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SDLRC - Scientific Articles all years by Author - N


The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation
The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation is compiled by Patricia Sheahan who publishes on a monthly basis a list of new scientific articles related to diamonds as well as media coverage and corporate announcementscalled the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service that is distributed as a free pdf to a list of followers. Pat has kindly agreed to allow her work to be made available as an online digital resource at Kaiser Research Online so that a broader community interested in diamonds and related geology can benefit. The references are for personal use information purposes only; when available a link is provided to an online location where the full article can be accessed or purchased directly. Reproduction of this compilation in part or in whole without permission from the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is strictly prohibited. Return to Diamond Resource Center
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Media/Corporate References by Name for all years
A B C D-Diam Diamonds Diamr+ E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Tips for Users
Posted/Published Reference CodesThe SDLRC provides 3 types of references identified in the reference code. DS for scientific article, DM for a media article, and DC for a corporate announcement. Consider DS0512-0001. The DS stands for "diamond scientific". 05 stands for 2005, the year the reference was posted. 12 represents the month the reference was posted. For all years prior to 2015 the default month is 12. -0001 is the reference's identifier and it does not mean anything. The number below the refence code, ie 2015, is the year the article was published. Note that the posted year may sometimes be later than the published year.
Sort OrderReferences are sorted by the "author" name and when the reference was posted to the compilation.
Most RecentIf the reference code is highlighted yellow, the reference was made available through the most recent monthly compilation of new literature. Use this to check out new references. When new references are posted, we make it our priority to track down an online link and obtain an abstract. With regard to older references, tracking down an abstract and an online link is a work in progress.
Link to external location of article: If the title has a link, it means we have found a location online where you can either retrieve the full article free, or purchase access to it. The Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is not a technical article procurement service; if you want a restricted article, you must deal directly with the vendor who controls the copyright to the article.
Searching this page for a specific term or authorIn your Firefox browser click Edit in the menu bar and then Find. In the Find box that shows up at the bottom of the web page enter your search term. Firefox will highlight all occurrences. This is particularly helpful when the author you are seeking was not the lead author by whom the compilation is sorted.
Sending or sharing a referenceThe left column (Posted/Published) has an embedded hyperlink for each reference. In Firefox, if you right click on it, you can obtain the link url for that reference's location within the page, which you can copy and paste into an email or any other document. You can also use the "share this link" option to tweet, facebook etc the link.
Author Index
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years - N
Posted/
Published
AuthorTitleSourceRegionKeywords
DS202001-0017
2019
NHuang, C., Zhang, N, Li, Z.X., Dang, Z.Modeling the inception of supercontinent breakup: stress state and the importance of orogens.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, in press available pdf 20p.Globalgeodynamics

Abstract: The relative significance of various geodynamic mechanisms that drive supercontinent breakup is unclear. A previous analysis of extensional stress during supercontinent breakup demonstrated the importance of the plume-push force relative to the dragging force of subduction retreat. Here, we extend the analysis to basal traction (shear stress) and cross-lithosphere integrations of both extensional and shear stresses, aiming to understand more clearly the relevant importance of these mechanisms in supercontinent breakup. More importantly, we evaluate the effect of preexisting orogens (mobile belts) in the lithosphere on supercontinent breakup process. Our analysis suggests that a homogeneous supercontinent has extensional stress of 20-50 MPa in its interior (<40° from the central point). When orogens are introduced, the extensional stress in the continents focuses on the top 80-km of the lithosphere with an average magnitude of ~160 MPa, whereas at the margin of the supercontinent the extensional stress is 5-50 MPa. In both homogeneous and orogeny-embedded cases, the subsupercontinent mantle upwellings act as the controlling factor on the normal stress field in the supercontinent interior. Compared with the extensional stress, shear stress at the bottom of the supercontinent is 1-2 order of magnitude smaller (0-5 MPa). In our two end-member models, the breakup of a supercontinent with orogens can be achieved after the first extensional stress surge, whereas for a hypothetical supercontinent without orogens it starts with more diffused local thinning of the continental lithospheric before the breakup, suggesting that weak orogens play a critical role in the dispersal of supercontinents.
DS201902-0261
2019
Naba, S.Baratoux, L., Soderlund, U., Ernst, R.E., de Roever, E., Jessell, M.W., Kamo, S., Naba, S., Perrouty, S., Metelka, V., Yatte, D., Grenholm, M., Diallo, D.P., Ndiaye, P.M., Dioh, E., Cournede, C., Benoit, M., Baratoux, D., Youbi, N., Rousse, S., BendaoudNew U-Pb baddeleyite ages of mafic dyke swarms of the West African and Amazonian cratons: implication for their configuration in supercontinents through time.Dyke Swarms of the World: a modern perspective, Srivastava et al. eds. Springer , pp. 263-314.Africa, West Africa, South Americageochronology

Abstract: Eight different generations of dolerite dykes crosscutting the Paleoproterozoic basement in West Africa and one in South America were dated using the high precision U-Pb TIMS method on baddeleyite. Some of the individual dykes reach over 300 km in length and they are considered parts of much larger systems of mafic dyke swarms representing the plumbing systems for large igneous provinces (LIPs). The new U-Pb ages obtained for the investigated swarms in the southern West African Craton (WAC) are the following (oldest to youngest): 1791?±?3 Ma for the N010° Libiri swarm, 1764?±?4 Ma for the N035° Kédougou swarm, 1575?±?5 for the N100° Korsimoro swarm, ~1525-1529 Ma for the N130° Essakane swarm, 1521?±?3 Ma for the N90° Sambarabougou swarm, 915?±?7 Ma for the N070° Oda swarm, 867?±?16 Ma for the N355° Manso swarm, 202?±?5 Ma and 198?±?16 Ma for the N040° Hounde swarm, and 200?±?3 Ma for the sills in the Taoudeni basin. The last ones are related to the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) event. The Hounde swarm is oblique to the dominant radiating CAMP swarm and may be linked with the similar-trending elongate Kakoulima intrusion in Guinea. In addition, the N150° Käyser swarm (Amazonian craton, South America) is dated at 1528?±?2 Ma, providing a robust match with the Essakane swarm in a standard Amazonia-West African craton reconstruction, and resulting in a combined linear swarm >1500 km by >1500 km in extent. The Precambrian LIP barcode ages of c. 1790, 1765-1750, 1575, 1520, 915. 870 Ma for the WAC are compared with the global LIP record to identify possible matches on other crustal blocks, with reconstruction implications. These results contribute to the refinement of the magmatic ‘barcode’ for the West African and Amazonian cratons, representing the first steps towards plausible global paleogeographic reconstructions involving the West African and Amazonian cratons.
DS1996-0168
1996
Nabalek, J.Braunmiller, J., Nabalek, J.Geometry of continental normal faults: seismological constraintsJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 181, No. B2, Feb. 10, pp. 3045-52GlobalTectonics, Continental faults
DS200712-0434
2007
Nabalek, J.L.Hetenyl, G., Cattin, R., Brunet, F., Bollinger, L., Vergne, J., Nabalek, J.L., Diament, M.Density distribution of the India plate beneath the Tibetan plateau: geophysical and petrological constraints on kinetics of lower crustal eclogitizationEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 264, 1-2, pp. 226-244.Asia, IndiaEclogite
DS1996-0169
1996
Nabelek, J.Braunmiller, J., Nabelek, J.Geometry of continental normal faults: seismological constraintsJournal of Geophysics Research, Vol. 101, No. 2, Feb. 10, pp. 3045-52.GlobalStructure -faults, Continental faults
DS200712-0433
2006
Nabelek, J.L.Hetenyi, G., Cattin, R., Vergne, J., Nabelek, J.L.The effective elastic thickness of the India Plate from receiver function imaging, gravity anomalies and thermomechanical modelling.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 167, 3, Dec. 1, pp. 1106-1108.IndiaGeophysics - gravity
DS1990-0998
1990
Nabelek, P.I.McCall, G.W., Nabelek, P.I., Bauer, R.L., Glascock, M.D.Petrogenesis of Archean lamprophyres in the southern Vermilion graniticcomplex, northeastern Minnesota, with implications for the nature of their mantle sourceContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 104, No. 4, pp. 439-452MinnesotaGranite -Vermilion complex, Lamprophyres
DS201112-0714
2010
Nabelek, P.I.Nabelek, P.I., Whittington, A.G., Hofmeister, A.M.Strain heating as a mechanism for partial melting and ultrahigh temperature metamorphism in convergent orogens: implications of temperature dependent thermalJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 115, B 12 B12417MantleMelting, geodynamics, rheology, geothermometry
DS201805-0973
2017
Nabelek, P.I.Ravna, E.K., Zozulya, D., Kullerud, K., Corfu, F., Nabelek, P.I., Janak, M., Slagstad, T., Davidsen, B., Selbekk, R.S., Schertl, H-P.Deep seated carbonatite intrusion and metasomatism in the UHP Tromso Nappe, northern Scandinavian Caledonides - a natural example of generation of carbonatite from carbonated eclogite.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 58, 12, pp. 2403-2428.Europe, Sweden, Norwaycarbonatite

Abstract: Carbonatites (sensu stricto) are igneous rocks typically associated with continental rifts, being emplaced at relatively shallow crustal levels or as extrusive rocks. Some carbonatites are, however, related to subduction and lithospheric collision zones, but so far no carbonatite has been reported from ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes. In this study, we present detailed petrological and geochemical data on carbonatites from the Tromsø Nappe—a UHP metamorphic terrane in the Scandinavian Caledonides. Massive to weakly foliated silicate-rich carbonate rocks, comprising the high-P mineral assemblage of Mg-Fe-calcite?±?Fe-dolomite?+?garnet?+?omphacitic clinopyroxene?+?phlogopite?+?apatite?+?rutile?+?ilmenite, are inferred to be carbonatites. They show apparent intrusive relationships to eclogite, garnet pyroxenite, garnet-mica gneiss, foliated calc-silicate marble and massive marble. Large grains of omphacitic pyroxene and megacrysts (up to 5?cm across) of Cr-diopside in the carbonatite contain rods of phlogopite oriented parallel to the c-axis, the density of rods being highest in the central part of the megacrysts. Garnet contains numerous inclusions of all the other phases of the carbonatite, and, in places, composite polyphase inclusions. Zircon, monazite and allanite are common accessory phases. Locally, veins of silicate-poor carbonatite (up to 10?cm across) occur. Extensive fenitization by K-rich fluids, with enrichment in phlogopite along contacts between carbonatite and silicate country rocks, is common. Primitive mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns for the carbonatite document a strong enrichment of light rare earth elements, Ba and Rb, and negative anomalies in Th, Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf. The carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of the carbonatite are distinctly different from those of the spatially associated calc-silicate marble, but also from mantle-derived carbonatites elsewhere. Neodymium and Sr isotope data coupled with the trace element distribution indicate a similarity of the Tromsø carbonatite to orogenic (off-craton) carbonatites rather than to anorogenic (on-craton) ones. U-Pb dating of relatively U-rich prismatic, oscillatory-zoned zircon gives an age of 454•5?±?1•1?Ma. We suggest that the primary carbonatite magma resulted from partial melting of a carbonated eclogite at UHP, in a deeply subducted continental slab.
DS201611-2131
2016
Nabiei, F.Piet, H., Badro, J., Nabiei, F., Gillet, P.Spin and valence dependence of iron partitioning in Earth's deep mantle.Proceedings of National Academy of Science USA, Vol. 113, 40, pp. 11127-11130.MantleIron

Abstract: We performed laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments combined with state-of-the-art electron microanalysis (focused ion beam and aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy) to study the distribution and valence of iron in Earth’s lower mantle as a function of depth and composition. Our data reconcile the apparently discrepant existing dataset, by clarifying the effects of spin (high/low) and valence (ferrous/ferric) states on iron partitioning in the deep mantle. In aluminum-bearing compositions relevant to Earth’s mantle, iron concentration in silicates drops above 70 GPa before increasing up to 110 GPa with a minimum at 85 GPa; it then dramatically drops in the postperovskite stability field above 116 GPa. This compositional variation should strengthen the lowermost mantle between 1,800 km depth and 2,000 km depth, and weaken it between 2,000 km depth and the D” layer. The succession of layers could dynamically decouple the mantle above 2,000 km from the lowermost mantle, and provide a rheological basis for the stabilization and nonentrainment of large low-shear-velocity provinces below that depth.
DS201701-0026
2016
Nabiel, F.Piet, H., Badro, J., Nabiel, F., Dennenwaldt, T., Shim, S-H., Cantoni, M., Hebert, C., Gillet, P.Spin and valence dependence on iron partitioning in Earth's deep mantle.Proceedings of National Academy of Science USA, Vol. 113, no. 40, pp. 11127-11130.MantleUHP

Abstract: We performed laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments combined with state-of-the-art electron microanalysis (focused ion beam and aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy) to study the distribution and valence of iron in Earth's lower mantle as a function of depth and composition. Our data reconcile the apparently discrepant existing dataset, by clarifying the effects of spin (high/low) and valence (ferrous/ferric) states on iron partitioning in the deep mantle. In aluminum-bearing compositions relevant to Earth's mantle, iron concentration in silicates drops above 70 GPa before increasing up to 110 GPa with a minimum at 85 GPa; it then dramatically drops in the postperovskite stability field above 116 GPa. This compositional variation should strengthen the lowermost mantle between 1,800 km depth and 2,000 km depth, and weaken it between 2,000 km depth and the D" layer. The succession of layers could dynamically decouple the mantle above 2,000 km from the lowermost mantle, and provide a rheological basis for the stabilization and nonentrainment of large low-shear-velocity provinces below that depth.
DS201804-0686
2018
Nabiel, F.Dorfman, S.M., Badro, J., Nabiel, F., Prakapenka, V.B., Cantoni, M., Gillet, P.Carbonate stability in the reduced lower mantle.Earth and Planteray Science Letters, Vol. 489, pp. 84-91.Mantlecarbonate

Abstract: Carbonate minerals are important hosts of carbon in the crust and mantle with a key role in the transport and storage of carbon in Earth's deep interior over the history of the planet. Whether subducted carbonates efficiently melt and break down due to interactions with reduced phases or are preserved to great depths and ultimately reach the core-mantle boundary remains controversial. In this study, experiments in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) on layered samples of dolomite (Mg,?Ca)CO3 and iron at pressure and temperature conditions reaching those of the deep lower mantle show that carbon-iron redox interactions destabilize the MgCO3 component, producing a mixture of diamond, Fe7C3, and (Mg,?Fe)O. However, CaCO3 is preserved, supporting its relative stability in carbonate-rich lithologies under reducing lower mantle conditions. These results constrain the thermodynamic stability of redox-driven breakdown of carbonates and demonstrate progress towards multiphase mantle petrology in the LHDAC at conditions of the lowermost mantle.
DS201805-0964
2018
Nabiel, F.Nabiel, F., Badro, J., Dennenwaldt, T., Oveisi, E., Cantoni, M., Hebert, C., El Goresy, A., Barrat, J-A., Gillet, P.A large planetary body inferred from diamond inclusions in a urelite metorite.Nature Communications, doe:10.1038/ s41467-018- 030808-6 6p. PdfTechnologyureilite

Abstract: Planetary formation models show that terrestrial planets are formed by the accretion of tens of Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos through energetic giant impacts. However, relics of these large proto-planets are yet to be found. Ureilites are one of the main families of achondritic meteorites and their parent body is believed to have been catastrophically disrupted by an impact during the first 10 million years of the solar system. Here we studied a section of the Almahata Sitta ureilite using transmission electron microscopy, where large diamonds were formed at high pressure inside the parent body. We discovered chromite, phosphate, and (Fe,Ni)-sulfide inclusions embedded in diamond. The composition and morphology of the inclusions can only be explained if the formation pressure was higher than 20?GPa. Such pressures suggest that the ureilite parent body was a Mercury- to Mars-sized planetary embryo.
DS1988-0493
1988
Nabighian, M.N.Nabighian, M.N.Electromagnetic methods in applied geophysicsSociety of Exploration Geophysicists, P.O. Box 702740, Tulsa OK 74120- 2740, Vol 2, 992 p. $250.00 United StatesGlobalGeophysics, Electromagnetic methods
DS1994-1261
1994
Nabiullin, V.I.Nabiullin, V.I.Geological industrial model of alluvial diamond placers and classification of their local prognostic criteria.10th. Prospecting In Areas Of Glaciated Terrain, p. 173-175. AbstractRussiaPlacers, alluvials, Exploration prospecting
DS201909-2040
2019
Nabyl, Z.Gaillard, E., Nabyl, Z., Tuduri, J., Di Carlo, I., Melleton, J., Bailly, L.The effects of F, Cl, P and H2O on the immiscibility and rare metals partitioning between carbonate and phonolite melts.Goldschmidt2019, 1p. AbstractGlobalcarbonatite - REE

Abstract: Carbonatite and alkaline magma constitute one of the principal resources of rare metals (REE, Nb, Ti, Zr). Carbonatite rare metals enrichment is mainly considered as the result of hydrothermal or supergen processes. However, the magmatic processes linked to carbonatites genesis and differentiation are still debated and whether these processes can significantly impact on the rare metal concentrations remains unclear. Experimental studies have shown that immiscibility processes between carbonate and silicate melts can lead to both REE enrichments and depletions in carbonatites. Anionic species (F, Cl, P or S) and water may impact both melt compositions and expand the immiscibility gap. Morever, anionic species are assumed to play an important role in REE behaviour in carbonate melts [1]. Indeed, halogens may occur in carbonatites as immiscible salt melts in melt inclusions [2] and primary REE- fluoride minerals have been identified as magmatic phases in carbonatites. Such occurrences thus question on the role of salt (carbonate, phosphate, fluoride and chloride) melts in REE and other rare metals partitioning. F, Cl, P and also H2O may all significantly increase the window of primary REE enrichment in carbonatites. Here we present high pressure and high temperature experiments made in piston-cylinder (850 to 1050°C, 8kb) simulating the immiscibility between carbonate and differentiated alkaline melts. We added F, Cl, P and H2O in order to assess the effect of salts and water on the immiscibility gap and on the rare metals partitoning between carbonatite and evolved silicate melts. The partitioning data are analysed using LA-ICP-MS, nano-SIMS, FTIR and RAMAN. The characterization of rare metal partition coefficients allow to determine the relative importance of F, Cl, P and H2O on carbonatites rare metal enrichments at evolved magmatic stage.
DS201909-2065
2019
Nabyl, Z.Nabyl, Z., Massuyeau, M., Gaillard, F., Tuduri, J., Iacono-Marziano, G., Rogerie, G., Le Trong, E., Di Carlo, I., Melleton, J., Bailly, L.REE-rich carbonatites immiscible with phonolitic magma.Goldschmidt2019, 1p. AbstractGlobalcarbonatite - REE

Abstract: uncommon type of magmatic rocks dominates by carbonate, are broadly enriched in rare earth elements (REE) relative to the majority of igneous silicate rocks. While more than 500 carbonatites are referenced worldwide [1], only a few contain economic REE concentrations that are widely considered as resulting from late magmatic-hydrothermal or supergene processes. Magmatic pre-enrichment, linked to the igneous processes at the origin of carbonatites, are, however, likely to contribute to the REE fertilisation. Field observations [1] and experimental surveys [2, 3] suggest that a large part of the carbonatite melts can be produced as immiscible liquids with silicate magmas. Experimental constraints reveals that such immiscibility processes can lead to both REE enrichments and depletions in carbonatites [2, 3], making the magmatic processes controlling REE enrichments unclear. Here we present results of high-pressure and hightemperature experiments, simultaneously addressing crystal fractionation of alkaline magmas and immiscibility between carbonate and silicate melts. The experimental data reveal that the degree of differentiation, controlling the chemical composition of alkaline melts is a key factor ruling the REE concentration of the coexisting immiscible carbonatites. The parameterization of the experimental data together with the compilation of geochemical data from various alkaline provinces show that REE concentrations similar to those of highly REE enriched carbonatites (SREE > 30000 ppm) can be produced by immiscibility with phono-trachytic melt compositions, while more primitive alkaline magma can only be immiscible with carbonatites that are not significantly enriched in REE.
DS202006-0940
2020
Nabyl, Z.Nabyl, Z., Massuyeau, M., Gaillard, F., Tuduri, J., Iacono-Marziano, G., Rogerie, G., Le Trong, E., Di Carlo, I., Melleton, J., Bailly, L.A window in the course of alkaline magma differentiation conducive to immiscible REE-rich carbonatites.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, in press available 57p. PdfMantlecarbonatite

