutian diamond provinces.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 54, 8, pp. 663-673.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Lomonosovskaya, Archangelsk, Snegurochka, XXIII Congress, Internationalnaya
DS201412-0267
2014
Kriulina, G.Y.Garanin, V.K., Bovkun, A.V., Garanin, K.V., Kriulina, G.Y., Iwanich, W.Diamonds and its grade in different petrochemical types of kimberlites ( based on Russian diamond deposits).6 Simposio Brasileiro de Geologia do Diamante, Aug. 3-7, 4p. AbstractRussiaMineral chemisty
DS201412-0270
2014
Kriulina, G.Y.Garanin, V.K., Garanin, K.V., Kriulina, G.Y.Granitoids of different geochemical types of Baikal area: their diamonds from Russia.30th. International Conference on Ore Potential of alkaline, kimberlite and carbonatite magmatism. Sept. 29-, http://alkaline2014.comRussiaDiamonds
DS201705-0828
2017
Kriulina, G.Y.Garanin, V.K., Kriulina, G.Y.Diamonds in Russia. ( discoveries)lithographie.org, No. 19, pp. 94-103.RussiaBook - history
DS201809-2041
2018
Kriulina, G.Y.Iskrina, A.V., Bobrov, A.V., Kriulina, G.Y., Zedgenizov, D.A., Garanin, V.K.Melt/fluid inclusions in diamonds from the Lomonosov deposit ( Arkangelsk kimberlite province).Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractRussia, Kola Peninsuladeposit - Lomonosov

Abstract: Melt/fluid inclusions in diamonds provide important evidence for mantle diamond-forming fluids or melts. By now, the major characteristics of the composition of microinclusions have been analyzed in diamonds from several kimberlite provinces and pipes worldwide [1-4]. Here we report the first data on the composition of parent diamondforming melts for diamonds from the Arkhangelsk kimberlite province. After the study of morphology, specialty of the internal structure, and distribution of microinclusions in diamonds, 10 single crystals were selected from the 31 diamonds of the representative collection. The studied crystals may be divided into two groups: cuboids and coated diamonds. The crystals have grayish yellow or dark gray colors and are almost nontransparent due to the high content of microinclusions. Polished slices of these diamonds were studied by IR-spectroscopy, which allowed us to calculate the content of nitrogen defects, as well as the content of water and carbonates in microinclusions. X-ray spectral analyses allowed to study the composition of fluid/melt microinclusions and showed that they were essentially carbonate-silicate with significant variations between these two end-members. All inclusions contain water, with the highest H2O/CO2 in highly siliceous inclusions. Unlike diamonds from Canada and South Africa [1, 2], the studied inclusions in diamionds from the Arkhangelsk province are almost free of chlorides. Comparison of the data obtained with the database on fliud/melt inclusions in diamonds worldwide shows similar of Arkhangelsk diamonds to some diamonds from Yakutia [3, 4], and the data obtained are the most similar to the composition of microinclusions in diamonds from the Internatsionalnaya pipe (Yakutia).
DS201112-0553
2011
Kriulina, G.Yu.Kriulina, G.Yu., Garanin, V.K., Rotman, A.Ya., Kovalchuk, O.E.Pecularities of diamonds from the commercial deposits of Russia.Moscow University Geology Bulletin, Vol. 66, 3, pp. 171-183.Russia, Yakutia, Kola PeninsulaArkhangelsk, Grib, Lomonosov, Mir, Internationalnaya
DS201412-0482
2014
Kriulina, G.Yu.Kriulina, G.Yu., Garanin, V.K., Rotman, A.Ya., Kovalchuk, O.E.Pecularities of diamonds from the commercial deposits of Russia.Moscow University Geology Bulletin, Vol. 66, 3, pp. 171-183.Russia, Yakutia, Kola Peninsula, ArchangelDiamond Morphology
DS201909-2054
2019
Kriulina, G.Yu.Kriulina, G.Yu., Vasiliev, E.A., Garanin, V.K.Structural and mineralogical features of diamonds from the Lomonosov deposit ( Arkhangelsk Province): new data and interpretation.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 486, 2, pp. 627-629.Russia, Archangeldeposit - Lomonosov

Abstract: Three groups of diamond crystals that differ in morphology, photoluminescence, infrared absorption, and thermal history were discovered in the Lomonosov deposit. The first group crystals are mostly octahedrons with minor signs of dissolution and a large share of nitrogen in the form of B defects. The crystals of the second type are strongly resorbed dodecahedroids with a small share of B defects. The third group consists of crystals with low-temperature ? defects; they are cuboids that are often without traces of resorption, and tetrahexahedroids. These patterns indicate the polygenicity of the diamond in the Lomonosov deposit.
DS201910-2275
2019
Kriulina, G.Yu.Kriulina, G.Yu., Iskrina, A.V., Zedgenizov, D.A., Bobrov, A.V., Garanin, V.K.The compositional pecularities of microinclusions in diamonds from the Lomonosov deposit ( Arkangelsk Province).Geochemistry International, Vol. 57, 9, pp. 963-980.Russiadeposit - Lomonosov

Abstract: The data on the composition of microinclusions in diamonds from the Lomonosov deposits are reported for the first time. The studied diamonds include “coated” (n = 5) and cubic (n = 5) crystals. The estimated range of the degree of nitrogen aggregation in diamonds (4-39% B1) does not support their direct links with kimberlite magmatism; however, their short occurrence in the mantle at higher temperatures is probable as well. The composition of melt/fluid microinclusions in these samples varies from essentially carbonatitic to significantly silicate. It is shown that the contents of MgO, CaO, Na2O, Cl, and P2O5 decrease with increasing content of silicates and water. Different mechanisms of the generation and evolution of diamond-forming media are discussed to explain the observed variations.
DS1981-0183
1981
Krivdik, S.G.Glevasskiy, YE.B., Krivdik, S.G.Metallogenesis of the Chernigov Massive Carbonatite, Azov Region.Izd. Nauk Dumka, Kiev, PP. 72-76.RussiaDating
DS1988-0380
1988
Krivdik, S.G.Krivdik, S.G.Titanite from alkali rocks of the Chernigovka carbonatite massif (Priazov) USSR.(Russian)Mineral. Zhurn., (Russian), Vol. 10, No. 3, pp. 76-80RussiaCarbonatite
DS1982-0348
1982
Krivenko, A.P.Krivenko, A.P., Fominykh, V.I.Picrites and the Genesis of Gabbro Monzodiorite Plutonites. RusTrudy Institute Geol. Geofiz., (Russian), No. 455, pp. 34-39RussiaPicrite
DS1991-1737
1991
Krivenko, A.P.Tolstykh, N.D., Krivenko, A.P., Elisafenko, V.N., Ponomarchuk, V.A.Mineralogy of apatite-bearing carbonatites from Kuznetsk AlatauSoviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 32, No. 11, pp. 41-48RussiaCarbonatite, Mineralogy
DS201803-0487
2018
Krivivichev, S.V.Yakovenchuk, V.N., Yu, G., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Panikorovskii, T.L., Britvin, S.N., Krivivichev, S.V., Shilovskikh, V.V., Bocharov, V.N.Kampelite, Ba3Mg1.5,Sc4(PO4)6(OH)3.4H2O, a new very complex Ba-Sc phosphate mineral from the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite complex ( Kola Peninsula) Russia.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 112, pp. 111-121.Russia, Kola Peninsulacarbonatite - Kovdor
DS201905-1027
2019
Krivobok, V.S.Ekimov, E.A., Kondrin, M.V., Krivobok, V.S., Khomich, A.A., Vlasov, I.I., Khmelnitskiy, R.A.Effect of Si, Ge and Sn dopant elements on structure and photoluminescence of nano- and microdiamonds synthesized from organic compounds.Diamond & Related Materials, Vol. 93, pp. 75-83.Globalluminescence

Abstract: HPHT synthesis of diamonds from hydrocarbons attracts great attention due to the opportunity to obtain luminescent nano- and microcrystals of high structure perfection. Systematic investigation of diamond synthesized from the mixture of hetero-hydrocarbons containing dopant elements Si or Ge (C24H20Si and C24H20Ge) with a pure hydrocarbon - adamantane (C10H16) at 8?GPa was performed. The photoluminescence of SiV- and GeV- centers in produced diamonds was found to be saturated when Si and Ge contents in precursors exceed some threshold values. The presence of SiC or Ge as second phases in diamond samples with saturated luminescence indicates that ultimate concentrations of the dopants were reached in diamond. It is shown that SiC inclusions can be captured by growing crystals and be a source of local stresses up to 2?GPa in diamond matrix. No formation of Ge-related inclusions in diamonds was detected, which makes Ge more promising as a dopant in the synthesis method. Surprisingly, the synthesis of diamonds from the C24H20Sn hetero-hydrocarbon was ineffective for SnV- formation: only fluorescence of N-and Si-related color centers was detected at room temperature. As an example of great potential for the synthesis method, mass synthesis of 50-nm diamonds with GeV- centers was realized at 9.4?GPa. Single GeV- production in individual nanodiamond was demonstrated.
DS201808-1799
2018
Krivocichev, S.V.Zhitova, E.S., Krivocichev, S.V., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Ivanyuk, G.Y., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Mikhailova, J.A.Crystal chemistry of natural layered double hydroxides: 4. Crystal structures and evolution of structural complexity of quintinite polytypes from the Kovdor alkaline ultrabasic massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 82, no. 2, pp. 329-346.Russia, Kola Peninsuladeposit - Kovdor

Abstract: Two quintinite polytypes, 3R and 2T, which are new for the Kovdor alkaline-ultrabasic complex, have been structurally characterized. The crystal structure of quintinite-2T was solved by direct methods and refined to R1 = 0.048 on the basis of 330 unique reflections. The structure is trigonal, P c1, a = 5.2720(6), c = 15.113(3) Å and V = 363.76(8) Å3. The crystal structure consists of [Mg2Al(OH)6]+ brucite-type layers with an ordered distribution of Mg2+ and Al3+ cations according to the × superstructure with the layers stacked according to a hexagonal type. The complete layer stacking sequence can be described as …=Ab1C = Cb1A=…. The crystal structure of quintinite-3R was solved by direct methods and refined to R1 = 0.022 on the basis of 140 unique reflections. It is trigonal, R m, a = 3.063(1), c = 22.674(9) Å and V = 184.2(1) Å3. The crystal structure is based upon double hydroxide layers [M2+,3+(OH)2] with disordered distribution of Mg, Al and Fe and with the layers stacked according to a rhombohedral type. The stacking sequence of layers can be expressed as …=?B = BC = CA=… The study of morphologically different quintinite generations grown on one another detected the following natural sequence of polytype formation: 2H ? 2T ? 1M that can be attributed to a decrease of temperature during crystallization. According to the information-based approach to structural complexity, this sequence corresponds to the increasing structural information per atom (IG): 1.522 ? 1.706 ? 2.440 bits, respectively. As the IG value contributes negatively to the configurational entropy of crystalline solids, the evolution of polytypic modifications during crystallization corresponds to the decreasing configurational entropy. This is in agreement with the general principle that decreasing temperature corresponds to the appearance of more complex structures.
DS200912-0706
2009
Krivolutskaya, N.A.Sobolev, A.V., Krivolutskaya, N.A., Kuzmin, D.V.Petrology of the parental melts and mantle sources of Siberian trap magmatism.Petrology, Vol. 17, 3, May pp. 253-286.RussiaMagmatism - Not specific to diamonds
DS2001-0005
2001
KrivonosAfanasev, V.P., Zinchuk, Pkhilenko, Krivonos, YanyginKarst role in the formation of diamond placers of the Muno Markhinskii interfluve Yakutsk diamond provinceGeol. Ore Depos., Vol. 43, No. 3, pp. 234-8.Russia, SiberiaAlluvials, Geomorphology
DS1970-0114
1970
Krivonos, V.F.Krivonos, V.F.Geology of Kimberlite in the Lena RegionIn: Geology, Petrography And Mineralogy of Magmatic Formatio, PP. 16-30.RussiaBlank
DS1970-0115
1970
Krivonos, V.F.Krivonos, V.F., Ilupin, I.P., Savrasov, D.I.New Methods of Estimating the Age of Kimberlites with the Lena Region As Example, Northeast Siberian PlatformIn: Geology, Petrography And Mineralogy of Magmatic Formatio, PP. 67-75.RussiaBlank
DS1970-0329
1971
Krivonos, V.F.Krivonos, V.F., Fedorov, P.T.New Dat a on the Nature of Local Pipe Like Magnetic Anomalies on the Eastern Part of the Anabar Anteclise.Geologii i Geofiziki, No. 6, PP. 96-104.Russia, YakutiaKimberlite, Geophysics
DS1982-0349
1982
Krivonos, V.F.Krivonos, V.F.Characteristics of Distribution of Diamonds in Alluvial Placers of Yakutia Diamond Province.Sovet. Geolog., No. 4, PP. 58-61.RussiaGeotectonics, Structure, Anabar Shield, Histograms
DS1988-0743
1988
Krivonos, V.F.Vuiko, V.L., Kvastnitsa, V.N., Koptil, V.I., Krivonos, V.F.Optical spectra and the color of small diamonds from kimberlites.(Russian)Mineral. Sbornik (L'Vov), (Russian), Vol. 42, No. 1, pp. 13-17RussiaDiamond morphology, Microdiamonds
DS1988-0744
1988
Krivonos, V.F.Vuyko, V.I., Kvasnitsa, V.N., Koptil, V.I., Krivonos, V.F.Optical spectra and color of small diamonds from kimberlite.(Russian)Mineral. Sbornik (L'Vov), (Russian), Vol. 42, No. 1, pp. 13-17RussiaMicrodiamonds, Diamond morphology -colou
DS1995-1026
1995
Krivonos, V.F.Krivonos, V.F.Petrochemical criterion for the diamondiferousness of kimberlites andlamproites.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Almazy Rossii Sakha abstract, p. 26-28.Russia, YakutiaGeochemistry -iron magnesiuM., Deposits
DS1982-0350
1982
Krivoshlyk, I.N.Krivoshlyk, I.N.Autoliths and Some Corollaries of the Hypothesis of Their Genesis from Immiscible Phases.Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 252, No. 1, PP. 81-83RussiaKimberlite, Inclusions, Xenoliths, Petrography
DS1983-0379
1983
Krivoshlyk, I.N.Krivoshlyk, I.N., Bobriyevich, A.P.Spherules of Immiscible Carbonatite in KimberliteDoklady Academy of Sciences ACAD. NAUK USSR EARTH SCI. SECTION., Vol. 261, No. 1-6, PP. 121-123.RussiaPetrography
DS1984-0433
1984
Krivoshlyk, I.N.Krivoshlyk, I.N., Bobriyevich, A.P.Typomorphic pecularities of carbonate serpentine paragenesis in kimberliterocks.(Russian)Mineral Sbornik (L'Vov), (Russian), Vol. 38, No. 1, pp. 7-11RussiaCarbonate
DS1985-0369
1985
Krivoshlyk, I.N.Krivoshlyk, I.N., Bobrievich, A.P.Secondary (binary) Liquifaction of Kimberlitic Magma.(russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 280, No. 6, pp. 1414-1418RussiaPetrology
DS1985-0370
1985
Krivoshlyk, I.N.Krivoshlyk, I.N., Bobrievich, A.P.The Repeated (double) Liquation in Kimberlite MagmaDoklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 280, No. 6, PP. 1414-1418.RussiaBlank
DS1985-0371
1985
Krivoshlyk, I.N.Krivoshlyk, I.N., Bobriyevich, A.P.A Possible Mode of Kimberlite Pipe Formation.(russian)Mineral. Sbornik (L'Vov), (Russian), Vol. 39, No. 1, pp. 3-7RussiaBlank
DS1986-0465
1986
Krivoshlyk, I.N.Krivoshlyk, I.N., Bobriyevich, A.P.Repeated seperation of kimberlite magma into immiscible meltsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 280, No. 1-6, pp. 122-125RussiaMagma
DS1987-0377
1987
Krivoshlyk, I.N.Krivoshlyk, I.N., Bobriyevich, A.P.Some conceptson the hydraulic hammer hypothesis inkimberlitepipes.(Russian)Mineral. Sbornik (L'Vov), (Russian), Vol. 41, No. 2, pp. 48-54RussiaPetrology, Diatremes
DS201912-2795
2019
Krivovchev, S.V.Krivovichev, S.V., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Panikorovskii, T.L., Savchenko, E.E., Pakhailova, Yu, A., Selivanova, E.A., Kadyrova, G.I., Ivanyuk, G.Yu.,Krivovchev, S.V.Nikmelnikovite: Ca 12 Fe 2+ Fe 3+3 Al3(SiO4) 6(OH)20: a new mineral from the Kovdor Massif ( Kola Peninsula, Russia)Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 488, 2, pp. 1200-1202.Russia, Kola Peninsuladeposit - Kovdor
DS201810-2340
2018
krivovichevkrivovichev, Hazen, R.M. Krivovichev, V.G. Structural and chemical complexity of minerals: correlations and time evolution.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 30, 2, pp. 231-236.Mantlegeochemistry

Abstract: Correlations between chemical and structural complexities of minerals were analysed using a total of 4962 datasets on the chemical compositions and 3989 datasets on the crystal structures of minerals. The amounts of structural and chemical Shannon information per atom and per unit cell or formula unit were calculated using the approach proposed by Krivovichev with no Hcorrection for the minerals with unknown H positions. Statistical analysis shows that there are strong and positive correlations (R 2 > 0.95) between the chemical and structural complexities and the number of different chemical elements in a mineral. Analysis of relations between chemical and structural complexities provides strong evidence that there is an overall trend of increasing structural complexity with the increasing chemical complexity. Following Hazen, four groups of minerals were considered that represent four eras of mineral evolution: "ur-minerals", minerals from chondritic meteorites, Hadean minerals, and minerals of the post-Hadean era. The analysis of mean chemical and structural complexities for the four groups demonstrate that both are gradually increasing in the course of mineral evolution. The increasing complexity follows an overall passive trend: more complex minerals form with the passage of geological time, yet the simpler ones are not replaced. The observed correlations between the chemical and structural complexities understood in terms of Shannon information suggest that, at a first approximation, chemical differentiation is a major force driving the increase of complexity of minerals in the course of geological time. New levels of complexity and diversifcation observed in mineral evolution are achieved through the chemical differentiation, which favours local concentrations of particular rare elements and creation of new geochemical environments.
DS201508-0368
2015
Krivovichev, S.Lyalina, L., Zolotarev, A.Jr., Selivanova, E., Savchenko, Ye., Zozulya, D., Krivovichev, S., Mikhailova, Yu.Structural characterization and composition of Y-rich hainite from Sakharojok nepheline syenite pegmatite ( Kola Peninsula, Russia).Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 109, 4, pp. 443-451.Russia, YakutiaNepheline syenite
DS2003-0751
2003
Krivovichev, S.V.Krivovichev, S.V., Armbruster, T., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Crystal structure of Lamprophyllite - 2M and Lamprophyllite -2O from the LovozeroEuropean Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 15, 4, pp. 711-18.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkaline rocks - mineralogy
DS200412-1056
2003
Krivovichev, S.V.Krivovichev, S.V., Armbruster, T., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Crystal structure of Lamprophyllite - 2M and Lamprophyllite -2O from the Lovozero alkaline massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 15, 4, pp. 711-18.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkaline rocks, mineralogy
DS200612-0908
2006
Krivovichev, S.V.Menishikov, Y.P., Krivovichev, S.V., Pakhomovsky, Yakovenchuk, Ivanyuk, Mikhailova, Armbruster,SelivanovaChivruaiite, Ca(Ti,Nb)5(Si6O17)2 (OH,O)5.13-14H20, a new mineral from hydrothermal veins of Khibiny and Lovozero alkaline massifs.American Mineralogist, Vol. 91, 5-6, May pp. 922-928.Russia, Kola PeninsulaMineralogy - alkaline
DS201012-0414
2010
Krivovichev, S.V.Krivovichev, S.V., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Zhitova, E.S., Zolotarev, A.A., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Ivanyuk, G.Yu.Crystal chemistry of natural layered double hydroxides, 1. Quintinite -2H-3c from the Kovdor alkaline massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 74, pp. 821-832.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS201112-1175
2011
Krivovichev, S.V.Zolotarev, A.A., Krivovichev, S.V., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Zhitova, E.S., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Ivanyuk, G.Y.Crystal chemistry of natural layered double hydroxides from the Kovdor alkaline massif, Kola. Polytypes of quininite: cation ordering and superstructures.Peralk-Carb 2011, workshop held Tubingen Germany June 16-18, PosterRussia, Kola PeninsulaAlkalic
DS201212-0731
2012
Krivovichev, S.V.Titkov, S.V., Krivovichev, S.V., Organova, N.I.Plastic deformation of natural diamonds by twinning: evidence from x-ray diffraction studies.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 76, 1, pp. 143-149.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201412-0307
2014
Krivovichev, S.V.Gordeev, E.I., Karpov, G.A., Anikin, L.P., Krivovichev, S.V., Filatov, S.K., Antonov, A.V., Ovsyannikov, A.A.Diamonds in lavas of the Tolbachik fissure eruption in Kamchatka.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 454, 1, pp. 47-49.RussiaTolbachik fissure
DS201505-0249
2015
Krivovichev, S.V.Belogub, E.V., Krivovichev, S.V., Pekov, I.V., Kuznetsov, A.M., Yapaskurt, V.O., Kitlyarov, V.A., Chukanov, N.V., Belakoviskiy, D.I.Nickelpicromerite, K2Ni(SO4)2*6H2O, a new picromerite group mineral from Slyudorudnik, South Urals, Russia.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 109, 2, pp. 143-152.Russia, UralsMineralogy

Abstract: A new picromerite-group mineral, nickelpicromerite, K2Ni(SO4)2 - 6H2O (IMA 2012-053), was found at the Vein #169 of the Ufaley quartz deposit, near the town of Slyudorudnik, Kyshtym District, Chelyabinsk area, South Urals, Russia. It is a supergene mineral that occurs, with gypsum and goethite, in the fractures of slightly weathered actinolite-talc schist containing partially vermiculitized biotite and partially altered sulfides: pyrrhotite, pentlandite, millerite, pyrite and marcasite. Nickelpicromerite forms equant to short prismatic or tabular crystals up to 0.07 mm in size and anhedral grains up to 0.5 mm across, their clusters or crusts up to 1 mm. Nickelpicromerite is light greenish blue. Lustre is vitreous. Mohs hardness is 2-2½. Cleavage is distinct, parallel to {10-2}. Dmeas is 2.20(2), Dcalc is 2.22 g cm-3. Nickelpicromerite is optically biaxial (+), a = 1.486(2), ß = 1.489(2), ? = 1.494(2), 2Vmeas =75(10)°, 2Vcalc =76°. The chemical composition (wt.%, electron-microprobe data) is: K2O 20.93, MgO 0.38, FeO 0.07, NiO 16.76, SO3 37.20, H2O (calc.) 24.66, total 100.00. The empirical formula, calculated based on 14 O, is: K1.93Mg0.04Ni0.98S2.02O8.05(H2O)5.95. Nickelpicromerite is monoclinic, P21/c, a = 6.1310(7), b = 12.1863(14), c = 9.0076(10) Å, ß = 105.045(2)°, V = 649.9(1) Å3, Z = 2. Eight strongest reflections of the powder XRD pattern are [d,Å-I(hkl)]: 5.386--34(110); 4.312-46(002); 4.240-33(120); 4.085--100(012, 10-2); 3.685-85(031), 3.041-45(040, 112), 2.808-31(013, 20-2, 122), 2.368-34(13-3, 21-3, 033). Nickelpicromerite (single-crystal X-ray data, R = 0.028) is isostructural to other picromerite-group minerals and synthetic Tutton’s salts. Its crystal structure consists of [Ni(H2O)6]2+ octahedra linked to (SO4)2- tetrahedra via hydrogen bonds. K+ cations are coordinated by eight anions. Nickelpicromerite is the product of alteration of primary sulfide minerals and the reaction of the acid Ni-sulfate solutions with biotite.
DS201706-1113
2017
Krivovichev, S.V.Zaitsev, A.N., Zhitova, E.S., Spratt, J., Zolotarev, A.A., Krivovichev, S.V.Isolueshite, NaNb03, from the Kovdor carbonatite, Kola Peninsula, Russia: composition, crystal structure and possible formation scenarios.Neues Jahrbuch fur Mineralogie, Vol. 194, 2, pp. 165-173.Russia, Kola Peninsuladeposit - Kovdor

Abstract: Isolueshite, a cubic complex oxide with the formula NaNbO3, occurs as euhedral crystals 0.4 - 0.7 mm in size in calcite carbonatite, Kovdor ultrabasic-alkaline complex (Kola, Russia). Average composition of isolueshite, based on 40 analyses by wavelength-dispersive electron microprobe is (Na0.84Ca0.07Sr0.01La0.01Ce0.01)S0.95(Nb0.90Ti0.11)S1.01O3. Minor and trace elements are Ti (4.1- 6.8 wt.% TiO2), REEs (1.8 - 4.0 wt.% REE2O3), Ca (1.7- 3.3 wt.% CaO), Zr (0.1- 0.8 wt.% ZrO2), Sr (0.3 - 0.4 wt.% SrO), Th (0.1- 0.5 wt.% ThO2), Fe (0.1- 0.2 wt.% Fe2O3) and Ta (0.1 wt.% Ta2O5). The crystal structure of isolueshite was refined to an agreement index (R1) of 0.028 for 82 unique reflections with |F0| = 4 s(F). The mineral is cubic, Pm3-m, a = 3.9045(5) Å and V = 59.525(13) Å3. The diffraction pattern of the crystal contains only regular and strong Bragg reflections with no signs of diffuse scattering. There are two sites in the crystal structure: A is 12-coordinated (A-O = 2.556(3) Å) and located at the corners of the cubic primitive cell and B is situated in the center of the unit-cell and has an octahedral coordination. The crystal-chemical formula based on the structure refinement is (Na0.84(1)Ca0.16(1))(Nb0.88(1)Ti0.12(1))O3. We suggest that isolueshite is a quenched (kinetically favored) polymorph of lueshite that formed as a result of rapid crystallization due to the sudden drop in temperature and/or pressure.
DS201801-0049
2017
Krivovichev, S.V.Popova, E.A., Lushnikov, S.G., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Krivovichev, S.V.The crystal structure of loparite: a new acentric variety.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 111, pp. 827-832.Russia, Kola Peninsuladeposit - Khibiny