Abstract: Rare earth element (REE) enrichments in carbonatites are often described as resulting from late magmatic-hydrothermal or supergene processes. However, magmatic pre-enrichment linked to the igneous processes at the origin of carbonatites are likely to contribute to the REE fertilisation. Experimental constraints reveals that immiscibility processes between carbonate and silicate melts can lead to both REE enrichments and depletions in carbonatites making the magmatic processes controlling REE enrichments unclear. We link REE contents of carbonatites to the magmatic stage at which carbonatites are separated from silicate magma in their course of differentiation. We present results of experiments made at pressure and temperature conditions of alkaline magmas and associated carbonatites differentiation (0.2-1.5 GPa; 725-975?°C; FMQ to FMQ?+?2.5), simultaneously addressing crystal fractionation of alkaline magmas and immiscibility between carbonate (calcio-carbonate type) and silicate melts (nephelinite to phonolite type). The experimental data shows that the degree of differentiation, controlling the chemical composition of alkaline melts, is a key factor ruling the REE concentration of the coexisting immiscible carbonate melts. In order to predict carbonate melt REE enrichments during alkaline magma differentiation, we performed a parameterisation of experimental data on immiscible silicate and carbonate melts, based exclusively on the silica content, the alumina saturation index and the alkali/alkaline-earth elements ratio of silicate melts. This parameterisation is applied to more than 1600 geochemical data of silicate magmas from various alkaline provinces (East African Rift, Canary and Cape Verde Islands) and show that REE concentrations of their potential coeval carbonatite melts can reach concentration ranges similar to those of highly REE enriched carbonatites (?REE?>?30 000?ppm) by immiscibility with phonolitic/phono-trachytic melt compositions, while more primitive alkaline magmas can only be immiscible with carbonatites that are not significantly enriched in REE.
DS202009-1643
2020
Nabyl, Z.Nabyl, Z., Massuyeau, M.,Gaillard, F., Tuduri, J., Gregory, G-M., Trong, E., Di Carlo, I., Melleton, J., Bailly, L. A window in the course of alkaline magma differentiation conducive to immiscible REE-rich carbonatite.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 282, pp. 297-323.Africa, East Africacarbonatites

Abstract: Rare earth element (REE) enrichments in carbonatites are often described as resulting from late magmatic-hydrothermal or supergene processes. However, magmatic pre-enrichment linked to the igneous processes at the origin of carbonatites are likely to contribute to the REE fertilisation. Experimental constraints reveals that immiscibility processes between carbonate and silicate melts can lead to both REE enrichments and depletions in carbonatites making the magmatic processes controlling REE enrichments unclear. We link REE contents of carbonatites to the magmatic stage at which carbonatites are separated from silicate magma in their course of differentiation. We present results of experiments made at pressure and temperature conditions of alkaline magmas and associated carbonatites differentiation (0.2-1.5 GPa; 725-975?°C; FMQ to FMQ?+?2.5), simultaneously addressing crystal fractionation of alkaline magmas and immiscibility between carbonate (calcio-carbonate type) and silicate melts (nephelinite to phonolite type). The experimental data shows that the degree of differentiation, controlling the chemical composition of alkaline melts, is a key factor ruling the REE concentration of the coexisting immiscible carbonate melts. In order to predict carbonate melt REE enrichments during alkaline magma differentiation, we performed a parameterisation of experimental data on immiscible silicate and carbonate melts, based exclusively on the silica content, the alumina saturation index and the alkali/alkaline-earth elements ratio of silicate melts. This parameterisation is applied to more than 1600 geochemical data of silicate magmas from various alkaline provinces (East African Rift, Canary and Cape Verde Islands) and show that REE concentrations of their potential coeval carbonatite melts can reach concentration ranges similar to those of highly REE enriched carbonatites (?REE?>?30 000?ppm) by immiscibility with phonolitic/phono-trachytic melt compositions, while more primitive alkaline magmas can only be immiscible with carbonatites that are not significantly enriched in REE.
DS201212-0506
2012
NACDNACDGovernance challenges - 2012 and beyond.National Association of Corporate Directors, August 27p.CanadaCSR - governance
DS200712-0768
2006
Nacher, U.Nacher, U.An update on Southern Era Diamonds Inc. 2006 exploration activities.34th Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 40-41. abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesExploration - update
DS201504-0196
2012
Nachtrab, F.Firsching, M., Muhlbauer, J., Nachtrab, F., Jobst, A.Basis material decomposition a quantitative X-ray imaging method and its application in industrial sorting.International Symposium on Digital Industrial Radiology and computed Tomography, Poster 13, 5p.TechnologyDiamond recovery
DS201504-0197
2012
Nachtrab, F.Firsching, M., Muhlbauer, J., Nachtrab, F., Uhlmann, N.Detection of enclosed diamonds using dual energy X-ray imaging.18th. World Conference on Nondestructive Testing held Durban SA, 7p.TechnologyDiamond recovery
DS1993-1750
1993
Nack, L.P.Wittke, J.H., Nack, L.P.Ocean Island Basalt (OIB)-like mantle source for continental alkaline rocks of the BalconesProvince, Texas: trace element and isotopic evidence.Journal of Geology, Vol. 101, No. 3, May pp. 333-344.GlobalAlkaline rocks, Geochronology
DS1998-1058
1998
Nadeau, L.Nadeau, L., Brouillette, P.Le graben du Saguenay: expression topographique failles et patron regional de fractures.Geological Association of Canada (GAC), Annual Meeting, Vol. 23, p. a133 abstract.QuebecTectonics, structure
DS2000-0082
2000
Nadeau, L.Berman, R.G., Easton, R.M., Nadeau, L.A new tectonometamorphic map of the Canadian Shield: introductionCan. Mineralog., Vol. 38, No. 2, Apr. pp. 277-286.Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, Northwest TerritoriesMap, Tectonics, metamorphism
DS200612-1031
2006
Nadeau, L.Parsons, S., Nadeau, L., Keating, P., Chung, C-J.Optimizing the use of aeromagnetic dat a for predictive geological interpretation: an example from the Grenville Province, Quebec.Computers & Geosciences, Vol. 32, 5, June, pp. 565-576.Canada, QuebecGeophysics - magnetics not specific to diamonds
DS200712-0769
2006
Nadeau, L.Nadeau, L., Ryan, J.J., Hinchey, A.M., James, Sandeman, Tremblay, Schetselaar, Berman, DavisOutlook on the geology of the Boothia MaIn land area, Kitikmeot region, Nunavut.34th Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 39-40. abstractCanada, NunavutGeology - brief overview
DS201312-0623
2013
Nadeau, O.Nadeau, O., Stevenson, R., Jebrak, M.Petrosomatic evolution of Montveil alkaline system and rare earth carbonatites, Abitibi, Canada.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractCanada, QuebecCarbonatite
DS201412-0610
2014
Nadeau, O.Nadeau, O., Stevenson, R., Jebrak, M.The geology, petrology and geochemistry of the Montviel alkaline-carbonatite hosted lanthanide-Nb ore deposit, Abitibi, Canada.GAC-MAC Annual Meeting May, abstract 1p.Canada, QuebecCarbonatite
DS201502-0084
2015
Nadeau, O.Nadeau, O., Cayer, A., Pelletier, M., Stevenson, R., Jebrak, M.The Paleoproterozoic Montviel carbonatite hosted REE-Nb deposit, Abitibi, Canada: Geology, Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Genesis.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 67, pp. 314-335.Canada, QuebecCarbonatite
DS201511-1865
2015
Nadeau, O.Nadeau, O., Stevenson, R., Jebrak, M.Evolution of Montviel alkaline-carbonatite complex by coupled fractional crystallization, fluid mixing and metasomatism. Pts. 1 and 2.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 72, pp. 1143-1162.Canada, QuebecCarbonatite

Abstract: Magmatic volatiles are critically important in the petrogenesis of igneous rocks but their inherent transience hampers the identification of their role in magmatic and mineralization processes. We present evidence that magmatic volatiles played a critical role in the formation of the 1894 Ma Paleoproterozoic Montviel alkaline-carbonatite complex, Canada, and the related carbonatite-hosted REE-Nb deposit. Field and drill core relationships indicate that lithological units of the complex were emplaced in the following order: clinopyroxenites, melteigites, ijolites, melanosyenites, leucosyenites, granites, lamprophyric silicocarbonatites, rare magnesiocarbonatites, calciocarbonatites, ferrocarbonatites, late mixed carbonatites, kimberlitic silicocarbonatites and polygenic breccias. Magmatic minerals within these units were systematically metasomatized. In undersaturated silicate rocks, augite recrystallized to aegirine–augite and aegirine, plagioclase recrystallized to albite, and nepheline recrystallized with analcime, cancrinite and albite. Primary biotite was replaced by secondary, REE-rich metasomatic biotite, particularly along fractures and alteration pockets. In carbonatites, liquidus phases consisted of calcite and dolomite and were recrystallized to ferroan dolomite, ankerite, siderite, barytocalcite, witherite and strontianite, which are intimately related to the REE-bearing carbonates and fluorocarbonates. Biotite is common to all lithologies, ranges in REE concentrations from 1.5 to 230 ppm and yielded subsolidus crystallization temperatures ranging from 770 °C to 370 °C. Sm-Nd isotope analyses from biotite and aegirine-augite yield a range of eNd values (+ 3.4 to - 3.0) that suggests mixing of fluids from three sources during the crystallization of the Montviel magmas. The clinopyroxenites to melteigite, ijolites and melanosyenites crystallized augite and biotite with initial eNd value = 3.4 and these minerals were metasomatized by a 1st fluid, lowering their eNd to values comprised between 0.8 and 3.4. Silicocarbonatites and carbonatites subsequently crystallized aegirine-augite and biotite with initial eNd value = 2.6 and a 2nd fluid metasomatized the minerals to lower ? values. Both the 1st and the 2nd fluids eventually mixed with a 3rd recrystallizing aegirine-augite and biotite and lower their eNd values down to - 3.0. The results presented herein suggest that the mantle magmas evolved through 4 distinct mantle pulses by fractional crystallization, mixing of depleted mantle fluids with crustal fluids, and metasomatism. Some of the silicate rocks also show evidence of assimilation of wall rock as part of their petrogenetic evolution. During the last stages of its evolution in carbonatites, the fluid source transited from the depleted mantle to the crust and we speculate that this resulted in a violent explosive eruption creating the diatreme-shaped, HREE-rich polygenic breccia.
DS201801-0040
2018
Nadeau, O.Nadeau, O., Stevenson, R., Jebrak, M.Interaction of mantle magmas and fluids with crustal fluids at the 1894 Ma Montviel alkaline carbonatite complex, Canada: insights from metasomatic and hydrothermal carbonates.Lithos, Vol. 296-299, pp. 563-579.Canada, Quebeccarbonatite - Montviel

Abstract: Alkaline and carbonatite rocks are relatively rare but offer the opportunity to study the contribution of fluids in the genesis of mantle and crustal rocks because they are commonly affected by metasomatism. Carbonate minerals represent versatile archives of mantle and crustal magmatic-hydrothermal processes because they can have magmatic, metasomatic or hydrothermal origins and because they host the trace elements, stable and radiogenic isotopes required to unravel their petrogenesis. Previous studies have shown that the 1894 Ma Montviel alkaline-carbonatite complex was emplaced through four injections of volatile-saturated, mantle magmas which evolved through fractional crystallization, mixing of mantle and crustal fluids and metasomatism. Trace element analyses and d18O, d13C, 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotope compositions of metasomatic and hydrothermal carbonates further support that each magma injection was accompanied by a volatile phase. Variations in trace element concentrations suggest that the carbonatite might have exsolved from a metasomatized mantle or hybrid silicate-carbonatite magma, and that the fluid composition evolved towards higher REE and lower HFSE with increasing degree of segregation of the carbonatite magma and the silicate source. A strong correlation between the C-O-Sr isotopic systems show that mantle fluids mixed with crustal fluids, increasing the 87Sr/86Sr from mantle to crustal values, and driving the C and O isotopic ratios towards respectively lighter and heavier values. The Sm/Nd isotopic system was weakly coupled with the other isotopic systems as depleted mantle fluids mixed with crustal fluids and metasomatized the crystallizing magmas, thereby redistributing the REE and affecting their Sm/Nd ratios. The Nd isotopes suggest that the mixed mantle/crustal fluids redistributed the rare earth elements, producing ultra-depleted (eNd = + 10), normally depleted (eNd = + 4) and slightly enriched (eNd = - 2) isotopic compositions.
DS1989-1084
1989
Nadeau, S.Nadeau, S.Carbon degassing from the earth's interior through geological timeGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting Program Abstracts, Vol. 14, p. A30. (abstract.)GlobalExperimental petrology, Mantle
DS1989-1085
1989
Nadeau, S.Nadeau, S.Volatile and trace element contents in magmas derived from variable mantle source compositionsGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting Program Abstracts, Vol. 14, p. A22. (abstract.)GlobalMantle, Experimental petrology
DS1990-1082
1990
Nadeau, S.Nadeau, S., Pineau, F., Javoy, M., Francis, D.Carbon concentrations and isotopic ratios in fluid-inclusion bearing upper mantle xenoliths along the northwestern margin of North AmericaChemical Geology, Vol. 81, No. 4, February 20, pp. 271-298United StatesGeochemistry, Xenolith inclusions
DS1993-1106
1993
Nadeau, S.Nadeau, S., Philippot, P., Pineau, F.Fluid inclusion and mineral isotopic compositions (H-C-O) in eclogitic rocks as tracers of local fluid migration during high pressure metamorphismEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 114, pp. 431-448.GlobalEclogite, Geochronology
DS1993-1616
1993
Nadeau, S.Trull, T., Nadeau, S., Pineau, F., Polve, M., Javoy, M.C-He systematics in hotspot xenoliths: implications for mantle carbon contents and carbon recycling.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 118, No. 1-4, July, pp. 43-64.Mantle, Hawaii, Kerguelen Islands, IndiaXenoliths -Carbon and helium, Hotspots
DS201707-1360
2017
Nadeau, S.Reis, N.J., Nadeau, S., Fraga, L.M., Menezes Betiollo, L., Telma Lins Faraco, M., Reece, J., Lachhman, D., Ault, R.Stratigraphy of the Roraima Supergroup along the Brazil Guyana border in the Guiana shield, northern Amazonian craton - results of the Brazil Guyana geology and geodiversity mapping project.Brazil Journal of Geology, Vol. 47, 1, pp. 43-57.South America, Brazil, Guyanacraton

Abstract: The Geological and Geodiversity Mapping binational program along the Brazil-Guyana border zone allowed reviewing and in- tegrating the stratigraphy and nomenclature of the Roraima Supergroup along the Pakaraima Sedimentary Block present in northeastern Brazil and western Guyana. The area mapped corresponds to a buffer zone of approximately 25 km in width on both sides of the border, of a region extending along the Maú-Ireng River between Mount Roraima (the tri- ple-border region) and Mutum Village in Brazil and Monkey Mountain in Guyana. The south border of the Roraima basin is overlain exclusively by effusive and volcaniclastic rocks of the Surumu Group of Brazil and its correlated equivalent the Burro-Burro Group of Guyana.
DS201803-0447
2017
Nadeau, S.Fraga, L.M., Cordani, U., Reis, N., Nadeau, S., Camara Maurer, V.U Pb shrimp and La ICPMS new dat a for different A type granites of the Orocaima igneous belt, central Guyana shield, northern Amazonian craton. ( Project Geology of the Guiana Shield)Anais Do 15 Simposio Geologia da Amazonia, Belem , Dec. 5p. Abstract pdfSouth America, Guianacraton

Abstract: The Orocaima Igneous Belt (OIB) is a huge plutono-volcanic belt at the central part of Guiana Shield, consisting mainly of 1.99-1.96 Ga volcano-plutonic rocks with high-K calc-alkaline, A-type and shosho-nitic geochemical signatures. Three A-type granitic bodies from the central part of the OIB have been dated using U-Pb SHRIMP and LA-ICPMS methods. A 1985±11 Ma age was calculated for the Macucal Mountain Granite of the Saracura Suite (Brazil) and ages of 1977±3.9 Ma and 1975±5 were calculated for the alkaline riebeckite granites respectively of the Lontra (Brazil) and Makarapan (Guyana) bodies. These ages are in the same range of those reported for the Aricamã A-type granitoids and the results indicate that different A-type magmatism took place in the 1.993-1.975 Ma interval along the OIB, coeval to high-K calc-alkaline and shoshonitic magmatism. This scenario fits well to a post-collisional setting.
DS201810-2371
2018
Nadeau, S.Reis, N.J., Nadeau, S., Fraga, L.M., Betiollo, L.M., Faraco, M.T.L., Reece, J., Lachhman, D., Ault, R.Stratigraphy of the Roraima Supergroup along the Brazil-Guyana border in the Guiana shield, northern Amazonian craton- results of the Brazil-Guyana geology and geodiversity mapping project.Brazilian Journal of Geology, Vol. 47, 1, pp. 43-57.South America, Brazil, Guyanacraton

Abstract: The Geological and Geodiversity Mapping binational program along the Brazil-Guyana border zone allowed reviewing and in- tegrating the stratigraphy and nomenclature of the Roraima Supergroup along the Pakaraima Sedimentary Block present in northeastern Brazil and western Guyana. The area mapped corresponds to a buffer zone of approximately 25 km in width on both sides of the border, of a region extending along the Maú-Ireng River between Mount Roraima (the tri- ple-border region) and Mutum Village in Brazil and Monkey Mountain in Guyana. The south border of the Roraima basin is overlain exclusively by effusive and volcaniclastic rocks of the Surumu Group of Brazil and its correlated equivalent the Burro-Burro Group of Guyana.
DS201904-0772
2017
Nadeau, S.Reis, N.J., Nadeau, S., Fraga, L.M., Menezes Betiollo, L., Telma Lins, Faraco, M., Reece, J., Lachhman, D., Ault, R.Stratigraphy of the Roraima Supergroup along the Brazil-Guyana border in the Guiana shield, northern Amazonian craton - results of the Brazil Guyana geology and geodiversity mapping project.Brazilian Journal of Geology, Vol. 41, 1, pp. 43-57.South America, Brazil, GuyanaGuiana shield

Abstract: The Geological and Geodiversity Mapping binational program along the Brazil-Guyana border zone allowed reviewing and integrating the stratigraphy and nomenclature of the Roraima Supergroup along the Pakaraima Sedimentary Block present in northeastern Brazil and western Guyana. The area mapped corresponds to a buffer zone of approximately 25 km in width on both sides of the border, of a region extending along the Maú-Ireng River between Mount Roraima (the triple-border region) and Mutum Village in Brazil and Monkey Mountain in Guyana. The south border of the Roraima basin is overlain exclusively by effusive and volcaniclastic rocks of the Surumu Group of Brazil and its correlated equivalent the Burro-Burro Group of Guyana.
DS1999-0500
1999
Nadeau, S.L.Nadeau, S.L., Epstein, S., Stolper, E.Hydrogen and carbon abundances and isotopic ratios iun apatite from alkaline intrusive complexes...Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 63, No. 11, 12, June 1, pp. 1837-52.GlobalCarbonatite, Geochemistry
DS1991-1212
1991
Nadejdina, E.Nadejdina, E., Shalashilina, T.Diamonds in metamorphic rocks #2Proceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June, pp. 535-536RussiaDiamond morphology, Diamond crystallography
DS1995-1512
1995
NadezhdinaPosukhova, L.F., Dobrzhinnetskaya, Nadezhdina, ShadrinaMorphology and growth conditions of diamonds in metamorphic rocksProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 452-454.Russia, Kazakhstan, ChinaMetamorphic, Diamond genesis
DS1987-0439
1987
Nadezhdina, E.D.Martovitskii, V.P., Nadezhdina, E.D., Ekimova, T.E.Internal structure and morphology of small nonkimberliticdiamonds.(Russian)Mineral Zhurn., (Russian), Vol. 9, No. 2, pp. 26-37GlobalBlank
DS1994-0489
1994
Nadezhdina, E.D.Ekimova, T.E., Lavrova, L.D., Nadezhdina, E.D., Petrova, M.Conditions of the formation of the Kumdykol diamond deposit, NorthernKazakhstan.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 36, No. 5, pp. 410-419.Russia, KazakhstanDiamond genesis, Deposit -Kumdykol
DS1984-0787
1984
Nadezhdina, Y.D.Yepishina, N.I., Nadezhdina, Y.D., Klyuyev, Y.A., Naletov.Hardness, viscosity and defects due to the fragility of continuousnatural lonsdaleite in natural diamonds.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk. SSSR (Russian), Vol. 276, No. 1, pp. 232-234RussiaDiamond, Morphology
DS1986-0788
1986
Nadezhdina, Y.D.Sukhorukova, T.Y., Nadezhdina, Y.D., Rumyantsev, G.S., ArtemenkoPhotoluminescence and EPR of non kimberlitic natural diamonds.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk. SSSR (Russian), Vol. 286, No. 6, pp. 1498-1501RussiaBlank
DS1986-0800
1986
Nadezhdina, Ye. D.Tepishina, N.I., Nadezhdina, Ye. D., Klyuyev, Yu.A., Naletov, A.M.Hardness and toughness in brittle fracture of nature lonsdaleite containing polycrystalline diamondsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 276, January pp. 112-114RussiaCrystallography, Diamond morphology
DS1984-0160
1984
Nadezhdina, YE.D.Bochek, L.I., Nadezhdina, YE.D., Rumyantsev, G.S.Reflection spectra and refractive index of lonsdaleite-containingdiamonds.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 279, No. 1, pp. 186-188RussiaDiamond Morphology
DS1986-0885
1986
Nadezhdina, Ye.D.Yepishina, N.I., Nadezhdina, Ye.D., Klyuyev, Yu.A., et al.Hardness and toughness in brittle fracture of natural lonsdaleite-containing polycrystalline diamondDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 276, No. 1-6, pp. 112-114RussiaPetrology, Natural diamonds
DS1987-0722
1987
Nadezhdina, Ye.D.Sukhorukova, T.Yu., Nadezhdina, Ye.D., Rumyantsev, G.S., ArtemenkoPhotoluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonsance ofnatural diamonds of nonkimberlite originDokl. Acad. Sciences USSR Earth Science Section, Vol. 286, No. 1-6, September pp. 156-159RussiaBlank
DS1990-1083
1990
Nadezhdina, Ye.D.Nadezhdina, Ye.D., Posukhova, T.V.The morphology of diamond crystals from metamorphic rocks.(Russian)Mineral. Zhurn., (Russian), Vol. 12, No. 2, pp. 3-15RussiaDiamond morphology, Metamorphic rocks
DS1991-0946
1991
Nadezhdina, Ye.D.Kvasnitsa, V.N., Nadezhdina, Ye.D.Regular intergrowth of diamond paramorphs on graphite.(Russian)Mineral. Zhurn., (Russian), Vol. 13, No. 3, pp. 95-98RussiaMineralogy, Diamond morphology
DS1993-1107
1993
Nadezhdina, Ye.D.Nadezhdina, Ye.D., et al.Typomorphism of non-kimberlite diamonds.(Russian)Mineralogischesky Zhurnal, (Russian), Vol. 15, No. 1, pp. 9-19RussiaDiamond morphology
DS1986-0787
1986
Nadezhdiy, E.D.Sukhoruki, T.I., Nadezhdiy, E.D., Ruminants, G.S., Artemky, V.V.Photoluminescence and electron paramagnetic res of natural nonkimberlitediamonds. (Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 286, No. 6, pp. 1498-1501RussiaDiamond morphology
DS1990-1204
1990
Nadezhina, T.N.Pushcharovsky, D.Yu., Yamnova, N.A., Nadezhina, T.N.Comparative crystal chemistry of new minerals from alkaline rocksInternational Mineralogical Association Meeting Held June, 1990 Beijing China, Vol. 1, extended abstract p. 334-335RussiaAlkaline rocks, Geochemistry
DS202010-1852
2020
Nadolinny, V.Komarovskikh, A., Rakhmanova, M., Yuryeva, O., Nadolinny, V.Infrared, photoluminescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance characteristic features of diamonds from Aikhal pipe, (Yakutia).Diamond & Related Materials, Vol. 109, 108045, 9p. PdfRussiadeposit - Aikhal

Abstract: The diversity of the defects in the collection (50 samples) of diamonds from the Aikhal pipe (Yakutia) has been studied with IR, PL, and EPR spectroscopy. The specific features of crystals have been established; the obtained information leads to the discussion about the diamond formation and growth conditions. One of the specific features observed is a high concentration of platelets. According to the platelet behavior, most of the crystals are regular suggesting the growth temperature to be 1100-1200 °C. The concentrations of A and B defects have been evaluated and the same temperature conditions have been obtained according to the Taylor diagram. Using the EPR spectroscopy, the C and N3V centers have been found in many crystals suggesting the aggregation of nitrogen during residence in the mantle at high temperatures. An interesting feature has been observed in the PL spectra. For most crystals, the spectrum with ZPL at 563.5 nm is very intensive. The structure of the observed defect is remaining unknown, the spectrum disappears as a result of annealing at 600 °C indicating the interstitial-vacancy annihilation mechanism.
DS202012-2224
2020
Nadolinny, V.Komarovskikh, A., Rakmanova, M., Yuryeva, O., Nadolinny, V.Infrared, photoluminescence, and electron paramagnetic resonance characteristic features of diamonds from the Aikhal pipe ( Yakutia).Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 109, 108045, 9p. PdfRussiadeposit - Aikhal

Abstract: The diversity of the defects in the collection (50 samples) of diamonds from the Aikhal pipe (Yakutia) has been studied with IR, PL, and EPR spectroscopy. The specific features of crystals have been established; the obtained information leads to the discussion about the diamond formation and growth conditions. One of the specific features observed is a high concentration of platelets. According to the platelet behavior, most of the crystals are regular suggesting the growth temperature to be 1100-1200 °C. The concentrations of A and B defects have been evaluated and the same temperature conditions have been obtained according to the Taylor diagram. Using the EPR spectroscopy, the C and N3V centers have been found in many crystals suggesting the aggregation of nitrogen during residence in the mantle at high temperatures. An interesting feature has been observed in the PL spectra. For most crystals, the spectrum with ZPL at 563.5 nm is very intensive. The structure of the observed defect is remaining unknown, the spectrum disappears as a result of annealing at 600 °C indicating the interstitial-vacancy annihilation mechanism.
DS2003-0991
2003
Nadolinny, V.A.Nadolinny, V.A., Shatsky, V.S., Sobolev, N.V., Twitchen, D.J., Yuryeva, O.P.Observation and interpretation of paramagnetic defects in Brazilian and Central AfricanAmerican Mineralogist, Vol.88, pp. 11-17.Brazil, Central African RepublicSpectroscopy - nitrogen
DS200912-0529
2009
Nadolinny, V.A.Nadolinny, V.A., Yurjeva, O.P., Pokhilenko, N.P.EPR and luminescence dat a on the nitrogen aggregation in diamonds from Snap Lake dyke system.Lithos, In press - available 19p.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Snap Lake
DS201212-0507
2012
Nadolinny, V.A.Nadolinny, V.A., Yuryeva,O.P., Rakhmanova, M.I., Shatsky, V.S., Palyanov, Y.N., Kupriyanov, I.N., Zedgenizov, D.A., Ragozin, A.L.Distribution of OK1, N3 and NU1 defects in diamond crystals of different habits.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 24, 4, pp. 645-650.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201412-0721
2014
Nadolinny, V.A.Rakhmanova, M.I., Nadolinny, V.A., Yuryeva, O.P., Pokhilenko, N.P.Pecularities of nitrogen impurity aggregation in diamonds from the Sytykanskaya pipe, Yakutia.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 27, 1, pp. 51-56.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Sytykanskaya
DS201503-0170
2015
Nadolinny, V.A.Rakhmanova, M.I., Nadolinny, V.A., Yuryeva, O.P., Pokhilenko, N.P., Logvinova, A.M.Pecularities of nitrogen impurity aggregation in diamonds from the Sytykanskaya pipe, Yakutia.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 27, pp. 51-56.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Sytykanskaya
DS201509-0440
2015
Nadolinny, V.A.Yuryeva, O.P., Rakhmanova, M.I., Nadolinny, V.A., Zedgenizov, D.A., Shatsky, V.S., Kagi, H., Komarovskikh, A.Yu.The characteristic photoluminescence and EPR features of superdeep diamonds ( Sao Luis, Brazil).Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, In press available 16p.South America, Brazil, Mato GrossoDeposit - Juina area

Abstract: Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were used for the first time to characterize properties of superdeep diamonds from the São-Luis alluvial deposits (Brazil). The infrared measurements showed the low nitrogen content (>50 of 87 diamonds from this locality were nitrogen free and belonged to type IIa) and simultaneously the extremely high level of nitrogen aggregation (pure type IaB being predominant), which indicates that diamonds under study might have formed under high pressure and temperature conditions. In most cases, PL features excited at various wavelengths (313, 473, and 532 nm) were indicative of different growth and post-growth processes during which PL centers could be formed via interaction between vacancies and nitrogen atoms. The overall presence of the 490.7 nm, H3, and H4 centers in the luminescence spectra attests to strong plastic deformations in these diamonds. The neutral vacancy known as the GR1 center has probably occurred in a number of crystals due to radiation damage in the post-growth period. The 558.5 nm PL center is found to be one of the most common defects in type IIa samples which is accompanied by the EPR center with g-factor of 2.00285. The 536 and 576 nm vibronic systems totally dominated the PL spectra of superdeep diamonds, while none of "normal" diamonds from the Mir pipe (Yakutia) with similar nitrogen characteristics showed the latter three PL centers.
DS201511-1892
2015
Nadolinny, V.A.Yuryeva, O.P., Rakhmanova, M.I., Nadolinny, V.A., Zedgenizov, D.A., Shatsky, V.S., Kagi, H., Komarovskikh, A.Yu.The characteristic photoluminescence and EPR features of superdeep diamonds ( Sao-Luis, Brazil).Physics and chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 42, 9, pp. 707-722.South America, BrazilSao-Luis alluvials

Abstract: Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were used for the first time to characterize properties of superdeep diamonds from the São-Luis alluvial deposits (Brazil). The infrared measurements showed the low nitrogen content (>50 of 87 diamonds from this locality were nitrogen free and belonged to type IIa) and simultaneously the extremely high level of nitrogen aggregation (pure type IaB being predominant), which indicates that diamonds under study might have formed under high pressure and temperature conditions. In most cases, PL features excited at various wavelengths (313, 473, and 532 nm) were indicative of different growth and post-growth processes during which PL centers could be formed via interaction between vacancies and nitrogen atoms. The overall presence of the 490.7 nm, H3, and H4 centers in the luminescence spectra attests to strong plastic deformations in these diamonds. The neutral vacancy known as the GR1 center has probably occurred in a number of crystals due to radiation damage in the post-growth period. The 558.5 nm PL center is found to be one of the most common defects in type IIa samples which is accompanied by the EPR center with g-factor of 2.00285. The 536 and 576 nm vibronic systems totally dominated the PL spectra of superdeep diamonds, while none of "normal" diamonds from the Mir pipe (Yakutia) with similar nitrogen characteristics showed the latter three PL centers.
DS201603-0434
2015
Nadolinny, V.A.Yureva, O.P., Rakhmanova, M.I., Nadolinny, V.A., Zedgenizov, D.A., Shatsjy, V.S., Kagi, H., Komarovskikh, A.Y.The characteristic photoluminesence and EPR features of super deep diamonds ( Sao-Luis, Brazil).Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 42, 9, pp. 707-722.South America, BrazilDeposit - Sao-Luis

Abstract: Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were used for the first time to characterize properties of superdeep diamonds from the São-Luis alluvial deposits (Brazil). The infrared measurements showed the low nitrogen content (>50 of 87 diamonds from this locality were nitrogen free and belonged to type IIa) and simultaneously the extremely high level of nitrogen aggregation (pure type IaB being predominant), which indicates that diamonds under study might have formed under high pressure and temperature conditions. In most cases, PL features excited at various wavelengths (313, 473, and 532 nm) were indicative of different growth and post-growth processes during which PL centers could be formed via interaction between vacancies and nitrogen atoms. The overall presence of the 490.7 nm, H3, and H4 centers in the luminescence spectra attests to strong plastic deformations in these diamonds. The neutral vacancy known as the GR1 center has probably occurred in a number of crystals due to radiation damage in the post-growth period. The 558.5 nm PL center is found to be one of the most common defects in type IIa samples which is accompanied by the EPR center with g-factor of 2.00285. The 536 and 576 nm vibronic systems totally dominated the PL spectra of superdeep diamonds, while none of “normal” diamonds from the Mir pipe (Yakutia) with similar nitrogen characteristics showed the latter three PL centers.
DS201909-2086
2019
Nadolinny, V.A.Shatsky, V.S., Nadolinny, V.A., Yuryeva, O.P., Rakhamanova, M.I., Komarovskikh, A.Yu.Features of the impurity composition of diamonds from placers of the northeastern Siberian craton.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 486, 2, pp. 644-646.Russia, Siberiadiamond morphology

Abstract: Diamond crystals from the Istok (25 crystals) and Mayat (49 crystals) placers were studied using the EPR, IR, and luminescence methods. The total content of impurity nitrogen in forms of A, B, and C (P1) centers ranges from 50 to 1200 ppm. According to the EPR spectroscopy, the presence of nitrogen C (P1), N3V and nitrogen-titanium OK1, N3, NU1 impurity centers was established in the investigated crystals. For 18 crystals from the Istok placer, the N3 nitrogen-titanium center was observed in the EPR spectra, but in the luminescence spectra there was no 440.3 nm system, which was previously attributed to the manifestation of the N3 defect. It is more likely that the nitrogen-titanium N3 EPR center corresponds to the electron-vibrational system 635.7 nm, which is observed in the luminescence spectra of these crystals. Crystals from the Istok placer contain the OK1, N3, and NU1 centers, but luminescence attributed to the oxygen-containing centers is absent in the region of 610-670 nm. For the Mayat placer crystals, the reverse situation was observed. The luminescence ascribed to the oxygen-containing centers was detected for 17 crystals, but there were no OK1, N3, and NU1 centers according to the EPR and luminescence. This result contradicts the arguments of a number of authors about the oxygen nature of these defects. For 5 crystals from the Mayat placer, the nickel impurity was registered. This indicates the presence of ultrabasic paragenesis diamond crystals in this placer.
DS1984-0458
1984
Nadolinnyi, V.A.Lisoivan, V.I., Nadolinnyi, V.A.Effect of Paramagnetic Nitrogen on the Lattice Parameter Ofdiamonds.Doklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 274, No. 1, PP. 72-75.RussiaMineral Chemistry
DS200512-0760
2004
Nadolinnyi, V.A.Nadolinnyi, V.A., Yreva, O.P., Yelisseyev, A.P., Pokhilenko, N.P., Chepurov, A.A.Disruption of B1 nitrogen defects in 1aB natural diamonds.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 399A, Nov-Dec. pp. 1228-1272.Diamond morphology
DS1994-1966
1994
Nadolinnyy, V.A.Yeliseyev, A.P., Nadolinnyy, V.A.New nickel containing paramagnetic centers in diamondDoklady Academy of Sciences USSR, Vol. 327, Oct. pp. 149-154.Russia, SiberiaDiamond morhology, Nickel Spectroscopy
DS1996-1016
1996
Nadolinnyy, V.A.Nadolinnyy, V.A.The scope for diagnosing the paragenesis of diamonds from opticalcharacteristics.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 344 No. 7, August pp. 73-78.India, Urals, AustraliaDiamond morphology, Pipes, placers
DS202002-0211
2020
Nadolly, V.A.Nadolly, V.A., Shatsky, V.S., Yuryeva, O.P., Rakhmanova, M.I., Komarovskikh, A.Yu., Kalinin, A.A., Palyanov, Yu.N.Formation features of N3V centers in diamonds from the Kholomolokh placer in the Northeast Siberian craton.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 47, 4, 7p. PdfRussia, Siberiadeposit - Khololmolokh