Abstract: The crystal structure of a new structural variety of loparite (Na0.56Ce0.21La0.14Ca0.06Sr0.03Nd0.02Pr0.01)S=1.03(Ti0.83Nb0.15)S=0.98O3 from the Khibiny alkaline massif, Kola peninsula, Russia, was solved by direct methods and refined to R1 = 0.029 for 492 unique observed reflections with I > 2s(I). The mineral is orthorhombic, Ima2, a = 5.5129(2), b = 5.5129(2) and c = 7.7874(5) Å. Similarly to other perovskite-group minerals with the general formula ABO3, the crystal structure of loparite is based upon a three-dimensional framework of distorted corner-sharing BO6. The A cations are coordinated by 12 oxygen atoms and are situated in distorted cuboctahedral cavities. In contrast to the ideal perovskite-type structure (Pm3-m), the unit cell is doubled along the c axis and the a and b axes are rotated in the ab plane at 45o. The BO6 octahedron displays distortion characteristic for the d0 transition metal cations with the out-of-center shift of the B site. The symmetry reduction is also attributable to the distortion of the BO6 octahedra which are tilted and rotated with respect to the c axis. The occurrence of a new acentric variety of loparite can be explained by the pecularities of its chemical composition characterized by the increased content of Ti compared to the previously studied samples.
DS201810-2341
2018
Krivovichev, S.V.Krivovichev, V.G., Charykova, M.V., Krivovichev, S.V.The concept of mineral systems and its application to the study of mineral diversity and evolution.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 30, 2, pp. 219-230.Mantlemineralogy

Abstract: The chemical diversity of minerals can be analysed in terms of the concept of mineral systems, defined by the set of chemical elements essential for the definition of a mineral species. Only species-defining elements are considered as essential. According to this approach, all minerals are classified into ten types of mineral systems with the number of essential components ranging from 1 to 10. For all the minerals known today, only 70 chemical elements act as essential species-defining constituents. The number of minerals of different chemical elements are calculated as follows (number of mineral species is given in parentheses): oxygen (4138), hydrogen (2814), silicon (1479), calcium (1182), sulfur (1064), aluminum (989), sodium (953), iron (953), copper (643), arsenic (601), phosphorus (599), and magnesium (576). The distribution of the majority of the species-defining elements among mineral systems submits to a normal distribution. Using the concept of mineral systems, different geological objects can be compared from the viewpoint of their mineral diversity as exemplified by alkaline massifs (Khibiny, Lovozero, Russia, and Mont Saint-Hilaire, Canada), evaporite deposits (Inder, Kazakhstan, and Searles Lake, USA) and fumaroles at active volcanoes (Tolbachik, Kamchatka, Russia, and Vulcano, Sicily, Italy). The concept of mineral systems can be applied to mineral evolution overall by calculating the mean number of elements for the first three stages in the evolution of minerals as proposed by R.M. Hazen and co-authors in 2008, plus a fourth period corresponding to Hazen's stages 4-10, as follows: 2.08?±?0.45 (I: ur-minerals); 2.68?±?0.13 (II: minerals of chondritic meteorites); 3.86?±?0.07 (III: Hadean minerals); 4.50?±?1.47 (IV: post-Hadean minerals).
DS201905-1046
2019
Krivovichev, S.V.Ivanyuk, G.Y., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Panikorovskii, T.L., Konoplyova, N., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Bazai, A.V., Bocharov, V.N., Krivovichev, S.V.Hydroxynatropyrochlore, ( Na, Ca, Ce)2 Nb2O6(OH), a new member of the pyrochlore group from the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite pipe, Kola Peninsula, Russia.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 83, pp. 107-113.Russia, Kola Peninsulacarbonatite

Abstract: Hydroxynatropyrochlore, (Na,?a,Ce)2Nb2O6(OH), is a new Na-Nb-OH-dominant member of the pyrochlore supergroup from the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite pipe (Kola Peninsula, Russia). It is cubic, Fd-3m, a = 10.3211(3) Å, V = 1099.46 (8) Å3, Z = 8 (from powder diffraction data) or a = 10.3276(5) Å, V = 1101.5(2) Å3, Z = 8 (from single-crystal diffraction data). Hydroxynatropyrochlore is a characteristic accessory mineral of low-carbonate phoscorite of the contact zone of the phoscorite-carbonatite pipe with host foidolite as well as of carbonate-rich phoscorite and carbonatite of the pipe axial zone. It usually forms zonal cubic or cubooctahedral crystals (up to 0.5 mm in diameter) with irregularly shaped relics of amorphous U-Ta-rich hydroxykenopyrochlore inside. Characteristic associated minerals include rockforming calcite, dolomite, forsterite, hydroxylapatite, magnetite,and phlogopite, accessory baddeleyite, baryte, barytocalcite, chalcopyrite, chamosite-clinochlore, galena, gladiusite, juonniite, ilmenite, magnesite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, quintinite, spinel, strontianite, valleriite, and zirconolite. Hydroxynatropyrochlore is pale-brown, with an adamantine to greasy lustre and a white streak. The cleavage is average on {111}, the fracture is conchoidal. Mohs hardness is about 5. In transmitted light, the mineral is light brown, isotropic, n = 2.10(5) (??= 589 nm). The calculated and measured densities are 4.77 and 4.60(5) g•cm-3, respectively. The mean chemical composition determined by electron microprobe is: F 0.05, Na2O 7.97, CaO 10.38, TiO2 4.71, FeO 0.42, Nb2O5 56.44, Ce2O3 3.56, Ta2O5 4.73, ThO2 5.73, UO2 3.66, total 97.65 wt. %. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of Nb+Ta+Ti = 2 apfu is (Na1.02Ca0.73Ce0.09Th0.09 U0.05Fe2+0.02)?2.00 (Nb1.68Ti0.23Ta0.09)?2.00O6.03(OH1.04F0.01)?1.05. The simplified formula is (Na, Ca,Ce)2Nb2O6(OH). The mineral slowly dissolves in hot HCl. The strongest X-ray powderdiffraction lines [listed as (d in Å)(I)(hkl)] are as follows: 5.96(47)(111), 3.110(30)(311), 2.580(100)(222), 2.368(19)(400), 1.9875(6)(333), 1.8257(25)(440) and 1.5561(14)(622). The crystal structure of hydroxynatropyrochlore was refined to R1 = 0.026 on the basis of 1819 unique observed reflections. The mineral belongs to the pyrochlore structure type A2B2O6Y1 with octahedral framework of corner-sharing BO6 octahedra with A cations and OH groups in the interstices. The Raman spectrum of hydroxynatropyrochlore contains characteristic bands of the lattice, BO6, B-O and O-H vibrations and no characteristic bands of the H2O vibrations. Within the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite pipe, hydroxynatropyrochlore is the latest hydrothermal mineral of the pyrochlore supergroup, which forms external rims around grains of earlier U-rich hydroxykenopyrochlore and separated crystals in voids of dolomite carbonatite veins. The mineral is named in accordance with the pyrochlore supergroup nomenclature.
DS201912-2795
2019
Krivovichev, S.V.Krivovichev, S.V., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Panikorovskii, T.L., Savchenko, E.E., Pakhailova, Yu, A., Selivanova, E.A., Kadyrova, G.I., Ivanyuk, G.Yu.,Krivovchev, S.V.Nikmelnikovite: Ca 12 Fe 2+ Fe 3+3 Al3(SiO4) 6(OH)20: a new mineral from the Kovdor Massif ( Kola Peninsula, Russia)Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 488, 2, pp. 1200-1202.Russia, Kola Peninsuladeposit - Kovdor
DS201810-2341
2018
Krivovichev, V.G.Krivovichev, V.G., Charykova, M.V., Krivovichev, S.V.The concept of mineral systems and its application to the study of mineral diversity and evolution.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 30, 2, pp. 219-230.Mantlemineralogy

Abstract: The chemical diversity of minerals can be analysed in terms of the concept of mineral systems, defined by the set of chemical elements essential for the definition of a mineral species. Only species-defining elements are considered as essential. According to this approach, all minerals are classified into ten types of mineral systems with the number of essential components ranging from 1 to 10. For all the minerals known today, only 70 chemical elements act as essential species-defining constituents. The number of minerals of different chemical elements are calculated as follows (number of mineral species is given in parentheses): oxygen (4138), hydrogen (2814), silicon (1479), calcium (1182), sulfur (1064), aluminum (989), sodium (953), iron (953), copper (643), arsenic (601), phosphorus (599), and magnesium (576). The distribution of the majority of the species-defining elements among mineral systems submits to a normal distribution. Using the concept of mineral systems, different geological objects can be compared from the viewpoint of their mineral diversity as exemplified by alkaline massifs (Khibiny, Lovozero, Russia, and Mont Saint-Hilaire, Canada), evaporite deposits (Inder, Kazakhstan, and Searles Lake, USA) and fumaroles at active volcanoes (Tolbachik, Kamchatka, Russia, and Vulcano, Sicily, Italy). The concept of mineral systems can be applied to mineral evolution overall by calculating the mean number of elements for the first three stages in the evolution of minerals as proposed by R.M. Hazen and co-authors in 2008, plus a fourth period corresponding to Hazen's stages 4-10, as follows: 2.08?±?0.45 (I: ur-minerals); 2.68?±?0.13 (II: minerals of chondritic meteorites); 3.86?±?0.07 (III: Hadean minerals); 4.50?±?1.47 (IV: post-Hadean minerals).
DS1993-0855
1993
Krjuchkov, A.I.Krjuchkov, A.I., Sarlthev, I.K.Some aspects of the evaluation of covered Yakutian diamond depositsDiamonds of Yakutia, pp. 113-114.Russia, YakutiaEvaluation
DS201012-0421
2010
Krmicek, L.Kynicky, J., Chakhmouradian, A.R., Cheng, Xu, Krmicek, L., Krmickova, M., Davis, B.Evolution of rare earth mineralization in carbonatites of the Lugiin Gol complex southern Mongolia.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 573.Asia, MongoliaCarbonatite
DS201112-0554
2011
Krmicek, L.Krmicek, L.The lamprophyre problem: return to the roots.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1241.Europe, BohemiaMinette
DS201609-1727
2016
Krmicek, L.Krmicek, L., Romer, R.L.,Ulrych, J., Glodny, J., Prelevic, D.Petrogenesis of orogenic lamproites of the Bohemian Massif: Sr-Nd-Pb-Li isotope constraints for Variscan enrichment of ultra-depleted mantle domains.Gondwana Research, Vol. 35, pp. 198-216.EuropeLamproite

Abstract: During convergence of Gondwana-derived microplates and Laurussia in the Palaeozoic, subduction of oceanic and continental crusts and their sedimentary cover introduced material of regionally contrasting chemical and isotopic compositions into the mantle. This slab material metasomatised the local mantle, producing a highly heterogeneous lithospheric mantle beneath the European Variscides. The eastern termination of the European Variscides (Moldanubian and Saxo-Thuringian zones of Austria, Czech Republic, Germany and Poland) is unusual in that the mantle was modified by material from several subduction zones within a small area. Orogenic lamproites sampled this lithospheric mantle, which has a chemical signature reflecting extreme depletion (low CaO and Al2O3 contents and high Mg-number) followed by strong metasomatic enrichment, giving rise to crust-like trace element patterns, variable radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr(330) (0.7062-0.7127) and non-radiogenic Nd isotopic compositions (eNd(330) = - 2.8 to - 7.8), crustal Pb isotopic compositions, and a wide range of d7Li values (- 5.1 to + 5.1). This metasomatic signature is variably expressed in the lamproites, depending on the extent of melting and the nature of the source of the metasomatic component. Preferential melting of the metasomatically enriched (veined) lithospheric mantle with K-rich amphibole resulted in lamproitic melts with very negative, crust-like d7Li values, which correlate positively with peralkalinity, HFSE contents and lower eNd. Both the higher degree of melting and progressive consumption of the metasomatic component reduce the chemical and isotopic imprints of the metasomatic end member. The very positive d7Li values of some lamproites indicate that the source of these lamproites may have been modified by subducted oceanic lithosphere. Fresh olivine from the Brloh (Moldanubian) lamproitic dyke shows very high Fo (up to 94%) and very high Li contents (up to 25 ppm), demonstrating that the extremely depleted and later enriched lithospheric mantle may have contributed significantly to the Li budget of the lamproites. The regional distribution of lamproites with contrasting chemical and isotopic fingerprints mimics the distribution of the different Variscan subduction zones.
DS201910-2276
2019
Krmicek, L.Krmicek, L., Ackerman, L., Hruby, J., Kynicky, J.The highly siderophile elements and Re Os isotope geochemistry of Variscan lamproites from the Bohemian Massif: implications for regionally dependent metasomatism of orogenic mantle.Chemical Geology, doi: 10.1016/ j.chemgeo .2019.119290 46p. PdfEurope, Czech Republic, Germany, Poland, Austrialamproites

Abstract: Orogenic lamproites represent a group of peralkaline, ultrapotassic and perpotassic mantle-derived igneous rocks that hold the potential to sample components with extreme compositions from highly heterogeneous orogenic mantle. In our pilot study, we present highly siderophile element (HSE) and ReOs isotope systematics of Variscan orogenic lamproites sampled in the territories of the Czech Republic, Austria and Poland, i.e., from the termination of the Moldanubian and Saxo-Thuringian zones of the Bohemian Massif. Orogenic lamproites of the Bohemian Massif are distinguished by variably high contents of SiO2, high Mg# and predominant mineral associations of K-rich amphibole and Fe-rich microcline. The HSE show (i) consistently very low contents in all investigated orogenic lamproites compared to the estimated concentrations in majority of mid-ocean ridge basalts, hotspot-related volcanic rocks (e.g., ocean island basalts, continental flood basalts, komatiites, some intraplate alkaline volcanic rocks such as kimberlites and anorogenic lamproites) and arc lavas, and (ii) marked differences in relative and absolute HSE abundances between the samples from the Moldanubian and Saxo-Thuringian Zone. Such a regional dependence in HSE from mantle-derived melts is exceptional. Orogenic lamproites have highly variable and high initial suprachondritic 187Os/188Os values (up to 0.631) compared with rather chondritic to subchondritic Os isotope values of the young lithospheric mantle below the Bohemian Massif. The highly radiogenic Os isotope component in orogenic lamproites may be derived from preferential melting of metasomatised vein assemblages sitting in depleted peridotite mantle. This process appears to be valid generally in the petrogenesis of orogenic lamproites both from the Bohemian Massif and from the Mediterranean area. As a specific feature of the orogenic lamproites from the Bohemian Massif, originally ultra-depleted mantle component correlative with remnants of the Rheic Ocean lithosphere in the Moldanubian Zone was metasomatised by a mixture of evolved and juvenile material, whereas the lithospheric mantle in the Saxo-Thuringian Zone was enriched through the subduction of evolved crustal material with highly radiogenic Sr isotope signature. As a result, this led to observed unique regionally dependent coupled HSE, RbSr and ReOs isotope systematics.
DS201911-2538
2019
Krmicek, L.Krmicek, L., Ackerman, L.Regionally dependent metasomatism of orogenic mantle revealed by highly siderophile elements and Re-Os isotope geochemistry of Variscan lamproites: a pilot study from the Bohemian Massif.Geologica Carpathica *** In Eng, Vol. 70, pp. 9-11.Europelamproite

Abstract: Orogenic (high-silica) lamproites represent a group of post-collisional mantle-derived igneous rocks that hold the potential to sample components with extreme compositions from highly heterogeneous mantle. In our pilot study, we explore highly siderophile element (HSE) and Re-Os isotope systematics of Variscan orogenic lamproites sampled from the termination of the Moldanubian and Saxo-Thuringian zones of the Bohemian Massif. Orogenic lamproites of the Bohemian Massif are distinguished by variably high contents of SiO2, high Mg# and predominant mineral associations of K-rich amphibole and Fe-rich microcline. The HSE show (i) consistently very low contents in all investigated orogenic lamproites compared to the estimated concentrations in majority of mid- ocean ridge basalts, hotspot-related volcanic rocks and arc lavas, and (ii) marked differences in relative and absolute HSE abundances between the samples from the Moldanubian and Saxo-Thuringian Zone. Such a regional dependence in HSE from mantle-derived melts is exceptional. Orogenic lamproites have highly variable and high initial suprachondritic 187Os/188Os values (up to 0.631) compared with rather chondritic to subchondritic Os isotope values of the young lithospheric mantle below the Bohemian Massif. The highly radiogenic Os isotope component in orogenic lamproites may be derived from preferential melting of metasomatised vein assemblages sitting in depleted peridotite mantle. This process appears to be valid generally in the petrogenesis of orogenic lamproites both from the Bohemian Massif (Variscan lamproites) and from the Mediterranean area (Alpine lamproites). As a specific feature of the orogenic lamproites from the Bohemian Massif, originally ultra-depleted mantle component correlative with remnants of the Rheic Ocean lithosphere in the Moldanubian Zone was metasomatised by a mixture of evolved and juvenile material, whereas the lithospheric mantle in the Saxo-Thuringian Zone was enriched through the subduction of evolved crustal material with highly radiogenic Sr isotope signature. As a result, this led to observed unique regionally dependent coupled HSE, Rb-Sr and Re-Os isotope systematics.
DS201912-2796
2019
Krmicek, L.Krmickova, S., Krmicek, L., Romer, R.L., Ulrych, J.Lead isotope evolution of the Central European upper mantle: constraints from the Bohemian Massif.Geoscience Frontiers, 10.1016/j.gsf.2019.09.009 Europegeochronology

Abstract: The Pb isotope composition of the upper mantle beneath Central Europe is heterogeneous due to the subduction of regionally contrasting material during the Variscan and Alpine orogenies. Late Variscan to Cenozoic mantle-derived melts allow mapping this heterogeneity on a regional scale for the last ca. 340 Myr. Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic anorogenic magmatic rocks of the Bohemian Massif (lamprophyres, volcanic rocks of basanite/tephrite and trachyte/phonolite series) concentrate mostly in the Eger Rift. Cretaceous ultramafic lamprophyres yielded the most radiogenic Pb isotope signatures reflecting a maximum contribution from metasomatised lithospheric mantle, whereas Tertiary alkaline lamprophyres originated from mantle with less radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb ratios suggesting a more substantial modification of lithospheric source by interaction with asthenospheric-derived melts. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of the basanite/tephrite and trachyte/phonolite series define a linear mixing trend between these components, indicating dilution of the initial lithospheric mantle signature by upwelling asthenosphere during rifting. The Pb isotope composition of Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic magmatic rocks of the Bohemian Massif follows the same Pb growth curve as Variscan orogenic lamprophyres and lamproites that formed during the collision between Laurussia, Gondwana, and associated terranes. This implies that the crustal Pb signature in the post-Variscan mantle is repeatedly sampled by younger anorogenic melts. Most Cenozoic mantle-derived rocks of Central Europe show similar Pb isotope ranges as the Bohemian Massif.
DS202003-0346
2020
Krmicek, L.Krmicek, L., Ackerman, L., Hruby, J., Kynicky, J.The highly siderophile elements and Re-Os isotope geochemistry of Variscan lamproites from the Bohemian Massif: implications for regionally dependent metasomatism of orogenic mantle.Chemical Geology, Vol. 532, 11p. Available pdfEurope, Czech republic, Austria, Polandlamproites

Abstract: Orogenic lamproites represent a group of peralkaline, ultrapotassic and perpotassic mantle-derived igneous rocks that hold the potential to sample components with extreme compositions from highly heterogeneous orogenic mantle. In our pilot study, we present highly siderophile element (HSE) and ReOs isotope systematics of Variscan orogenic lamproites sampled in the territories of the Czech Republic, Austria and Poland, i.e., from the termination of the Moldanubian and Saxo-Thuringian zones of the Bohemian Massif. Orogenic lamproites of the Bohemian Massif are distinguished by variably high contents of SiO2, high Mg# and predominant mineral associations of K-rich amphibole and Fe-rich microcline. The HSE show (i) consistently very low contents in all investigated orogenic lamproites compared to the estimated concentrations in majority of mid-ocean ridge basalts, hotspot-related volcanic rocks (e.g., ocean island basalts, continental flood basalts, komatiites, some intraplate alkaline volcanic rocks such as kimberlites and anorogenic lamproites) and arc lavas, and (ii) marked differences in relative and absolute HSE abundances between the samples from the Moldanubian and Saxo-Thuringian Zone. Such a regional dependence in HSE from mantle-derived melts is exceptional. Orogenic lamproites have highly variable and high initial suprachondritic 187Os/188Os values (up to 0.631) compared with rather chondritic to subchondritic Os isotope values of the young lithospheric mantle below the Bohemian Massif. The highly radiogenic Os isotope component in orogenic lamproites may be derived from preferential melting of metasomatised vein assemblages sitting in depleted peridotite mantle. This process appears to be valid generally in the petrogenesis of orogenic lamproites both from the Bohemian Massif and from the Mediterranean area. As a specific feature of the orogenic lamproites from the Bohemian Massif, originally ultra-depleted mantle component correlative with remnants of the Rheic Ocean lithosphere in the Moldanubian Zone was metasomatised by a mixture of evolved and juvenile material, whereas the lithospheric mantle in the Saxo-Thuringian Zone was enriched through the subduction of evolved crustal material with highly radiogenic Sr isotope signature. As a result, this led to observed unique regionally dependent coupled HSE, RbSr and ReOs isotope systematics.
DS202009-1637
2020
Krmicek, L.Krmicek, L., Romer, R.L., Cempirek, J., Gadas, P., Krmickova, S., Glodny, J.Petrographic and Sr-Nd-Pb-Li isotope characteristics of a complex lamproite intrusion from the Saxo-Thuringian zone: a unique example of peralkaline mantle-derived melt differentiation.Lithos, Vol. 374-375, 15p. PdfEurope, Bohemian Massiflamproites

Abstract: Variscan orogenic lamproites in the Bohemian Massif predominantly occur as 1 to 2?m wide and petrographically uniform dykes along the eastern borders of the Moldanubian and Saxo-Thuringian zones. Variscan orogenic lamproites were derived by preferential melting of subduction-related olivine-free metasomatic vein assemblages stabilised in the lithospheric mantle. These lamproitic melts may subsequently undergo extensive differentiation. In this study, we present the first combined petrographic and Sr-Nd-Pb-Li isotope characteristics of a complex lamproite exposed at ca 100?m long profile near Horní Rokytnice (Czech Republic) in the Saxo-Thuringian Zone. This lamproite is characterised by the primary mineral assemblage of K-amphibole + K-feldspar ± aegirine and quartz that petrographically varies from relatively primitive (fine-grained, mafic) to more differentiated (medium- to coarse-grained, felsic) pegmatitic lamproite domains. These domains may represent the product of crystallisation of immiscible liquids that had separated from the mafic melt. The primitive lamproite zone is characterised by the typomorphic minerals - baotite, benitoite, and henrymeyerite. The more differentiated pegmatitic domains are free of aegirine and show replacement of primary red-luminescent (Fe3+-rich) K-feldspar by blue-luminescent (Fe-poor) K-feldspar. Residual fluids rich in Ca, Ti, and HFSE in combination with the decreasing peralkalinity of the lamproite system resulted in the local formation of secondary zircon, titanite and quartz at the expense of the primary Ti-Ba-Zr-K lamproitic mineral assemblages. Lamproites from the Moldanubian and Saxo-Thuringian zones fall on separate mixing trends in the 87Sr/86Sr(t) - eNd(t) diagram, which indicates that the mantle beneath these two zones had been metasomatised by different crustal material. The scatter in the peralkalinity index vs. d7Li diagram indicates that the Li isotope composition is not controlled by mixing of two end members metasome and ambient depleted mantle alone, but may also be affected by late-stage magmatic and hydrothermal processes. The compositionally zoned Horní Rokytnice dyke is special as the petrographically different types show a variation of about 4 d-units in d7Li due to dyke-internal processes, such as fractionation, which increases d7Li in late-stage lamproitic melts, and post-emplacement interaction with fluids that reduced d7Li in samples that have lost Li. Post-emplacement alteration also led to the disturbance in the Pb isotope systematics of the differentiated orogenic lamproite as indicated by variable over-correction of in situ radiogenic Pb ingrowth.
DS202101-0021
2020
Krmicek, L.Krmicek, L., Romer, R.L., Timmerman, M.J., Ultych, J., Glodny, J.Long lasting ( 65Ma) regionally contrasting Late-to Post-orogenic variscan mantle-derived potassic magmatism in the Bohemian Massif.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 61, 7, doi.org/10.1093 /petrology/egaa072Europemagmatism

Abstract: The orogenic development after the continental collision between Laurussia and Gondwana, led to two contrasting associations of mantle-derived magmatic rocks on the territory of the Bohemian Massif: (i) a 340-310?Ma lamprophyre-lamproite orogenic association; and (ii) a 300-275?Ma lamprophyre association of anorogenic affinity. Major types of potassic mantle-derived magmatic rocks recognized in the orogenic and anorogenic associations include: (i) calc-alkaline to alkaline lamprophyres; (ii) alkaline ‘orthopyroxene minettes’ and geochemically related rocks grouped here under the new term lampyrite; and (iii) peralkaline lamproites. These three types significantly differ with respect to mineral, whole-rock and Sr-Nd-Pb-Li isotope composition and spatial distribution. The calc-alkaline lamprophyres occur throughout the entire Saxo-Thuringian and Moldanubian zones, whereas the different types of malte-derived potassic rocks are spatially restricted to particular zones. Rocks of the Carboniferous lamprophyre-lamproite orogenic association are characterized by variable negative eNd(i) and variably radiogenic Sr(i), whereas the rocks of the Permian lamprophyre association of anorogenic affinity are characterized by positive eNd(i) and relatively young depleted-mantle Nd-model ages reflecting increasing input from upwelling asthenospheric mantle. The small variation in the Pb isotopic composition of post-collisional potassic mantle-derived magmatic rocks (of both the orogenic and anorogenic series) implies that the Pb budget of the mantle beneath the Bohemian Massif is dominated by the same crust-derived material, which itself may include material derived from several sources. The source rocks of ‘orthopyroxene minettes’ are characterized by isotopically light (‘eclogitic’) Li and strongly radiogenic (crustal) Sr and may have been metasomatized by high-pressure fluids along the edge of a subduction zone. In contrast, the strongly Al2O3 and CaO depleted mantle source of the lamproites is characterized by isotopically heavy Li and high SiO2 and extreme K2O contents. This mantle source may have been metasomatized predominantly by melts. The mantle source of the lamprophyres may have undergone metasomatism by both fluids and melts.
DS201012-0421
2010
Krmickova, M.Kynicky, J., Chakhmouradian, A.R., Cheng, Xu, Krmicek, L., Krmickova, M., Davis, B.Evolution of rare earth mineralization in carbonatites of the Lugiin Gol complex southern Mongolia.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 573.Asia, MongoliaCarbonatite
DS201912-2796
2019
Krmickova, S.Krmickova, S., Krmicek, L., Romer, R.L., Ulrych, J.Lead isotope evolution of the Central European upper mantle: constraints from the Bohemian Massif.Geoscience Frontiers, 10.1016/j.gsf.2019.09.009 Europegeochronology