Abstract: In recent years, despite significant progress in the development of new methods for the synthesis of diamond crystals and in their post-growth treatment, many questions remain unclear about the conditions for the formation and degradation of aggregate impurity nitrogen forms. Meanwhile, they are very important for understanding (evaluating) the origin, age, and post-growth conditions of natural diamonds. In the present work, an attempt was made to analyze the causes of the formation of high concentrations of N3V centers in natural IaB-type diamonds from the Kholomolokh placer (the Northeast Siberian craton). The possibility of decay of B centers during the plastic deformation of diamonds is analyzed and experiments on the high-temperature annealing of diamonds containing B centers are reported. The formation of N3V centers during the destruction of the B centers at high-pressure annealing of crystals has been established by experiment. It is assumed that, in the post-growth period, diamond crystals were exposed to tectono-thermal stages of raising the superplumes of the Earth's crust of the Siberian craton.
DS1998-0845
1998
NadonLeckie, D.A., Nadon, Spirito, McCurdy, FriskeEvolution of fluvial landscapes in the Western Canada Foreland Basin; Late Jurassic to the modern...Geological Survey of Canada Open File, No. 2369Alberta, Northwest TerritoriesGeochemistry - regional stream sediment
DS2001-0722
2001
NadyozhinaMalevsky-Malevich, S.P., Molkentin, NadyozhinaNumerical simulation of permafrost parameters distribution in RussiaCold Regions Science and Tech., Vol. 32, No. 1, pp. 1-11.RussiaPermafrost, climate change - not specific to diamonds
DS2002-1123
2002
Naeher, U.Naeher, U.An update on Southern Era reosurces Ltd. 2002 diamond exploration program in the Northwest Territories. Yamba Lake, Back Lake, Misty Lake, WO, Monument, Lac de Gras30th. Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, Abstracts Of Talks And Posters, Nov. 20-22, p. 48,49. abstractNorthwest TerritoriesExploration - brief overview
DS200612-0963
2005
Naeher, U.Naeher, U.Southern Era Diamonds Inc. - An update on Southern Era Diamonds 2004-2005 diamond exploration programs in NWT.32ndYellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 48 abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesUpdate - SouthernEra
DS201312-0660
2013
Naemura, K.Obata, M., Ozawa, K., Naemura, K., Miyake, A.Isochemical breakdown of garnet in orogenic garnet peridotite and its implication to reaction kinetics.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 107, 6, pp. 881-895.Europe, Czech RepublicKelphite
DS200412-1399
2004
Naemura, T.Nakamura, D., Svojtka, K., Naemura, T., HirajamaVery high pressure >4 GPa eclogite associated with the Moldanubian Zone garnet peridotite Nove Dory, Czech Republic.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 22, 6, pp. 593-603.Europe, Czech RepublicEclogite, UHP
DS201112-0439
2011
Naeraa, T.Hoffmann, J.E., Munker, C., Naeraa, T., Rosing, M.T., Herwartz, D., Garbe-Schonberg, Svahnberg, H.Mechanisms of Archean crust formation inferred from high precision HFSE systematics in TTGs.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 75, 15, pp. 4157-4178.Europe, GreenlandMantle melting
DS201212-0714
2012
Naeraa, T.Szilas, K., Naeraa, T., Schersten, A., Stendal, H., Frei, R., Van Hinsberg, V.J., Kokfelt, T.F., Rosing, M.T.Origin of Mesoarchean arc related rocks with boninite-komatiite affinities from southern West Greenland.Lithos, in pressEurope, GreenlandBoninites
DS1970-0254
1971
Naeser, C.S.Brookins, D.G., Naeser, C.S.Age of Emplacement of Riley County, Kansas Kimberlites and A Possible Minimum Age for the Dakota Sandstone.Geological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 82, No. 6, PP. 1723-1726.KansasKimberlite, Central States, Geochronology
DS1970-0370
1971
Naeser, C.W.Naeser, C.W.Geochronology of the Navajo-hopi Diatremes, Four Corners AreJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 76, No. 20, PP. 4978-4985.United States, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, Colorado Plateau, Rocky MountainsDiatreme
DS1975-0566
1977
Naeser, C.W.Mccallum, M.E., Naeser, C.W.Fission Track Ages of Tertiary Intrusive Rocks in the Manhattan Mining District, Northern Front Range Colorado.Isochron West., No. 18, PP. 1-4.United States, Colorado, State Line, Rocky MountainsBlank
DS1975-0583
1977
Naeser, C.W.Naeser, C.W., Mccallum, M.E.Fission Track Dating of Kimberlitic ZirconsInternational Kimberlite Conference SECOND EXTENDED ABSTRACT VOLUME., United States, State Line, Rocky MountainsIsotope
DS1983-0274
1983
Naeser, C.W.Haggerty, S.E., Raber, E., Naeser, C.W.Fissure Track Dating of Kimberlitic ZirconsEarth Plan. Sci. Letters, Vol. 63, No. 1, PP. 41-50.South Africa, Botswana, Angola, Tanzania, Wyoming, State LineGeochronology, Kimberley Pool, Orapa, Val Do Queve, Koffiefontein
DS1989-1086
1989
Naeser, N.D.Naeser, N.D., McCulloch, T.H.Thermal history of sedimentary basins- methods and case historiesSpringer-Verlag, 312p. ISBN 3-540-96702-8GlobalBook -Thermal history, Table of contents
DS201112-0855
2002
Naeth, A.Reid, N.B., Naeth, A.Ekati diamond mine processed kimberlite reclamation.University of British Columbia, Thesis,Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Ekati
DS201412-0611
2014
Naeth, A.M.Naeth, A.M., Wilkinson, S.R.Establishment of restoration trajectories for Up land Tundra Communities on diamond mine wastes in the Canadian Arctic.Restoration Ecology, Vol. 22, 4, pp. 534-543.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Ekati
DS200612-1149
2005
Naeth, M.A.Reid, N.B., Naeth, M.A.Establishment of a vegetation cover on tundra kimberlite mine tailings. 2. A field study.Restoration Ecology, Vol. 13, 4, pp. 602-608.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesEnvironmental
DS201512-1951
2015
Naeth, M.A.Miller, V.S., Naeth, M.A.Development of soils and plant communities for reclamation in northern diamond mines.43rd Annual Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts, abstract p. 68.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesReclamation

Abstract: Reclamation research in the north over the past 30 years has primarily focused on oil and gas and transportation corridor disturbances. Among industries, disturbances caused by infrastructure and transportation corridors are similar. However, each industry has its unique by products that determine which reclamation methods are most appropriate to achieve end land use goals and the relative ease of reclamation. The purpose of this research program is to develop methods to enhance revegetation of disturbed sites at diamond mines in the north, in particular to create soil like substrates on sites where soil has been removed with the use of onsite and commercial materials and to reestablish a diverse native plant community. Reclamation substrates include by products from the diamond mining process like crushed rock, till/lake sediment, processed kimberlite and various combinations of till/lake sediment and processed kimberlite. Greenhouse experiments were also conducted at the University of Alberta to test a range of substrates and amendments with potential to aid reclamation in the field. In 2013 and 2014, research sites were established at Diavik Diamond Mine using the best performing substrates to determine the effect of micro topography, addition of organic matter and erosion control on native grass and forb establishment; effective moss propagation techniques and; effective lichen propagation methods. Preliminary results and observations from completed greenhouse experiments and the first two growing seasons will be discussed. This research directly enhances knowledge and sustainability of northern regions. It will lead to recommendations for enhanced reclamation protocols to be used by industry and government in the north.
DS1975-1166
1979
Nag, D.K.Nag, D.K.Bibliography on Indian KimberliteIndian Minerals, Vol. 33, No. 4, PP. 53-55.IndiaBibliography
DS2002-1124
2002
Nag, P. editor.Nag, P. editor.National atlas of India. A set of popular maps - abridged edition - 30 coloured plates website www.kkagencies.com $ 80. accept credit cards., www.kkagencies.comIndiaOverview of India ( country, population, roads, railwa
DS200412-1394
2002
Nag, P.editor.Nag, P.editor.National atlas of India. a set of popular maps - abridged edition- 30 coloured plates. including physiography.Chapter 4 on minerals.info @kkagencies.com, www.kkagencies.comIndiaAtlas - collection Overview of India ( country, population, roads, railwa
DS1984-0540
1984
Nag, S.Nag, S., Chakravorty, P.S., Smith, T.E., Huang, C.H.The Petrology and Geochemistry of Intrusive Alkaline Rocks Of Elchuru, Prakasam District, Andhra Pradesh, India.Geological Journal, Vol. 19, PP. 57-76.India, Andhra PradeshIjolite, Malignite, Geochemistry, Petrology
DS2001-1057
2001
Nag, S.Shanker, R., Nag, S., Ganguly, A., Absar, Rawat, SinghAre Majhgawan Hinota pipe rocks truly group I kimberlite?Indian Acad. Sciences Earth and Plan., Vol. 110, No. 1, pp. 63-76.IndiaKimberlite - classification, Deposit - Majhgawan
DS200412-1793
2003
Nag, S.Shanker, R., Nag, S., Ganguly, A., Rawat, B.P.Chemistry of common and minor minerals in orangeite ( group II kimberlite) of Majhgawan, Panna District, Madhya Pradesh, India.Indian Journal of Geology, Vol. 73, pp. 207-220.India, Madhya PradeshGeochemistry - orangeite
DS201312-0936
2013
Naga Lakshmi, V.Vani, T., Naga Lakshmi, V.Inetgration of geophysical and geological dat a of kimberlites in Narayanpet-Maddur field, Andhra Pradesh, India.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, Special Issue of the Journal of the Geological Society of India,, Vol. 2, pp. 229-239.India, Andhra PradeshDeposit - Narayanpet
DS201012-0525
2010
Naga Raju, K.Naga Raju, K., Subba Rao, D.V., Balaram, V.Polybaric melting in an upwelling harzburgite diapir: evidence from central Indian boninite like rocks.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractIndiaBoninites
DS1985-0474
1985
Nagabhushanam, B.Nagabhushanam, B., Venkatanarayana, B.Geology and Geochemistry of Kimberlites of Wajrakarur Area, anantapur District, Andhra Pradesh.Geophysical Research. Bulletin., Vol. 23, No. 1, PP. 43-54.India, Andhra Pradesh, WajrahkarurPetrology, Mineral Chemistry, Geochronology
DS1970-0099
1970
Nagaeva, N.P.Ilupin, I.P., Nagaeva, N.P.Chromium and Nickel in an Ilmenite from the Yakutian Kimberlites.In: Geology, Petrography And Mineralogy of Magmatic Formatio, PP. 288-300.RussiaBlank
DS201312-0624
2013
Nagagawa, T.Nagagawa, T., Tackley, P.J.Implications of high core thermal conductivity on Earth's coupled mantle and core evolution.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 40, 11, pp. 2652-2656.MantleGeothermometry
DS201412-0403
2014
Nagahara, H.Imada, S., Ohta, K., Yagi, T., Hirose, K., Yoshida, H., Nagahara, H.Measurements of lattice thermal conductivity of MgO to core-mantle boundary.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 41, 13, pp. 4542-4547.MantleGeothermometry
DS1987-0542
1987
Nagahara, N.Obata, M., Nagahara, N.Layering of alpine type peridotite and the segregation of partial melt In the upper mantleJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 92, No. b5 April 10, pp. 3467-3474JapanMantle genesis, Metasomatism
DS200612-1263
2006
Nagai, T.Seto, Y., Hamane, D., Nagai, T., Fujino, K.The fate of carbonates with subducted slabs into the lower mantle and a possible formation of diamonds.International Mineralogical Association 19th. General Meeting, held Kobe, Japan July 23-28 2006, Abstract p. 130.MantleDiamond genesis, subduction
DS200712-1061
2006
Nagai, T.Takafuji, N., Fujino, K., Nagai, T., Seto, Y., Hamane, D.Decarbonation reaction of magnesite in subduction slabs at the lower mantle.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 33, 10, pp. 651-654.MantleSubduction
DS200712-1062
2006
Nagai, T.Takafuji, N., Fujino, K., Nagai, T., Seto, Y., Hamane, D.Decarbonation reaction of magnesite in subducting slabs at the lower mantle.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 33, 10, pp. 651-654.MantleSubduction
DS200812-1042
2008
Nagai, T.Seto, Y., Hamane, D., Nagai, T., Fujino, K.Fate of carbonates within oceanic plates subducted to the lower mantle, and a possible mechanism of diamond formation.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 35, 4, pp. 223-229.MantleUHP, Diamond genesis
DS1986-0693
1986
Nagaleva, N.B.Rybalko, S.I., Gamarik, M.Y., Rybalkova, E.A., Nagaleva, N.B.The finding of feldspar in diamond.(Russian)Mineral. Zhurnal, (Russian), Vol.8, No. 6, pp. 78-79RussiaBlank
DS200612-0531
2006
Naganjaneyulu, K.Harinarayana, T., Naganjaneyulu, K., Patro, B.P.K.Detection of a collision zone in south Indian Shield region from magnetotelluric studies.Gondwana Research, Vol. 10, Aug.1-2, pp. 48-56.IndiaGeophysics - tellurics
DS201012-0526
2010
Naganjaneyulu, K.Naganjaneyulu, K., Santosh, M.The Cambrian collisional suture of Gondwana in southern India: a geophysical appraisal.Journal of Geodynamics, Vol. 50, 3-4, pp. 256-267.IndiaTectonics
DS201808-1762
2018
Naganjaneyulu, K.Kusham, A., Pratap, B., Naick, P., Naganjaneyulu, K.Lithospheric architecture in the Archean Dharwar craton, India: a magnetotelluric model.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 183, pp. 43-53.Indiacraton

Abstract: oriented, 280?km long profile (from Yellapura to Sindhanur) with 22 magnetotelluric stations. Regional strike directions, estimated were -5° and 13° for the crust and the lithospheric mantle respectively. Our results indicate in western Dharwar craton, presence of low resistivity zones in the crust besides two significant upper mantle conductive features within the highly resistive Archaean lithosphere. We analyze the available geophysical data that include heat flow, seismic tomography and magnetotellurics (MT) from the Dharwar craton. Our inference supports to the existence of a thick lithosphere. A thickness of more than 200?km is estimated for the lithosphere beneath the Dharwar craton by our magnetotelluric model. The study has brought out the presence of lithospheric upper mantle conductive features in the depth range of 100-200?km bounded to the west part of the magnetotelluric profile. Significant variations in conductivity are seen on either side of the Chitradurga shear zone. The conductive feature in the depth range 120-150?km is related with kimberlite melts and the conductive nature in the depth range 160-200?km is explained by refertilization process, as craton passed over the Marion (ca. 90?Ma) hotspot.
DS201905-1055
2019
Naganjaneyulu, K.Kusham, A.P., Naick, B.P., Naganjaneyulu, K.Crustal and lithospheric mantle conductivity structure in the Dharwar craton, India.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 176, pp. 253-263.Indiageophysics - magnetotellurics

Abstract: The vertical extension and structure of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle beneath the Archean Dharwar craton is the main attraction of the work presented here. To delineate the electrical conductivity structure of the Dharwar craton, a magnetotelluric study is carried out. This study comprises magnetotelluric data at 22 stations along a west-east slanting profile. Inter-station spacing is approximately 15?km. This magnetotelluric study is initiated from Dandeli (in the west) to Sindhanur (in the east side). The preferable geoelectric strike directions for the crust and lithospheric mantle are N3°E and N16°E respectively. A 2-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model derived by using the crustal and lithospheric mantle strike azimuths, identified conductive features in the stable continental Dharwar craton. In the crust, prominent conductors are present in the eastern and western part of the profile. A conducting feature is present in the deeper crust associated with the Chitradurga shear zone (CSZ). The study infers a thick lithosphere beneath Dharwar craton as a preserved cratonic nucleus on the eastern and a few conductive anomalies in the western part of the Dharwar craton. The model shows two separate conductors in the depth range of 110-250?km. This study shows, the possibility of presence of kimberlite melt in the western Dharwar craton in the depth range of 110-150?km.
DS201904-0752
2019
Nagao, J. KagiKobayashi, M., Sumino, H., Burgess, R., Nakai, S., Iizuka, T., Nagao, J. Kagi, H., Nakamura, M., Takahashi, E., Kogiso, T., Ballentine, C.J.Halogen heterogeneity in the lithosphere and evolution of mantle halogen abundances inferred from intraplate mantle xenoliths. Kilbourne HoleGeochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 20, 2, pp. 952-973.United States, New Mexicoxenoliths

Abstract: Elemental and isotopic compositions of volatile species such as halogens, noble gases, hydrogen, and carbon can be used to trace the evolution of these species in the Earth. Halogens are important tracers of subduction recycling of surface volatiles into the mantle: however, there is only limited understanding of halogens in the mantle. Here we provide new halogen data of mantle xenoliths from intraplate settings. The mantle xenoliths show a wide range of halogen elemental ratios, which are expected to be related to later processes after the xenoliths formed. A similar primary halogen component is present in the xenoliths sampled from different localities. This suggests that the mantle has the uniform halogen composition over a wide scale. The halogen composition in the convecting mantle is expected to have remained constant over more than 2 billion years, despite subduction of iodine-rich halogens. We used mass balance calculations to gain understanding into evolution rate of I/Cl ratio in the mantle. Calculations suggest that, in order to maintain the I/Cl ratio of the mantle over 2 Gyr, the I/Cl ratio of the subducted halogens must be no more than several times higher than the present-day mantle value.
DS1987-0228
1987
Nagao, K.Fukunaga, K., Matsuda, J., Nagao, K., Miyamoto, N., Ito, K.Noble gas enrichment in vapour growth diamonds and the origin of Diamonds in urelitesNature, Vol. 328, No. 6126, July 9, pp. 141-143GlobalMeteorites, Diamond
DS1989-0956
1989
Nagao, K.Matsuda, J., Nagao, K.Noble gas emplacement in shock produced diamondsGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 53, pp. 1117-1121GlobalDiamond Synthesis, Ureilites
DS1994-1525
1994
Nagao, K.Sano, Y., Nagao, K., Pillinger, C.T.Carbon and noble gases in Archean chertChemical Geology, Vol. 112, No. 3-4, February 10, pp. 327-342GlobalChert, Geochemistry
DS200912-0032
2008
Nagarajan, B.Banerjee, P., Burgmann, R., Nagarajan, B., Apel, E.Intraplate deformation of the Indian subcontinent.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 35, 18, Sept. 28, L18301IndiaSubduction
DS1993-1587
1993
Nagarajan, N.Thakur, N.K., Nagarajan, N., Joshi, M.S.Estimation of the regional Bouguer gravity field over the Indian Peninsula using two dimensional filtering.Tectonophysics, Vol. 225, pp. 543-550.IndiaGeophysics -gravity
DS200612-1050
2006
Nagarajan, N.Patro, B.P.K., Nagarajan, N., Sarma, S.V.S.Crustal geoelectric structure and the focal depths of major stable continental region earthquakes in India.Current Science, Vol. 90, 1, Jan. 10, pp. 107-113..Asia, IndiaGeophysics - seismics, tectonics
DS200812-1007
2008
Nagarajan, N.Satry, R.S., Nagarajan, N., Sarma, S.V.S.Electrical imaging of deep crustal features of Kutch, India.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 172, no. 3, March pp. 934-944.IndiaGeophysics - seismics
DS201805-0955
2018
Nagaraju, B.Kokandakar, G.J., Ghodke, S.S., Rathna, K., Laxman, B. M., Nagaraju, B., Bhosle, M.V., Kumar, K.V.Density, viscosity and velocity ( ascent rate) of alkaline magmas.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 91, pp. 135-146.IndiaAlkaline - Prakasam

Abstract: Three distinct alkaline magmas, represented by shonkinite, lamprophyre and alkali basalt dykes, characterize a significant magmatic expression of rift-related mantle-derived igneous activity in the Mesoproterozoic Prakasam Alkaline Province, SE India. In the present study we have estimated emplacement velocities (ascent rates) for these three varied alkaline magmas and compared with other silicate magmas to explore composition control on the ascent rates. The alkaline dykes have variable widths and lengths with none of the dykes wider than 1 m. The shonkinites are fine- to medium-grained rocks with clinopyroxene, phologopite, amphibole, K-feldspar perthite and nepheline as essential minerals. They exhibit equigranular hypidiomorphic to foliated textures. Lamprophyres and alkali basalts characteristically show porphyritic textures. Olivine, clinopyroxene, amphibole and biotite are distinct phenocrysts in lamprophyres whereas olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase form the phenocrystic mineralogy in the alkali basalts. The calculated densities [2.54-2.71 g/cc for shonkinite; 2.61-2.78 g/cc for lamprophyre; 2.66-2.74 g/cc for alkali basalt] and viscosities [3.11-3.39 Pa s for shonkinite; 3.01-3.28 Pa s for lamprophyre; 2.72-3.09 Pa s for alkali basalt] are utilized to compute velocities (ascent rates) of the three alkaline magmas. Since the lamprophyres and alkali basalts are crystal-laden, we have also calculated effective viscosities to infer crystal control on the velocities. Twenty percent of crystals in the magma increase the viscosity by 2.7 times consequently decrease ascent rate by 2.7 times compared to the crystal-free magmas. The computed ascent rates range from 0.11-2.13 m/sec, 0.23-2.77 m/sec and 1.16-2.89 m/sec for shonkinite, lamprophyre and alkali basalt magmas respectively. Ascent rates increase with the width of the dykes and density difference, and decrease with magma viscosity and proportion of crystals. If a constant width of 1 m is assumed in the magma-filled dyke propagation model, then the sequence of emplacement velocities in the decreasing order is alkaline magmas (4.68-15.31 m/sec) > ultramafic-mafic magmas (3.81-4.30 m/sec) > intermediate-felsic magmas (1.76-2.56 m/sec). We propose that SiO2 content in the terrestrial magmas can be modeled as a semi-quantitative "geospeedometer" of the magma ascent rates.
DS201805-0965
2018
Nagaraju, B.Nagaraju, B., Ghodke, S.S., Rathna, K., Kokandakar, G.J., Bhosle, M.V., Kumar, K.V.Fractal analysis of in situ host rock nepheline sysenite xenoliths in a micro- shonkinite dyke ( The Elchuru alkaline complex, SE India).Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 91, 3, pp. 263-272.Indiashonkinite