Abstract: The Pb isotope composition of the upper mantle beneath Central Europe is heterogeneous due to the subduction of regionally contrasting material during the Variscan and Alpine orogenies. Late Variscan to Cenozoic mantle-derived melts allow mapping this heterogeneity on a regional scale for the last ca. 340 Myr. Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic anorogenic magmatic rocks of the Bohemian Massif (lamprophyres, volcanic rocks of basanite/tephrite and trachyte/phonolite series) concentrate mostly in the Eger Rift. Cretaceous ultramafic lamprophyres yielded the most radiogenic Pb isotope signatures reflecting a maximum contribution from metasomatised lithospheric mantle, whereas Tertiary alkaline lamprophyres originated from mantle with less radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb ratios suggesting a more substantial modification of lithospheric source by interaction with asthenospheric-derived melts. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of the basanite/tephrite and trachyte/phonolite series define a linear mixing trend between these components, indicating dilution of the initial lithospheric mantle signature by upwelling asthenosphere during rifting. The Pb isotope composition of Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic magmatic rocks of the Bohemian Massif follows the same Pb growth curve as Variscan orogenic lamprophyres and lamproites that formed during the collision between Laurussia, Gondwana, and associated terranes. This implies that the crustal Pb signature in the post-Variscan mantle is repeatedly sampled by younger anorogenic melts. Most Cenozoic mantle-derived rocks of Central Europe show similar Pb isotope ranges as the Bohemian Massif.
DS202009-1637
2020
Krmickova, S.Krmicek, L., Romer, R.L., Cempirek, J., Gadas, P., Krmickova, S., Glodny, J.Petrographic and Sr-Nd-Pb-Li isotope characteristics of a complex lamproite intrusion from the Saxo-Thuringian zone: a unique example of peralkaline mantle-derived melt differentiation.Lithos, Vol. 374-375, 15p. PdfEurope, Bohemian Massiflamproites

Abstract: Variscan orogenic lamproites in the Bohemian Massif predominantly occur as 1 to 2?m wide and petrographically uniform dykes along the eastern borders of the Moldanubian and Saxo-Thuringian zones. Variscan orogenic lamproites were derived by preferential melting of subduction-related olivine-free metasomatic vein assemblages stabilised in the lithospheric mantle. These lamproitic melts may subsequently undergo extensive differentiation. In this study, we present the first combined petrographic and Sr-Nd-Pb-Li isotope characteristics of a complex lamproite exposed at ca 100?m long profile near Horní Rokytnice (Czech Republic) in the Saxo-Thuringian Zone. This lamproite is characterised by the primary mineral assemblage of K-amphibole + K-feldspar ± aegirine and quartz that petrographically varies from relatively primitive (fine-grained, mafic) to more differentiated (medium- to coarse-grained, felsic) pegmatitic lamproite domains. These domains may represent the product of crystallisation of immiscible liquids that had separated from the mafic melt. The primitive lamproite zone is characterised by the typomorphic minerals - baotite, benitoite, and henrymeyerite. The more differentiated pegmatitic domains are free of aegirine and show replacement of primary red-luminescent (Fe3+-rich) K-feldspar by blue-luminescent (Fe-poor) K-feldspar. Residual fluids rich in Ca, Ti, and HFSE in combination with the decreasing peralkalinity of the lamproite system resulted in the local formation of secondary zircon, titanite and quartz at the expense of the primary Ti-Ba-Zr-K lamproitic mineral assemblages. Lamproites from the Moldanubian and Saxo-Thuringian zones fall on separate mixing trends in the 87Sr/86Sr(t) - eNd(t) diagram, which indicates that the mantle beneath these two zones had been metasomatised by different crustal material. The scatter in the peralkalinity index vs. d7Li diagram indicates that the Li isotope composition is not controlled by mixing of two end members metasome and ambient depleted mantle alone, but may also be affected by late-stage magmatic and hydrothermal processes. The compositionally zoned Horní Rokytnice dyke is special as the petrographically different types show a variation of about 4 d-units in d7Li due to dyke-internal processes, such as fractionation, which increases d7Li in late-stage lamproitic melts, and post-emplacement interaction with fluids that reduced d7Li in samples that have lost Li. Post-emplacement alteration also led to the disturbance in the Pb isotope systematics of the differentiated orogenic lamproite as indicated by variable over-correction of in situ radiogenic Pb ingrowth.
DS201312-0927
2013
Krmiek, L.Ulrych, J., Krmiek, L.Recent views on lamprophyric melilitic rocks ( polzenites) of the Bohemian Massif.Goldschmidt 2013, 1p. AbstractEuropeMelilite
DS200612-0713
2005
Krmsky, R.S.Klein, E.L., Moura, C.A.V., Krmsky, R.S., Griffin, W.L.The Gurupi Belt, northern Brazil: lithostratigraphy, geochronology, and geodynamic evolution.Precambrian Research, Vol. 141, 3-4, Nov. 20, pp. 83-105.South America, BrazilGeochronology, alkaline
DS1988-0390
1988
Krochuk, m V.M.Kvasnitsa, V.N., Krochuk, m V.M., Afasyev, V.P., Tsymbal, Yu.S.Crystal morphology of kimberlite chrome spinel.(Russian)Mineral. Zhurn., (Russian), Vol. 10, No. 3, June pp. 45-51RussiaMineralogy, Spinel
DS1987-0391
1987
Krochuk, V.M.Kvasnitsa, V.N., Krochuk, V.M., Egorova, L.N., Kharkiv, A.D.Crystal morphology of zircon from kimberlites.(Russian)Mineral Zhurn., (Russian), Vol. 9, No. 2, pp. 37-45RussiaBlank
DS1988-0391
1988
Krochuk, V.M.Kvasnitsa, V.N., Krochuk, V.M.Evolutional sequence of diamond crystal twins.(Russian)Ontogeniya Mineralov I Teknol. Mineral., (Russian), p. 138-144GlobalDiamond Morphology
DS1988-0392
1988
Krochuk, V.M.Kvasnitsa, V.N., Krochuk, V.M., Melnikov, V.S., Yatsenko, V.G.Crystal morphology of graphite from magmatic rocks Of the Ukrainianshield.(Russian)Mineral Zhurn., (Russian), Vol. 10, No. 5, pp. 68-76RussiaCarbonatite
DS1983-0400
1983
Krochuk, V.M. ETAL.Legokova, G.V., Krochuk, V.M. ETAL.Characteristics of chemical composition of the crystalline shape of amphiboles and pyroxenes of carbonatites in the Azov searegion.(Russian)Mineral. Zhurn., (Russian), Vol. 5, No. 4, pp. 69-75RussiaCarbonatite
DS1998-1217
1998
KroenkeRatcliffe, J.T., Bercovici, D., Schubert, G., KroenkeMantle plume heads and initiation of plate tectonic reorganizationsEarth Plan. Sci. Lett, Vol. 156, No. 3-4, March 30, pp. 195-208MantlePlumes, Tectonics, geodynamics
DS1998-1218
1998
KroenkeRatcliffe, J.T., Bercovici, Schubert, KroenkeMantle plume heads and the initiation of plate tectonic reorganizationsEarth Sci. Plan. Lett., Vol. 156, No. 3-4, Mar. 30, pp. 195-208.MantlePlumes, Tectonics
DS1997-1240
1997
Kroenke, L.Wessel, P., Kroenke, L.A geometric technique for relocating hotspots and refining absolute platemotions.Nature, Vol. 387, No. 6631, May 22, pp. 365-370.MantleHotspots, Tectonics
DS1980-0199
1980
Krogh, E.J.Krogh, E.J.Compatible P-t Conditions for Eclogites and Surrounding Gneisses in the Kristiansund Area, Western Norway.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 75, No. 4, PP. 387-394.Norway, ScandinaviaPetrogenesis
DS1980-0200
1980
Krogh, E.J.Krogh, E.J.Geochemistry and Petrology of Glaucophane Bearing Eclogites and Associated Rocks from Sunnfiord Western Norway.Lithos, Vol. 13, No. 4, PP. 355-Norway, ScandinaviaBlank
DS1982-0351
1982
Krogh, E.J.Krogh, E.J.Metamorphic Evolution of Norwegian Country Rock Eclogites As Deduced from Mineral Inclusions and Compositional Zoning In Garnets.Lithos, Vol. 15, No. 4, PP. 305-321.Norway, ScandinaviaRelated Rocks
DS1986-0127
1986
Krogh, E.J.Carswell, D.A., Krogh, E.J., Griffin, W.L.Norwegian orthopyroxene eclogites: calculated equilibration conditions and petrogenetic implicationsThe Caledonide Orogen-Scandinavia and Related areas, Gee, D.G. Sturt, B.A., pp. 823-842NorwayEclogites
DS1995-1027
1995
Krogh, E.J.Krogh, E.J., Carswell, D.A.HP and ultra high pressure (UHP) eclogites and garnet peridotites in the ScandinavianCaledonides.Cambridge University of Press, pp. 244-298.Scandinavia, NorwayEclogites, garnet peridotites
DS1990-0888
1990
Krogh, E.T.Krogh, E.T., Andresen, A., Bryhni, I., Broks, T.M., KristenesenEclogites and polyphase P-T cycling in the Caledonian uppermost allochthonin Troms, northern NorwayJournal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 8, No. 3, May pp. 289-310NorwayEclogites
DS2002-0762
2002
Krogh, T.James, D.T., Kamo, S., Krogh, T.Evolution of 3.1 and 3.0 Ga volcanic belts and a new thermotectonic model for the Hopedale Block, North Atlantic Craton, Canada.Canadian Journal of Earth Science, Vol.39,5, May, pp.687-710.Quebec, Labrador, GreenlandTectonics - regional framework
DS1983-0511
1983
Krogh, T.E.Percival, J.A., Krogh, T.E.uranium-lead (U-Pb) zircon geochronology of the Kapuskasing structural zone and vicinity on the Chapleau Foleyet area.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 20, pp. 83043.OntarioTectonics - Structure, Ksz
DS1987-0378
1987
Krogh, T.E.Krogh, T.E., Corfu, F., Davis, D.W., Dunning, G.R., Heaman, L.M.Precise uranium-lead (U-Pb) (U-Pb) ages of diabase dykes and mafic to ultramafic rocks usingGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Special Paper, No. 34, p. 151QuebecIle Bizard kimberlite brief mention
DS1987-0379
1987
Krogh, T.E.Krogh, T.E., Corfu, F., Davis, Dunning, Heaman, NakamuraPrecise uranium-lead (U-Pb) isotopic ages of diabase dikes and mafic to ultramafic rocks using trace amounts of baddeleyiteHalls and Fahrig, Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Special Vol., No. 34, pp. 147-52.Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology
DS1988-0613
1988
Krogh, T.E.Scharer, U., Krogh, T.E., Wardle, Ryan, Gandhiuranium-lead (U-Pb) ages of early to middle Proterozoic volcanism and metamorphism in the Makkovik Orogen, Labrador.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 25, pp. 1098-1107.LabradorGeochronology
DS1990-0968
1990
Krogh, T.E.Machado, N., Krogh, T.E., Weber, W.uranium-lead (U-Pb) geochronology of basement gneisses in the Thompson Belt: evidence for Pikwitonei type crust .. basement..Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, pp. 794-802.ManitobaGeochronology, Trans Hudson Orogeny
DS1990-0969
1990
Krogh, T.E.Machado, N., Krogh, T.E.uranium-lead (U-Pb) (U-Pb) geochronology of basement gneisses in the Thompson Belt (Manitoba):evidence for pre-Kenoran and Pikwitonei type crust and early ProterozoicbasementCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, No. 6, June pp. 794-802ManitobaThompson belt, Geochronology
DS1991-1197
1991
Krogh, T.E.Moser, D.E., Krogh, T.E., Heaman, L.M., Hanes, J.A., Helmstaedt, H.The age and significance of Archean mid-crustal extension in the Kapuskasing uplift, Superior Province, CanadaGeological Society of America Annual Meeting Abstract Volume, Vol. 23, No. 5, San Diego, p. A 134OntarioTectonics, Kapuskasing uplift
DS1991-1481
1991
Krogh, T.E.Ryan, B., Krogh, T.E., Heaman, Scharer, PhillipeOn recent geochronological studies in the Nain Province Churchill province and Plutonic Suite.Newfound. Geological Survey, Paper 91-1, pp. 257-61.Quebec, Labrador, UngavaNain Plutonic suite, Geochronology
DS1993-0856
1993
Krogh, T.E.Krogh, T.E.high Pressure precision uranium-lead (U-Pb) (U-Pb) ages for granulite metamorphism and deformation in the Archean KSZ, Ontario: implications for structure and development of lower crust #2Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 119, No. 1-2, August pp. 1-18OntarioTectonics, Geochronology KSZ
DS1993-0857
1993
Krogh, T.E.Krogh, T.E.high Pressure precision uranium-lead (U-Pb) (U-Pb) ages for granulite metamorphism and deformation in the Archean Kapuskasing structural zone, Ontario: implications for structure and development #1Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 199, No. 1-2, August pp. 1-18OntarioTectonics, Kapuskasing Structural Zone
DS1993-0858
1993
Krogh, T.E.Krogh, T.E., Kamo, S.L., Bohor, B.F.Fingerprinting the K T impact site and determining the time of impact by Ulead dating of single shocked zirconsEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 119, pp. 425-9.ColoradoGeochronology, Manson impact site
DS1994-0294
1994
Krogh, T.E.Chen, Y.D., O'Reilly, S.Y., Krogh, T.E.Precise zircon dating of a lower crustal xenolith from southEastern Australia and its geological implications.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstract Volume, Vol. 19, p. PosterAustraliaXenolith, Geochronology
DS1995-0246
1995
Krogh, T.E.Bussy, F., Krogh, T.E., Wardle, R.J.Lat Labradorian, metamorphism and anorthosite granitoid intrusion, Cape Caribou River allochthon, GrenvilleCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, pp. 1411-25.Quebec, Ungava, LabradorMealy Mountains, metamorphism
DS1996-0998
1996
Krogh, T.E.Moser, D.E., Heaman, L.M., Krogh, T.E., Hanes, J.A.Intracrustal extension of an Archean orogen revealed using single grain Ulead zircon geothermometry.Tectonics, Vol. 15, No. 5, Oct. pp. 1093-1109.OntarioSuperior Province, Wawa domain, Geochronology, Wawa gneiss domain
DS1996-1517
1996
Krogh, T.E.Wasteneys, H.A., Wardle, R.J., Krogh, T.E.Extrapolation of tectonic boundaries across the Labrador Shelf: uranium-lead (U-Pb)geochronology of well samples.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 33, pp. 1308-24.Quebec, Labrador, UngavaTectonics, Saglek Fiord. Hopedale Block
DS1997-0186
1997
Krogh, T.E.Chen, Y.D., O'Reilly, Y.S., Krogh, T.E.Combined uranium-lead (U-Pb) dating and Sm neodymium studies on lower crustal and mantle xenoliths from the Delegate basaltic pipes.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 130, No. 2, pp. 154-161.AustraliaXenoliths
DS2002-0605
2002
Krogh, T.E.Gower, C.F., Krogh, T.E.A U Pb geochronological review of the Proterozoic history of the eastern Grenville Province.Canadian Journal of Earth Science, Vol.39,5, May, pp.795-829.QuebecTectonics - New Quebec and Torngat Orogens
DS2002-0900
2002
Krogh, T.E.Krogh, T.E., Kamo, S., Gower, C.K., Owen, J.V.Augmented and reassessed U Pb geochronological dat a from the Labradorian Grenvillian front in the Smokey Archipelago Eastern Labrador.Canadian Journal of Earth Science, Vol.39,5, May, pp.831-43.LabradorGeochronology
DS2003-0221
2003
Krogh, T.E.Carswell, D.A., Tucker, R.D., O'Brien, P.J., Krogh, T.E.Coesite micro-inclusions and the U Pb age of zircons from the Hariedland eclogite inLithos, Vol. 67, 3-4, April pp. 181-190.NorwayCoesite
DS2003-0222
2003
Krogh, T.E.Carswell, D.A., Tucker, R.D., O'Brien, P.J., Krogh, T.E.Coesite micro-inclusions and the U Pb age of zircons from the Hareidland eclogite inLithos, Vol.67, 3-4, April, pp. 181-190.NorwayGeochronology, UHP
DS200412-0287
2003
Krogh, T.E.Carswell, D.A., Tucker, R.D., O'Brien, P.J., Krogh, T.E.Coesite micro-inclusions and the U Pb age of zircons from the Hareidland eclogite in the Western Gneiss region of Norway.Lithos, Vol.67, 3-4, April, pp. 181-190.Europe, NorwayGeochronology, UHP
DS2000-0536
2000
Krogh Ravna, E.Krogh Ravna, E.Distribution of iron (Fe2) and magnesium between coexiting garnet and hornblende in synthetic and natural systems:Lithos, Vol. 53, No. 3-4, Sept. pp. 265-77.GlobalPetrology - experimental, Geothermometry
DS2002-0575
2002
Krogh Ravna, E.J.Gilotti, J.A., Krogh Ravna, E.J.First evidence for ultrahigh pressure metamorphism in the north east Greenland Caledonides.Geology, Vol. 30,6, June,pp. 551-4.GreenlandEclogite, coesite, pseudomorph, UHP
DS200412-1057
2004
Krogh Ravna, E.J.Krogh Ravna, E.J., Terry, M.P.Geothermobarometry of UHP and HP eclogites and schists - an evaluation of equilibration temperatures among garnet clinopyroxen kyanite phengiteJournal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 22, 6, pp. 579-592.TechnologyUHP
DS200612-0746
2006
Krogh Ravna, E.J.Krogh Ravna, E.J., Roux, M.R.M.Metamorphic evolution of the Tonsvika eclogite, Tromso Nappe - evidence for a new UHPM province in the Scandinavian Caledonides.International Geology Review, Vol. 48, 10, October pp. 861-881.Europe, Scandinavia, NorwayUHP
DS201312-0436
2013
Krogh Ravna, E.J.Janak, M., Krogh Ravna, E.J., Kullerud, K., Yoshida, K., Milovsky, R., Hirajima, T.Discovery of diamond in the Tromso Nappe, Scandinavian Caledonides ( N. Norway).Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 31, 6, pp. 691-703.Europe, NorwayMicrodiamonds in gneiss
DS2002-1135
2002
Krogstad, E.J.Nielsen, S.G., Baker, J.A., Krogstad, E.J.Petrogenesis of an early Archean (3.4) Ga norite dyke, Isua, West Greenland: evidence for early Archean crustal recycling?Precambrian Research, Vol. 118, 1-2, pp. 133-48.GreenlandDyke - not specific to diamonds, petrology
DS1996-0789
1996
Krohe, A.Krohe, A.Variscan tectonics of central Europe: post accretionary intraplatede formation of weak continental lithosphere.Tectonics, Vol. 15, No. 6, Dec. pp. 1364-88.Europe, Germany, AustriaTectonics, Paleoplates, geodynamics
DS200712-0757
2006
Krohe, A.Mposkos, E., Krohe, A.Pressure temperature deformation paths of closely associated ultra high pressure ( diamond bearing) crustal and mantle rocks of the Kimi Complex:Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 43, 12, Dec. pp. 1755-1776.Europe, GreeceUHP - not specific to diamonds, eclogite
DS1989-1566
1989
Krokhalev, V.Ya.Votyakov, S.L., Ilupin, I.P., Krasnobaev, A.A., Krokhalev, V.Ya.ESR and luminescence of zircons and apatites from kimberlites of SiberiaGeochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), No. 1, pp. 29-35RussiaLuminescence, Zircons, apatite
DS1989-1567
1989
Krokhalev, V.Ya.Votyakov, S.L., Ilupin, I.P., Krasnobayev, A.A., Krokhalev, V.Ya.ESR and luminescence of Siberian kimberlite zircon and apatiteGeochemistry International, Vol. 26, No. 8, pp. 26-32RussiaSpectroscopy -luminesence, Zircon/apatite
DS1985-0062
1985
Krol, L.G.Bergman, S.C., Dunn, D.P., Krol, L.G.Petrology and Geochemistry of the Linhaisai Minette, Karamuriver, Central Kalimantan.Geological Association of Canada (GAC)., Vol. 10, P. A4, (abstract.).Kalimantan, BorneoBlank
DS1985-0063
1985
Krol, L.G.Bergman, S.C., Krol, L.G.The Diamondiferous Pamali Breccia Southeast Kalimantan Indonesia: Intrusive Kimberlite Breccia or Sedimentary Conglomerate?Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 17, No. 3, FEBRUARY P. 151. (abstract.). REPRINT 28P.IndonesiaMineral Chemistry, Petrology
DS1987-0048
1987
Krol, L.G.Bergman, S.C., Dunn, D.P., Krol, L.G.Petrology of the Linhaisai minette, central Kalimantan, IndonesiaCanadian Mineralogist, In pressIndonesiaMinette
DS1987-0049
1987
Krol, L.G.Bergman, S.C., Turner, W.P., Krol, L.G.The Diamondiferous Pamali breccia, southeast Kalimantan, Indonesia: intrusive kimberlite breccia or sedimentary conglomerateGeological Society of America Special Paper, No. 215, PP. 183-197IndonesiaKimberlite, Breccia
DS1987-0050
1987
Krol, L.G.Bergman, S.C., Turner, W.S., Krol, L.G.A reassessment od rhe Diamondiferous Pamali breccia southeastKalimantanIndonesia: intrusive kimberlite breccia or sedimentary conglomerate?Mantle metasomatism and alkaline magmatism, edited E. Mullen Morris and, No. 215, pp. 183-197GlobalAnalyses p. 190-191
DS1920-0036
1920
Krol, L.H.Krol, L.H.Bijdrage Tot de Kennis Van Den Oorsprong En de Verspreidungder Diamant houdende Afzettingen in Zuidoost-borneo En Van De Opsporing En Winning Van Den Diamant.Amsterdam: Jaarboek Van Het Mijnwezen In Nederlandsch Oost-i, Vol. 49, No. 1, PP. 250-304.BorneoBlank
DS1930-0070
1931
Krol, L.H.Krol, L.H.Leboer En Diamant, Een Syngenese?De Mijningenieur., Vol. 12, OCTOBER, PP. 178-181.BorneoBlank
DS1988-0053
1988
Krol., L.G.Bergman, S.C., Dunn, D.P., Krol., L.G.Rock and mineral chemistry of the Linhaisai minette, centralIndonesia, and the origin of the Borneo diamondsCanadian Mineralogist, Vol. 26, No. 1, March pp. 23-43GlobalBlank
DS1987-0380
1987
Kronberg, B.I.Kronberg, B.I., Tazaki, K.Detailed geochemical studies of the initial stages of weathering of alkaline rocks: Ilha de Sao Sebastiao, BrasilChemical Geology, Vol. 60, No. 1/4, March 10, pp. 79-88BrazilGeomorphology
DS201212-0382
2012
Kronbichler, M.Kronbichler, M., Heister, T., Bangeth, W.High accuracy mantle convection simulation through numerical methods.Geophysical Journal International, in press availableMantleConvection
DS1970-0948
1974
Kroner, A.Kroner, A., Jackson, M.P.A.Geological Reconnaissance of the Coast between Luederitz And Marble Point Southwest Africa.Precambr. Res. Unit University Cape Town., Bulletin. No. 15, PP. 79-103.Southwest Africa, NamibiaGeology, Littoral Diamond Placers
DS1984-0434
1984
Kroner, A.Kroner, A.Evolution, Growth and Stabilization of the Precambrian Lithosphere.Physics And Chemistry of The Earth, Vol. 15, PP. 69-106.South Africa, Antarctica, India, RussiaArchaean Granite, Greenstone, Craton, Kaapvaal
DS1987-0381
1987
Kroner, A.Kroner, A.Proterozoic Lithospheric evolutionA.g.u, Geodynamics series, Vol. 17, 288pMidcontinentUSA, Tectonics
DS1988-0381
1988
Kroner, A.Kroner, A., Todt, W.Single zircon dating constraining the maximum age of theBarberton greenstone belt, Southern AfricaJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 93, No. B12, Dec. 10, pp. 15, 329-15, 338South AfricaGeochronology, Barberton Greenstone Belt
DS1989-0831
1989
Kroner, A.Kroner, A., Compston, W., Williams, I.S.Growth of early Archean crust in the ancient gneiss complex of Swazilandas revealed by single zircondatingTectonophysics, Vol. 161, No. 3/4, pp. 271-298GlobalCraton, Tectonics
DS1989-0857
1989
Kroner, A.Layer, P.W., Kroner, A., Mcwilliams, M., York, D.Elements of the Archean thermal history and apparent polar wander of the eastern Kaapvaal craton, Swaziland, from single grain dating andPaleomagnetismEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 93, No. 1, May pp. 23-34GlobalGeochronology
DS1991-0930
1991
Kroner, A.Kroner, A.Tectonic evolution in the Archean and ProterozoicTectonophysics, Vol. 187, pp. 393-410Canada, FinlandTectonics, Evolution -Archean, Proterozoic
DS1991-0931
1991
Kroner, A.Kroner, A.Tectonic evolution in the Archean and ProterozoicTectonophysics, Vol. 187, pp. 393-410.South Africa, AustraliaTectonics - plate
DS1991-0932
1991
Kroner, A.Kroner, A.African linkage of Precambrian Sri LankaGeol. Runschau, Vol. 80, No. 2, pp. 429-440Sri LankaPan African, Archean Gondwana
DS1992-0917
1992
Kroner, A.Layer, P.W., Kroner, A., York, D.Pre-3000 Ma thermal history of the Archean Kaap Valley pluton, SouthAfricaGeology, Vol. 20, No. 8, August pp. 717-720South AfricaGeochronology, Barberton greenstone belt
DS1993-1528
1993
Kroner, A.Stern, R.J., Kroner, A.Late Precambrian crustal evolution in northeast Sudean isotopic and geochronologicconstraints.Journal of Geology, Vol. 101, pp. 555-574.GlobalMantle - lithosphere, Tectonics
DS1994-0752
1994
Kroner, A.Hegner, E., Kroner, A., Hunt, P.A precise uranium-lead (U-Pb) (U-Pb) zircon age for the Archean Pongola Supergroup volcanics inSwazilandJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 18, No. 4, May pp. 339-342GlobalGeochronology, Archean
DS1994-0952
1994
Kroner, A.Kroner, A., Tegtmeyer, A.Gneiss greenstone relationships in the ancient gneiss complex of southwestern Swaziland, and implications for early crustal evolution.Precambrian Research, Vol. 67, pp. 109-139.GlobalTectonics
DS1994-0953
1994
Kroner, A.Kroner, A., Tegtmeyer, A.Gneiss-greenstone relationships in ancient gneiss complex of southwest southern Africa, and implications for early crustal evolutionPrecambrian Research, Vol. 67, pp. 109-137GlobalTectonics, Crustal evolution
DS1995-1317
1995
Kroner, A.Munyanyiwa, H., Kroner, A., Jaeckel, P.uranium-lead (U-Pb) and lead lead single zircon ages for the chrno-enderbites from the Magondimobile beltSouth African Journal of Geology, Vol. 98, No. 1, March pp. 52-57ZimbabweGeochronology, Magondi belt
DS1996-0203
1996
Kroner, A.Byerly, G.R., Kroner, A., Walsh, M.M.Prolonged magmatism and time constraints for sediment deposition in the Early Archean Barberton greenstonePrecambrian Research, Vol. 78, No. 1-3, May 1, pp. 125-150South AfricaGreenstone belts, Barberton area
DS1997-0637
1997
Kroner, A.Kroner, A., et al.Kibaran magmatism and Pan African granulite metamorphism in northernMozambique: single zircon agesJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 25, No. 3, Oct. pp. 467-484GlobalGeochronology, metamorphism
DS1998-1315
1998
Kroner, A.Seth, B., Kroner, A., Okrusch, M.Archean to neoproterozoic magmatic events in the Kaoko belt of northwest Namibia and their geodynamic significance.Precambrian Research, Vol. 92, No. 4, Dec. 1, pp. 341-365.NamibiaMagmatism, Tectonics
DS2000-0166
2000
Kroner, A.Collins, A.S., Kroner, A., Razakamana, T., Windley, B.F.The tectonic architecture of the East African Orogen in central Madagascar: a structural and geochronologicalJournal of African Earth Sciences, p. 21. abstract.MadagascarTectonics, Geochronology
DS2000-0537
2000
Kroner, A.Kroner, A.The East African orogen: its role in Rodinia and Gondwana supercontinent formation and dispersal.Geological Society of America (GSA) Abstracts, Vol. 32, No. 7, p.A-247.Madagascar, AfricaOrogeny - Pan African
DS2000-0538
2000
Kroner, A.Kroner, A., Hegner, E., Pidgeon, R.T.Age and magmatic history of the Antananrivo Block, central Madagascar: derived from zircon geochronologyAmerican Journal of Science, Vol. 300, No. 4, Apr. pp. 251-88.MadagascarMagmatism, Geochronology - age determinations, isotopic
DS2000-0539
2000
Kroner, A.Kroner, A., Willner, A.P., Collins, A., Hegner, MuhongoThe Mozambique Belt of East Africa and Madagascar: a new zircon and neodymium ages - implications Rodinia, GondwanaJournal of African Earth Sciences, p. 49. abstract.GlobalSupercontinent - Gondwana
DS2000-1022
2000
Kroner, A.Windley, B.F., Kroner, A., Collins, A., Whitehouse, M.The tectonic evolution of Madagascar and Yemen in the Neoproterozoic and their role in accretion....Igc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.MadagascarTectonics - Gondwanaland, Alkaline rocks
DS2002-1341
2002
Kroner, A.Ring, U., Kroner, A., Buchwaldt, R., Toulkeridis, T., Layer, P.W.Shear zone patterns and eclogite facies metamorphism in the Mozambique belt ofPrecambrian Research, Vol. 116, No.1-2, pp. 19-56.Malawi, East AfricaMetamorphism, Tectonics
DS2002-1720
2002
Kroner, A.Windley, B.F., Kroner, A., Guo, J., Qu, G., Li, Y., Zhang, C.Neoproterozoic to Paleozoic geology of the Altai Orogen NW China: new zircon age dat a and tectonic evolution.Journal of Geology, Vol. 110, 6, pp. 719-738.ChinaGeochronology
DS2003-0752
2003
Kroner, A.Kroner, A., Cordani, Y.African, southern Indian and South American cratons were not part of the RodiniaTectonophysics, Vol. 375, 1-4, pp. 325-52.Africa, India, South AmericaGeochronology - Gondwanaland
DS2003-1312
2003
Kroner, A.Sommer, H., Kroner, A., Hauzenberger, C., Muhongo, S., Wingate, M.T.Metamorphic petrology and zircon geochronology of high grade rocks from the centralJournal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 21, 9, pp. 915-934.TanzaniaGeochronology - not specific to diamonds
DS200412-1058
2003
Kroner, A.Kroner, A., Cordani, Y.African, southern Indian and South American cratons were not part of the Rodinia supercontinent: evidence from field relationshiTectonophysics, Vol. 375, 1-4, pp. 325-52.Africa, India, South AmericaGeochronology - Gondwanaland
DS200412-1877
2003
Kroner, A.Sommer, H., Kroner, A., Hauzenberger, C., Muhongo, S., Wingate, M.T.Metamorphic petrology and zircon geochronology of high grade rocks from the central Mozambique belt of Tanzania: crustal recycliJournal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 21, 9, pp. 915-934.Africa, TanzaniaGeochronology - not specific to diamonds
DS200512-0581
2005
Kroner, A.Kroner, A., Brown, L.Structure, composition and evolution of the South Indian and Sri Lankan granulite terrains from deep seismic profiling and geophysical investigations.Gondwana Research, Vol. 8, 3, pp. 317-335.India, AsiaGeophysics - seismics
DS200612-0230
2006
Kroner, A.Cawood, P.A., Kroner, A., Pisarevsky, S.Precambrian plate tectonics: criteria and evidence.GSA Today, Vol. 16, 7, July pp. 4-11.CanadaPaleomagnetism, subduction, geochronology, geochemistry
DS200712-0635
2006
Kroner, A.Liu, D., Jian, P., Kroner, A., Xu, S.Dating of prograde metamorphic events deciphered from episodic zircon growth in rocks of the Dabie Sulu UHP complex, China.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 250, 3-4, Oct. 30, pp. 650-666.ChinaUHP
DS200812-0236
2008
Kroner, A.Condie, K.C., Kroner, A.When did plate tectonics begin? Evidence from the geologic record.Geological Society of America Special Paper, 440, pp. 281-MantleGeochronology
DS200912-0102
2009
Kroner, A.Cawood, P.A., Kroner, A., Collins, W.J., Kusky, T.M., Mooney, W.D., Windley, B.F.Accretionary orogens through Earth history.Geological Society of London, Special Publication Earth Accretionary systems in Space and Time, No. 318, pp. 1-36.MantleOrogen
DS201012-0415
2010
Kroner, A.Kroner, A.The role of geochronology in understanding continental evolution.The evolving continents: understanding processes of continental growth, Geological Society of London, Vol. 338, pp. 179-196.MantleGeochronology
DS201212-0383
2012
Kroner, A.Kroner, A., Liu, D.Advances in high-resolution ion-microprobe geochronogy ( 2 pg overview)Gondwana Research, Vol. 21, 4, pp. 717-718.TechnologyGeochronology
DS201412-0870
2013
Kroner, A.Sommer, H., Wan,Y., Kroner, A., Xie, H., Jacob, D.E.Shrimp zircon ages and petrology of lower crustal granulite xenoliths from the Letseng-La-Terae kimberlite, Lesotho: further evidence for a Namaquanatal connection.South Africa Journal of Geology, Vol. 116, 2, pp. 183-198.Africa, LesothoDeposit - Letseng
DS201811-2586
2018
Kroner, A.Kroner, A., Nagel, T.J., Hoffmann, J.E., Liu, X., Wong, J., Hegner, E., Xie, H., Kasper, U., Hofmann, A., Liu, D.High temperature metamorphism and crustal melting at ca. 3.2 Ga in the eastern Kaapvaal craton.Precambrian Research, Vol. 317, pp. 101-116.Africa, South Africacraton

Abstract: The question of whether high-grade metamorphism and crustal melting in the early Archaean were associated with modern-style plate tectonics is a major issue in unravelling early Earth crustal evolution, and the eastern Kaapvaal craton has featured prominently in this debate. We discuss a major ca. 3.2?Ga tectono-magmatic-metamorphic event in the Ancient Gneiss Complex (AGC) of Swaziland, a multiply deformed medium- to high-grade terrane in the eastern Kaapvaal craton consisting of 3.66-3.20?Ga granitoid gneisses and infolded greenstone remnants, metasedimentary assemblages and mafic dykes. We report on a 3.2?Ga granulite-facies assemblage in a metagabbro of the AGC of central Swaziland and relate this to a major thermo-magmatic event that not only affected the AGC but also the neighbouring Barberton granitoid-greenstone terrane. Some previous models have related the 3.2?Ga event in the eastern Kaapvaal craton to subduction processes, but we see no evidence for long, narrow belts and metamorphic facies changes reflecting lithospheric suture zones, and there is no unidirectional asymmetry in the thermal structure across the entire region from Swaziland to the southern Barberton granite-greenstone terrane as is typical of Phanerozoic and Proterozoic belts. Instead, we consider an underplating event at ca. 3.2?Ga, giving rise to melting in the lower crust and mixing with mantle-derived under- and intraplated mafic magma to generate the voluminous granitoid assemblages now observed in the AGC and the southern Barberton terrane. This is compatible with large-scale crustal reworking during a major thermo-magmatic event and the apparent lack of a mafic lower crust in the Kaapvaal craton as shown by seismic data.
DS202003-0373
2020
Kroner, A.Yin, A., Brandl, G., Kroner, A.Plate tectonics processes at ca 2.0 Ga: evidence from >600 km of plate convergence. Limpopo beltGeology, Vol. 48, pp. 103-107.Africa, South Africatectonics

Abstract: We addressed when plate-tectonic processes first started on Earth by examining the ca. 2.0 Ga Limpopo orogenic belt in southern Africa. We show through palinspastic reconstruction that the Limpopo orogen originated from >600 km of west-directed thrusting, and the thrust sheet was subsequently folded by north-south compression. The common 2.7-2.6 Ga felsic plutons in the Limpopo thrust sheet and the absence of an arc immediately predating the 2.0 Ga Limpopo thrusting require the Limpopo belt to be an intracontinental structure. The similar duration (~40 m.y.), slip magnitude (>600 km), slip rate (>15 mm/yr), tectonic setting (intracontinental), and widespread anatexis to those of the Himalayan orogen lead us to propose the Limpopo belt to have developed by continent-continent collision. Specifically, the combined Zimbabwe-Kaapvaal craton (ZKC, named in this study) in the west (present coordinates) was subducting eastward below an outboard craton (OC), which carried an arc equivalent to the Gangdese batholith in southern Tibet prior to the India-Asia collision. The ZKC-OC collision at ca. 2.0 Ga triggered a westward jump in the plate convergence boundary, from the initial suture zone to the Limpopo thrust within the ZKC. Subsequent thrusting accommodated >600 km of plate convergence, possibly driven by ridge push from the west side of the ZKC. As intracontinental plate convergence is a key modern plate-tectonic process, the development of the Limpopo belt implies that the operation of plate tectonics, at least at a local scale, was ongoing by ca. 2.0 Ga on Earth.
DS201902-0324
2019
Kroner, U.Stephan, T., Kroner, U., Romer, R.L.The pre-orogenic detrital zircon record of the Peri-Gondwanan crust.Geological Magazine, Vol. 156, 2, pp. 281-307.Mantlegeochronology

Abstract: We present a statistical approach to data mining and quantitatively evaluating detrital age spectra for sedimentary provenance analyses and palaeogeographic reconstructions. Multidimensional scaling coupled with density-based clustering allows the objective identification of provenance end-member populations and sedimentary mixing processes for a composite crust. We compiled 58 601 detrital zircon U-Pb ages from 770 Precambrian to Lower Palaeozoic shelf sedimentary rocks from 160 publications and applied statistical provenance analysis for the Peri-Gondwanan crust north of Africa and the adjacent areas. We have filtered the dataset to reduce the age spectra to the provenance signal, and compared the signal with age patterns of potential source regions. In terms of provenance, our results reveal three distinct areas, namely the Avalonian, West African and East African-Arabian zircon provinces. Except for the Rheic Ocean separating the Avalonian Zircon Province from Gondwana, the statistical analysis provides no evidence for the existence of additional oceanic lithosphere. This implies a vast and contiguous Peri-Gondwanan shelf south of the Rheic Ocean that is supplied by two contrasting super-fan systems, reflected in the zircon provinces of West Africa and East Africa-Arabia.
DS200712-0587
2007
Kronord, V.A.Kuskov, O.L., Kronord, V.A.Composition, temperature and thickness of the lithosphere of the Archean Kaapvaal craton.Izvestia Physics of the Solid Earth, Vol. 43, 1, pp. 42-62. Ingenta 1070870033Africa, South AfricaCraton
DS201412-0490
2014
Kronrod, V.Kuskov, O., Kronrod, V., Prokofev, A., Pavlenkova, N.Petrological -geophysical models of the internal structure of the lithospheric mantle of the Siberian craton.Petrology, Vol. 22, 1, pp. 17-44.RussiaGeophysics - geodynamics
DS200612-0753
2006
Kronrod, V.A.Kuskov, O.L., Kronrod, V.A.Determining the temperature of the Earth's continental upper mantle from geochemical and seismic data.Geochemistry International, Vol. 44, 3, pp. 232-248.MantleGeothermometry
DS200612-0754
2006
Kronrod, V.A.Kuskov, O.L., Kronrod, V.A., Annersten, H.Inferring upper mantle temperatures from seismic and geochemical constraints: implications for Kaapvaal Craton.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 244, 1-2, Apr. 15, pp. 133-154.Africa, South AfricaGeothermometry
DS200712-0588
2007
Kronrod, V.A.Kuskov, O.L., Kronrod, V.A., Zhidikova, A.P.Composition, temperature, and thickness of the lithosphere of the Kaapvaal Craton.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A532.Africa, South AfricaGeothermometry
DS201412-0491
2014
Kronrod, V.A.Kuskov, O.L., Kronrod, V.A., Prokofyev, A.A., Pavlenkova, N.I.Thermo-chemical structure of the lithospheric mantle underneath the Siberian craton inferred from long-range seismic profiles.Tectonophysics, Vol. 615-616, pp. 154-166.Russia, SiberiaGeothermometry
DS202010-1845
2020
KronzGordeychik, B., Churikova, T., Shea, T., Kronz, A,m Simakin, A., Worner, G.Fo and Ni relations in olivine differentiate between crystallization and diffusion trends.Journal of Petrology, 10.1093/petrology/egaa083Mantleolivine

Abstract: Nickel is a strongly compatible element in olivine, and thus fractional crystallization of olivine typically results in a concave-up trend on a Fo-Ni diagram. "Ni-enriched" olivine compositions are considered those that fall above such a crystallization trend. To explain Ni-enriched olivine crystals, we develop a set of theoretical and computational models to describe how primitive olivine phenocrysts from a parent (high-Mg, high-Ni) basalt re-equilibrate with an evolved (low-Mg, low-Ni) melt through diffusion. These models describe the progressive loss of Fo and Ni in olivine cores during protracted diffusion for various crystal shapes and different relative diffusivities for Ni and Fe-Mg. In the case when the diffusivity of Ni is lower than that for Fe-Mg interdiffusion, then olivine phenocrysts affected by protracted diffusion form a concave-down trend that contrasts with the concave-up crystallization trend. Models for different simple geometries show that the concavity of the diffusion trend does not depend on the size of the crystals and only weakly depends on their shape. We also find that the effect of diffusion anisotropy on trend concavity is in the same magnitude as the effect of crystal shape. Thus, both diffusion anisotropy and crystal shape do not significantly change the concave-down diffusion trend. Three-dimensional numerical diffusion models using a range of more complex, realistic olivine morphologies with anisotropy corroborate this conclusion. Thus, the curvature of the concave-down diffusion trend is mainly determined by the ratio of Ni and Fe-Mg diffusion coefficients. The initial and final points of the diffusion trend are in turn determined by the compositional contrast between mafic and more evolved melts that have mixed to cause disequilibrium between olivine cores and surrounding melt. We present several examples of measurements on olivine from arc basalts from Kamchatka, and several published olivine datasets from mafic magmas from non-subduction settings (lamproites and kimberlites) that are consistent with diffusion-controlled Fo-Ni behaviour. In each case the ratio of Ni and Fe-Mg diffusion coefficients is indicated to be?
DS2002-1766
2002
Kronz, A.Zack, T., Kronz, A., Foley, S.F., Rivers, T.Trace element abundances in rutiles from eclogites and associated garnet mica schistsChemical Geology, Vol. 184, 1-2, pp. 97-122.AlpsSubduction, Heavy minerals - not specific to diamonds
DS200412-0890
2004
Kronz, A.Jacob, D.E., Kronz, A., Viljoen, K.S.Cohenite, native iron and troilite inclusions in garnets from polycrystalline diamond aggregates.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 146, 5, pp. 566-76.Africa, South AfricaDiamond inclusions
DS200512-1205
2005
Kronz, A.Xiao, Y., Hoefs, J., Kronz, A.Compositionally zoned Cl rich amphiboles from North Dabie Shan, China: monitor of high pressure metamorphic fluid rock interaction processes.Lithos, Vol. 81, 1-4, April pp. 279-295.ChinaUHP
DS200512-1229
2004
Kronz, A.Zack, T., Moraes, R., Kronz, A.Temperature dependence of Zr in rutile: empirical calibration of a rutile thermometer.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 148, 4, pp. 471-488.Thermometry
DS201012-0317
2010
Kronz, A.Jacob, D.E., Wirth, R., Enzmann, F., Kronz, A.Combined FIB/TEM and microcomputer tomography of polycrystalline diamond ( framesite) from Orapa, Botswana.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 178.Africa, BotswanaFramesite
DS201112-0471
2011
Kronz, A.Jacob, D.E., Wirth, R., Enzmann, F., Kronz, A., Schreiber, A.Nano-inclusion suite and high resolution micro-computed tomography of polycrystalline diamond (framesite) from Orapa, Botswana.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 308, 3-4, pp. 307-316.Africa, BotswanaInclusions
DS201112-0472
2011
Kronz, A.Jacob, D.E., Wirth, R., Enzmann, F., Kronz, A., Schrieber, A.Nano-inclusion suite and high resolution micro-computed-tomography of polycrystalline diamond (framesite) from Orapa, Botswana.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 308, 3-4, pp. 307-316.Africa, BotswanaDeposit - Orapa
DS201412-0519
2014
Kronz, A.Liu, L., Xiao, Y., Worner, G., Kronz, A., Hou, Z.Detrital rutile geochemistry and theromometry from the Dabie orogen: implications for source - sediment links in a UHPM terrane.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 89, pp. 123-140.ChinaUHP
DS201810-2360
2018
Kronz, A.Nasdala, L., Corfu, F., Schoene, B., Tapster, S.R., Wall, C.J., Schmitz, M.D., Ovtcharova, M., Schaltegger, U., Kennedy, A.K., Kronz, A., Reiners, P.W., Yang, Y-H., Wu, F-Y., Gain, S.E.M., Griffin, W.L., Szymanowski, D., Chanmuang, C., Ende, N.M., ValleyGZ7 and GZ8 - two zircon reference materials for SIMS U-Pb geochronology.Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research, http://orchid.org/0000-0002-2701-4635 80p.Asia, Sri Lankageochronology

Abstract: Here we document a detailed characterization of two zircon gemstones, GZ7 and GZ8. Both stones had the same mass at 19.2 carats (3.84 g) each; both came from placer deposits in the Ratnapura district, Sri Lanka. The U-Pb data are in both cases concordant within the uncertainties of decay constants and yield weighted mean ²°6Pb/²³8U ages (95% confidence uncertainty) of 530.26 Ma ± 0.05 Ma (GZ7) and 543.92 Ma ± 0.06 Ma (GZ8). Neither GZ7 nor GZ8 have been subjected to any gem enhancement by heating. Structure-related parameters correspond well with the calculated alpha doses of 1.48 × 10¹8 g?¹ (GZ7) and 2.53 × 10¹8 g?¹ (GZ8), respectively, and the (U-Th)/He ages of 438 Ma ± 3 Ma (2s) for GZ7 and 426 Ma ± 9 Ma (2s) for GZ8 are typical of unheated zircon from Sri Lanka. The mean U concentrations are 680 µg g?¹ (GZ7) and 1305 µg g?¹ (GZ8). The two zircon samples are proposed as reference materials for SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry) U-Pb geochronology. In addition, GZ7 (Ti concentration 25.08 µg g?¹ ± 0.18 µg g?¹; 95% confidence uncertainty) may prove useful as reference material for Ti-in-zircon temperature estimates.
DS201904-0753
2019
Kroonenberg, S.Kroonenberg, S., Mason, P.R.D., Kriegsman, L. de Roever, E.W.F., Wong, T.E.Geology and mineral deposits of the Guiana Shield.SAXI-XI Inter Guiana Geological Conferene 2019: Paramaribo, Suriname, 6p. PdfSouth America, Brazil, VenezuelaGuiana shield

Abstract: The Guiana Shield records a long history that starts in the Archean, but culminates in the Trans-Amazonian Orogeny between 2.26-2.09 Ga as a result of an Amazonian-West-Africa collision. This event is responsible for the emplacement of a major part of its mineralisations, especially gold, iron and manganese. The diamondiferous Roraima Supergroup represents its molasse. Between 1.86 and 1.72 Ga the Rio Negro Block accreted in the west. The Grenvillian Orogeny caused shearing and mineral resetting between 1.3 and 1.1 Ga when Amazonia collided with Laurentia. Younger platform covers contain placer gold mineralisation. Several suits of dolerite dykes record short-lived periods of crustal extension. Bauxite plateaus cover various rock units.
DS201904-0760
2019
Kroonenberg, S.Naipal, R., Kroonenberg, S., Mason, P.R.D.Ultramafic rocks of the Paleoproterozoic greenstone belt in the Guiana shield of Suriname, and their mineral potential.SAXI-XI Inter Guiana Geological Conferene 2019: Paramaribo, Suriname, 5p. PdfSouth America, SurinameGuiana shield

Abstract: The ultramafic rocks of the Marowijne Greenstone Belt in Suriname and elsewhere in the Guiana Shield comprise both intrusive dunite-gabbroic bodies and ultramafic lavas and volcaniclastic rocks. They were emplaced in the early stages of the Trans-Amazonian Orogeny (2.26-2.09 Ga), but their petrogenesis and geotectonic significance have still to be elaborated. They present several economically interesting mineralisations, including chromium, nickel, platinum, gold and diamonds. In Suriname diamonds are found since the 19 th century; possible source rocks show similarities with the diamondiferous komatiitic volcaniclastic rocks in Dachine, French Guiana and in Akwatia in the Birimian Greenstone Belt of Ghana. This might point to a regionally extensive diamond belt in the Guiana Shield and its predrift counterpart in the West-African Craton.
DS201812-2833
2016
Kroonenberg, S.B.Kroonenberg, S.B., de Roever, E.W.F., Fraga, L.M., Faraco, T., Lafon, J-M., Cordani, U., Wong, T.E.Paleoproterzoic evolution of the Guiana Shield in Suriname: a revised model.Netherlands Journal of Geolsciences, Vol. 95, 4, pp. 491-522.South America, SurinameGuiana shield

Abstract: The Proterozoic basement of Suriname consists of a greenstone-tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite belt in the northeast of the country, two high-grade belts in the northwest and southwest, respectively, and a large granitoid-felsic volcanic terrain in the central part of the country, punctuated by numerous gabbroic intrusions. The basement is overlain by the subhorizontal Proterozoic Roraima sandstone formation and transected by two Proterozoic and one Jurassic dolerite dyke swarms. Late Proterozoic mylonitisation affected large parts of the basement. Almost 50 new U-Pb and Pb-Pb zircon ages and geochemical data have been obtained in Suriname, and much new data are also available from the neighbouring countries. This has led to a considerable revision of the geological evolution of the basement. The main orogenic event is the Trans-Amazonian Orogeny, resulting from southwards subduction and later collision between the Guiana Shield and the West African Craton. The first phase, between 2.18 and 2.09 Ga, shows ocean floor magmatism, volcanic arc development, sedimentation, metamorphism, anatexis and plutonism in the Marowijne Greenstone Belt and the adjacent older granites and gneisses. The second phase encompasses the evolution of the Bakhuis Granulite Belt and Coeroeni Gneiss Belt through rift-type basin formation, volcanism, sedimentation and, between 2.07 and 2.05 Ga, high-grade metamorphism. The third phase, between 1.99 and 1.95 Ga, is characterised by renewed high-grade metamorphism in the Bakhuis and Coeroeni belts along an anticlockwise cooling path, and ignimbritic volcanism and extensive and varied intrusive magmatism in the western half of the country. An alternative scenario is also discussed, implying an origin of the Coeroeni Gneiss Belt as an active continental margin, recording northwards subduction and finally collision between a magmatic arc in the south and an older northern continent. The Grenvillian collision between Laurentia and Amazonia around 1.2-1.0 Ga caused widespread mylonitisation and mica age resetting in the basement.
DS202009-1644
2019
Kroonenberg, S.B.Naipal, R., Kroonenberg, S.B., Mason, P.R.D.Ultramafic rocks of the Paleoproterozoic greenstone belt in the Guiana shield of Suriname, and their mineral potential.SAXI-XI Inter Guiana Geological Conference, held Paramaribo, Suriname., 5p. PdfSouth America, Surinamediamond

Abstract: The ultramafic rocks of the Marowijne Greenstone Belt in Suriname and elsewhere in the Guiana Shield comprise both intrusive dunite-gabbroic bodies and ultramafic lavas and volcaniclastic rocks. They were emplaced in the early stages of the Trans-Amazonian Orogeny (2.26-2.09 Ga), but their petrogenesis and geotectonic significance have still to be elaborated. They present several economically interesting mineralisations, including chromium, nickel, platinum, gold and diamonds. In Suriname diamonds are found since the 19 th century; possible source rocks show similarities with the diamondiferous komatiitic volcaniclastic rocks in Dachine, French Guiana and in Akwatia in the Birimian Greenstone Belt of Ghana. This might point to a regionally extensive diamond belt in the Guiana Shield and its predrift counterpart in the West-African Craton.
DS202009-1645
2020
Kroonenberg, S.B.Naipal, R., Zwaan, J.C.(Hanco),, Kroonenberg, S.B., Kreigsman, L.M., Mason, P.R.D.Diamonds from the Nassau Mountains, Suriname.Journal of Gemmology, Vol. 37, 2, pp. 180-191. pdfSouth America, Surinamedeposit - Paramaka Creek