Abstract: Formation of the fragments of the wall-rock during dyking is one of the important manifestations of instantaneous magmatic events. This process is well documented at shallower depths of Earth’s crust but not at deeper levels. In this paper the in situ xenoliths of host rock nepheline syenite within a micro-shonkinite dyke emplaced at mid-crustal depths is described and the fractal theory applied to evaluate origin of the xenoliths. The nepheline syenite xenoliths are angular to oval shaped and sub-millimetre to ~50 cm long. The xenoliths are matrix supported with clasts and matrix being in equal proportions. Partly detached wall-rock fragments indicate incipient xenolith formation, which suggested that the model fragmentation processes is solely due to dyke emplacement. Fractal analytical techniques including clast size distribution, boundary roughness fractal dimension and clast circularity was carried out. The fractal data suggests that hydraulic (tensile) fracturing is the main process of host rock brecciation. However, the clast size and shape are further affected by postfragmentation processes including shear and thermal fracturing, and chemical erosion. The study demonstrates that dyking in an isotropic medium produces fractal size distributions of host rock xenoliths; however, post-fragmentation processes modify original fractal size distributions.
DS200612-1267
2005
Nagaraju, B.V.Sharma, R., Muthry, Ch.V.V.S., Nagaraju, B.V., Gouda, H.C., Singh, R.K.Interpretation of aeromagnetic dat a of Panna and adjoining areas for evaluating of structural patterns favourable for emplacement of KCRs and depth magneticsGeological Society of India, Bangalore November Meeting Group Discussion on Kimberlites and Related Rocks India, Abstract p. 121-122.India, Madhya Pradesh, Aravalli Bundelkhand CratonGeophysics - magnetics
DS200812-1043
2008
Nagaraju, B.V.Sharma, R., Murthy, C.V.V.S., Mishra, V.P., Nagaraju, B.V., Gouda, H.C., Singh, R.K.Study of structural pattern through aeromagnetic dat a for mineral prospecting and kimberlite clan rocks in an area around Mahbubnagar, A.P.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 72, 2, pp. 175-189.IndiaGeophysics - magnetics
DS201212-0387
2012
Nagaraju, E.Kumar, A., Nagaraju, E., Besse, J., Bhaskar Rao, Y.J.New age, geochemical and paleomagnetic dat a on a 2.21 Ga dyke swarm from south India: constraints on paleoproterozic reconstruction.Precambrian Research, Vol. 221-221, pp. 123-138.IndiaGeochronology, LIP, rock magnetism
DS201412-0487
2014
Nagaraju, E.Kumar, A., Nagaraju, E., Srinivasa Sarma, D., Davis, D.W.Precise baddeleyite geochronology by the thermal extraction thermal ionization mass spectrometry method.Chemical Geology, Vol. 371, pp. 72-79.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Palabora carbonatite
DS200812-1137
2008
Nagaraju, K.Subba Rao, D.V., Sridhar, D.N., Balaram, V., Nagaraju, K., Gnaneshwara Rao, T., Keshavakrishna, A., Singh, U.P.Proterozoic mafic ultramafic dyke swarms in the vicinity of Chhattisgarh Khariar Singhora basins in northern Bastar Craton, central India.Indian Dykes: editors Srivastava, Sivaji, Chalapathi Rao, pp. 377-396.IndiaBoninites
DS201606-1106
2016
Nagaraju, P.Ray, L., Nagaraju, P., Singh, S.P., Ravi, G., Roy, S.Radioelemental, petrological and geochemical characterization of the Bundelk hand craton, central India: implication in the Archean geodynamic evolution.International Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 105, 4, pp. 1087-1107.IndiaNot specific to diamonds

Abstract: We have carried out radioelemental (232Th, 238U, 40K), petrological and geochemical analyses on granitoids and gneisses covering major rock formations of the Bundelkhand craton, central India. Our data reveal that above characteristics are distinct among granitoids (i.e. pink, biotite and grey granitoids) and gneisses (i.e. potassic and sodic types). Pink granitoid is K-feldspar-rich and meta-aluminous to per-aluminous in character. Biotite granitoid is meta-aluminous in character. Grey granitoid is rich in Na-feldspar and mafic minerals, granodiorite to diorite in composition and meta-aluminous in character. Among these granitoids, radioelements (Th, U, K) are highest in pink granitoid (45.0 ± 21.7 ppm, 7.2 ± 3.4 ppm, 4.2 ± 0.4 %), intermediate in biotite granitoid (44.5 ± 28.2 ppm, 5.4 ± 2.8 ppm, 3.4 ± 0.7 %) and lowest in grey granitoid (17.7 ± 4.3 ppm, 4.4 ± 0.6 ppm, 3.0 ± 0.4 %). Among gneisses, potassic-type gneisses have higher radioelements (11.8 ± 5.3 ppm, 3.1 ± 1.2 ppm, 2.0 ± 0.5 %) than the sodic-type gneisses (5.6 ± 2.8 ppm, 1.3 ± 0.5 ppm, 1.4 ± 0.7 %). Moreover, the pink granitoid and the biotite granitoid have higher Th/U (6 and 8, respectively) compared to the grey granitoid (Th/U: 4), implying enrichment of Th in pink and biotite granitoids relative to grey granitoid. K/U among pink, biotite and grey granitoids shows little variation (0.6 × 104, 0.6 × 104, 0.7 × 104, respectively), indicating relatively similar increase in K and U. Therefore, mineralogical and petrological data along with radioelemental ratios suggest that radioelemental variations in these lithounits are mainly related to abundances of the radioactive minerals that have formed by the fractionation of LILE from different magma sources. Based on present data, the craton can be divided into three distinct zones that can be correlated with its evolution in time and space. The central part, where gneisses are associated with metavolcanics of greenstone belt, is characterized by lowest radioelements and is the oldest component. The southern part, dominated by pink granitoid, is characterized by highest radioelements and is the youngest part. The northern part, dominated by grey and biotite granitoid, is characterized by moderate radioelements.
DS201806-1239
2018
Nagarkar, S.Patwardhan, B., Nagarkar, S., Gadre, S.R., Lakhotia, S.C., Katoch, V.M., Moher, D.A critical analysis of the 'UGC' approved list of journals.Current Science, Vol. 114, 6, Mar. 25, pp. 1299-1303.Indialegal

Abstract: Scholarly journals play an important role in maintaining the quality and integrity of research by what they publish. Unethical practices in publishing are leading to an increased number of predatory, dubious and low-quality journals worldwide. It has been reported that the percentage of research articles published in predatory journals is high in India. The University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi has published an 'approved list of journals', which has been criticized due to inclusion of many substandard journals. We have developed a protocol with objective criteria for identifying journals that do not follow good publication practices. We studied 1336 journals randomly selected from 5699 in the university source component of the 'UGC-approved list'. We analysed 1009 journals after excluding 327 indexed in Scopus/Web of Science. About 34.5% of the 1009 journals were disqualified under the basic criteria because of incorrect or non-availability of essential information such as address, website details and names of editors; another 52.3% of them provided false information such as incorrect ISSN, false claims about impact factor, claimed indexing in dubious indexing databases or had poor credentials of editors. Our results suggest that over 88% of the non-indexed journals in the university source component of the UGC-approved list, included on the basis of suggestions from different universities, could be of low quality. In view of these results, the current UGC-approved list of journals needs serious reconsideration. New regulations to curtail unethical practices in scientific publishing along with organization of awareness programmes about publication ethics at Indian universities and research institutes are urgently needed.
DS1998-1059
1998
Nagasaki, A.Nagasaki, A., Enami, M.Strontium bearing zoisite and epidote in ultra high pressure metamorphic rocks from Su Lu province... ultra high pressure (UHP) conditionsAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 83, pp. 240-7.Chinametamorphism, strontium, Dabie Shan
DS1993-1108
1993
Nagasawa, H.Nagasawa, H., Morioka, M.Does diffusion change the rare earth patterns of igneous rocks?Geochemical Journal, Vol. 26, pp. 347-355GlobalIgneous rocks, Melilite, Geochemistry, rare earth elements (REE).
DS1993-1109
1993
Nagasawa, H.Nagasawa, H., Morioka, M.Does diffusion change the rare earth patterns of igneous rocksGeochemical Journal, Vol. 26, No. 6, pp. 347-356.GlobalIgneous rocks, Rare earth geochronology
DS201506-0284
2015
Nagase, T.Miyahara, M., Ohtani, E., El Goresy, A., Lin, Y., Feng, L.,Zhang, J-C., Gillet, P., Nagase, T., Muto, J., Nishijima, M.Unique large diamonds in a urelilite from Almahat a Sitta TC3, asteroid.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 163, pp. 14-26.TechnologyUrelilite
DS201312-0356
2013
Nagashima, K.Hallis, L.J., Huss, G.R., Taylor, D.R., Nagashima, K., Halldorsson, S.A., Hilton, D.R.The D/H ratio of the deep mantle.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractMantleDeuterium/Hydrogen
DS201312-0625
2012
Nagashima, K.Nagashima, K., Nara, M., Matsuda,J-I.Raman spectroscopic study of diamond and graphite in ureilites and the origin of diamonds.Meteorites and Planetary Science, Vol. 47, 11, pp. 1728-1737. (thanks Grant)TechnologyUrelilite
DS201512-1924
2015
Nagashima, K.Hallis, L.J., Huss, G.R., Nagashima, K., Taylor, G.J., Halldorsson, S.A.Evidence of primordial water in Earth's deep mantle.Science, Vol. 350, 6252 Nov. 13, pp. 795-797.MantleWater

Abstract: The hydrogen-isotope [deuterium/hydrogen (D/H)] ratio of Earth can be used to constrain the origin of its water. However, the most accessible reservoir, Earth’s oceans, may no longer represent the original (primordial) D/H ratio, owing to changes caused by water cycling between the surface and the interior. Thus, a reservoir completely isolated from surface processes is required to define Earth’s original D/H signature. Here we present data for Baffin Island and Icelandic lavas, which suggest that the deep mantle has a low D/H ratio (dD more negative than -218 per mil). Such strongly negative values indicate the existence of a component within Earth’s interior that inherited its D/H ratio directly from the protosolar nebula.
DS1983-0474
1983
Nagata, J.Nagata, J., Goto, A., Obata, M.The Parabolic Pattern of Chromium Partioning Observed Between Pyroxenes and Spinel from Ultramafic Rocks and its Petrologic Significance.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 82, No. 1, PP. 42-51.GlobalMineral Chemistry, Mineralogy
DS1982-0356
1982
Nagata, K.Labrecque, J.J., Nagata, K., Ishizaki, C., Ishizaki, K.Environmental Impact of Diamond Mining in the Guanamo Riverbasin.Agid Report No. 7, Hidden Wealth: Mineral Exploration Techni, PAPER F3, P. 185. (abstract.)GlobalChemistry, Waters
DS1989-1147
1989
Nagata, Y.Ohtani, E., Kawabe, I., Moriyama, J., Nagata, Y.Partitioning of elements between majorite garnet and melt and Implications for petrogenesis of komatiiteContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 103, pp. 263-269. Database # 18231GlobalArchean mantle, Komatiite
DS1995-1379
1995
Nagata, Y.Ohtani, E., Nagata, Y., Suzuki, A., Kato, T.Melting relations of peridotite and the density crossover in planetarymantles.Chemical Geology, Vol. 120, No. 3-4, March 1, pp. 207-221.MantleMelt, majorite, Magma
DS201610-1890
2016
Nagayoshi, M.Nagayoshi, M., Kubo, T., Kato, T.Experimental investigation of the kinetics of the spinel to garnet transformation in peridotite: a preliminary study.American Mineralogist, Vol. 101, pp. 2020-2028.TechnologyReaction rim, UHP

Abstract: To study the kinetics of the spinel-to-garnet transformation in peridotite, we conducted reaction experiments in the garnet peridotite stability field (3.2 GPa, 1020-1220 °C, for 0.6-30 h) using a single spinel crystal embedded in monomineralic orthopyroxene powder or in a mixture of powdered orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene. The growth textures observed in the reaction rim between the spinel crystal and the polycrystalline pyroxenes show that the reaction rim grew in both the spinel and pyroxenes directions, suggesting mobility of both SiO2 and R2O3 components (where R is a trivalent cation). Olivine grains formed only in the presence of monomineralic orthopyroxene and were present in some domains without forming reaction rims. Based on a diffusion-controlled growth model, the growth kinetics of the garnet reaction rim can be described by [x(t)]2 = k0 exp(-H*/RT)t, where x(t) is the rim width at time t, R is the gas constant, T is the absolute temperature, and H* is the activation enthalpy of reaction; k0 and H* are, respectively, k0 = 10-19.8 ± 4.9 m2/s and H* = 171 ± 58 kJ/mol. The development of a garnet reaction rim around a spinel core has been observed in alpine-type peridotitic rocks and mantle xenoliths. The reaction rims experimentally produced in this study are characteristic of corona textures observed in natural rocks, and the experimentally measured growth rate of the rims places important constraints on dynamic transformation processes involving spinel and garnet in peridotite. However, to reconstruct the P-T-t history of the corona texture based on these elementary processes, additional detailed studies on the textural evolution and quantitative kinetics of the garnet-rim growth stage are required.
DS1988-0494
1988
Nagaytsev, Yu.V.Nagaytsev, Yu.V.The mobilization of ore elements in the course of metamorphic reactions andprocessesInternational Geology Review, Vol. 30, No. 10, October pp. 1084-1091. Database # 1788RussiaGenesis, metamorphism
DS200412-0584
2003
Nagel, T.Froitzheim, N., Pleuger, J., Roller, S., Nagel, T.Exhumation of high and ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks by slab extraction.Geology, Vol. 31, 10, p. 925-8.Europe, AlpsUHP, metamorphism
DS201012-0674
2010
Nagel, T.J.Schmidt, S., Nagel, T.J., Froitzheim, N.A new occurrence of microdiamond bearing metamorphic rocks, SW Rhodopes, Greece.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 22, 2, pp. 189-198.Europe, GreeceMetamorphic diamonds
DS201703-0436
2017
Nagel, T.J.Van Acken, D., Luguet, A., Pearson, D.G., Nowell, G.M., Fonseca, R.O.C., Nagel, T.J., Schulz, T.Mesoarchean melting and Neoarchean ro Paleoproterozoic metasomatism during the formation of the cratonic mantle keel beneath West Greenland.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 203, pp. 37-53.Europe, GreenlandCraton
DS201811-2586
2018
Nagel, T.J.Kroner, A., Nagel, T.J., Hoffmann, J.E., Liu, X., Wong, J., Hegner, E., Xie, H., Kasper, U., Hofmann, A., Liu, D.High temperature metamorphism and crustal melting at ca. 3.2 Ga in the eastern Kaapvaal craton.Precambrian Research, Vol. 317, pp. 101-116.Africa, South Africacraton

Abstract: The question of whether high-grade metamorphism and crustal melting in the early Archaean were associated with modern-style plate tectonics is a major issue in unravelling early Earth crustal evolution, and the eastern Kaapvaal craton has featured prominently in this debate. We discuss a major ca. 3.2?Ga tectono-magmatic-metamorphic event in the Ancient Gneiss Complex (AGC) of Swaziland, a multiply deformed medium- to high-grade terrane in the eastern Kaapvaal craton consisting of 3.66-3.20?Ga granitoid gneisses and infolded greenstone remnants, metasedimentary assemblages and mafic dykes. We report on a 3.2?Ga granulite-facies assemblage in a metagabbro of the AGC of central Swaziland and relate this to a major thermo-magmatic event that not only affected the AGC but also the neighbouring Barberton granitoid-greenstone terrane. Some previous models have related the 3.2?Ga event in the eastern Kaapvaal craton to subduction processes, but we see no evidence for long, narrow belts and metamorphic facies changes reflecting lithospheric suture zones, and there is no unidirectional asymmetry in the thermal structure across the entire region from Swaziland to the southern Barberton granite-greenstone terrane as is typical of Phanerozoic and Proterozoic belts. Instead, we consider an underplating event at ca. 3.2?Ga, giving rise to melting in the lower crust and mixing with mantle-derived under- and intraplated mafic magma to generate the voluminous granitoid assemblages now observed in the AGC and the southern Barberton terrane. This is compatible with large-scale crustal reworking during a major thermo-magmatic event and the apparent lack of a mafic lower crust in the Kaapvaal craton as shown by seismic data.
DS1992-0255
1992
Nagendra, R.Chunduru, R.K., Nagendra, R., Patangay, N.S.RESDYK- a FORTRAN program for computing apparent resistivity over an infinitely deep outcropping vertical dikeComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 17, No. 10, pp. 1395-1408GlobalComputers, Program -RESDYK
DS201112-0715
2011
Nageswara Rao, B.Nageswara Rao, B., Kumar, N., Singh, A.P., Prabhakar Rao, M.R.K., Mall, D.M., Singh, B.Crustal density structure across the Central Indian shear zone from gravity data.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 42, 3, pp. 341-353..IndiaGeophysics - Bundelkhand Craton
DS1996-1017
1996
Nagihara, S.Nagihara, S., Lister, C.R.B., Sclater, J.G.Relating of old oceanic lithosphere: deductions from observationsEarth and Plan. Sci. Letters, Vol. 139, pp. 91-104GlobalLithosphere, Geothermometry
DS1996-1018
1996
Nagihara, S./Nagihara, S./, Lister, C.R.B., Sclater, J.G.Reheating of old oceanic lithosphere: deductions from observationsEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 139, pp. 91-104.MantleHot spots, Thermal history
DS2001-0426
2001
NaglerGuillot, S., Hattoriu, K.H., DeSigoyer, Nagler, AuzendeEvidence of hydration of the mantle wedge and its role in the exhumation of eclogitesEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 193, No. 2, pp. 115-27.MantleSubduction, Eclogites
DS1995-0145
1995
Nagler, T.F.Berger, M., Kramers, J.D., Nagler, T.F.Geochemistry and geochronology of charnoender bites in the northern Marginal Zone of the Limpopo Belt.-genesisSchweiz. Mineral. Petrog. Mitt, Vol. 75, pp. 17-42South Africa, ZimbabweGeochemistry, Limpopo Belt -Northern Marginal Zone
DS1998-0809
1998
Nagler, T.F.Kreissig, K., Nagler, T.F., Kramers, J.D.Are Archean provinces juxtaposed terranes? Isotope and trace element geochemical considerations.Mineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 813-4.South Africa, Montana, GreenlandCraton, Geochronology - rare earth elements (REE) patterns
DS1998-1060
1998
Nagler, T.F.Nagler, T.F., Kramers, J.D.neodymium isotopic evolution of the upper mantle during the Precambrian: dat a and the uncertainty of both.Precambrian Research, Vol. 91, No. 3-4, Aug. pp. 233-253.MantlePrecambrian, Geochronology
DS1997-0832
1997
Nagler, Th. F.Nagler, Th. F., Kramers, J.D., Kamber, B.S., Frei, R.Growth of subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath Zimbabwe started at or before 3.8 Ga: Re -Os studyGeology, Vol. 25, No. 11, Nov. pp. 983-986.ZimbabweMantle, Geochronology, chromites
DS1986-0591
1986
Nago, T.Nago, T., Matsumoto, Y., et al.Cenozoic minette from Kawamoto district, Shimane prefecture SouthwestJapan.*JAPGanseki Kobutsu Kosho Gakki-Shi, *JAP, Vol. 81, No. 10, pp. 423-426JapanPetrology, Minette
DS1989-1087
1989
Nago, T.Nago, T., Fujibayashi, N.Highly potassic lamprophyre from the Sera Plateau In the ChugokuMountains, southwest Japan.*JPN.Ganko, *JPN., Vol. 84, No. 8, pp. 70-277JapanMinette, Potassic lamprophyre
DS1991-1213
1991
Nagy, D.Nagy, D.Enclosed area of a polygonActa Geodaetica, Geophysica et Montanistica, Vol. 26, No. 1-4, pp. 9-17GlobalPolygon, Geophysics
DS200412-0439
2004
Nagy, G.Demeny, A., Vennemann, T.W., Hegner, E., Nagy, G., Milton, J.A., Embey-Isztin, A., Homonnay, Z., Dobosi, G.Trace element and C O Sr Nd isotope evidence for subduction related carbonate silicate melts in mantle xenoliths ( Pannonian BasLithos, Vol. 75, 1-2, July pp. 89-113.Europe, HungarySubduction, trace element fingerprinting, petrogenetic
DS200812-0281
2008
Nagy, G.Demeny, A., Casilla, R., Ahijado, A., De la Nuez, J., Milton, A.J., Nagy, G.Carbonate xenoliths in La Palma: carbonatite or alteration product?Chemie der Erde, Vol. 68, 4, pp. 369-381.Europe, SpainCarbonatite
DS200812-0282
2008
Nagy, G.Demeny, A., Casillas, R., Ahijado, A., La Nuez, J.de, Milton, J.A., Nagy, G.Carbonate xenoliths in La Palma: carbonatite or alteration product?Chemie der Erde, Vol. 68, 4, pp. 369-381.Europe, Canary IslandsGeochronology
DS201112-0152
2011
Nagy, G.Casillas, R., Demeny, A., Nagy, G., Ahijado, A., Fernandez, C.Metacarbonatites in the Basal Complex of Fuerteventura ( Canary Islands). The role of fluid/rock interactions during contact metamorphism and anatexis.Lithos, Vol. 125, pp. 503-520.Europe, Canary IslandsCarbonatite
DS202001-0044
2019
Nagy, L.Tang, F., Taylor, R.J.M., Einsle, J.F., Borlina, C.S., Fu, R.R., Weiss, B.P., Williams, H.M., Williams, W., Nagy, L., Midgley, P.A., Lima, E.A., Bell, E.A., Harrison, T.M., Alexander, E.W., Harrison, R.J.Secondary magnetite in ancient zircon precludes analysis of a Hadean geodynamo. Jack HillsProceedings National Academy of Science, Vol. 116, pp. 407-412.Australiapaleomagnetism