Abstract: Alluvial diamonds have been found in Suriname since the late 19th century, but to date the details of their origin remain unclear. Here we describe diamonds from Paramaka Creek (Nassau Mountains area) in the Marowijne greenstone belt, Guiana Shield, north-eastern Suriname. Thirteen samples were studied, consisting mainly of euhedral crystals with dominant octahedral and dodecahe-dral habits. They had colourless to brown to slightly greenish body colours, and some showed green or (less commonly) brown irradiation spots. Surface features showed evidence of late-stage resorption that occurred during their transport to the earth’s surface. The studied diamonds were predominantly type IaAB, with nitrogen as both A and B aggregates. In the DiamondView most samples displayed blue and/or green luminescence and concentric growth patterns. Their mineral inclusion assemblages (forsterite and enstatite) indicate a peridotitic (possibly harzburgitic) paragenesis.
DS202101-0022
2020
Kropac, K.Kropac, K., Dolnicek, Z., Uher, P., Burianek, D., Safai, A., Urubek, T.Zirconian-niobian titanite and associated Zr-, Nb-, REE-rich accessory minerals: products of hydrothermal overprint of leucocratic teschenites ( Sileasian Unit, outer western Carpathians, Czech Republic).Geologica Carpathica ** Eng, Vol. 71, 4, pp. 343-360. pdfEurope, Czech Republicalkaline rocks

Abstract: Sills of hydrothermally altered alkaline magmatic rock (teschenite) of Lower Cretaceous age at the Certák and Repište sites in the Silesian Unit (Flysch Belt of the Outer Western Carpathians, Czech Republic) host leucocratic dykes and nests which contain accessory minerals enriched in Zr, Nb and REE: Zr-, Nb-rich titanite, zircon, gittinsite, pyrochlore, monazite, REE-rich apatite, epidote, and vesuvianite. Titanite forms wedge-shaped crystals or irregular aggregates enclosed in the analcime groundmass or overgrowths on Zr-rich ferropargasite and taramite or Zr-rich aegirine-augite to aegirine. Titanite crystals show oscillatory or irregular patchy to sector zoning and contain up to 17.7 wt. % ZrO2 and 19.6 wt. % Nb2O5, and =1.1 wt. % REE2O3. High-field-strength elements (HFSE) are incorporated into the structure of the studied titanite predominantly by substitutions: (i) [6]Ti4+???[6]Zr4+; (ii) [6]Ti4+?+?[6]Al3+???[6]Zr4+?+?[6]Fe3+; and (iii) [6]2Ti4+???[6]Nb5+?+?[6](Al, Fe)3+. Magmatic fractional crystallization, high-temperature hydrothermal autometasomatic overprint and low-temperature hydrothermal alterations resulted in the formation of the HFSE-rich mineral assemblages within the leucocratic teschenites. Autometamorphic processes caused by high-temperature hypersaline aqueous solutions (salinity ~50 wt. %, ~390-510 °C), which were released from the HFSE-enriched residual melt, played a major role in the crystallization of Zr-, Nb-, and REE-rich minerals. The mobilization of HFSE could have occurred either by their sequestration into a fluid phase exsolved from the crystallizing melt or by superimposed alteration processes. The distinctive positive Eu anomaly (EuCN/Eu*?=?1.85) of leucocratic dykes infers possible mixing of Eu2+-bearing magmatic fluids with more oxidized fluids.
DS202101-0036
2014
Kropac, K.Urubek, T., Dolnicek, Z., Kropac, K.Genesis of syntectonic hydrothermal veins in the igneous rock of teschenite association ( Outer western Carpathians, Czeck Republic): growth mechanisms and origin of fluids. ( REE) ** note dateGeologica Carpathica ** Eng, Vol. 65, 6, pp. 419-431. pdf doi: 10.15 /geoca-2015-0003Europe, Czech Republicalkaline rocks

Abstract: Hydrothermal mineralization hosted by the Lower Cretaceous igneous rock of the teschenite association at Jasenice (Silesian Unit, Flysch Belt, Outer Western Carpathians) occurs in two morphological types - irregular vein filled by granular calcite and regular composite vein formed by both fibrous and granular calcite and minor chlorite, quartz, and pyrite. Crosscutting evidence indicates that the granular veins are younger than the composite vein. The composite vein was formed by two mechanisms at different times. The arrangement of solid inclusions in the marginal fibrous zone suggests an episodic growth by the crack-seal mechanism during syntectonic deformation which was at least partially driven by tectonic suction pump during some stages of the Alpine Orogeny. Both the central part of the composite vein and monomineral veins developed in a brittle regime. In these cases, the textures of vein suggest the flow of fluids along an open fracture. The parent fluids of both types of vein are characterized by low temperatures (Th=66-163 °C), low salinities (0.4 to 3.4 wt. % NaCl eq.), low content of strong REE-complexing ligands, and d18O and d13C ranges of + 0.2/+12.5 %. SMOW and -11.8/-14.1 %. PDB, respectively. The parent fluids are interpreted as the results of mixing of residual seawater and diagenetic waters produced by dewatering of clay minerals in the associ-ated flysch sediments. The flow of fluids was controlled by tectonic deformation of the host rock.
DS200712-0538
2007
Kropachev, A.P.Khudolev, A.K., Kropachev, A.P., Tkachenko, V.I., Rublev, A.G., Sergeev, S.A., Matukov, D.I,LyahnitskayaMesoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic evolution of the Siberian Craton and adjacent microcontinents: an overview with constraints for a Laurentian Connection.SEPM Special Publication 86, pp. 209-226.RussiaCraton
DS200712-0539
2007
Kropachev, A.P.Khudolev, A.K., Kropachev, A.P., Tkachenko, V.I., Rublev, A.G., Sergeev, S.A., Matukov, D.I,LyahnitskayaMesoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic evolution of the Siberian Craton and adjacent microcontinents: an overview with constraints for a Laurentian Connection.SEPM Special Publication 86, pp. 209-226.RussiaCraton
DS1984-0475
1984
Kropotkin, P.N.Malkov, B.A., Milanovskiy, Y.Y., Kropotkin, P.N., Pushcharovski.Archean Diamond Bearing Mantle and Kimberlite Volcanism in The Expanding Earth Theory.Izd. Nauka, Moscow., PP. 56061.RussiaIgneous Rocks, Kimberlite, Genesis, Plate Tectonics
DS1994-0954
1994
Kropotkin, P.N.Kropotkin, P.N., Efremov, V.H.New proofs of plate tectonic theoryGeotectonics, Vol. 28, No. 1, August pp. 13-19RussiaTectonics
DS1960-0759
1966
Kropotova, O.I.Vinogradov, A.P., Kropotova, O.I., Orlov, Y.U., Grinenko, V.A.Isotopic Composition of Diamond Crystals and CarbonadoTranslation From Institute Geochemistry And Analytical Chemistry, 3P.Russia, BrazilIsotope
DS1975-0547
1977
Kroptova, O.I.Kratsov, A.I., Kroptova, O.I., Voytov, G.I., Ivanov, V.A.Isotopic Composition of Carbon of Diamonds and Carbon Compounds in Pipes of the East Siberian Diamond Province.Dokl. Academy of Science Ussr, Earth Sci. Section., Vol. 223, No. 1-6, PP. 206-208.RussiaGeochronology
DS1983-0239
1983
Krot, A.N.Garanin, V.K., Krot, A.N., Kudryavtseva, G.P.Evolution of Peridotitic and Eclogitic Magmas in Kimberlitepipes.Geol. Rudn. Mest., Vol. 25, No. 4, PP. 14-28.RussiaKimberlite, Petrology, Geochemistry
DS1984-0291
1984
Krot, A.N.Garanin, V.K., Krot, A.N., Kudryavtseva, G.P.The Evolution of Peridotite and Eclogite Magmas in Kimberlite Pipes.International Geology Review, Vol. 26, No. 1, PP. 82-97.RussiaGenesis
DS1985-0075
1985
Krot, A.N.Botkunov, A.I., Garanin, V.K., Krot, A.N., et al.Primary Hydrocarbon Inclusions in Garnets from the Mir and Sputnik Kimberlite Pipes.Doklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 280, No. 2, PP. 468-472.RussiaBlank
DS1986-0093
1986
Krot, A.N.Botkunov, A.I., Garanin, V.K., Ivanova, T.N., Krot, A.N., KudryavtsevaOptical and colorimetric spectroscopic characteristics of garnets withNov. Dann. O Minetal. Moskva, (Russian), No. 33, pp. 120-129RussiaMineralogy, Garnet
DS1986-0094
1986
Krot, A.N.Botkunov, A.I., Garanin, V.K., Krot, A.N., Kudryavtseva, G.P., MatsyukPrimary hydrocarbon inclusions in garnets from the Mir and Sputnikkimberlite pipesDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 280, No. 1-6, October pp. 136-141RussiaMineralogy, Garnet
DS1986-0261
1986
Krot, A.N.Garanin, V.K., Kudryavtseva, G.P., Krot, A.N.Role of sulfides in the evolution of mantle rocks of basic and ultrabasiccomposition and in the emergence of kimberlitebodiesProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 178-180RussiaBlank
DS1987-0068
1987
Krot, A.N.Botkunov, A.I., Garanin, V.K., Krot, A.N., Kudryavtseva, G.P.Garnet mineral inclusions in kimberlites of Yakutia,their genetic and practical importance.(Russian)Geol. Rudyn. Mestoroz., (Russian), Vol. 29, No. 1, pp. 15-29Russia, Anabar shieldMineral inclusions, Petrology
DS1987-0069
1987
Krot, A.N.Botkunov, A.I., Garanin, V.K., Krot, A.N., Kuryavtseva, G.P.Mineral inclusions in garnets from Yakutian kimberlites and their genetic and practical significance.*rusGeol. Rudn. Mestorozhd. *rus, Vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 15-29RussiaMineralogy
DS1990-0889
1990
Krot, A.N.Krot, A.N.Origin of garnets with regularly disposed gyrocarbon silicate and oxide inclusions from kimberlite Mir pipeInternational Mineralogical Association Meeting Held June, 1990 Beijing China, Vol. 1, extended abstract p. 58RussiaMineralogy -garnets, Kimberlite -Mir
DS1993-0859
1993
Krot, A.N.Krot, A.N., Poskukojovsky, T.V., Guseva, E.V., Galimov, E.M., Botkunov, A.I. et.Genesis of the garnets containing hydrocarbon inclusions (Mir kimberlitepipe). (Russian)Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), No. 6, June pp. 891-899RussiaGeochemistry -garnets, Deposit -Mir
DS1994-0955
1994
Krot, A.N.Krot, A.N., Posukhova, Ye.V., Guseva, E.M., et al.Origin of garnets containing hydrocarbon inclusions in the Mir kimberlitepipe.Geochemistry International, Vol. 31, No. 1, pp. 122-130.Russia, YakutiaDiamond morphology, Deposit -Mir
DS201809-2001
2018
Krot, A.N.Brenker, F.E., Koch, T.E., Prior, D.J., Lilly, K., Krot, A.N., Bizzarro, M., Frost, D.Fe rich Ferropericlase in super deep diamonds and the stability of high FeO wadsleyite. Implications on the composition and temperature of the Earth's transition zone.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractMantlediamond inclusions

Abstract: The high amount of Fe-rich ferropericlase inclusions found in diamonds of a potential super-deep origin questions the bulk chemical model of the Earth [e.g., 1]. Although this might be due to a biased sampling of the lower mantle, it is worth to further address this discrepancy. A limiting factor of the Fe-content of the Earth´s deep mantle (TZ and lower mantle) is a correlation of the depths of the observed main mantle discontinuities with the (Fe,Mg)SiO4 phase diagram. In particular, the 520 kmdiscontinuity is related to the phase transformation of wadsleyite (assuming Fa10) to ringwoodite. The existing phase diagrams suggest a stability limit of wadsleyite =Fa40 [e.g., 2,3], which limits the Fe-content of the Earth´s transition zone. Here we report on a discovery of Fe-rich wadsleyite grains (up to Fa56) in the high-pressure silicate melt droplets within Fe,Ni-metal in shock veins of the CB (Bencubbin-like) metal-rich carbonaceous chondrite QC 001 [4], which were identified using HR-EDX, nano-EBSD and TEM. Although the existence of such Fe-rich wadsleyite in shock veins may be due to the kinetic reasons, new theoretical and experimental studies of the stability of (Fe,Mg)SiO4 at high temperature (> 1800 K) are clearly needed. This may have significant impact on the temperature and chemical estimates of the Earth´s transition zone.
DS2000-0540
2000
Krotkov, V.V.Krotkov, V.V.A new approach to the exploration of diamond deposits by large diameter boreholes.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 373A, No. 6, Aug-Sept. pp.930-2.RussiaDiamond - exploration, drilling, sampling
DS1992-0896
1992
Kroto, H.W.Kroto, H.W.Carbon onions introduce new flavour to fullerene studiesNature, Vol. 359, No. 6397, October 22, p. 670GlobalFullerene, Carbon
DS2000-0754
2000
Krotov, A.V.Perchuk, L.L., Gerya, T.V., Krotov, A.V.P-T paths and tectonic evolution of shear zones separating high grade terrains from cratons:Min. Petrol., Vol. 69, No. 1-2, pp. 109-42.South Africa, Russia, Kola PeninsulaHigh grade terrains - comparison, Tectonics - Kola and Limpopo
DS201811-2569
2018
Krotova, M.D.Ekimov, E.A., Sidorov, V.A., Maslakov, K.I., Sirotinkin, B.P., Krotova, M.D., Pleskov, Yu.V.Influence of growth medium composition on the incorporation of boron in HPHT diamond.Diamond & Related Materials, Vol. 89, pp. 101-107.Mantleboron

Abstract: Influence of growth medium composition on the efficiency of boron doping of carbonado-like diamond at 8-9 GPa was studied by diluting the C-B growth system with metallic solvents of carbon, Co and Ni. Addition of these metals to the original system leads to a decrease in the synthesis temperature, degree of doping with boron and suppression of superconductivity in diamond. According to XPS analysis, content of substitutional boron is equal to 0.07, 0.16 and 0.39 at.% in diamonds obtained in Co-C-B, Ni-C-B and C-B growth systems, respectively. Metallic behavior at normal temperatures and superconductivity below 5 K in diamond, synthesized in C-B system, change to semiconducting character of conductivity down to 2 K in diamonds obtained in the diluted systems; a faint hint of superconducting transition at 2 K was detected in the case of diamond grown in Ni-C-B system. By comparing phase composition of the inclusions and the doping efficiency of the diamonds, we are able to suggest that high chemical affinity of boron to boride-forming metals hinders the boron doping of diamond. The heavily boron-doped carbonado-like diamond compacts demonstrate high electrochemical activity in aqueous solutions and can be used as miniature electrodes in electrosynthesis and electroanalysis.
DS201812-2805
2018
Krotova, M.D.Ekimov, E.A., Sidorov, V.A., Maslakov, K.I., Sirotinkin, B.P., Krotova, M.D., Pleskov, Yu.V.Influence of growth medium composition on the incorporation of boron in HPHT diamond.Diamond & Related Materials, Vol. 89, pp. 101-107.Mantlecarbonado
DS1975-0266
1976
Krough, T.E.Davis, G.L., Krough, T.E.The Ages of Zircons from South African Kimberlite PipesEos, Vol. 57, No. 4, P. 356. (abstract.).South AfricaGeochronology
DS1975-0267
1976
Krough, T.E.Davis, G.L., Krough, T.E., Erlank, A.J.The Ages of Zircons from Kimberlites of South AfricaCarnegie Institute Yearbook, FOR 1975, PP. 821-824.South AfricaGeochronology
DS1998-0159
1998
Krouse, G.R.Bratus, M.D., Zinchuk, N.N., Krouse, G.R., Vityk, M.O.Crystallization conditions and sulfur, carbon and oxygen isotopic systematics of sulfide calcite AssociationGeochemistry International, Vol. 36, No. 3, pp. 222-228.Russia, YakutiaGeology, diamond morphology, fluid inclusions, Deposit - Udachnaya, Geochronology
DS1970-0367
1971
Krouse, H.R.Mitchell, R.H., Krouse, H.R.Isotopic Composition of Sulphur in Carbonatite at Mountain Pass, California.Nature., Vol. 231, P. 182.United States, California, West CoastRelated Rocks
DS1975-0144
1975
Krouse, H.R.Mitchell, R.H., Krouse, H.R.Sulphur Isotope Geochemistry of CarbonatitesGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta ., Vol. 39, PP. 1505-1513.GlobalBlank
DS1997-0448
1997
Krouse, R.Grinenko, L.N., Lightfoot, P., Krouse, R.Unusual isotopic composition and concentration of carbon in West Greenland mafic volcanicsGeochemistry International, Vol. 34, No. 11, Nov. pp. 958-967GreenlandVolcanics, Geochronology
DS201112-0555
2011
Krovolutskaya, N.Krovolutskaya, N., Bryanchaninova, N.Olivines of igneous rocks.Russian Journal of General Chemistry, Vol. 81, 6, pp. 1302-1314.TechnologyOlivine, petrology
DS1987-0382
1987
Krs, M.Krs, M., Pondaga, M.M., Savary, B.P.Geophysical investigation of the ring structure at Zanzui, NorthernTanzaniaPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol.45, pp. 294-303TanzaniaGeophysics, Structure
DS201809-2043
2018
Kruachanta, M.Ivarsson, M., Skogby, H., Bengtson, S., Siljestrom, S., Ounchanum, P., Boonsoong, A., Kruachanta, M., Marone, F., Belivanova, V., Holstrom, S.Intricate tunnels in garnets from soils and river sediments in Thailand - possible endolithic microborings.PluS One, Vol. 13, 8, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0200351Asia, Thailandgarnets

Abstract: Garnets from disparate geographical environments and origins such as oxidized soils and river sediments in Thailand host intricate systems of microsized tunnels that significantly decrease the quality and value of the garnets as gems. The origin of such tunneling has previously been attributed to abiotic processes. Here we present physical and chemical remains of endolithic microorganisms within the tunnels and discuss a probable biological origin of the tunnels. Extensive investigations with synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) reveal morphological indications of biogenicity that further support a euendolithic interpretation. We suggest that the production of the tunnels was initiated by a combination of abiotic and biological processes, and that at later stages biological processes came to dominate. In environments such as river sediments and oxidized soils garnets are among the few remaining sources of bio-available Fe2+, thus it is likely that microbially mediated boring of the garnets has trophic reasons. Whatever the reason for garnet boring, the tunnel system represents a new endolithic habitat in a hard silicate mineral otherwise known to be resistant to abrasion and chemical attack.
DS1995-1028
1995
Kruchkov, A.I.Kruchkov, A.I., Kharkiv, A.D., Rogovoi, V.V.Dynamic effect of traps on kimberlites: identification of kimberliteklippen.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 305-306.Russia, YakutiaKlippen -blocks of kimberlite, Deposit -Pdtrappovaya, Jubilee, Alakit
DS1995-0996
1995
Kruchkov etalKoptil, V.I., Banzeruk, V.I., Zinchuk, N.N., Kruchkov etalTypomorphism of diamonds from kimberlite bodies and placers of the Yakutian diamondiferous province.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 287-288.Russia, YakutiaDiamond morphology, Alluvials
DS1989-1577
1989
Krueger, R.A.Walton, K.R., Dismukes, J.P., Krueger, R.A., Field, F.R. III, ClarkTechnology assessment for CVD-diamond-coated cutting tool insertsMaterials and Society, Vol. 13, No. 3, pp. 319-350GlobalDiamond synthesis, CVD -overview/good refs
DS1992-0897
1992
Krug, E.C.Krug, E.C.Acid rain: an example of environmental epistemologyMining Engineering, Vol. 44, No. 12, December pp. 1431-1434GlobalEnvironment, Acid rain
DS1995-1029
1995
Krug, H-J.Krug, H-J., et al.The formation and fragmentation of periodic bands through precipitation and Ostwald ripeningFractal Distribution, pp. 269-282GlobalLithosphere, Liesegang-ring formation
DS1995-1030
1995
Krug, M.A.Krug, M.A.Kimberlite-diamond explorationRhodes University, MSc. thesisGlobalKimberlites, Thesis
DS201609-1711
2010
Krug, M.A.Chinn, I.L., Krug, M.A., Minnie, W.P., Rikhotso, C.T.Decoding the diamonds from the AK6 kimberlite.The 4th Colloquium on Diamonds - source to use held Gabarone March 1-3, 2010, 8p.Africa, BotswanaDeposit - AK6

Abstract: The AK6 kimberlite is situated 25 km south of the Debswana Orapa Mine in Botswana and was discovered by De Beers geologists in 1969 during the follow-up of geophysical targets in the Orapa area. The kimberlite was not extensively pursued at the time as the initial bulk sampling indicated it to be of limited size and low grade, factors largely contributed to by the basalt breccia capping. Completion of high resolution integrated geophysical techniques and drill bulk sampling to depth recovered 97 tons of kimberlite during 2003 and 2004, which led to the increased size and grade estimates. Bulk sampling by Large Diameter Drilling (LDD, 23 inch diameter) commenced in 2005; 13 holes were drilled to a cumulative depth of 3,699 m and 689 carats of diamonds were recovered. In July 2006 the De Beers Mineral Resource Classification Committee classified these Phase I LOO results at a High Inferred level with an average grade of 24 carats per hundred tonnes (cpht) at a bottom cut-off of +1 mm, and a modeled average diamond value of 150 dollars per carat. A second phase of LDO drilling was initiated in 2006, and bulk sampling by trenching commenced in 2007 in order to deliver a resource estimate at indicated level. An Indicated Resource of 11.1 million carats at an average grade of 22 cpht was declared for the deposit mining lease application lodged in 2007.
DS201605-0858
2016
Krugel, W.Krugel, W., Motsumi, K.Letlhakane legacy - concept becomes reality.Diamonds Still Sparkling SAIMM 2016 Conference, Mar. 14-17, pp. 159-166.Africa, BotswanaDeposit - Letlhakane
DS2001-0726
2001
KrugerManhica, A.S.T.D., Grantham, Armstrong, Guise, KrugerPolyphase deformation and metamorphism at the Kalahari Craton - Mozambique Belt boundary.Geological Society of London, Special Publication, Special Paper 184, pp. 303-22.South Africa, MozambiqueMetamorphism, Craton
DS1996-0759
1996
Kruger, D.Kley, J., Gangui, A.H., Kruger, D.Basement involved blind thrusting in the eastern Cordillera Oriental:evidence from cross sect. balanceTectonophysics, Vol. 259, No. 1-3, June 30, pp. 171-184BoliviaGeophysics -magnetotellurics, gravity, Tectonics
DS1995-1031
1995
Kruger, F.Kruger, F., Weber, M., Scherbaum, F., Schkittenhardt, J.Evidence for normal and in homogeneous lowermost mantle and core mantle boundary structure under Arctic /CanadaGeophysical Journal of International, Vol. 122, No. 2, August pp. 637-657.Arctic, Northwest TerritoriesMantle, Core
DS2002-0901
2002
Kruger, F.Kruger, F., Scherbaum, F., Rosa, J.W.C., Kind, R., Zetsche, F., Hohne, J.Crustal and upper mantle structure in the Amazon region ( Brasil) determined with broadband mobile stations.Journal of Geophysical Research, Oct. 29, 10.1029/2001JB000598.BrazilGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics
DS2002-0902
2002
Kruger, F.Kruger, F., Scherbaum, F., Rosa, J.W.C., Kind, R., Zetsche, F., Hohne, J.Crustal and upper mantle structure in the Amazon region ( Brazil) determined with broadband mobile stations.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 107, 10, ETE 17 DOI 10.1029/2001JB000598BrazilGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics
DS1975-0787
1978
Kruger, F.J.Kruger, F.J.A Contribution to the Petrology of KimberlitesMsc. Thesis, Rhodes University, 124P.South Africa, LesothoPetrography, Xenoliths, De Beers, Letseng la Terae
DS1980-0201
1980
Kruger, F.J.Kruger, F.J.The Occurrence of Cebollite in Kimberlite and Included Zeolitized Crustal Xenoliths.Mineralogical Magazine., Vol. 43, No. 329, MARCH, PP. 583-586.LesothoMineral Chemistry
DS1982-0352
1982
Kruger, F.J.Kruger, F.J.The Occurrence of Cebollite in Kimberlite and Included Zeolitized Crustal Xenoliths- a Correction and Discussion of The occurrence of Pectolite.Mineralogical Magazine., Vol. 46, No. 339, PP. 274-275.South Africa, LesothoKimberlite, Microprobe, Chemistry, De Beers, Letseng la Terae
DS1991-0404
1991
Kruger, F.J.Duane, M.J., Kruger, F.J.Geochronological evidence for tectonically driven brine migration During the early Proterozoic Rheis orogeny of southern AfricaGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 18, No. 5, May pp. 975-978Southern AfricaGeochronology, Brine
DS2000-0145
2000
Kruger, F.J.Cawthorn, R.G., Harris, C., Kruger, F.J.Discordant ultramafic pegmatoidal pipes in the Bushveld ComplexContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 140, No. 1, pp.119-39.South AfricaUltramafic - pipes, Bushveld Complex
DS201012-0248
2010
Kruger, F.J.Grantham, G.H., Manhica, A.D.S.T., Armstrong, R.A., Kruger, F.J., Loubser, M.New SHRIMP, Rb/Sr and Sm/Nd isotope and whole rock chemical dat a from central Mozambique and western Dronning Maud Land: implications for eastern KalahariJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 59, 1, pp.74-100.Africa, Mozambique, AntarcticaCraton, amalgamation of Gondwana
DS201112-0556
2011
Kruger, J.C.Kruger, J.C., Romer, R.L., Kampf, H.Late Cretaceous alnoite from the Delitzsch carbonatite - ultramafic complex.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1243.Europe, GermanyAlnoite, carbonatite
DS201312-0518
2013
Kruger, J.C.Kruger, J.C., Romer, R.L., Kampf, H.Late Cretaceous ultramafic lamprophyres and carbonatites from the Delitzsch Complex, Germany.Chemical Geology, Vol. 353, pp. 140-150.Europe, GermanyCarbonatite
DS1982-0320
1982
Kruger, J.M.Keller, G.R., Kruger, J.M., Schneider, R.V., Aiken, C.L.V., Lai.Regional Geophysical Studies of the Southern Oklahoma Aulocogen and Ouachita SystemGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 14, No. 3, P. 115, (abstract.).OklahomaMid-continent, Geophysics
DS1984-0398
1984
Kruger, J.M.Keller, G.R., Kruger, J.M., Peeples, W.J.The Regional Geophysical and Tectonic Setting of the Ouachita SystemGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 16, No. 2, FEBRUARY P. 88. (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent
DS1984-0435
1984
Kruger, J.M.Kruger, J.M., Keller, G.R.Gravity Anomalies in the Ouachita Mountains AreaGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 16, No. 2, FEBRUARY P. 105. (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent
DS1997-0638
1997
Kruger, J.M.Kruger, J.M., Martinez, A., Berendsen, P.Use of high resolution ground penetration radar in kimberlite delineationMining Engineering, Vol. 49, No. 11, Nov. pp. 73-79.GlobalGeophysics - Radar GPR., Deposit - Randolph 2
DS1998-0810
1998
Kruger, J.M.Kruger, J.M.Evidence from gravity and magnetic dat a for diffuse extension along the southern termination MidcontinentGeological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting, abstract. only, p.A110.GlobalTectonics, Mid continent Rift
DS201710-2236
2017
Kruger, K.Kruger, K., Maphane, K.Desert Gems: Bostwana's major mines. Orapa, Letlhakane and Damtshaa mines.11th International Kimberlite Field Trip Guide, Sept. 23p. PdfAfrica, Botswanadeposit - Orapa, Letlhakane, Damtshaa
DS200612-0946
2006
Kruger, S.J.Morkel, J., Kruger, S.J., Vermaak, M.K.G.Characterization of clay mineral fractions in tuffisitic kimberlite breccias by x-ray diffraction.South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 106, 6, pp. 397-406.Africa, South AfricaPetrology
DS200712-0582
2007
Kruger, T.Kruger, T.The impact of BEE lesgislation on mining investment in South Africa.Mineweb, pp.22,23,24.Africa, South AfricaNews item - legal
DS1996-0790
1996
Krugh, K.A.Krugh, K.A.Post Cheyenne belt thermotectonism of eastern margin of the Wyoming Province - Hartville Uplift, southeast WyomingGeological Society of America, Abstracts, Vol. 28, No. 7, p. A-315.WyomingTectonics, Hartville Uplift
DS201212-0684
2012
Kruk, A.Sokol, A.G., Kupriyanov, I., Palyanov, Yu., Kruk, A.Water activity in kimberlite magmas: constrains from melting experiments at 6.3 Gpa.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractRussiaDeposit - Udachnaya
DS201212-0685
2013
Kruk, A.N.Sokol, A.G., Kupriyanov, I.N., Palyanov, Y.N., Kruk, A.N., Sobolev, N.V.Melting experiments on the Udachnaya kimberlite at 6.3-7.5 Gpa: implications for the role of H2O in magma generation and formation of hydrous olivine.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 101, pp. 133-155.RussiaDeposit - Udachnaya
DS201212-0686
2012
Kruk, A.N.Sokol, A.G., Kupriyanov, I.N., Palyanov, Yu.N., Kruk, A.N., Sobolev, N.V.Melting experiments on the Udachnaya kimberlite at 6.3-7.5 Gpa: implications for the role of H2O in magma generation and formation of hydrous olivine.emc2012 @ uni-frankfurt.de, 1p. AbstractRussiaDeposit - Udachnaya
DS201312-0864
2013
Kruk, A.N.Sokol,A.G.,Kupriyanov, I.N., Palyanov, Y.N., Kruk, A.N., Sobolev, N.V.Melting experiments in the Udachnaya kimberlite at 6.3-7.5 Gpa: implications for the role of H2O in magma generation and formation of hydrous olivine.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 101, Jn. 15, pp. 133-155.RussiaDeposit - Udachnaya
DS201502-0089
2015
Kruk, A.N.Palyanov, Y.U., Sokol, A.G., Khokhryakov, A.F., Kruk, A.N.Conditions of diamond crystallization in kimberlite melt: experimental data.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 56, 1-2, pp. 196-210.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201502-0105
2015
Kruk, A.N.Sokol, A.G., Kruk, A.N.Conditions of kimberlite magma generation: experimental constraints.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 56, 1, pp. 245-259.MantleKimberlite genesis
DS201509-0428
2015
Kruk, A.N.Sokol, A.G., Kruk, A.N., Chebotarev, D.A., Palyanov, Yu.N., Sobolev, N.V.The composition of garnet as an indicator of the conditions of peridotite-carbonatite interaction in the subcratonic lithosphere ( Experimental data).Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 463, 1, pp. 746-750.MantleGarnet, carbonatite

Abstract: The article focuses on the study of composition of garnets of the lherzolitic and harzburgitic parageneses and the conditions of peridotite. As per the study, reconstruction of the conditions of metasomatism of peridotitic sources of kimberlite is possible in the evolution of garnet. It mentions the importance of dry and hydrous carbonatitic melt upon alteration of peridotitic sources of kimberlite as it acted as an another heat source.
DS201602-0240
2016
Kruk, A.N.Sokol, A.G., Kruk, A.N., Chebotarev, D.A., Palynaov, Yu.N., Sobolev, N.V.Conditions of carbonation and wehrlitization of lithospheric peridotite upon interaction with carbonatitic melts.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 465, 2, pp. 1262-1267.RussiaDeposit - Udachnaya

Abstract: Study of the mechanism of carbonation and wehrlitization of harzburgite upon metasomatism by carbonatitic melts of various genesis was carried out. Experiments with durations of 60-150 h were performed at 6.3 GPa and 1200°C. The data showed that carbonatite with MgO/CaO > 0.3 percolating into the peridotitic lithosphere may provide crystallization of magnesite in it. The influence of all studied carbonatites results in wehrlitization of peridotite. The compositions of melts formed by interaction with harzburgite (~2 wt % SiO2, Ca# = 36-47) practically do not depend on the composition of the initial carbonatite. Based on the data obtained, we conclude that the formation of magnesite-bearing and magnesite-free metasomatized peridotites may have a significant influence on the CO2 regime in the further generation of kimberlitic magmas of groups I and II.
DS201604-0630
2016
Kruk, A.N.Sokol, A.G., Kruk, A.N., Chebotarev, D.A., Palyanov, Y.N.Carbonatite melt-peridotite interaction at 5.5- 7.0 Gpa: implications for metasomatism in lithospheric mantle. KimberliteLithos, Vol. 248-251, pp. 66-79.MantleMetasomatism

Abstract: Interaction between carbonatite melt and peridotite is studied experimentally by melting samples of interlayered peridotite-carbonatite-peridotite in graphite containers at 1200-1350 °C and 5.5-7.0 GPa in a split-sphere multianvil apparatus. Starting compositions are lherzolite and harzburgite, as well as carbonatite which may form in the upper part of a slab or in a plume-related source. Most experimental runs were of 150 h duration in order for equilibrium to be achieved. The interaction produced carbonatitic melts with low SiO2 (= 7 wt.%) and high alkalis. At 1200 °C, melt-peridotite interaction occurs through Mg-Ca exchange, resulting in elimination of orthopyroxene and crystallization of magnesite and clinopyroxene. At 1350 °C hybridization of the carbonatite and magnesite-bearing peridotite melts occurred with consumption of clinopyroxene and magnesite, and crystallization of orthopyroxene at MgO/CaO = 4.3. The resulting peridotite-saturated melt has Ca# (37-50) depending on primary carbonatite composition. Compositions of silicate phases are similar to those of high-temperature peridotite but are different from megacrysts in kimberlites. CaO and Cr2O3 changes in garnet produced from the melt-harzburgite interaction at 1200 and 1350 °C perfectly match the observed trend in garnet from metasomatized peridotite of the Siberian subcontinental lithospheric mantle. K-rich carbonatite melts equilibrated with peridotite at 5.5-7.0 GPa and 1200-1350 °C correspond to high-Mg inclusions in fibrous diamond. Carbonatite melt is a weak solvent of entrained xenoliths and therefore cannot produce kimberlitic magma if temperatures are ~ 1350 °C on separation from the lithospheric peridotite source and ~ 1000 °C on eruption.
DS201606-1101
2016
Kruk, A.N.Kruk, A.N., Sokol, A.G., Chebotarev, D.A., Palyanov, Yu.A., Sobolev, N.V.Composition of a carbonatitic melt in equilibrium with lherzolite at 5.5-6.3 Gpa and 1350C.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 467, 1, pp. 303-307.Carbonatite

Abstract: Generation of ultra-alkaline melts by the interaction of lherzolite with cardonatites of various genesis was simulated at the P-T parameters typical of the base of the subcratonic lithosphere. Experiments with a duration of 150 h were performed at 5.5 and 6.3 GPa and 1350°C. The concentrations of CaO and MgO in melts are buffered by the phases of peridotite, and the concentrations of alkalis and FeO depend on the composition of the starting carbonatite. Melts are characterized by a low (<7 wt %) concentration of SiO2 and Ca# from 0.40 to 0.47. It is demonstrated that only high-Mg groups of carbonatitic inclusions in fibrous diamonds have a composition close to that of carbonatitic melts in equilibrium with lherzolite. Most likely, the formation of kimberlite-like melts relatively enriched in SiO2 requires an additional source of heat from mantle plumes and probably H2O fluid.
DS201705-0876
2017
Kruk, A.N.Sokol, A.G., Kruk, A.N., Palynov, Y.N., Sobolev, N.V.Stability of phlogopite in ultrapotassic kimberlite-like systems at 5.5-7.5 Gpa.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, in press available 22p.MantleMetasomatism, magmatism, carbonatite

Abstract: Hydrous K-rich kimberlite-like systems are studied experimentally at 5.5-7.5 GPa and 1200-1450 °C in terms of phase relations and conditions for formation and stability of phlogopite. The starting samples are phlogopite-carbonatite-phlogopite sandwiches and harzburgite-carbonatite mixtures consisting of Ol + Grt + Cpx + L (±Opx), according to the previous experimental results obtained at the same P-T parameters but in water-free systems. Carbonatite is represented by a K- and Ca-rich composition that may form at the top of a slab. In the presence of carbonatitic melt, phlogopite can partly melt in a peritectic reaction at 5.5 GPa and 1200-1350 °C, as well as at 6.3-7.0 GPa and 1200 °C: 2Phl + CaCO3 (L)?Cpx + Ol + Grt + K2CO3 (L) + 2H2O (L). Synthesis of phlogopite at 5.5 GPa and 1200-1350 °C, with an initial mixture of H2O-bearing harzburgite and carbonatite, demonstrates experimentally that equilibrium in this reaction can be shifted from right to left. Therefore, phlogopite can equilibrate with ultrapotassic carbonate-silicate melts in a = 150 °C region between 1200 and 1350 °C at 5.5 GPa. On the other hand, it can exist but cannot nucleate spontaneously and crystallize in the presence of such melts in quite a large pressure range in experiments at 6.3-7.0 GPa and 1200 °C. Thus, phlogopite can result from metasomatism of peridotite at the base of continental lithospheric mantle (CLM) by ultrapotassic carbonatite agents at depths shallower than 180-195 km, which creates a mechanism of water retaining in CLM. Kimberlite formation can begin at 5.5 GPa and 1350 °C in a phlogopite-bearing peridotite source generating a hydrous carbonate-silicate melt with 10-15 wt% SiO2, Ca# from 45 to 60, and high K enrichment. Upon further heating to 1450 °C due to the effect of a mantle plume at the CLM base, phlogopite disappears and a kimberlite-like melt forms with SiO2 to 20 wt% and Ca# = 35-40.
DS201812-2834
2018
Kruk, A.N.Kruk, A.N., Sokol, A.G., Palyanov, Yu.N.Phase relations in the harzburgite-hydrous carbonate melt at 5.5-7.5 Gpa and 1200-1350 C. ( primary kimberlite)Petrology, Vol. 26, 6, pp. 575-587.Mantlemetasomatism

Abstract: Phase relations are studied experimentally in the harzburgite-hydrous carbonate melt system, the bulk composition of which represents primary kimberlite. Experiments were carried out at 5.5 and 7.5 GPa, 1200-1350°?, and \({{X}_{{{\text{C}}{{{\text{O}}}_{2}}}}}\) = 0.39-0.57, and lasted 60 hours. It is established that olivine-orthopyroxene-garnet-magnesite-melt assemblage is stable within the entire range of the studied parameters. With increase of temperature and \({{X}_{{{\text{C}}{{{\text{O}}}_{2}}}}}\) in the system, Ca# in the melt and the olivine fraction in the peridotite matrix significantly decrease. The composition of silicate phases in run products is close to those of high-temperature mantle peridotite. Analysis of obtained data suggest that magnesite at the base of subcontinental lithosphere could be derived by metasomatic alteration of peridotite by asthenospheric hydrous carbonate melts. The process is possible in the temperature range typical of heat flux of 40-45 mW/m², which corresponds to the conditions of formation of the deepest peridotite xenoliths. Crystallization of magnesite during interaction with peridotite matrix can be considered as experimentally substantiated mechanism of CO2 accumulation in subcratonic lithosphere.
DS201509-0411
2015
Kruk, N.N.Krupchatnikov, V.I., Vrublevskii, V.V., Kruk, N.N.Early Mesozoic lamproites and monzonitoids of southeastern Gorny Altai: geochemistry, Sr-Nd isotope composition, and sources of melts.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 56, pp. 825-843.RussiaChuya Complex

Abstract: Small intrusions of lamprophyres and lamproites (Chuya complex) and K-monzonitoids (Tarkhata and Terandzhik complexes) are widespread in southeastern Gorny Altai. Geochronological (U-Pb and Ar-Ar) isotope studies show their formation in the Early-Middle Triassic (~ 234-250 Ma). Lamproites have been revealed within two magmatic areas and correspond in geochemical parameters to the classical Mediterranean and Tibet orogenic lamproites. According to isotope data ((87Sr/86Sr)T = 0.70850-0.70891, (143Nd/144Nd)T = 0.512157-0.512196, 206Pb/204Pb = 17.95-18.05) and Th/La and Sm/La values, the Chuya lamproites and lamprophyres melted out from the enriched lithospheric mantle with the participation of DM, EM1, EM2, and SALATHO. The monzonitoid series of the Tarkhata and Terandzhik complexes are similar in petrographic and geochemical compositions but differ significantly in Sr-Nd isotope composition: The Tarkhata monzonitoids are close to the Chuya lamproites, whereas the Terandzhik ones show a higher portion of DM ((87Sr/86Sr)T = 0.70434-0.70497, (143Nd/144Nd)T = 0.512463-0.512487) in their source, which suggests its shallower depth of occurrence and the higher degree of its partial melting as compared with the derivates of the Chuya and Tarkhata complexes. The studied rock associations tentatively formed in the postcollisional setting under the impact of the Siberian superplume.
DS1992-0898
1992
Krum, G.L.Krum, G.L., Jones, T.A.Pitfalls, in computer contouringGeobyte, Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 30-35GlobalComputer, Computer contouring
DS1992-0899
1992
Krumbein, W.E.Krumbein, W.E., Schehnhuber, H.J.Geophysiology of mineral deposits - a model for a biologically driving force of global changes through earth historyTerra Nova, Global Change Special Issue, Vol. 4, pp. 351-362GlobalGlobal Change, Mineral deposits
DS1991-0933
1991
Kruner, A.Kruner, A., Byerly, G.R., Lowe, D.R.Chronology of early Archean granite-greenstone evolution in the BarbertonMountainland, South Africa, based on precise dating by single zirconevaporationEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 103, No. 1/4, April pp. 41-54South AfricaGeochronology, Greenstone -granite
DS1859-0015
1785
Krunitz, J.G.Krunitz, J.G.Edelstein. #2In: Oekonomisch Technologische Encyklopadie Oder Allgemeines, PP. 61-110.GlobalGemology
DS200512-1155
2004
KrupchatnikovVrublevskii, V.V., Gertner, I.F., Polyakov, Izokh, Krupchatnikov, Travin, VoitenkoAr Ar isotopic age of lamproite dikes of the Chua Complex, Gornyi Altai.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 399A, 9, Nov-Dec. pp. 1252-55.RussiaLamproite
DS200412-2066
2004
Krupchatnikov, V.I.Vrublevskii, V.V., Zhuravlev, D.Z., Gertner, I.F., Krupchatnikov, V.I., Vladimirov, A.G., Rikhvanov, L.P.Sm Nd isotopic systematics of alkaline rocks and carbonatites from the Edelveis Complex, Northern Chuya Range, Gornyi Altai.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 397, 6, July-August pp. 870-874.RussiaGeochronology
DS200612-1496
2006
Krupchatnikov, V.I.Vrublevskii, V.V., Voitenko, N.N., Romanov, A.P., Polyakov, G.V., Izokh, A.E., Gertner, I.F., Krupchatnikov, V.I.Magma sources of Triassic lamproites of Gornyi Altai and Taimyr: Sr and Nd isotope evidence for plume lithosphere interaction.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 405A 9, pp. 1365-1367.RussiaLamproite
DS201509-0411
2015
Krupchatnikov, V.I.Krupchatnikov, V.I., Vrublevskii, V.V., Kruk, N.N.Early Mesozoic lamproites and monzonitoids of southeastern Gorny Altai: geochemistry, Sr-Nd isotope composition, and sources of melts.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 56, pp. 825-843.RussiaChuya Complex

Abstract: Small intrusions of lamprophyres and lamproites (Chuya complex) and K-monzonitoids (Tarkhata and Terandzhik complexes) are widespread in southeastern Gorny Altai. Geochronological (U-Pb and Ar-Ar) isotope studies show their formation in the Early-Middle Triassic (~ 234-250 Ma). Lamproites have been revealed within two magmatic areas and correspond in geochemical parameters to the classical Mediterranean and Tibet orogenic lamproites. According to isotope data ((87Sr/86Sr)T = 0.70850-0.70891, (143Nd/144Nd)T = 0.512157-0.512196, 206Pb/204Pb = 17.95-18.05) and Th/La and Sm/La values, the Chuya lamproites and lamprophyres melted out from the enriched lithospheric mantle with the participation of DM, EM1, EM2, and SALATHO. The monzonitoid series of the Tarkhata and Terandzhik complexes are similar in petrographic and geochemical compositions but differ significantly in Sr-Nd isotope composition: The Tarkhata monzonitoids are close to the Chuya lamproites, whereas the Terandzhik ones show a higher portion of DM ((87Sr/86Sr)T = 0.70434-0.70497, (143Nd/144Nd)T = 0.512463-0.512487) in their source, which suggests its shallower depth of occurrence and the higher degree of its partial melting as compared with the derivates of the Chuya and Tarkhata complexes. The studied rock associations tentatively formed in the postcollisional setting under the impact of the Siberian superplume.
DS2002-0012
2002
Krupenik, V.Ahmedov, A., Panova, E., Krupenik, V., Svehnikova, K.Diamond from Early Proterozoic and Devonian rocks of the joint zone of the Baltic Shield and Russian platform.18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.272.Russia, Baltic ShieldLithogenesis - sedimentary basins
DS2000-0128
2000
Krupicka, J.Burwash, R.A., Krupicka, J., Wubrans, J.R.Metamorphic evolution of the Precambrian basement of AlbertaCan. Mineralog., Vol. 38, No. 2, Apr. pp. 423-34.AlbertaTectonics - metamorphism
DS202002-0198
2019
Krupnik, D.Krupnik, D., Khan, S.Close range, ground based hyperspectral imaging for mining applications at various scales: review and case studies. ( not specific to diamonds). Glossary addedEarth Science Reviews, Vol. 198, 34p. PdfGlobalhyperspectral

Abstract: Detailed mapping of mineral phases at centimeter scale can be useful for geological investigation, including resource exploration. This work reviews case histories of ground-based close-range hyperspectral imaging for mining applications. Studies of various economic deposits are discussed, as well as techniques used for data correction, integration with other datasets, and validation of spectral mapping results using geochemical techniques. Machine learning algorithms suggested for automation of the mining workflow are reviewed, as well as systems for environmental monitoring such as gas leak detection. Three new case studies that use a ground-based hyperspectral scanning system with sensors collecting data in the Visible Near-Infrared and Short-Wave Infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum in active and abandoned mines are presented. Vertical exposures in a Carlin Style sediment-hosted gold deposit, an active Cu-Au-Mo mine, and an active asphalt quarry are studied to produce images that delineate the extent of alteration minerals at centimeter scale to demonstrate an efficient method of outcrop characterization, which increases understanding of petrogenesis for mining applications. In the Carlin-style gold deposit, clay, iron oxide, carbonate, and jarosite minerals were mapped. In the copper porphyry deposit, different phases of alteration are delineated, some of which correspond to greater occurrence of ore deposits. A limestone quarry was also imaged, which contains bitumen deposits used for road paving aggregate. Review of current literature suggests use of this technology for automation of mining activities, thus reducing physical risk for workers in evaluating vertical mine faces.
DS200712-0469
2006
Krupsky, D.P.Ismail-Zadeh, A.T., Korotkii, A.I., Krupsky, D.P., Tsepelev, I.A., Schubert, G.Evolution of thermal plumes in the Earth's mantle.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 411, 9, Nov-Dec. pp. 1442-1443.MantleGeothermometry
DS1930-0112
1932
Krusch, P.Krusch, P.Der Diamant Am Ende Seiner HerrschaftZeitschr. F. Prakt. Geol., Vol. 40, PP. 65-71.South AfricaDiamond
DS1997-0639
1997
Kruse, F.A.Kruse, F.A., Boardman, J.W.Characterization and mapping of kimberlites and related diatremes using airborne visible/ Infrared imaging...Twelfth Geologic Remote Sensing, Nov. 17th., AbstractsUtah, Colorado, WyomingGeophysics - remote sensing, Spectrometer
DS201112-0557
2011
Kruse, F.A.Kruse,F.A., Bedell, R.L., Taranik, J.V., Peppin, W.A., Weatherbee, O., Calvin, W.M.Mapping alteration minerals at prospect, outcrop and drill core scales using imagining spectroscopy.International Journal of Remote Sensing, Vol. 33, 6, pp. 1780-1798.GlobalSpectroscopy - not specific to diamonds
DS201903-0524
2000
Kruse, F.A.Kruse, F.A., Boardman, J.W.Characterization and mapping of kimberlites and related diatremes using hyperspectral remote sensing.IEEE.org * note date , pp. 299-304.United States, Colorado, Wyomingdeposit - Kelsey Lake

Abstract: Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and commercially-available HyMap hyperspectral data were used to study the occurrence and mineralogical characteristics of limberlite diatremes in the State-Line district of Colorado/Wyoming. A mosaic of five flightlines of AVIRIS data acquired during 1996 with 20-m resolution is being used to locate and characterize the kimberlite diatremes. Higher spatial resolution data (1.6 m AVIRIS and 4m HyMap acquired in 1998 and 1999, respectively) are being used to map additional detail. Poor exposures, vegetation cover, and weathering, however, make identification of characteristic kimberlite minerals difficult except where exposed by mining. Minerals identified in the district using the hyperspectral data include calcite, dolomite, illite/muscovite, and serpentine (principally antigorite), however, most spectral signatures are dominated by both green and dry vegetation. The goal of this work is to determine methods for characterizing subtle mineralogic changes associated with kimberlites as a guide to exploration in a variety of geologic terrains.
DS1998-0777
1998
Kruszewski, J.Koleba, W., Empson, J., Kruszewski, J.Metallic and industrial mineral assessment report on the exploration work in the Wandering River area.Alberta Geological Survey, MIN 19980019AlbertaExploration - assessment, Mineral Finders Inc.
DS201810-2305
2018
Kruszewski, L.Chukanov, N.V., Rastsvetaeva, R.K., Kruszewski, L., Akensov, S.M., Rusakov, V., Britvin, S.N., Vozchikova, S.A.Siudaite, Na8(Mn2+2Na) Ca6Fe3+3Zr3NbSi25O74(OH)2Cl.5H20: a new eudialyte group mineral from the Khibiny alkaline massif, Kola Peninsula.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 45, pp. 745-758.Russia, Kola Peninsulaalkaline