Abstract: Zircon crystals from the Jack Hills, Western Australia, are one of the few surviving mineralogical records of Earth’s first 500 million years and have been proposed to contain a paleomagnetic record of the Hadean geodynamo. A prerequisite for the preservation of Hadean magnetization is the presence of primary magnetic inclusions within pristine igneous zircon. To date no images of the magnetic recorders within ancient zircon have been presented. Here we use high-resolution transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that all observed inclusions are secondary features formed via two distinct mechanisms. Magnetite is produced via a pipe-diffusion mechanism whereby iron diffuses into radiation-damaged zircon along the cores of dislocations and is precipitated inside nanopores and also during low-temperature recrystallization of radiation-damaged zircon in the presence of an aqueous fluid. Although these magnetites can be recognized as secondary using transmission electron microscopy, they otherwise occur in regions that are indistinguishable from pristine igneous zircon and carry remanent magnetization that postdates the crystallization age by at least several hundred million years. Without microscopic evidence ruling out secondary magnetite, the paleomagnetic case for a Hadean-Eoarchean geodynamo cannot yet been made.
DS1996-1434
1996
Nahan, P.B.Tolwinski, B., Nahan, P.B.An application of L-TOPS to project evaluationSociety for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME)-American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME) Preprint, 96-77GlobalGeostatistics, Ore reserves
DS201112-0716
2010
Nahass, S.Nahass, S.Diamantes: politicas e perspectivas de exploracao no Brasil.5th Brasilian Symposium on Diamond Geology, Nov. 6-12, abstract p. 18.South America, BrazilBrief - overview production
DS200812-0524
2007
Naher, U.Johnson, A., Stachel, T., Creighton, S.,Naher, U.Peridotite xenoliths from the Monument Property, Slave Craton, NWT, Canada. SouthernEra35th. Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, Abstracts only p. 29.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMineralogy
DS200812-0575
2007
Naher, U.Kivi, K.R., Naher, U.New Nadin a explorations Ltd. drills and discovers more kimberlite at Lac de Gras.35th. Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, Abstracts only p. 31.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesExploration - brief overview
DS200812-0782
2007
Naher, U.Naher, U., Kivi, K.The DOGMAG, a low cost alternative to airborne magnetic surveys in diamond exploration. SouthernEra35th. Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, Abstracts only p. 44.Africa, Democratic Republic of Congo, Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeophysics - DOGMAG
DS1995-2020
1995
NahonWalter, A.V., Filocteaux, R., Parron, C., Loubet, M., NahonRare earth elements and isotopes (Strontium, neodymium, Oxygen, Carbon) in minerals from Juquia carbonatite Brasil: tracers evol.Chemical Geology, Vol. 120, No. 1-2, Feb. 1, pp. 27-44.BrazilCarbonatite, Deposit -Juquia
DS1989-0512
1989
Nahon, D.Girard, J-P, Deynoux, M., Nahon, D.Diagenesis of the upper Proterozoic siliciclastic sediments of the Taoudeni basin, West Africa, and relation to diabase emplacementJournal of Sedimentary Petrology, Vol. 59, No. 2, March pp. 233-248. Database # 17951West AfricaProterozoic, Diagenesis
DS1990-1532
1990
Nahon, D.Walter, A.V., Flicoteaux, R., Girard, J.P., Loubet, M., Nahon, D.rare earth elements (REE) pattern in apatites from the Juquia carbonatite, BrasilChemical Geology ( Geochem. of the Earth's surface and of min. formation, 2nd., Vol. 84, No. 1-4, July 5, pp. 378-379. AbstractBrazilCarbonatite, Juquia
DS1993-1110
1993
Nahon, D.Nahon, D.Introduction to the petrology of soils and chemical weatheringJohn Wiley and Sons, 313p. approx. $ 100.00BookWeathering, Soils
DS1995-2021
1995
Nahon, D.Walter, A.V., Nahon, D., Flicoteaux, R., et al.Behaviour of major and trace elements and fractionation of rare earth elements (REE) undertropical weathering of apatite rich carb.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 136, No. 3-4, pp. 591-602.BrazilCarbonatite, Laterites
DS1996-0861
1996
Nahon, D.Lucas, Y., Nahon, D., Cornu, S., Eyrolle, F.Genese et fonctionnement des sols en milieu equatorial.*FreC.r. Academy Of Science Paris, Vol. 322, II a, pp. 1-16South America, AmazonasSoil genesis, Mineral solution reactions -ferralitic soil profiles
DS1997-0833
1997
Nahon, D.Nahon, D., Merino, E.Pseudomorphic replacement in tropical weathering: evidence, geochemicalconsequences, kinetic-rheology..American Journal of Science, Vol. 297, No. 4, April pp. 393-417GlobalWeathering, alluvials, Geochemistry
DS1987-0501
1987
Naichuk, N.V.Naichuk, N.V., Pavlov, G.G., Skarzhiniskiy, V.I.Mineralogical-geochemical criteria for the exploration and prospecting of rocks of ultrabasic alkaline formations and carbonatites and the relatedapatiteGeol. Zhurn., (Russian), Vol. 47, No. 2, pp. 102-106RussiaBlank
DS201905-1055
2019
Naick, B.P.Kusham, A.P., Naick, B.P., Naganjaneyulu, K.Crustal and lithospheric mantle conductivity structure in the Dharwar craton, India.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 176, pp. 253-263.Indiageophysics - magnetotellurics

Abstract: The vertical extension and structure of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle beneath the Archean Dharwar craton is the main attraction of the work presented here. To delineate the electrical conductivity structure of the Dharwar craton, a magnetotelluric study is carried out. This study comprises magnetotelluric data at 22 stations along a west-east slanting profile. Inter-station spacing is approximately 15?km. This magnetotelluric study is initiated from Dandeli (in the west) to Sindhanur (in the east side). The preferable geoelectric strike directions for the crust and lithospheric mantle are N3°E and N16°E respectively. A 2-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model derived by using the crustal and lithospheric mantle strike azimuths, identified conductive features in the stable continental Dharwar craton. In the crust, prominent conductors are present in the eastern and western part of the profile. A conducting feature is present in the deeper crust associated with the Chitradurga shear zone (CSZ). The study infers a thick lithosphere beneath Dharwar craton as a preserved cratonic nucleus on the eastern and a few conductive anomalies in the western part of the Dharwar craton. The model shows two separate conductors in the depth range of 110-250?km. This study shows, the possibility of presence of kimberlite melt in the western Dharwar craton in the depth range of 110-150?km.
DS201808-1762
2018
Naick, P.Kusham, A., Pratap, B., Naick, P., Naganjaneyulu, K.Lithospheric architecture in the Archean Dharwar craton, India: a magnetotelluric model.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 183, pp. 43-53.Indiacraton

Abstract: oriented, 280?km long profile (from Yellapura to Sindhanur) with 22 magnetotelluric stations. Regional strike directions, estimated were -5° and 13° for the crust and the lithospheric mantle respectively. Our results indicate in western Dharwar craton, presence of low resistivity zones in the crust besides two significant upper mantle conductive features within the highly resistive Archaean lithosphere. We analyze the available geophysical data that include heat flow, seismic tomography and magnetotellurics (MT) from the Dharwar craton. Our inference supports to the existence of a thick lithosphere. A thickness of more than 200?km is estimated for the lithosphere beneath the Dharwar craton by our magnetotelluric model. The study has brought out the presence of lithospheric upper mantle conductive features in the depth range of 100-200?km bounded to the west part of the magnetotelluric profile. Significant variations in conductivity are seen on either side of the Chitradurga shear zone. The conductive feature in the depth range 120-150?km is related with kimberlite melts and the conductive nature in the depth range 160-200?km is explained by refertilization process, as craton passed over the Marion (ca. 90?Ma) hotspot.
DS200912-0867
2009
NaidooZimmermann, U., Foruie, Naidoo, Van Staden, Chemalle, Nakamura, Koyayashi, Kosler, Beukes, Tait.Unroofing the Kalahari craton: provenance dat a from neoproterozoic to Paleozoic successions.Goldschmidt Conference 2009, p. A1536 Abstract.Africa, South AfricaTectonics
DS201906-1320
2019
Naidoo, S.R.Matindi, T.B., Naidoo, S.R., Ntwaeaborwa, O.M.Luminesence induced by N-O ion implantation into diamond.Diamond & Related Materials, Vol. 96, pp. 11-19.Globalphotoluminescence

Abstract: The incorporation of shallow n-type dopants in diamond is one of the major challenges for its electronic applications. n-Type behaviour in diamond has been observed for substitutional phosphorus and nitrogen, with activation energies of approximately 0.62 and 1.7?eV, respectively. Both nitrogen and phosphorus are deep lying substitutional impurity states in diamond. It has been theoretically found that the substitution of the NO molecule into the diamond lattice forms a stable defect in the band gap and, in the negatively charged state induces a shallow defect below the conduction band edge which may lead to n-type conductivity. In this study, low-temperature photoluminescence measurements using different excitation wavelengths were used to investigate the nature and behaviour of the defects induced by the implantation of NO ions into type IIa Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond samples. Luminescence peaks were observed at 293.3, 297.3, 305.9, 309.8, 314.4 and 556.7?nm on the sample which was implanted by NO ions and annealed at 600?°C. The origin of these peaks is discussed and the mechanism of electronic transitions leading to emission of photoluminescence from these samples is proposed.
DS201112-0335
2011
Naidoo, T.Fourie, P.H., Zimmermana, U., Beukes, N.J., Naidoo, T., Kobayasji, K., Kosler, J., Nakamura, Tait, TheronProvenance and reconnaissance study of detrital zircons of the Paleozoic Cape Supergroup: revealing the interaction of Kalahari and Rio de la Plat a cratons.International Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 100, 2, pp. 527-541.Africa, South Africa, South America, BrazilGeochronology
DS201112-0717
2011
Naidoo, T.Naidoo, T., Zimmermann, U., Miyazaki, J.T., Vervoort, J.Isotope study of Neoproterozoic to lower Paleozoic successions of the southern Kalahari craton.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1523.AfricaRodinia
DS1960-0716
1966
Naidu, P.R.J.Naidu, P.R.J., Viswanathiah, M.N.Proceedings of the International Mineralogical Association General Meeting Held New Delhi, Dec. 5th to 22nd. 1964.India Mineralogical Society Volume., 252P.IndiaMineralogy
DS201312-0626
2013
Naif, S.Naif, S.,Key, K., Constable, S., Evans, R.L.Melt rich channel observed at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary.Nature, Vol. 495, March 21, pp. 356-359.MantleMelting
DS1993-0217
1993
Nai-hsien MaoCarr, J.R., Nai-hsien MaoA general form of probability kriging for estimation of the indicator and uniform transformsMathematical Geology, Vol. 25, No. 4, May pp. 425-438GlobalGeostatistics
DS200812-0857
2008
Naik, A.Patel, S.C., Ravi, S., Anilkumar, Y., Naik, A., Thakur, S.S., Pati, J.K.Mafic xenoliths in Proterozoic kimberlites from eastern Dharwar Craton, India: mineralogy and P-T regime.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 34, 3, pp. 336-346.IndiaDeposit - Wajrakur
DS1985-0475
1985
Naik, M.S.Naik, M.S.Phlogopite Micas from Kimberlite of Majhgawan Panna Madhya PradeshIndian Mineralogist, Vol. 26, pp. 8-11IndiaMineralogy, Kimberlite
DS1990-1084
1990
Naik, M.S.Naik, M.S.Chemistry and origin of garnet megacrysts in kimberlites of MajhgawanPatna.Gondwana Geological Magazine, Vol. 3, pp. 9-13.IndiaMegacrysts
DS202007-1163
2019
Naik, R.Meshram, R.R., Dora, M.L., Naik, R., Shareef, M., Gopalakrishna, G., Moeshram, T., Baswani, S.R., Randive, K.R.A new find of calc-alkaline lamprophyres in Thanewasna area, western Bastar craton, India.Journal of Earth System Science, Vol. 128, 1, 7p. PdfIndiaminette

Abstract: Lamprophyre dykes within the granitoid and charnockite are reported for the first time from the Western Bastar Craton, Chandrapur district, Maharashtra. It shows porphyritic-panidiomorphic texture under a microscope, characterised by the predominance of biotite phenocrysts with less abundance of amphibole and clinopyroxene microphenocryst. The groundmass is composed more of K-feldspars over plagioclase, amphiboles, clinopyroxene, biotite, chlorite, apatite, sphene and magnetite. The mineral chemistry of biotite and magnesio-hornblende is indicative of minette variety of calc-alkaline lamprophyre (CAL), which is further supported by preliminary major oxides and trace element geochemistry. This unique association of CAL with granitoid provides an opportunity to study the spatio-temporal evolution of the lamprophyric magma in relation to the geodynamic perspective of the Bastar Craton.
DS200812-0783
2007
Nailer, S.G.Nailer, S.G., Moore, M., Chapman, J.On the role of nitrogen in stiffening the diamond structure.Journal of Applied Crystallography, Vol. 40, 6, pp. 1146-1152.TechnologyDiamond crystallography
DS1997-1265
1997
Naiman, Z.J.Wirth, K.R., Verwoort, J.D., Naiman, Z.J.The Chengwatana Volcanics: petrogenesis of the southernmost volcanic rocks exposed in the MidcontinentCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 34, No. 4, April, pp. 536-548Wisconsin, MinnesotaVolcanics, Rift system
DS201904-0760
2019
Naipal, R.Naipal, R., Kroonenberg, S., Mason, P.R.D.Ultramafic rocks of the Paleoproterozoic greenstone belt in the Guiana shield of Suriname, and their mineral potential.SAXI-XI Inter Guiana Geological Conferene 2019: Paramaribo, Suriname, 5p. PdfSouth America, SurinameGuiana shield

Abstract: The ultramafic rocks of the Marowijne Greenstone Belt in Suriname and elsewhere in the Guiana Shield comprise both intrusive dunite-gabbroic bodies and ultramafic lavas and volcaniclastic rocks. They were emplaced in the early stages of the Trans-Amazonian Orogeny (2.26-2.09 Ga), but their petrogenesis and geotectonic significance have still to be elaborated. They present several economically interesting mineralisations, including chromium, nickel, platinum, gold and diamonds. In Suriname diamonds are found since the 19 th century; possible source rocks show similarities with the diamondiferous komatiitic volcaniclastic rocks in Dachine, French Guiana and in Akwatia in the Birimian Greenstone Belt of Ghana. This might point to a regionally extensive diamond belt in the Guiana Shield and its predrift counterpart in the West-African Craton.
DS202009-1644
2019
Naipal, R.Naipal, R., Kroonenberg, S.B., Mason, P.R.D.Ultramafic rocks of the Paleoproterozoic greenstone belt in the Guiana shield of Suriname, and their mineral potential.SAXI-XI Inter Guiana Geological Conference, held Paramaribo, Suriname., 5p. PdfSouth America, Surinamediamond

Abstract: The ultramafic rocks of the Marowijne Greenstone Belt in Suriname and elsewhere in the Guiana Shield comprise both intrusive dunite-gabbroic bodies and ultramafic lavas and volcaniclastic rocks. They were emplaced in the early stages of the Trans-Amazonian Orogeny (2.26-2.09 Ga), but their petrogenesis and geotectonic significance have still to be elaborated. They present several economically interesting mineralisations, including chromium, nickel, platinum, gold and diamonds. In Suriname diamonds are found since the 19 th century; possible source rocks show similarities with the diamondiferous komatiitic volcaniclastic rocks in Dachine, French Guiana and in Akwatia in the Birimian Greenstone Belt of Ghana. This might point to a regionally extensive diamond belt in the Guiana Shield and its predrift counterpart in the West-African Craton.
DS202009-1645
2020
Naipal, R.Naipal, R., Zwaan, J.C.(Hanco),, Kroonenberg, S.B., Kreigsman, L.M., Mason, P.R.D.Diamonds from the Nassau Mountains, Suriname.Journal of Gemmology, Vol. 37, 2, pp. 180-191. pdfSouth America, Surinamedeposit - Paramaka Creek

Abstract: Alluvial diamonds have been found in Suriname since the late 19th century, but to date the details of their origin remain unclear. Here we describe diamonds from Paramaka Creek (Nassau Mountains area) in the Marowijne greenstone belt, Guiana Shield, north-eastern Suriname. Thirteen samples were studied, consisting mainly of euhedral crystals with dominant octahedral and dodecahe-dral habits. They had colourless to brown to slightly greenish body colours, and some showed green or (less commonly) brown irradiation spots. Surface features showed evidence of late-stage resorption that occurred during their transport to the earth’s surface. The studied diamonds were predominantly type IaAB, with nitrogen as both A and B aggregates. In the DiamondView most samples displayed blue and/or green luminescence and concentric growth patterns. Their mineral inclusion assemblages (forsterite and enstatite) indicate a peridotitic (possibly harzburgitic) paragenesis.
DS1990-1085
1990
Nair, A.M.Nair, A.M., Dorbor, J.K.Industrial minerals of LiberiaIndustrial Minerals, No. 270, March p. 137. ( 1 page overview)GlobalBrief overview, Diamonds mentioned
DS1984-0541
1984
Nair, N.G.K.Nair, N.G.K., Santosh, M., Thampi, P.K.Alkali Granite=syenite-carbonatite Association in Munnar, Kerala, India; Implications for Rifting, Alkaline Magmatism And Liquid Immiscibility.Proceedings INDIAN Academy of Science EARTH PLANET. SCIENCES, Vol. 93, No. 2, PP. 149-158.IndiaGeotectonics
DS1984-0542
1984
Nair, N.G.K.Nair, N.G.K., Santosh, M., Thampi, P.K.Alkalic Granite Syenite Carbonatite Association in Munnar, kerala India: Implications for Rifting, Alkaline Magmatism And Liquid Immiscibility.Proceedings INDIAN Academy of Science, Vol. 93, No. 2, JULY PP. 149-158.India, KeralaCarbonatite
DS200512-0761
2005
Nair, R.K.Nair, R.K., Chacko, T.Experimental constraints on eclogite stability in MORB type bulk sompositions under fluid absent conditions.GAC Annual Meeting Halifax May 15-19, Abstract 1p.MantlePetrology
DS201212-0508
2012
Nair, R.R.Nair, R.R., Singh, Y., Trivedi, D., Kandpal, S.Ch.Anisotropy in the flexural response of the Indian shield.Tectonophysics, Vol. 532-535, pp. 193-204.IndiaPlate thickness
DS201509-0423
2014
Nair, R.R.Ratheesh-Kumar, R.T., Ishwar-Kumar, C., Windley, B., Razakamanana, T., Nair, R.R., Sajeev, K.India-Madagascar paleo-fit based on flexural isostasy of their rifted margins.Gondwana Research, Vol. 28, 2, pp. 581-600.India, Africa, MadagascarTectonics

Abstract: The present study contributes new constraints on, and definitions of, the reconstructed plate margins of India and Madagascar based on flexural isostasy along the Western Continental Margin of India (WCMI) and the Eastern Continental Margin of Madagascar (ECMM). We have estimated the nature of isostasy and crustal geometry along the two margins, and have examined their possible conjugate structure. Here we utilize elastic thickness (Te) and Moho depth data as the primary basis for the correlation of these passive margins. We employ the flexure inversion technique that operates in spatial domain in order to estimate the spatial variation of effective elastic thickness. Gravity inversion and flexure inversion techniques are used to estimate the configuration of the Moho/Crust-Mantle Interface that reveals regional correlations with the elastic thickness variations. These results correlate well with the continental and oceanic segments of the Indian and African plates. The present study has found a linear zone of anomalously low-Te (1-5 km) along the WCMI (~1680 km), which correlates well with the low-Te patterns obtained all along the ECMM. We suggest that the low-Te zones along the WCMI and ECMM represent paleo-rift inception points of lithosphere thermally and mechanically weakened by the combined effects of the Marion hotspot and lithospheric extension due to rifting. We have produced an India-Madagascar paleo-fit representing the initial phase of separation based on the Te estimates of the rifted conjugate margins, which is confirmed by a close-fit correlation of Moho geometry and bathymetry of the shelf margins. The matching of tectonic lineaments, lithologies and geochronological belts between India and Madagascar provide an additional support for the present plate reconstruction.
DS200612-0964
2006
Nair, S.K.Nair, S.K., Gao, S.S., Liu, K.H., Silver, P.G.Southern African crustal evolution and composition: constraints from receiver function system.Journal Geophysical Research, Vol. 111, B2, Feb. 17, B02304Africa, South AfricaGeophysics - seismics
DS1970-0484
1972
Nairis, B.Brundin, N.H., Nairis, B.Alterative Sample Types in Regional Geochemical ProspectingJournal of GEOCHEM. Exploration, Vol. 1, No. 1, PP. 7-46.GlobalGeochemistry, Sampling, Heavy Mineral Concentrates
DS1982-0347
1982
Nairis, H.J.Kresten, P., Nairis, H.J.Alno DiamondsGeol. Foren. Forhandl., Vol. 104, P. 210.Scandinavia, SwedenAlnoite, Diamond Discovery, Crystallography
DS1992-0006
1992
Nairn, A.E.M.Adamia, S., Akhvlediani, K.T., Kilasonia, V.M., Nairn, A.E.M.Geology map of the Dubawnt Lake area, Northwest TerritoriesInternational Geology Review, Vol. 34, No. 5, May pp. 447-476Russia, GeorgiaGeology, Review
DS201605-0877
2016
Naismith, A.Naismith, A., Howell, G., Marsden, H.Design and development of a decline shaft through poorly consolidated Kalahari deposits at Ghaghoo diamond mine.Diamonds Still Sparkling SAIMM 2016 Conference, Mar. 14-17, pp. 1-14.Africa, BotswanaDeposit - Ghaghoo
DS1998-1061
1998
Naito, K.Naito, K., Otto, J.M.Legislative regimes for exploration and mining projects: formulating guidelines to assess regulatory.Seg Newsletter, No. 33, April pp. 14-15GlobalLegal - mining policy, Economics - investment, discoveries
DS202001-0030
2019
Najih, A.Najih, A., Montero, P., Verati, C., Chabou, M.C., Fekkak, A., Baidder, L., Ezzouhairi, H., Bea, F., Michard, A.Initial Pangean rifting north of the West African craton: insights from late Permian U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar dating of alkaline magmatism from the eastern Anti-Atlas ( Morocco).Journal of Geodynamics, Vol. 132, 17p.Africa, Moroccocamptonites

Abstract: Numerous mafic dykes, sills and laccoliths crop out in the southern part of the Tafilalt basin (Eastern Anti-Atlas, Morocco). These rocks intrude the mildly folded Ordovician to Early Carboniferous formations, consisting mainly of lamprophyric dolerites and camptonites with minor gabbros and syenodiorites. Previous geochemical studies have shown that the Tafilalt magmatism of sodic-alkaline affinity has been produced by low degrees of partial melting from an enriched deep mantle source within the garnet stability field. However, the age and the geodynamic context of these rocks were presently unknown since no isotopic dating had so far been made of the Tafilalt dolerites. To resolve this issue, we present here the first 40Ar/39Ar biotite and U-Pb zircon dating from the Tafilalt alkaline magmatism. Three samples (biotite separates) yielded well-defined 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages of 264.2?±?2.7 Ma, 259.0?±?6.3 Ma and 262.6?±?4.5 Ma whereas 206Pb/238U dating of zircon from one of these samples yielded an age of 255?±?3 Ma. These ages coincide within the dating error, and indicate that this magmatism occurred in the late Permian. Considering geochronological and geochemical data, we propose that the Tafilalt magmatism reflects an early-rift magmatic activity that preceded the Triassic rifting heralded by the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. This magmatic activity is recorded in both sides of the future Atlantic Ocean by small-volume alkaline magmatism that started in the late Permian and extends into the Triassic. The alkaline magmas are probably generated in response to an increase in the mantle potential temperature underneath the Pangea supercontinent.
DS201012-0297
2010
Najorka, J.Humprhreys, E.R., Bailey, K., Hawkesworth, C.J., Wall, F., Najorka, J., Rankin, A.H.Aragonite in olivine from Calatrava, Spain - evidence for mantle carbonatite melts from > 100km depth.Geology, Vol. 38, 10, pp. 911-914.Europe, SpainCarbonatite
DS1981-0310
1981
Naka, S.Naka, S., Suwa, Y., Takeda, Y., Hirano, S.I.Some Observations of Graphite Diamond Transformation by Electro Thermal Analysis.Nippon Kagai Kaishi, (1972), No. 9, PP. 1468-1473.GlobalMineralogy
DS1982-0453
1982
Naka, S.Naka, S., Suwa, Y., Hirano, S.Study of Graphite-diamond Transformation Process by Electrothermal Analysis.Proceedings high pressure AND RESEARCH INDUSTRY 8TH. AIRAPT Conference, Vol. 1, PP. 365-368.GlobalResearch
DS1985-0682
1985
Naka, S.Tsuzuki, A., Hirano, S.I., Naka, S.Influencing Factors for Diamond Formation from Several Starting Carbons.Journal of MATERIAL SCIENCE., Vol. 20, No. 6, JUNE PP. 2260-2264.GlobalBlank
DS2001-0851
2001
Nakada, M.Okuno, J., Nakada, M.Effects of water load on geophysical signals due to glacial rebound and implications for mantle viscosity.Earth Planets and Space, Vol. 53, No. 12, pp. 1121-36.MantleGeophysics - seismics, Geomorphology
DS2003-0992
2003
Nakada, M.Nakada, M.Core mantle coupling including a viscoelastic inner core: an application to the axialPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 138, 3-4, pp. 289-315.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-1395
2003
Nakada, M.Nakada, M.Core mantle coupling including a viscoelastic inner core: an application to the axial rotation associated with the Quaternary glPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 138, 3-4, pp. 289-315.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-2167
2004
Nakada, M.Yanagawa, T.K., Nakada, M., Yuen, D.A.A simplified mantle convection model for thermal conductivity stratification.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 146, 1-2, pp. 163-177.MantleGeothermometry
DS200812-0784
2008
Nakada, M.Nakada, M.Long tern true polar wander of the Earth including the effects of convective pressures in the mantle and continental drift.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 175, 3, pp. 1235-1244.MantlePolar Wander
DS1995-1323
1995
Nakada, N.Nakada, N., Takeda, Y.Roles of mantle diapir and ductile lower crust on island arc tectonicsTectonophysics, Vol. 246, No. 1-3, June 15, pp. 147-162JapanMantle diapirs, Tectonics -arc
DS201812-2835
2018
Nakada, R.Kuwahara, H., Nomura, R., Nakada, R., Irifune, T.Simultaneous determination of melting phase relations of mantle peridotite and mid-ocean ridge basalt at the uppermost lower mantle conditions.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 284, pp. 36-50.Mantleperidotite

Abstract: Interpretation of melting phase relationships of mantle peridotite and subducted basaltic crust is important for understanding chemical heterogeneity in the Earth’s interior. Although numerous studies have conducted melting experiments on peridotite and mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), and suggested that the solidus temperature of MORB is lower than that of peridotite at whole mantle pressure conditions, both solidus temperatures overlap within their uncertainties. In this study, we conducted simultaneous experiments on KLB-1 peridotite and normal MORB (N-MORB) at pressures from 25?GPa to 27?GPa and temperatures from 2398?K to 2673?K, to compare the solidus temperatures and their melting phase relations. The experimental results show that the solidus temperature of the N-MORB is nearly identical to the KLB-1 peridotite at 25?GPa but lower at 27?GPa. In addition, we found that the crossover of melt fractions between KLB-1 peridotite and N-MORB occurs at 25-27?GPa. These changes are likely to be attributed to the majorite-bridgmanite transition of MORB. This indicates that the dominant melting component may change depending on the location of the uppermost lower mantle. Our calculation result on the density of partial melts along the mantle geotherm suggests that partial melts of KLB-1 peridotite are gravitationally stable around the top of the transition zone, whereas partial melts of N-MORB are gravitationally stable even at the top of lower mantle. These results suggest that the distribution of partial melts may be different between KLB-1 peridotite and N-MORB in the deep Earth. Our results may be useful for understanding the fate of partial melts of peridotitic mantle and recycled basaltic crust.
DS200412-1396
2004
Nakagawa, T.Nakagawa, T., Tackley, P.J.Effects of thermo-chemical mantle convection on the thermal evolution of the Earth's core.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 220, 1-2, March 30, pp. 107-119.MantleGeothermometry, core mantle boundary, convection
DS200412-1397
2004
Nakagawa, T.Nakagawa, T., Tackley, P.J.Thermo-chemical structure in the mantle arising from a three component convective system and implications for geochemistry.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 146, 1-2, pp. 125-138.MantleGeothermometry
DS200512-0762
2005
Nakagawa, T.Nakagawa, T., Guffett, B.A.Mass transport mechanism between the upper and lower mantle in numerical simulations of thermochemical mantle convection with multicomponent phase changes.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 230, 1-2, pp. 11-27.MantleGeothermometry
DS200512-0763
2004
Nakagawa, T.Nakagawa, T., Tackley, P.J.Effects of perovskite-post perovskite phase change near core-mantle boundary in compressible mantle convection.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 31, 16, L16611 DOI 10.1029/2004 GLO20648MantleConvection
DS200512-0764
2005
Nakagawa, T.Nakagawa, T., Tackley, P.J.Deep mantle heat flow and thermal evolution of the Earth's core in thermochemical multiphase models of mantle convection.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 6, doi. 10.1029/2005 GC000967MantleCore, mantle boundary, geothermometry
DS200612-0418
2006
Nakagawa, T.Fukura, S., Kagi, H., Nakagawa, T.Photoluminescence, Rama and infrared studies of carbonado.International Mineralogical Association 19th. General Meeting, held Kobe, Japan July 23-28 2006, Abstract p. 138.Africa, Central African Republic, South America, BrazilCarbonado - morphology
DS200612-1405
2005
Nakagawa, T.Tackley, P.J., Xie, S., Nakagawa, T., Hernlund, J.W.Numerical and laboratory studies of mantle convection: philosphy, accomplishments and thermochemical structure and evolution.American Geophysical Union, Geophysical Monograph, Ed. Van der Hilst, Earth's Deep Mantle, structure ...., No. 160, pp. 83-100.MantleConvection
DS200812-1147
2007
Nakagawa, T.Tackley, P.J., Nakagawa, T., Hernlund, J.W.Influence of the post perovskite transition on thermal and thermo-chemical mantle convection.AGU American Geophysical Union Monograph, No. 174, pp. 229-248.MantleGeothermometry
DS201212-0509
2012
Nakagawa, T.Nakagawa, T., Tackley, P.J.Influence of magmatism on mantle cooling, surface heat flow and Urey ratio.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 329-330, pp. 1-10.MantleGeothermometry
DS201601-0033
2015
Nakagawa, T.Nakagawa, T., Tackley, P.J.Influence of plate tectonic mode on the coupled thermochemical evolution of Earth's mantle and core.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 16, 10, pp. 3400-3413.MantleGeothermometry

Abstract: We investigate the influence of tectonic mode on the thermochemical evolution of simulated mantle convection coupled to a parameterized core cooling model. The tectonic mode is controlled by varying the friction coefficient for brittle behavior, producing the three tectonic modes: mobile lid (plate tectonics), stagnant lid, and episodic lid. The resulting compositional structure of the deep mantle is strongly dependent on tectonic mode, with episodic lid resulting in a thick layer of subducted basalt in the deep mantle, whereas mobile lid produces only isolated piles and stagnant lid no basaltic layering. The tectonic mode is established early on, with subduction initiating at around 60 Myr from the initial state in mobile and episodic cases, triggered by the arrival of plumes at the base of the lithosphere. Crustal production assists subduction initiation, increasing the critical friction coefficient. The tectonic mode has a strong effect on core evolution via its influence on deep mantle structure; episodic cases in which a thick layer of basalt builds up experience less core heat flow and cooling and a failed geodynamo. Thus, a continuous mobile-lid mode existing from early times matches Earth's mantle structure and core evolution better than an episodic mode characterized by large-scale flushing (overturn) events.
DS201704-0641
2017
Nakagawa, T.Nakagawa, T., Spiegelman, M.W.Global scale water circulation in the Earth's mantle: implications for the mantle water budget in the early Earth.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 464, pp. 189-199.MantleWater

Abstract: We investigate the influence of the mantle water content in the early Earth on that in the present mantle using numerical convection simulations that include three processes for redistribution of water: dehydration, partitioning of water into partially molten mantle, and regassing assuming an infinite water reservoir at the surface. These models suggest that the water content of the present mantle is insensitive to that of the early Earth. The initial water stored during planetary formation is regulated up to 1.2 OMs (OM = Ocean Mass; 1.4×1021 kg1.4×1021 kg), which is reasonable for early Earth. However, the mantle water content is sensitive to the rheological dependence on the water content and can range from 1.2 to 3 OMs at the present day. To explain the evolution of mantle water content, we computed water fluxes due to subducting plates (regassing), degassing and dehydration. For weakly water dependent viscosity, the net water flux is almost balanced with those three fluxes but, for strongly water dependent viscosity, the regassing dominates the water cycle system because the surface plate activity is more vigorous. The increased convection is due to enhanced lubrication of the plates caused by a weak hydrous crust for strongly water dependent viscosity. The degassing history is insensitive to the initial water content of the early Earth as well as rheological strength. The degassing flux from Earth's surface is calculated to be approximately O(1013) kg/yrO(1013) kg/yr, consistent with a coupled model of climate evolution and mantle thermal evolution.
DS201810-2359
2018
Nakagawa, T.Nakagawa, T., Iwamori, H., Yanagi, R., Nako, A.On the evolutiom of the water ocean in the plate mantle system.Progress in Earth and Planetary Science, Vol. 5, pp. 51- 16p.Mantlewater

Abstract: Here, we investigate a possible scenario of surface seawater evolution in the numerical simulations of surface plate motion driven by mantle dynamics, including thermo-chemical convection and water migration, from the early to present-day Earth to constrain the total amount of water in the planetary system. To assess the validity of two hypotheses of the total amount of water inferred from early planetary formation processes and mineral physics, we examine the model sensitivity to the total water in the planetary system (both surface and deep interior) up to 15 ocean masses. To explain the current size of the reservoir of surface seawater, the predictions based on the numerical simulations of hydrous mantle convection suggest that the total amount of water should range from 9 to 12 ocean masses. Incorporating the dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) with a recently discovered hydrous mineral at lower mantle pressures (phase H) indicates that the physical mechanism of the mantle water cycle would not be significantly influenced, but the water storage region would be expanded in addition to the mantle transition zone. The DHMS solubility field may have a limited impact on the partitioning of water in the Earth’s deep mantle.
DS201907-1563
2019
Nakagawa, T.Nakagawa, T., Nakakuki, T.Dynamics in the uppermost lower mantle: insights into the deep mantle water cycle based on the numerical modeling of subducted slabs and global-scale mantle dynamics.Annual Reviews of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 47, pp. 41-66.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: In this review, we address the current status of numerical modeling of the mantle transition zone and uppermost lower mantle, focusing on the hydration mechanism in these areas. The main points are as follows: (a) Slab stagnation and penetration may play significant roles in transporting the water in the whole mantle, and (b) a huge amount of water could be absorbed into the deep mantle to preserve the surface seawater over the geologic timescale. However, for further understanding of water circulation in the deep planetary interior, more mineral physics investigations are required to reveal the mechanism of water absorption in the lower mantle and thermochemical interaction across the core-mantle boundary region, which can provide information on material properties to the geodynamics community. Moreover, future investigations should focus on determining the amount of water in the early planetary interior, as suggested by the planetary formation theory of rocky planets. Moreover, the supplying mechanism of water during planetary formation and its evolution caused by plate tectonics are still essential issues because, in geodynamics modeling, a huge amount of water seems to be required to preserve the surface seawater in the present day and to not be dependent on an initial amount of water in Earth's system.
DS202002-0212
2019
Nakagawa, T.Nakagawa, T., Nakakuki, T.Dynamics in the uppermost lower mantle: insights into the deep mantle water cycle based on the numerical modeling of subducted slabs and global scale mantle dynamics.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 47, pp. 41-66.Mantlesubduction, water