Abstract: The new eudialyte-group mineral siudaite, ideally Na8(Mn2+2Na)Ca6Fe3+3Zr3NbSi25O74(OH)2Cl•5H2O, was discovered in a peralkaline pegmatite situated at the Eveslogchorr Mt., Khibiny alkaline massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia. The associated minerals are aegirine, albite, microcline, nepheline, astrophyllite, and loparite-(Ce). Siudaite forms yellow to brownish-yellow equant anhedral grains up to 1.5 cm across. Its lustre is vitreous, and the streak is white. Cleavage is none observed. The Mohs’ hardness is 4½. Density measured by hydrostatic weighing is 2.96(1) g/cm3. Density calculated using the empirical formula is equal to 2.973 g/cm3. Siudaite is nonpleochroic, optically uniaxial, negative, with ??=?1.635(1) and e?=?1.626(1) (??=?589 nm). The IR spectrum is given. The chemical composition of siudaite is (wt%; electron microprobe, H2O determined by HCN analysis): Na2O 8.40, K2O 0.62, CaO 9.81, La2O3 1.03, Ce2O3 1.62, Pr2O3 0.21, Nd2O3 0.29, MnO 6.45, Fe2O3 4.51. TiO2 0.54, ZrO2 11.67, HfO2 0.29, Nb2O5 2.76, SiO2 47.20, Cl 0.54, H2O 3.5, -O?=?Cl -?0.12, total 99.32. According to Mössbauer spectroscopy data, all iron is trivalent. The empirical formula (based on 24.5 Si atoms pfu, in accordance with structural data) is [Na7.57(H2O)1.43]S9(Mn1.11Na0.88Ce0.31La0.20Nd0.05Pr0.04K0.41)S3(H2O)1.8(C a5.46Mn0.54)S6(Fe3+1.76Mn2+1.19)S2.95Nb0.65(T i0.20Si0.50)S0.71(Zr2.95Hf0.04Ti0.01)S3Si24.00Cl0.47O70(OH)2Cl0.47•1.2H2O. The crystal structure was determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The new mineral is trigonal, space group R3m, with a?=?14.1885(26) Å, c?=?29.831(7) Å, V?=?5200.8(23) Å3 and Z?=?3. Siudaite is chemically related to georgbarsanovite and is its analogue with Fe3+-dominant M2 site. The strongest lines of the powder X-ray diffraction pattern [d, Å (I, %) (hkl)] are: 6.38 (60) (-114), 4.29 (55) (-225), 3.389 (47) (131), 3.191 (63) (-228). 2.963 (100) (4-15), 2.843 (99) (-444), 2.577 (49) (3-39). Siudaite is named after the Polish mineralogist and geochemist Rafal Siuda (b. 1975).
DS1985-0372
1985
Krutikhovska, Z.O.Krutikhovska, Z.O., Melnichuk, E.V., Slonitska, S.G., Orlyuk, M.I.Regional magnetic anomalies in the southwestern Russian platform and smallscale prediction of mineral resources.(Russian)Dopov. Akad. Nauk UKR. RSR Ser. B., Geokl. Khim. Biol., (Russian), No. 4, pp. 36-41RussiaGeophysics
DS1987-0383
1987
Krutikhovskaya, Z.A.Krutikhovskaya, Z.A., Yeliseyeva, S.V., Negrutsa, V.Z., SlivinskayaRegional magnetic anomalies of old shields and platforms as indicators of early Precambrian rift troughsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 288, No. 1-6, pp. 72-75RussiaBlank
DS1950-0383
1958
Krutoyariskiy, M.A.Dukhanin, S.F., Krutoyariskiy, M.A.Interpretation of Aerial Photographs in Prospecting for Kimberlite Bodies.Inf. Bulletin. Niiga., No. 10, PP. 59-65.RussiaBlank
DS1960-0289
1962
Krutoyarski, M.A.Rabkin, M.I., Krutoyarski, M.A., Milashev, V.A.Classification and Nomenclature of Yakutian KimberlitesNiiga., Vol. 121, PP. 154-164.RussiaBlank
DS1960-0379
1963
Krutoyarski, M.A.Milashev, V.A., Krutoyarski, M.A., Rabhkin, M.I., Ehrlich, E.N.Kimberlitic Rocks and Picritic Porphyries of the North Eastern Part of the Siberian PlatformNiiga., Gosgeoltekizdat., Vol. 126, PP. 1-10.5.RussiaMineral Chemistry
DS1960-0162
1961
Krutoyarskii, M.A.Krutoyarskii, M.A., Milashev, V.A., Rabkin, M.I.The Classification of Kimberlitic Rocks of YakutiaNiiga, Info. Bulletin., Vol. 23, PP. 23-26.RussiaBlank
DS1950-0406
1958
Krutoyarskiy, M.A.Krutoyarskiy, M.A.Some Kimberlite Bodies in the Basin of the River Omonos in The Olenek Region.Zap. Vses. Miner. Obshch., PT. 87, No. 2, PP. L66-L80.RussiaBlank
DS1950-0483
1959
Krutoyarskiy, M.A.Krutoyarskiy, M.A.On Certain Kimberlite Bodies of the River OmonosZap. Imp. Miner. Obshch., PT. 87, No. 2L.RussiaBlank
DS1960-0364
1963
Krutoyarsky, M.A.Krutoyarsky, M.A., Lopatin, B.G., et al.Kimberlites of the Valleys of Rivers Omonos and UkukitInternational Geology Review, Vol. 5, No. 7.RussiaBlank
DS1960-0468
1964
Krutoyarsky, M.A.Krutoyarsky, M.A., Milashev, V.A.Dependence of Diamond Crystal Morphology on the Facies Formation Conditions of the Kimberlites of the Siberian PlatformZap. Vses. Miner. Obshch., PT. 93, No. 6, PP. 697-703.RussiaBlank
DS1960-0019
1960
Kryativ, B.M.Bobrievich, A.P., Kryativ, B.M., Shchukin, V.N.Certain Dat a on the Geology and Petrography of the Siberiankimberlite.Akad. Nauk Sssr Ser. Geol., No. 6.RussiaBlank
DS1960-0189
1961
Kryatov, B.M.Shschukin, V.N., Kryatov, B.M., Volotovskiy, A.G.The Inter relation of Kimberlites and TraprocksIn: Diamonds of Yakutia., RussiaBlank
DS201809-2040
2018
Kryazhev, S.G.Ignatov, P.A., Novikov, K.V., Shmonov, A.M., Zaripov, N.R., Khodnya, M.S., Razumov, A.N., Kilishekov, O.K., Kryazhev, S.G., Kovalchuk, O.E.Zoning of faults and secondary mineralization of host rocks of kimberlites of the Maiscoe diamond deposit, Nakyn field, Yakutia.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 60, 3, pp. 201-209.Russiadeposit - Maiscoe
DS200512-1230
2003
Krydik, S.Zagnitko, V., Krydik, S., Donskiy, M.Isotopic geochemistry of carbonatites of Ukraine.Periodico di Mineralogia, (in english), Vol. LXX11, 1. April, pp. 153-159.Europe, UkraineGeochronology, Chernigovka Complex
DS1994-0956
1994
Krylov, D.P.Krylov, D.P., Ustinov, V.I.Condition of the formation of the Archean charnockites and Aker Peaks(Napier Complex) East Antarctica).Geochemistry International, Vol. 31, No. 8, pp. 13-23.AntarcticaGeochronology, Napier Complex
DS2000-0583
2000
Krylov, I.N.Lobach-Zhuchenko, S.B., Chekulaev, V.P., Krylov, I.N.Lamprophyres of western KareliaDoklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 370, No. 1, Jan-Feb pp. 43-5.Russia, KareliaLamprophyres, Petrology
DS1991-0934
1991
Krylov, S.V.Krylov, S.V., Mishenkin, B.P., Bryskin, A.V.Deep structure of the Baikal rift from multiwave seismic explorationsJournal of Geodynamics, Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 87-96RussiaTectonics, Structure
DS1982-0608
1982
Krylov, V.S.Tselikov, A.I., Krylov, V.S., et al.Critical Size of Diamond NucleusDoklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 265, No. 3, PP. 681-684.RussiaBlank
DS1993-0860
1993
Krylova, M.D.Krylova, M.D.Petrogenetic conclusions from the distribution of trace elements between the principal eclogite minerals.Geochemistry International, Vol. 30, No. 3, March, pp. 136-142.RussiaEclogite, Petrology, Xenoliths, metamorphic complexes, pyrgarnites
DS201502-0111
2015
Krymsky, R.Sushchevskaya, N., Melanholina, E., Belyatsky, B., Krymsky, R., Migdisova, N.Oceanic magmatic evolution during ocean opening under influence of mantle plume.Economic Geology Research Institute 2015, Vol. 17,, #3059, 1p. AbstractIndiaLamproite
DS201412-0902
2014
Krymsky, R.Sh.Sushchevskaya, N.M., Migdisova, N.A., Antonov, A.V., Krymsky, R.Sh., Belyatsky, B.V., Kuzmin, D.V., Bychkova, Ya.V.Geochemical features of the Quaternary lamproitic lavas of Gaussberg volcano, East Antarctica: result of the impact of the Kerguelen plume.Geochemistry International, Vol. 52, 12, pp. 1030-1048.AntarcticaLamproitic lavas
DS201312-0519
2013
Krystopowicz, N.J.Krystopowicz, N.J., Currie, C.A.Crustal eclogization and lithosphere delamination in orogens.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 361, pp. 195-207.MantleTectonics
DS1991-1938
1991
Kryuchkov, A.I.Zinchuk, N.N., Kryuchkov, A.I., Melnik, Yu.M.Alteration of kimberlite at the contact with dolerite as in YakutiaDoklady Academy of Sciences, Earth Sci. Section, Vol. 307, No. 1-6, pp. 148-151RussiaMineralogy, metamorphism
DS1993-0861
1993
Kryuchkov, A.I.Kryuchkov, A.I.History of the formation and development of Amakinskaya geologicalexpedition.Diamonds of Yakutia, pp. 105-106.Russia, YakutiaAmakinskaya expedition, Exploration
DS1994-0957
1994
Kryuchkov, A.I.Kryuchkov, A.I., Leliukh, M.J., Krasinets, S.S., Afansiev, V.P.Two unusual Paleozoic kimberlite diatremes in the Daldyn-Alakit region Of the Siberian PlatformProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 1, pp. 34-39.Russia, SiberiaDaldyn-Alakit, Kimberlite diatremes
DS1995-0997
1995
Kryuchkov, A.I.Koptil, V.I., Kryuchkov, A.I., Zinchuk, N.N.Prediction of new primary diamond deposits: diamond typomorphism implications ...Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Almazy Rossii Sakha abstract, p. 23.Russia, YakutiaMineralogy, alluvials, Diamond morphology
DS1995-1032
1995
Kryuchkov, A.I.Kryuchkov, A.I., Kharkiv, A.D.On the question of the identification of kimberlite bodies undergoing the dynamic effects of traps.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Almazy Rossii Sakha abstract, p. 15.Russia, YakutiaGeodynamics, Tectonics, Deposit -Alakit Markha
DS1995-1033
1995
Kryuchkov, A.I.Kryuchkov, A.I., Kharkiv, A.D., Pokhilenko, N.P.Identification of kimberlite bodies subjected to dynamic effect oftraps.... Yubileinaya pipe.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 36, No. 5, pp. 61-71.Russia, YakutiaSill, Trap rocks, Deposit -Jubillee, Ozernaya
DS1995-1083
1995
Kryuchkov, A.I.Lelukh, M.I., Vasiliev, A.A., Kryuchkov, A.I., Cherny, S.D.New dat a on morphology of kimberlite bodiesProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Almazy Rossii Sakha abstract, p. 10, 11.Russia, YakutiaStructure - pipe, Deposit -Rot Front, Yakutskaya
DS1993-0840
1993
Kryuchkov, E.Y.Koptil, V.Y., Kryuchkov, E.Y.Diamond typomorphism: the criteria of target prediction for all stages ofgeoexploration.Diamonds of Yakutia, pp. 29-30.Russia, YakutiaDiamond genesis
DS1991-0935
1991
Kryuchokov, A.I.Kryuchokov, A.I., Nikulin, V.I., Krasinets, S.S., Lelyukh, M.I.Conditions of localization and structure of a new kimberlite body in the Aikhal area (Siberian platform)Soviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 32, No. 5, pp. 52-58Russia, SiberiaKimberlite, structure, Aikhal area
DS1960-0975
1968
Kryukov, A.V.Kryukov, A.V.Inclusions of Pyrope Peridotite As Signs of the Connection Of Kimberlite with Alkaline Basaltoids.In: The Earth's Crust And Upper Mantle. Moscow: Nauka., PP. 141-145.RussiaBlank
DS1985-0420
1985
Kryukov, A.V.Matsyuk, S.S., Kryukov, A.V., et al.A Comparative Study of the Composition and Properties of Garnets from The alkali Basalt Pipes of the Minusinsk Basin And kimberlites of Yakutia.(russian)Mineral. Zhurn., (Russian), Vol. 7, No. 4, pp. 18-29RussiaPyrope, Analyses
DS1989-0832
1989
Kryukov, A.V.Kryukov, A.V., Vaag, O.V., Mkrtychyan, A.K., et al.New pyrope bearing carbonate collector in the southern part of the TunguskasynecliseSoviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 30, No. 4, pp. 47-54RussiaGarnets, Petrology
DS1989-1543
1989
Kryukov, A.V.Vasilenko, V.B., Kryukov, A.V., Kuznetsova, L.G.Petrochemical types of alkali-ultrabasic rocks of the Chadobets UpliftSociet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 30, No. 8, pp. 43-48RussiaPetrology, Mentions kimberlite pipes
DS200612-0652
2006
Kryukova, E.B.Kadik, A.A., Litvin, Y.A., Koltashev, V.V., Kryukova, E.B., Plotnichenko, V.G.Solubility of hydrogen and carbon in reduced magmas of the early Earth's mantle.Geochemistry International, Vol. 44, 1, pp. 33-47.MantleGeochemistry
DS2000-0961
2000
Kryvdik, S.G.Tsymbal, S.N., Kryvdik, S.G.Kimberlites and lamproites of Ukrainian ShieldIgc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.UKraineKirovogradian Block, Geochemistry
DS2000-1045
2000
Kryvdik, S.G.Zagnitko, V.N., Kryvdik, S.G., Parfenova, A.Y.Geochemistry, mineralogy and petrology of carbonatites of UkraineIgc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.UKraineCarbonatite, Magmatism
DS2001-0636
2001
Kryvdik, S.G.Kryvdik, S.G.Alkaline magmatism of the Ukrainian shieldAlkaline Magmatism -problems mantle source, pp. 41-51.UKraineAlkaline rocks, Magmatism
DS200512-0582
2001
Kryvdik, S.G.Kryvdik, S.G.Alkaline magmatism of the Ukrainian shield.Alkaline Magmatism and the problems of mantle sources, pp. 41-51.Europe, UkraineMagmatism
DS200512-0595
2005
Kryvdik, S.G.Kvasnytsya, V.M., Glevassky, Y.B., Kryvdik, S.G.Paleotectonic, petrological and mineralogical criteria of diamond bearing ability of the Ukrainian shield.Gems & Gemology, abstracts Mineralogical Journal (Ukraine) Vol. 26, 1, pp. 24-40. *** in English, Vol. 41, 2, Summer p. 194. abstract onlyEurope, UkraineTectonics
DS201412-0483
2014
Kryvdik, S.G.Kryvdik, S.G.Geochemical features of ilmenites from the alkaline complexes of the Ukrainian shield: LA-ICP MS data.Geochemistry International, Vol. 52, 4, pp. 287-295.Europe, UkraineCarbonatite
DS201212-0384
2012
Kryvoshhlyk, I.N.Kryvoshhlyk, I.N.Geometry of kimberites ** engKIEV Kimberlite conference, p;. 105-106. abstractGlobalComputer generated geometric distribution order
DS201511-1856
2015
KryvoshlykKryvoshlyk, IgorMathematical calculations of kimberlite diamond grade.Kryvoshlyk, 38ppt. Available ppt. Email ikryvoa481 @hotmail.comTechnologyMicrodiamonds - responses

Abstract: Diamond grade is the most important parameter of a kimberlite rock. A few hundreds of microprobe analyses of garnets picked randomly from a kimberlite concentrate might be enough to calculate mathematically accurate diamond grade.
DS201511-1857
2015
KryvoshlykKryvoshlyk, IgorKimberlite diamond grade ( actual projects and numbers)Kryvoshlyk, 18ppt. Available ppt. email ikryvoa481 @hotmail.comTechnologyMicrodiamonds - responses
DS200812-0604
2007
Kryvoshlyk, I.Kryvoshlyk, I.Kimberlite provinces of southern hemisphere.earthref.org, Sept. 1p.GlobalMap
DS200812-0605
2007
Kryvoshlyk, I.Kryvoshlyk, I.Kimberlite volcano: major characteristics and some conclusions.earthref.org, Sept. 3p.MantlePetrology
DS200812-0606
2008
Kryvoshlyk, I.Kryvoshlyk, I.Multivariate functions for the kimberlite diamond grade calculations.earthref.org, July 2, 6p.TechnologyDiamond grade
DS200812-0607
2008
Kryvoshlyk, I.Kryvoshlyk, I.Multivariate functions for the kimberlite grade calculations.available - google kryvoshlyk EarthRef email ikryvoa481 @rogers.com, 6p, overview tel 416 248-8514TechnologyDiamond grade - chemical composition of pyrope
DS200812-0608
2008
Kryvoshlyk, I.Kryvoshlyk, I.Kimberlite garnets: the complete geochemical program for exploration for diamonds.earthref.org, January, 3p.TechnologyGeochemistry
DS200812-0609
2008
Kryvoshlyk, I.Kryvoshlyk, I.Garnet and ilmenite geochemical computer programs for exploration for diamonds.earthref.org, June 8, 4p.TechnologyGeochemistry - indicators
DS200812-0610
2008
Kryvoshlyk, I.Kryvoshlyk, I.Distribution of kimberlite provinces in northern hemisphere.earthref.org, January, 1p.GlobalMap
DS200812-0611
2008
Kryvoshlyk, I.Kryvoshlyk, I.Pyroclastic nature of kimberlites. Reality and illusions.earthref.org, April, 5p.TechnologyPetrology
DS200812-0612
2008
Kryvoshlyk, I.Kryvoshlyk, I.Spiderweb - the universal diamond exploration system.earthref.org, July 21, 1p.TechnologyPetrology
DS201412-0484
2014
Kryvoshlyk, I.Kryvoshlyk, I.System of mathematical calculations of a kimberlite diamond grade.GSSA Kimberley Diamond Symposium and Trade Show provisional programme, Sept. 10-12, POSTERTechnologyEconomics
DS1998-0811
1998
Kryvoshlyk, I.N.Kryvoshlyk, I.N.Brief review of the theory of liquid immiscibility of kimberlite magma7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 473-4.Russia, YakutiaKimberlites, Autoliths
DS2003-0753
2003
Kryvoshlyk, I.N.Kryvoshlyk, I.N.Garnet and ilmenite geochemical computer programs for exploration for diamonds8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 8, POSTER abstractGlobalBlank
DS200412-1059
2003
Kryvoshlyk, I.N.Kryvoshlyk, I.N.Garnet and ilmenite geochemical computer programs for exploration for diamonds.8 IKC Program, Session 8, POSTER abstractTechnologyDiamond exploration
DS200812-0903
2008
Kryvoshlyk, I.N.Podolsky, M.H., Seller, M.H., Kryvoshlyk, I.N., Seghedi, I., Maicher, D.Whole rock geochemistry investigations of the 5034 and Tuzo kimberlites and potential applications to improving geology and resource models, Gahcho Kue project, NWTNorthwest Territories Geoscience Office, p. 72. abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Gahcho Kue
DS201312-0204
2013
Krzeminska, E.Demaiffe, D., Wiszniewska, J., Krzeminska, E., Williams, I.S., Stein, H., Brassinnes, S., Ohnenstetter, D., Deloule, E.A hidden alkaline and carbonatite province of Early Carboniferous age in northeast Poland: zircon U-Pb and pyrrhotite Re-Os geochronology.Journal of Geology, Vol. 121, 1, pp. 91-104.Europe, PolandCarbonatite
DS202009-1674
2020
Krzeminska, E.Wiszniewska, J.B., Krzeminska, E., Petecki, Z., Grababarczyk, A., Demaiffe, D.Geophysical and petrological constraints for ultramafic-alkaline-carbonatite magmatism in the Tajno intrusion, NE Poland.Goldschmidt 2020, 1p. AbstractEurope, Polandcarbonatites

Abstract: This Tajno alkaline massif (together with the nearby Elk and Pisz intrusions) occurs beneath a thick Mesozoic- Cenozoic sedimentary cover. It has first been recognized by geophysical (magnetic and gravity) investigations, then directly by deep drilling (12 boreholes down to 1800 m). The main rock types identified as clinopyroxenites, syenites, carbonatites, have been cut by later multiphase volcanic /subvolcanic dykes. This massif was characterized as a differentiated ultramafic, alkaline and carbonatite complex, quite comparable to the numerous massifs of the Late Devonian Kola Province of NW Russia [1,2]. Recent geochronological data (U-Pb on zircon from an albitite and Re-Os on pyrrhotite from a carbonatite) indicate that the massif was emplaced at ca. 348 Ma (Early Carboniferous). All the rocks, but more specifically the carbonatites, are enriched in Sr, Ba and LREE, like many carbonatites worldwide but depleted in high field strength elements (Ti, Nb, Ta, Zr). The initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.70370 to 0.70380) and eNd(t) (+3.3 to +0.7) isotopic compositions of carbonatites plot in the depleted quadrant of the Nd-Sr diagram, close to “FOcal ZOne” (FOZO) deep mantle domain [1]. The Pb isotopic data (206Pb/204Pb <18.50) do not point to an HIMU (high U/Pb) source. The ranges of C and O stable isotopic compositions of the carbonatites are quite large; some data plot in (or close to) the “Primary Igneous Carbonatite” box while others extend to much higher, typically crustal d18O and d13C values.
DS201805-0990
2018
Krzemnicki, M.S.Wang, H.A.O., Cartier, L.E., Baumgartner, L.P., Bouvier, A-S., Begue, F., Chalain, J-P., Krzemnicki, M.S.A preliminary SIMS study using carbon isotopes to separate natural from synthetic diamonds.Journal of Gemmology, Vol. 36, 1, pp. 38-43.Technologysynthetics
DS201810-2300
2018
Krzemnicki, M.S.Cartier, L.E., Ali, S.H., Krzemnicki, M.S.Blockchain, chain of custody and trace elements: an overview of tracking and traceability opportunities in the gem industry.The Journal of Gemmology, Vol. 36, 3, pp. 212-227.Globalblockchain terminology
DS201901-0012
2018
Krzemnicki, M.S.Cartier, L.E., Ali, S.H., Krzemnicki, M.S.Blockchain, chain of custody and trace elements: an overview of tracking and traceability opoortunities in the gem industry.Journal of Gemmology, Vol. 36, 3, pp. 212-227.Globalblockchain

Abstract: Dr. Laurent Cartier and Dr. Saleem Ali of the Knowledge Hub recently co-authored an overview article on traceability in the gem and jewellery industry. This paper was published in the Journal of Gemmology and is entitled 'Blockchain, Chain of Custody and Trace Elements: An Overview of Tracking and Traceability Opportunities in the Gem Industry'. Recent developments have brought due diligence, along with tracking and traceability, to the forefront of discussions and requirements in the diamond, coloured stone and pearl industries. This article provides an overview of current trends and developments in the tracking and traceability of gems, along with an explanation of the terms used in this context. Further, the article discusses current initiatives in the sector and provides an introduction blockchain concepts.
DS200812-0613
2007
Krzyzanowska, J.Krzyzanowska,J.The impact of mixed fleet hauling on mining operations at Venetia mine.Journal of South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 107, 4, pp. 215-224.Africa, South AfricaMining
DS1930-0305
1939
Ksanda, C.J.Ksanda, C.J., Henderson, E.P.Identification of Diamond in the Canon Diablo IronAmerican MINERALOGIST., Vol. 24, PP. 677-680.United States, Arizona, Colorado PlateauMeteorite
DS201901-0050
2018
Ksenofontov, D.A.Ogorodova, L.P., Gritsenko, Y.D., Vigasina, M.F., Bychkov, A.Y., Ksenofontov, D.A., Melchakova, L.V.Thermodynamic properties of natural melilites.American Mineralogist, Vol. 103, pp. 1945-1952.Mantlemineralogy

Abstract: In the present study, four samples of natural melilites were characterized using electron microprobe analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, and Raman spectroscopy, and their thermodynamic properties were measured with a high-temperature heat-flux Tian-Calvet microcalorimeter. The enthalpies of formation from the elements were determined to be: -3796.3 ± 4.1 kJ/mol for Ca1.8Na0.2(Mg0.7Al0.2Fe2+0.1?)Si2O7, -3753.6 ± 5.2 kJ/mol for Ca1.6Na0.4(Mg0.5Al0.4Fe2+0.1?)Si2O7, -3736.4 ± 3.7 kJ/mol for Ca1.6Na0.4(Mg0.4Al0.4Fe2+0.2?)Si2O7, and -3929.2 ± 3.8 kJ/mol for Ca2(Mg0.4Al0.6)[Si1.4Al0.6O7]. Using the obtained formation enthalpies and estimated entropies, the standard Gibbs free energies of formation of these melilites were calculated. Finally, the enthalpies of the formation of the end-members of the isomorphic åkermanite-gehlenite and åkermanite-alumoåkermanite series were derived. The obtained thermodynamic properties of melilites of different compositions can be used for quantitative modeling of formation conditions of these minerals in related geological and industrial processes.
DS2000-0541
2000
Kuamgai, I.Kuamgai, I., Kurita, K.On the fate of mantle plumes at density interfacesEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 179, No. 1, June 15, pp.63-72.MantlePlumes, Zones
DS2003-0754
2003
Kuang, S.Kuang, S., Zhang, B.Crust mantle interaction in Dabie Orogenic belt, central China: geochemical evidenceChinese Journal of Geochemistry, Vol. 22, 3, pp. 231-43.ChinaUHP
DS200412-1060
2003
Kuang, S.Kuang, S., Zhang, B.Crust mantle interaction in Dabie Orogenic belt, central China: geochemical evidence from late Cretaceous basalts.Chinese Journal of Geochemistry, Vol. 22, 3, pp. 231-43.ChinaUHP
DS2001-0637
2001
Kuang, W.Kuang, W., Chao, B.F.Topographic core mantle coupling in geodynamo modelingGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 28, No. 9, May 1, pp. 1871-4.MantleModel - geodynamics, tectonics, Topography
DS201412-0485
2014
Kuang, X.Kuang, X., Jiao, J.J.An integrated permeability - depth model for Earth's crust.Geophysics Research Letters, Vol. 41, pp. 7539-7545.MantleGeophsyics - seismics
DS200612-1206
2006
KubaSakai, T., Kondo, T., Ohtani, E., Terasaki, H., Miyahara, Yoo, Endo, Kuba, Suzuki, KikegawaWetting property at the core mantle boundary and core signature in plume source region.International Mineralogical Association 19th. General Meeting, held Kobe, Japan July 23-28 2006, Abstract p. 129.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS1988-0300
1988
kuba, C.Herzberg, C., Feigenson, M., kuba, C., Ohtani, E.Majorite fractionation recorded in the geochemistry of peridotites from South AfricaNature, Vol. 332, No. 6167, April 28, pp. 823-826South AfricaBlank
DS200612-1205
2006
Kuba, T.Sakai, T., Kondo, T., Ohtain, E., Terasaki, H., Endo, N., Kuba, T., Suzuki, T., Kikegawa, T.Interaction between iron and post perovskite at core mantle boundary and core signature in plume source region.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 33, 15, August 16, L15317MantleGeophysics - seismics, boundary
DS201212-0019
2012
Kuberek, N.T.Araujo, D.P., Weska, R.K., Correa, R.S., Valadao, L.V., Kuberek, N.T., Suvorova, L.F.The kimberlite Juina-5 Brazil: textural and xenocryst chemistry.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractSouth America, BrazilDeposit - Juina-5
DS1991-0705
1991
Kubicki, J.D.Hemley, R.J., Kubicki, J.D.Mineral physics: deep mantle meltingNature, Vol. 349. No. 6307, January 24, p. 283GlobalMantle, Physics
DS201908-1784
2019
Kubinova, S.Kubinova, S., Wali Faryad, S.Mineral textures of olivine minette and their significance for crystallization history of parental magma: an example from the Moldanubian zone ( the Bohemian Massif).Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 113, 4, pp. 477-491.Europeminette

Abstract: One of the best-preserved dykes of olivine minette among the lamprophyre dyke swarm in the Moldanubian Zone of the Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic) was investigated. The minette, exposed at Horní Kožlí Village (near Prachatice town), has porphyric texture with phenocrysts of olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and biotite in a fine-grained matrix consisting of K-feldspar, biotite, clinopyroxene and minor plagioclase and quartz. Accessory minerals are apatite, Cr-rich spinel and iron sulphides. Olivine is mostly replaced by talc and rimmed by two zones (coronas) - a talc-rich inner zone and a biotite-rich outer zone. Rarely, larger grains of quartz with a corona of clinopyroxene are present. The clinopyroxene grows mostly perpendicular to the quartz rim and radially penetrates the quartz crystal. Three stages of mineral crystallization were distinguished. The first stage with apatite, olivine, biotite, spinel, orthopyroxene and part of the clinopyroxene occurred in the mantle position. During the second stage, felsic phases (K-feldspar, plagioclase, quartz) in the matrix were crystallized. The enrichment of the residual melt by silica and Na occurred as the result of both fractionation and contamination during magma ascent through the granulite facies crust during post-collision orogeny in the Bohemian Massif. Minerals related to the third stage were formed during filling of the vesicles (quartz with reaction rims of clinopyroxene) and subsequent alteration (talc after olivine). The origin of quartz with clinopyroxene reaction rims (‘quartz ocelli’) is explained by filling of cavities formed by the escape of volatiles.
DS2001-0850
2001
KuboOhtani, E., Toma, Litasov, Kubo, SuzukiStability of dense hydrous magnesium silicate phases and water storage capacity in transition zone -Physical Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 124, No. 1-2, pp. 105-117.MantleSlab melting, water
DS1998-0812
1998
Kubo, A.Kubo, A., Hiramatsu, Y.On presence of seismic anisotropy in the asthenosphere beneath continents and its dependence - plate velocityPure and Applied Geophys., Vol. 151, No. 2-4, Mar. 1, pp. 281-305.MantleGeophysics - seismics, Geodynamics
DS2000-0542
2000
Kubo, A.Kubo, A., Akaogi, M.Post garnet transitions in the system up to 28 Gpas: phase relations of garnet, ilmenite and perovskite.Physical Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 121, No. 1-2, pp.85-102.GlobalGarnets, Perovskite
DS2002-0808
2002
Kubo, A.Kamon, T., Fujino, K., Miura, H., Kubo, A., Katsura, T., Ito, E.Phase relations and structure variations in Ca Ti O3 Ca SiO3 perovskite18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.76.MantleUHP mineralogy - perovskite
DS200412-2075
2004
Kubo, A.Walter, M.J., Kubo, A., Yoshino, T., Brodholt, J., Koga, K.T., Ohishi, Y.Phase relations and equation of state aluminous Mg silicate perovskite and implications for Earth's lower mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 222, 2, pp. 501-516.MantlePerovskite
DS200712-0981
2007
Kubo, A.Shim, S-H., Kubo, A., Duffy, T.S.Raman spectroscopy of perovskite and post-perovskite phases of MgGeO3 to 123 GPa.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 260, 1-2, pp. 166-178.MantlePerovskite
DS200712-0982
2007
Kubo, A.Shim, S-H., Kubo, A., Duffy, T.S.Raman spectroscopy of perovskite and post-perovskite phases of MgGeO3 to 123 GPa.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 260, 1-2, pp. 166-178.MantlePerovskite
DS200812-0301
2008
Kubo, A.Duffy, T.S., Kubo, A., Shieh, S., Dorfman, S., Prakapenka, V.High pressure phases in the MgO FeO Al2O3 SiO2 system: implications for the deep mantle.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A230.MantlePetrology
DS1984-0436
1984
Kubo, K.Kubo, K., Satoh, H.Petrology of Lamphrophyre in the Urakawa Area, Hokkaido, Japan.Journal of Geological Society JAPAN., Vol. 90, No. 10, PP. 717-731.JapanPetrography, Chemical Analyses, Monchoquite, Miocene Age
DS2003-0823
2003
Kubo, T.Litasov, K., Ohtani, E., Langenhorst, F., Yurimoto, H., Kubo, T., Kondo, T.Water solubility in Mg perovskites and water storage capacity in the lower mantleEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 211, 1-2, June 15, pp. 189-203.MantleWater storage
DS2003-0824
2003
Kubo, T.Litasov, K., Ohtani, E., Langenhorst, F., Yurimoto, H., Kubo, T., Kondo, T.Water solubility in Mg perovskites and water storage capacity in the lower mantleEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 211, 1-2, pp. 189-203.MantleBlank
DS200412-1144
2003
Kubo, T.Litasov, K., Ohtani, E., Langenhorst, F., Yurimoto, H., Kubo, T., Kondo, T.Water solubility in Mg perovskites and water storage capacity in the lower mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 211, 1-2, June 15, pp. 189-203.MantleWater storage
DS200612-0519
2006
Kubo, T.Hae, R., Ohtani, E., Kubo, T., Koyama, T., Utada, H.Hydrogen diffusivity in wadsleyite and water distribution in the mantle transition zone.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 243,1-2, Mar. 15, pp. 141-148.MantleIR spectroscopy
DS200612-0601
2005
Kubo, T.Hosoya, T., Kubo, T., Ohtaini, E., Sano, A., Funakoshi, K.Water controls the fields of metastable olivine in cold subducting slabs.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 32, 17, Sept. 16, pp.Li7305-06.MantleSubduction
DS200612-1221
2006
Kubo, T.Sano, A., Ohtani, E., Litasov, K., Kubo, T., Hosoya, T., Funakoshi, K., Kikegawa, T.In situ x-ray diffraction study of the effect of water on the garnet perovksite transformation in MORB and implications for the penetration of oceanic crust...Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 159, 1-2, pp. 118-126.MantleWater in lower mantle
DS200712-0583
2007
Kubo, T.Kubo, T.Kinetics of high pressure transformations in Earth's mantle minerals.Review of High Pressure Science and Technology, Japan Society of High Pressure Science, Vol. 17, 2, pp. 159-172.MantleMineralogy
DS200812-0799
2008
Kubo, T.Nishi, M., Kato, T., Kubo, T., Kikegawa, T.Survival of pyropic garnet in subducting plates.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 170-3-4, Nov. pp. 274-280.MantleSubduction
DS200812-0800
2008
Kubo, T.Nishi, M., Kato, T., Kubo, T., Kikegawa, T.Survival of pyropic garnet in subducting plates.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, in press available, 31p.MantleSubduction - garnets
DS201312-0653
2013
Kubo, T.Nishi, M., Kubo, T., Ohfuji, H., Kato, T., Nishihara, Y., Irifune, T.Slow Si-Al interdiffusion in garnet and stagnation of subducting slabs.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 361, pp. 44-49.MantleSubduction
DS201610-1890
2016
Kubo, T.Nagayoshi, M., Kubo, T., Kato, T.Experimental investigation of the kinetics of the spinel to garnet transformation in peridotite: a preliminary study.American Mineralogist, Vol. 101, pp. 2020-2028.TechnologyReaction rim, UHP

Abstract: To study the kinetics of the spinel-to-garnet transformation in peridotite, we conducted reaction experiments in the garnet peridotite stability field (3.2 GPa, 1020-1220 °C, for 0.6-30 h) using a single spinel crystal embedded in monomineralic orthopyroxene powder or in a mixture of powdered orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene. The growth textures observed in the reaction rim between the spinel crystal and the polycrystalline pyroxenes show that the reaction rim grew in both the spinel and pyroxenes directions, suggesting mobility of both SiO2 and R2O3 components (where R is a trivalent cation). Olivine grains formed only in the presence of monomineralic orthopyroxene and were present in some domains without forming reaction rims. Based on a diffusion-controlled growth model, the growth kinetics of the garnet reaction rim can be described by [x(t)]2 = k0 exp(-H*/RT)t, where x(t) is the rim width at time t, R is the gas constant, T is the absolute temperature, and H* is the activation enthalpy of reaction; k0 and H* are, respectively, k0 = 10-19.8 ± 4.9 m2/s and H* = 171 ± 58 kJ/mol. The development of a garnet reaction rim around a spinel core has been observed in alpine-type peridotitic rocks and mantle xenoliths. The reaction rims experimentally produced in this study are characteristic of corona textures observed in natural rocks, and the experimentally measured growth rate of the rims places important constraints on dynamic transformation processes involving spinel and garnet in peridotite. However, to reconstruct the P-T-t history of the corona texture based on these elementary processes, additional detailed studies on the textural evolution and quantitative kinetics of the garnet-rim growth stage are required.
DS1989-0833
1989
Kubovics, I.Kubovics, I., Szabo, C., Solymos, K.Geochemistry of phlogophites in ultramafic xenoliths of lamprophyre dikes (Alcusutdoboz Hungary)Neues Jahrbuch Fur Mineralogie Abhandlungen, Vol. 161, No. 2, October pp. 171-191HungaryGeochemistry, Lamprophyres
DS1990-0886
1990
Kubyshev, A.I.Kravchenko, S.M., Belyakov, A.Yu., Kubyshev, A.I., Tolstov, A.V.Scandium rare earth yttrium niobium ores - a new economic resourceInternational Geology Review, Vol. 32, No. 3, March pp. 280-284BrazilCarbonatite, Rare earths Araxa
DS1997-0488
1997
Kucera, R.E.Hausel, W.D., Kucera, R.E., McCandless, T.E., GregoryDiamond exploration potential of the Wyoming craton, western USA ... extends into southernmost Alberta.Wyom. Geol. Association Guidebook, No. 48, pp. 139-176.Alberta, Wyoming, SaskatchewanCraton - brieg mention of Wyoming province
DS1998-0597
1998
Kucera, R.E.Hausel, W.D., Kucera, R.E., McCandless, T.E., GregoryMantle derived diatremes in the southern Green River Basin, Wyoming, USA7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 320-1.WyomingDiatremes, Deposit - Cedar Mountain
DS1996-0254
1996
Kucerova, L.Cermak, V., Safanda, J., Kresl, M., Kucerova, L.Heat flow studies in central Europe with special emphasis on dat a from former CzechoslovakiaGlobal Tectonics and Metallogeny, Vol. 5, No. 3-4, p. 109-123GlobalHeat Flow project, volcanism.
DS200512-0036
2004
KuchkinAshchepkov, I.V., Vladykin, Rotman, Loginova, Afanasiev, Palessky, Saprykin, Anoshin, Kuchkin, KhmelnikovaMir and Internationalnaya kimberlite pipes - trace element geochemistry and thermobarometry of mantle minerals.Deep seated magmatism, its sources and their relation to plume processes., pp. 194-208.RussiaGeobarometry - Mir, International
DS200612-0046
2005
KuchkinAshchepkov, I.V., Vladykin, Rotman, Afansiev, Loginova, Kuchkin, Palessky, Nikolaeva, Saprykin, AnoshinVariations of the mantle mineralogy and structure beneath Upper - Muna kimberlite field.Problems of Sources of Deep Magmatism and Plumes., pp. 170-187.RussiaMineralogy
DS200512-0034
2004
Kuchkin, A.Ashchepkov, I.V., Vladykin, N.V., Rotman, A.Y., Loginova, A.M., Nikolaeva, L.A., Palessky, V.S., Saprykin, A.I., Anoshin, G.N., Kuchkin, A., Khmelnikova, O.S.Reconstructions of the mantle layering beneath the Alakite kimberlite field: comparative characteristics of the mineral geochemistry and TP sequences.Deep seated magmatism, its sources and their relation to plume processes., pp. 160-177.RussiaGeochemistry - Alakite
DS1990-1456
1990
Kuchs, R.P.Teskey, D.J., Dods, S.D., Kuchs, R.P.New high resolution aeromagnetic survey of Lake Superior- a contribution to the Great Lakes International multidisciplinary program on crustal evolutionGLIMPCE.Geological Association of Canada (GAC)/Mineralogical Association of Canada (MAC) Vancouver 90 Program with Abstracts, Held May 16-18, Vol. 15, p. A129.. AbstractMidcontinentGeophysics -aeromagnetics, GLIMPCE.
DS1985-0119
1985
Kuchuk, V.I.Chernobe, YM., Kuchuk, V.I., Klochkov, O.V., Golikova, E.V.Influence of Temperature on the Coagulation of Natural Diamond Suspensions.Colloid Journal, Vol. 47, No. 2, MAR-APRIL PP. 361-362.RussiaBlank
DS1985-0373
1985
Kuchuk, V.I.Kuchuk, V.I., Golikova, E.V., Chernoberezhakii, YU.M.Potentiometric Titration of a Natural Diamond MicropowderColloid Journal, Vol. 46, No. 6, PP. 982-987.GlobalDiamond Properties
DS1989-0260
1989
Kuchuk, V.I.Chernobe, Y.M., Kuchuk, V.I., et al.Temperature dependence of stability of natural diamond dispersions inALCL3 solutions.(technical note).(Russian)V. Lenin Fiz., (russian), Vol. 1, Feb, pp. 103-106GlobalNatural diamond, Diamond morphology
DS2002-0459
2002
KucksFinn, C.A., Pilkington, M., Miles, Hernadez, Cuevas, Velez, Sweeney, KucksThe new North American magnetic anomaly mapGeological Society of America Annual Meeting Oct. 27-30, Abstract p. 387.United States, CanadaMap - magnetic
DS200612-0675
2006
KucksKeller, G.R., Hildenbrand, Kucks, Webring, Briesacher, Rujawitz, Hittleman, Roman, Winester, Aldouri et al.A community effort to construct a gravity database for the United States and an associated Web portal.In: Sinha, A.K. Geoinformatics: data to knowledge, GSA Special Paper, 397, 397, pp.21-34 rUnited StatesGeophysics - gravity data
DS1980-0174
1980
Kucks, R.P.Hildenbrand, T.G., Kucks, R.P., Kane, M.F., Hendricks, J.D.Aeromagnetic Map and Associated Depth Map of the Upper Mississippi Embayment Region.United States Geological Survey (USGS) miscellaneous FIELD MAP, No. MF-1158, 1: 1, 000, 000.GlobalMid-continent
DS1990-0210
1990
Kucks, R.P.Blank, H.R., Kucks, R.P.Preliminary aeromagnetic, gravity and generalized geologic maps of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Basin and Range-Colorado plateau transition zone study area in southwestUtah, NevadaUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 89-0432, 16p. 3 oversize sheets 1: 250, 000Colorado Plateau, UtahGeophysics -magnetics, gravity, Map
DS1991-1711
1991
Kucks, R.P.Teskey, D.J., Thomas, M.D., Gibb, R.A., Dods, S.D., Kucks, R.P.High resolution aeromagnetic survey of Lake SuperiorEos, Vol. 72, No. 8, February 19, p. 81, 85, 86Ontario, MichiganBlank
DS1999-0503
1999
Kudari, S.A.D.Nayak, S.S., Kudari, S.A.D.Search for kimberlites in Kalyandurg block, Anantapur district, Andhra Pradesh and Bellary and Tumkur districts.Geological Society of India Records, Vol. 132,5, pp.35-39.India, KarnatakaKimberlite
DS200412-1414
2001
Kudari, S.A.K.Nayak, S.S., Rao, K.R.P., Kudari, S.A.K., Ravi, S.Geology and tectonic setting of kimberlites and lamproites of southern India.Geological Society of India Special Publication, No.58, pp. 603-613.IndiaTectonics
DS200612-0968
2001
Kudati, S.A.D.Nayak, S.S., Rao, K.R.P., Kudati, S.A.D., Ravi, S.Geology and tectonic setting of the kimberlites and lamproites of southern India. Wajrakarur, Natayanpet, Dharwar Craton, Chigicherla.National Seminar on Exploration Survey, Geological Society of India Special Publication, No. 58, pp. 567-575.India, Andhra PradeshTectonics
DS200812-1287
2008
Kudi, Y.Yamaguchi, H., Salto, I., Kudi, Y., Masuzawa, T., Yamada, T., Kudo, M., Takakuma, Y., Okano, K.Electron emission mechanism of hydrogeneated natural type IIb diamond (111).Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 17, 2, pp. 162-166.TechnologyType II diamonds
DS200612-0421
2006
Kudin, A.Galimov, E., Kudin, A., Skorobogatskii, V., Plotnichenko, V., Bondarev, O., Zarubin, B., Strazdovskii, V., Aronin, A., Fisenko, A., Bykov, I., Barinov, A.Experimental corrobation of the synthesis of diamond in the cavitation process.Doklady Physical Chemistry, Vol. 49, 3, pp. 150-153.TechnologyDiamond synthesis
DS1991-0191
1991
Kudjavtseva, G.P.Bulanova, B., Varlamov, D.A., Garanin, V.K., Kudjavtseva, G.P.Chemico-genetic classification of the most important minerals-satellites Of the diamondProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 490-491RussiaMineral chemistry, Genesis
DS1988-0203
1988
Kudo, A.M.Erskine, D.B., Brookins, D.G., Kudo, A.M., Ward, D.B.Geochemistry of rocks with absarokititc and shoshoniti caffinities From the Absaroka volcanic field, WyomingGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstract Volume, Vol. 20, No. 3, February p. 159. AbstractWyomingBlank
DS200812-1286
2008
Kudo, M.Yamaguchi, H.,Kudo, Y., Masuzawa, T., Kudo, M., Yamada, Takakuwa, OkanoCombine x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy/ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy/field emission spectroscopy for characterization of electron emmision of diamond.Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology B Microelectronics and Nanometer Structures, Vol. 26, 2, pp. 730-734. American Vacuum SocietyTechnologyDiamond emission
DS200812-1287
2008
Kudo, M.Yamaguchi, H., Salto, I., Kudi, Y., Masuzawa, T., Yamada, T., Kudo, M., Takakuma, Y., Okano, K.Electron emission mechanism of hydrogeneated natural type IIb diamond (111).Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 17, 2, pp. 162-166.TechnologyType II diamonds
DS200812-1286
2008
Kudo, Y.Yamaguchi, H.,Kudo, Y., Masuzawa, T., Kudo, M., Yamada, Takakuwa, OkanoCombine x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy/ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy/field emission spectroscopy for characterization of electron emmision of diamond.Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology B Microelectronics and Nanometer Structures, Vol. 26, 2, pp. 730-734. American Vacuum SocietyTechnologyDiamond emission
DS201212-0385
2012
Kudo, Y.Kudo, Y., Hirose, K.,Murakami, M., Asahara, Y., Ozawa, H., Ohishi, Y., Hirao, N.Sound velocity measurements of CaSiO3 perovskite to 133 Gpa an implications for lowermost mantle seismic anomalies.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 349-350 pp. 1-7.MantlePerovskite
DS1996-0611
1996
Kudoh, Y.Hassan, I., Kudoh, Y., Ito, E.MgSiO3 perovskite: a HRTEM studyMineralogical Magazine, Vol. 60, No. 5, Oct 1, pp. 799-804.GlobalPerovskite
DS200612-0747
2006
Kudrayvtseva, G.P.Kudrayvtseva, G.P., Posukhova, T.V., Polazchenko, O.Diamonds from the V Grib pipe: internal structure and origin.International Mineralogical Association 19th. General Meeting, held Kobe, Japan July 23-28 2006, Abstract p. 140.RussiaGrip - diamond morphology
DS1998-0148
1998
KudriavtsevaBovkun, A.V., Garanin, V.K., Kudriavtseva, PossuklovaChemical genetic classification of microcrystalline oxides from kimberlite groundmass - system prospecting7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 91-93.Russia, Arkangelsk, Kola PeninsulaMicroprobe analyses, Deposit - Zolitskoye, Verkhotinskoye, Kepinskoye, Touri
DS1998-0149
1998
KudriavtsevaBovkun, A.V., Garanin, V.K., Kudriavtseva, PossuklovaDiamonds from Timan placers: morphology, spectroscopy and genesis7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 97-99.Russia, TimanPLacers, alluvials, Diamond morphology - types
DS1998-0150
1998
KudriavtsevaBovkun, A.V., Garanin, V.K., Kudriavtseva, PossuklovaChemical genetic classification of oxides from kimberlite groundmass as basis - evaluation of diamond7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 94-96.Russia, Yakutia, AikalHigh magnesian - spinels, Deposit - Obnazhenna, Mir, Udachnaya, Morkokka
DS1982-0215
1982
Kudriavtseva, G.P.Garanin, V.K., Kudriavtseva, G.P., et al.A New Variety of Eclogites in Yakutian KimberlitesDoklady Academy of Sciences Nauk SSSR., Vol. 262 , No. 6, PP. 1450-1455.RussiaKimberlite
DS1983-0240
1983
Kudriavtseva, G.P.Garanin, V.K., Kudriavtseva, G.P., Soshkina, L.T.Genesis of Ilmenite from KimberlitesDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 172, No. 1-6, MARCH PP. 102-106.RussiaGenesis, Petrography, Mineralogy
DS1998-0467
1998
Kudriavtseva, G.P.Garanin, V.K., Kudriavtseva, G.P.Diamonds from the M.V. Lomonosov deposit, Arkangelsk diamondiferousprovince.Ima 17th. Abstract Vol., p. A15. poster abstractRussia, Arkangelsk, Kola PeninsulaDiamond morphology, Deposit - Lomonosov
DS1998-0468
1998
Kudriavtseva, G.P.Garanin, V.K., Kudriavtseva, G.P., Possukhova, T.V.Diamonds of Arkhangelsk kimberlite province ( review)7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 233-235.Russia, Arkangelsk, Kola PeninsulaDiamond morphology, Deposit - Lomonosov
DS1998-0469
1998
Kudriavtseva, G.P.Garanin, V.K., Kudriavtseva, G.P., Vasilyeva, E.R.The fundamental study of garnets: application for prospecting and economical estimation - diamond bearing7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 236-8.Russia, Arkangelsk, Kola PeninsulaGarnet mineralogy, Deposit - Zolitsky, Verkhotinsky
DS1990-0258
1990
KudrjavtsevaBusheva, E.B., Vasiljeva, E.R., Garanin, V.K., KudrjavtsevaMineralogy of kimberlites of the northern European part of the USSRInternational Mineralogical Association Meeting Held June, 1990 Beijing China, Vol. 2, extended abstract p. 786-788RussiaKimberlites, Mineralogy
DS1994-0820
1994
KudrjavtsevaJacob, D., Jagoutz, E., Lowry, D., Mattey, D., KudrjavtsevaDiamondiferous eclogites from Siberia: remnants of Archean oceanic crustGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 58, 23, pp. 5191-207.Russia, SiberiaEclogites, Deposit -Udachnaya
DS1990-0520
1990
Kudrjavtseva, G.P.Garanin, V.K., Zhiljaeva, V.A., Kudrjavtseva, G.P., MikhailichenkoMineralogy of ferrimagnetic oxides and magnetic properties of Kimberlites and lamproitesInternational Mineralogical Association Meeting Held June, 1990 Beijing China, Vol. 1, extended abstract p. 29-30RussiaMineralogy -oxides, Lamproites, kimberlites
DS1990-0521
1990
Kudrjavtseva, G.P.Garanin, V.K., Zhukov, G.D., Kudrjavtseva, G.P., Laverova, T.N.Mineralogy of garnets with inclusions from Sitikanskaja kimberlite pipeInternational Mineralogical Association Meeting Held June, 1990 Beijing China, Vol. 2, extended abstract p. 799-801RussiaMineralogy -garnets, Sitikanskaja
DS1990-1505
1990
Kudrjavtseva, G.P.Varlamov, D.A., Garanin, V.K., Kudrjavtseva, G.P.Mineral inclusions in high grade metamorphism garnetsInternational Mineralogical Association Meeting Held June, 1990 Beijing China, Vol. 2, extended abstract p. 896-897RussiaMicroscopy, Diamond inclusions
DS1991-0114
1991
Kudrjavtseva, G.P.Bezborodov, S.M., Garanin, V.K., Kudrjavtseva, G.P., Schepina, N.A.The pecularities of the mineral composition of the diamond bearing eclogites from the Udachnaya kimberlite pipeProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 481-483RussiaDiamond morphology, Garnet composition
DS1991-0137
1991
Kudrjavtseva, G.P.Bogatikov, O.A., Garanin, V.K., Kononova, K.A., Kudrjavtseva, G.P.Ore minerals from the lamproite ground massProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 484-485Russia, Australia, SpainOxide mineral chemistry, Diamond evaluation
DS1991-0532
1991
Kudrjavtseva, G.P.Garanin, V.K., Kudrjavtseva, G.P.New technology of the searching of the diamond bearing kimberlites methodological basis and fields of applicationsProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 505-507RussiaDiamond evaluation, Diamond genesis
DS1991-0533
1991
Kudrjavtseva, G.P.Garanin, V.K., Kudrjavtseva, G.P., Laverova, T.N.The comparative characteristics of ilmenite from the kimberlite Provinces of the USSRProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 508-509RussiaIlmenite, Mineral chemistry
DS1991-0534
1991
Kudrjavtseva, G.P.Garanin, V.K., Kudrjavtseva, G.P., Michailichchenko, O.A.Mineralogy of oxides from the ground mass of kimberlites of Yakutia and northern European part of the USSRProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 510-512RussiaMineralogy, Oxides
DS1991-0936
1991
Kudrjavtseva, G.P.Kudrjavtseva, G.P., Bushueva, E.B., Vasiljeva, E.R., Verichev, E.M.Geological structure and mineralogy of the kimberlites of the Archangelsk kimberlite provinceProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 530-532RussiaDiatremes, Structure
DS1994-0958
1994
Kudrjavtseva, G.P.Kudrjavtseva, G.P., Garanin, V.K.New dat a on the internal structure of diamond and its genesisInstitute of Mining and Metallurgy (IMM) Bulletin, Economic Geology in Europe and Beyond- abstracts of meeting, p. B196, abstract only.GlobalDiamond morphology
DS1987-0235
1987
Kudrryavtseva, G.P.Garanin, V.K., Kudrryavtseva, G.P., Marakushev, A.A., CherenkovaA new variety of deep seated high alumin a rock in kimberlite pipesInternational Geology Review, Vol. 29, No. 11, November pp. 1366-1376RussiaFerroalkremite, analyses, Anabar region
DS201906-1356
2019
Kudryatsev, A.Vasilev, E., Petrovsky, V., Kozlov, A., Antonov, A., Kudryatsev, A., Orekhova, K.The story of one diamond: the heterogeneous distribution of the optical centres within a diamond crystal from the Ichetju placer, northern Urals.Mineralogical Magazine, in press availableRussia, Uralsdiamond crystallography

Abstract: We have investigated a diamond crystal that consists of several misorientated subgrains. The main feature of the crystal is the dark in the cathodoluminescence core that has “estuary-like” boundaries extending along the subgrain interfaces. The core has more than 3100 ppm of nitrogen, and the share of the B form is more than 95%; the absorbance of the centre N3VH at 3107 cm -1 reaches 75 cm-1. The N3 centre’s absorbance, as well as N3 luminescence, is absent in the core. In the outer part of the crystal, the bright blue luminescence of the N3 centre is registered, and the N3 absorbance reaches 5.3 cm-1. These observations may be explained by the conversion of N3 centres to N3VH after attaching a hydrogen atom. After the full conversion of the N3 centres, the diamond becomes darker under CL. We hypothesize the dark core has a specific shape due to the post-growth diffusion of the hydrogen.