Abstract: In this review, we address the current status of numerical modeling of the mantle transition zone and uppermost lower mantle, focusing on the hydration mechanism in these areas. The main points are as follows: (a) Slab stagnation and penetration may play significant roles in transporting the water in the whole mantle, and (b) a huge amount of water could be absorbed into the deep mantle to preserve the surface seawater over the geologic timescale. However, for further understanding of water circulation in the deep planetary interior, more mineral physics investigations are required to reveal the mechanism of water absorption in the lower mantle and thermochemical interaction across the core-mantle boundary region, which can provide information on material properties to the geodynamics community. Moreover, future investigations should focus on determining the amount of water in the early planetary interior, as suggested by the planetary formation theory of rocky planets. Moreover, the supplying mechanism of water during planetary formation and its evolution caused by plate tectonics are still essential issues because, in geodynamics modeling, a huge amount of water seems to be required to preserve the surface seawater in the present day and to not be dependent on an initial amount of water in Earth's system.
DS202005-0752
2019
Nakagawa, T.Nakagawa, T., Nakakuki, T.Dynamics in the uppermost lower mantle: insights into the deep mantle water cycle based on the numerical modeling of subducted slabs and global-scale mantle dynamics.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 47, pp. 41-66. pdfMantlewater, subduction

Abstract: In this review, we address the current status of numerical modeling of the mantle transition zone and uppermost lower mantle, focusing on the hydration mechanism in these areas. The main points are as follows: (a) Slab stagnation and penetration may play significant roles in transporting the water in the whole mantle, and (b) a huge amount of water could be absorbed into the deep mantle to preserve the surface seawater over the geologic timescale. However, for further understanding of water circulation in the deep planetary interior, more mineral physics investigations are required to reveal the mechanism of water absorption in the lower mantle and thermochemical interaction across the core-mantle boundary region, which can provide information on material properties to the geodynamics community. Moreover, future investigations should focus on determining the amount of water in the early planetary interior, as suggested by the planetary formation theory of rocky planets. Moreover, the supplying mechanism of water during planetary formation and its evolution caused by plate tectonics are still essential issues because, in geodynamics modeling, a huge amount of water seems to be required to preserve the surface seawater in the present day and to not be dependent on an initial amount of water in Earth's system. 1) Slab stagnation and penetration of the hydrous lithosphere are essential for understanding the global-scale material circulation. 2) Thermal feedback caused by water-dependent viscosity is a main driving mechanism of water absorption in the mantle transition zone and uppermost lower mantle. 3) The hydrous state in the early rocky planets remains to be determined from cosmo- and geochemistry and planetary formation theory. 4) Volatile cycles in the deep planetary interior may affect the evolution of the surface environment.
DS202011-2055
2020
Nakagawa, T.Nakagawa, T.A coupled core-mantle evolution: review and future prospects.Progress in Earth and Planetary Science, doi.org./10.1186/ s40645-020-00374-8 17p. PdfMantlegeophysics, geothermometry

Abstract: In this review, I provide the current status and future prospects for the coupled core-mantle evolution and specifically summarize the constraints arising from geomagnetism and paleomagnetism on the long-term secular variations of the geomagnetic field. The heat flow across the core-mantle boundary (CMB) is essential for determining the best-fit scenario that explains the observational data of geomagnetic secular variations (e.g., onset timing of the inner core growth, geomagnetic polarity reversals, and westward drift) and should include the various origins of the heterogeneous structures in the deep mantle that have affected the heat transfer across the core-mantle boundary for billions of years. The coupled core-mantle evolution model can potentially explain the onset timing of the inner core and its influence on the long-term geomagnetic secular variations, but it is still controversial among modeling approaches on the core energetics because the paleomagnetic data contains various uncertainties. Additionally, with the coupled core-mantle evolution model in geodynamo simulations, the frequency of the geomagnetic polarity reversals can be explained with the time variations of the heat flow across the CMB. Additionally, the effects of the stable region in the outermost outer core to the magnetic evolution are also crucial but there would be still uncertain for their feasibility. However, despite this progress in understanding the observational data for geomagnetic secular variations, there are several unresolved issues that should be addressed in future investigations: (1) initial conditions—starting with the solidification of the global magma ocean with the onset timing of plate tectonics and geodynamo actions and (2) planetary habitability—how the dynamics of the Earth’s deep interior affects the long-term surface environment change that has been maintained in the Earth’s multisphere coupled system.
DS200612-0653
2006
Nakai, M.Kagi, H., Fukura, S., Nakai, M., Sugiyama, K.Development of a Built in scanning near field microscope head for an atomic force microscope system and its application to natural polycrystalline diamondsInternational Mineralogical Association 19th. General Meeting, held Kobe, Japan July 23-28 2006, Abstract p. 114.TechnologyCarbonado
DS1991-0651
1991
Nakai, S.Halliday, A.N., Ohr, M., Mezger, K., Chesley, J.T., Nakai, S.Recent developments in dating ancient crustal fluid flowReviews of Geophysics, Vol. 29, No. 4, November pp. 577-584MantleModel -fluid flow, Geochronology
DS200412-1436
2004
Nakai, S.Nishio, Y., Nakai, S., Yamamoto, J., Sumino, H., Matsumoto, T., Prikhodko, V.S., Arai, S.Lithium isotopic systematics of the mantle derived ultramafic xenoliths: implications for EMI origin.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 217, 3, Jan. 15, pp. 245-261.MantleGeochronology
DS200412-2165
2004
Nakai, S.Yamamoto, J., Kaneoka, I., Nakai, S., Kagi, H., Prikhodko, V.S., Arai, S.Evidence for subduction related components in the subcontinental mantle from low 3He/4He and 40Ar/36Ar ratio in mantle xenolithsChemical Geology, Vol. 207, 3-4, July 16, pp. 237-259.RussiaGeochemistry - noble gases, subduction, lherzolite
DS200612-0915
2006
Nakai, S.Mibe, K., Orihashi, Y., Nakai, S., Fujii, T.Element partitioning between transition zone minerals and ultramafic melt under hydrous conditions.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 33, 16, August 28, L16307.MantleWater
DS200612-1203
2006
Nakai, S.Sahoo, Y.V., Nakai, S., Ali, A.Modified ion exchange separation for tungsten isotopic measurements from kimberlite samples using multi-collector inductivity coupled plama mass spectrometry.Analyst, ( Royal Society of Chemistry), Vol. 131, 3, pp. 434-439.TechnologyGeochemistry
DS200812-0018
2008
Nakai, S.Ali, A., Nakai, S., Bell, K., Sahoo, Y.W isotope study of natrocarbonatites from Oldoinyo Lengai Tanzania.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A15.Africa, TanzaniaCarbonatite
DS200912-0771
2009
Nakai, S.Toyama, C., Muramatsu, Y., Kojitani, H., Yamamoto, J., Nakai, S., Kaneoka, I.Geochemical studies of kimberlites and their constituent minerals from Chin a and South Africa.Goldschmidt Conference 2009, p. A1343 Abstract.ChinaDeposit - Shandong, Liaoning
DS200912-0831
2009
Nakai, S.Yamamoto, J.,Nakai, S., Nishimura, K., Kaneoka, I., Sato, K., Okumura, T., Prikhodko,V.S., Arai, S.Intergranular trace elements in mantle xenoliths from Russian Far East: example for mantle metasomatism by hydrous melt.Island Arc, Vol. 18, 1, pp. 225-241.RussiaMetasomatism
DS201808-1722
2018
Nakai, S.Agashev, A.M., Nakai, S., Serov, I.V., Tolstov, A.V., Garanin, K.V., Kovalchuk, O.E.Geochemistry and origin of the Mirny field kimberlites, Siberia.Mineralogy and Petrology, doi.org/10.1007/s00710-018-06174 12p.Russia, Siberiadeposit - Mirny

Abstract: Here we present new data from a systematic Sr, Nd, O, C isotope and geochemical study of kimberlites of Devonian age Mirny field that are located in the southernmost part of the Siberian diamondiferous province. Major and trace element compositions of the Mirny field kimberlites show a significant compositional variability both between pipes and within one diatreme. They are enriched in incompatible trace elements with La/Yb ratios in the range of (65-00). Initial Nd isotope ratios calculated back to the time of the Mirny field kimberlite emplacement (t?=?360 ma) are depleted relative to the chondritic uniform reservoir (CHUR) model being 4 up to 6 ?Nd(t) units, suggesting an asthenospheric source for incompatible elements in kimberlites. Initial Sr isotope ratios are significantly variable, being in the range 0.70387-0.70845, indicating a complex source history and a strong influence of post-magmatic alteration. Four samples have almost identical initial Nd and Sr isotope compositions that are similar to the prevalent mantle (PREMA) reservoir. We propose that the source of the proto-kimberlite melt of the Mirny field kimberlites is the same as that for the majority of ocean island basalts (OIB). The source of the Mirny field kimberlites must possess three main features: It should be enriched with incompatible elements, be depleted in the major elements (Si, Al, Fe and Ti) and heavy rare earth elements (REE) and it should retain the asthenospheric Nd isotope composition. A two-stage model of kimberlite melt formation can fulfil those requirements. The intrusion of small bodies of this proto-kimberlite melt into lithospheric mantle forms a veined heterogeneously enriched source through fractional crystallization and metasomatism of adjacent peridotites. Re-melting of this source shortly after it was metasomatically enriched produced the kimberlite melt. The chemistry, mineralogy and diamond grade of each particular kimberlite are strongly dependent on the character of the heterogeneous source part from which they melted and ascended.
DS201904-0752
2019
Nakai, S.Kobayashi, M., Sumino, H., Burgess, R., Nakai, S., Iizuka, T., Nagao, J. Kagi, H., Nakamura, M., Takahashi, E., Kogiso, T., Ballentine, C.J.Halogen heterogeneity in the lithosphere and evolution of mantle halogen abundances inferred from intraplate mantle xenoliths. Kilbourne HoleGeochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 20, 2, pp. 952-973.United States, New Mexicoxenoliths

Abstract: Elemental and isotopic compositions of volatile species such as halogens, noble gases, hydrogen, and carbon can be used to trace the evolution of these species in the Earth. Halogens are important tracers of subduction recycling of surface volatiles into the mantle: however, there is only limited understanding of halogens in the mantle. Here we provide new halogen data of mantle xenoliths from intraplate settings. The mantle xenoliths show a wide range of halogen elemental ratios, which are expected to be related to later processes after the xenoliths formed. A similar primary halogen component is present in the xenoliths sampled from different localities. This suggests that the mantle has the uniform halogen composition over a wide scale. The halogen composition in the convecting mantle is expected to have remained constant over more than 2 billion years, despite subduction of iodine-rich halogens. We used mass balance calculations to gain understanding into evolution rate of I/Cl ratio in the mantle. Calculations suggest that, in order to maintain the I/Cl ratio of the mantle over 2 Gyr, the I/Cl ratio of the subducted halogens must be no more than several times higher than the present-day mantle value.
DS1993-1772
1993
Nakajima, T.Wu Chengyu, Ge Bai, Zhongxin Yuan, Nakajima, T., Ishihara, S.Proterozoic metamorphic rock hosted Zirconium, Yttrium and heavy rare earth elements (HREE) mineralization in the Dabie Mountain area.International Geology Review, Vol. 35, No. 9, pp. 898-919.ChinaCarbonatite, Rare earth
DS201112-0698
2011
Nakajima, Y.Mookerjee, M., Nakajima, Y., Steinle-Neumann, G., Glazyrin, K., Wu, X., Dubrovinsky, McCammon, ChumakovHigh pressure behaviour of iron carbide (Fe[7]C[3j] at inner core conditions.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 116, B4, B04201.MantleHP core
DS201601-0034
2015
Nakajima, Y.Nakajima, Y., Imada, S., Hirose, K., Komabayashi, T., Ozawa, H., Tateno, S., Tsutsui, S., Kuwayama, Y., Baron, A.Q.R.Carbon depleated outer core revealed by sound velocity measurements of liquid iron-carbon alloy.Nature Communications, 10.1038/ NCOMMS9942MantleCarbon

Abstract: The relative abundance of light elements in the Earth’s core has long been controversial. Recently, the presence of carbon in the core has been emphasized, because the density and sound velocities of the inner core may be consistent with solid Fe7C3. Here we report the longitudinal wave velocity of liquid Fe84C16 up to 70?GPa based on inelastic X-ray scattering measurements. We find the velocity to be substantially slower than that of solid iron and Fe3C and to be faster than that of liquid iron. The thermodynamic equation of state for liquid Fe84C16 is also obtained from the velocity data combined with previous density measurements at 1 bar. The longitudinal velocity of the outer core, about 4% faster than that of liquid iron, is consistent with the presence of 4-5 at.% carbon. However, that amount of carbon is too small to account for the outer core density deficit, suggesting that carbon cannot be a predominant light element in the core.
DS201912-2808
2019
Nakajima, Y.Oka, K., Hirose, K., Tagawa, S., Kidokoro, Y., Nakajima, Y., Kuwayama, Y., Morard, G., Coudurier, N., Fiquet, G.Melting in the Fe-FeO system to 204 GPa: implications for oxygen in Earth's core.American Mineralogist, Vol. 104, pp. 1603-1607.Mantlemelting

Abstract: We performed melting experiments on Fe-O alloys up to 204 GPa and 3500 K in a diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and determined the liquidus phase relations in the Fe-FeO system based on textural and chemical characterizations of recovered samples. Liquid-liquid immiscibility was observed up to 29 GPa. Oxygen concentration in eutectic liquid increased from >8 wt% O at 44 GPa to 13 wt% at 204 GPa and is extrapolated to be about 15 wt% at the inner core boundary (ICB) conditions. These results support O-rich liquid core, although oxygen cannot be a single core light element. We estimated the range of possible liquid core compositions in Fe-O-Si-C-S and found that the upper bounds for silicon and carbon concentrations are constrained by the crystallization of dense inner core at the ICB.
DS201808-1773
2018
Nakakakuki, T.Nakao, A., Iwamori, H., Nakakakuki, T., Suzuki, Y.J., Nakamura, H.Roles of hydrous lithospheric mantle in deep water transportation and subduction dynamics.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 45, 11, pp. 5336-5343.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: Rocks on the Earth's surface are cooled, hardened, eventually forming rigid plates that move around relative to one another. When two plates converge, one plate overrides the other, which sinks into the Earth's deep mantle. The sinking plate carries water, which softens rocks and also affects the behavior of the sinking/overriding plates and surrounding mantle flows (“subduction dynamics”). To investigate the role of water in subduction dynamics, 2-D fluid dynamical simulations were performed. The simulations suggest that subduction dynamics change significantly with the level of hydration of the sinking plate, which is represented by the thickness of a hydrous layer. When the hydrous layer is thin, the plate sinks rapidly with a shifting boundary and stagnates above the lower mantle. In contrast, when the hydrous layer is thick, plate convergence is sluggish, the plate boundary remains stationary, and the sinking plate penetrates into the lower mantle. These results indicate that a small amount of water is expected for the northwest part of the Pacific Plate, characterized by the rapid convergence, plate boundary shifting, and stagnation of the sinking plate.
DS1997-0834
1997
Nakakuki, T.Nakakuki, T., Yuen, D.A., Honda, S.The interaction of plumes with the transition zone under continents andoceans.Earth and Planetary Letters, Vol. 146, No. 3/4. Feb 1, pp. 379-392.MantlePlumes
DS200612-1007
2005
Nakakuki, T.Okamoto, T., Sumita, I., Nakakuki, T., Yoshida, S.Deformation of a partially molten D' layer by small scale convection and the resulting seismic anistrophy and ultralow velocity zone.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 153, 1-3, pp. 32-48.MantleBoundary
DS200712-1054
2007
Nakakuki, T.Tagawa, M., Nakakuki, T., Kameyama, M., Tajima, F.The role of history dependent rheology in plate boundary lubrication for generating one-sided subduction.Pure and Applied Geophysics, Pageoph, Vol. 164, 5, pp. 879-907.MantleSubduction
DS200712-1055
2007
Nakakuki, T.Tagawa, M., Nakakuki, T., Kameyama, M., Tajima, F.The role of history dependent rheology in plate boundary lubrication for generating one-sided subduction.Pure and Applied Geophysics, Pageoph, Vol. 164, 5, pp. 879-907.MantleSubduction
DS200712-1056
2007
Nakakuki, T.Tagawa, M., Nakakuki, T., Kameyama, M., Tajima, F.The role of history dependent rheology in plate boundary lubrication for generating one sided subduction.Pure and Applied Geophysics, Pageoph, Vol. 164, 5, May pp. 879-907.MantleSubduction
DS200712-1057
2007
Nakakuki, T.Tagawa, M., Nakakuki, T., Kameyama, M., Tajima, F.The role of history dependent rheology in plate boundary lubrication for generating one-sided subduction.Pure and Applied Geophysics, Vol. 164, 5, May pp. 879-907.MantleSubduction, convection
DS200712-1058
2007
Nakakuki, T.Tagawa, M., Nakakuki, T., Tajima, F.Dynamical modeling of trench retreat driven by the slab interaction with the mantle transition zone.Earth Planets and Space, Vol. 59, 2, pp. 65-74.MantleSubduction
DS200712-1059
2007
Nakakuki, T.Tagawa, M., Nakakuki, T., Tajima, F.Dynamical modeling of trench retreat driven by the slab interaction with the mantle transition zone.Earth Planets and Space, Vol. 59, 2, pp. 65-74.MantleSubduction
DS200812-0785
2008
Nakakuki, T.Nakakuki, T., Hamada, C., Tagawa, M.Generation and driving forces of plate like motion and asymmetric subduction in dynamical models of an integrated mantle lithosphere system.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 166, 3-4, pp. 128-146.MantleSubduction
DS200912-0234
2009
Nakakuki, T.Fukao, Y., Obayashi, M., Nakakuki, T.Stagnant slab: a review.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 37, pp. 19-46.MantleSubduction
DS201907-1563
2019
Nakakuki, T.Nakagawa, T., Nakakuki, T.Dynamics in the uppermost lower mantle: insights into the deep mantle water cycle based on the numerical modeling of subducted slabs and global-scale mantle dynamics.Annual Reviews of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 47, pp. 41-66.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: In this review, we address the current status of numerical modeling of the mantle transition zone and uppermost lower mantle, focusing on the hydration mechanism in these areas. The main points are as follows: (a) Slab stagnation and penetration may play significant roles in transporting the water in the whole mantle, and (b) a huge amount of water could be absorbed into the deep mantle to preserve the surface seawater over the geologic timescale. However, for further understanding of water circulation in the deep planetary interior, more mineral physics investigations are required to reveal the mechanism of water absorption in the lower mantle and thermochemical interaction across the core-mantle boundary region, which can provide information on material properties to the geodynamics community. Moreover, future investigations should focus on determining the amount of water in the early planetary interior, as suggested by the planetary formation theory of rocky planets. Moreover, the supplying mechanism of water during planetary formation and its evolution caused by plate tectonics are still essential issues because, in geodynamics modeling, a huge amount of water seems to be required to preserve the surface seawater in the present day and to not be dependent on an initial amount of water in Earth's system.
DS202002-0212
2019
Nakakuki, T.Nakagawa, T., Nakakuki, T.Dynamics in the uppermost lower mantle: insights into the deep mantle water cycle based on the numerical modeling of subducted slabs and global scale mantle dynamics.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 47, pp. 41-66.Mantlesubduction, water

Abstract: In this review, we address the current status of numerical modeling of the mantle transition zone and uppermost lower mantle, focusing on the hydration mechanism in these areas. The main points are as follows: (a) Slab stagnation and penetration may play significant roles in transporting the water in the whole mantle, and (b) a huge amount of water could be absorbed into the deep mantle to preserve the surface seawater over the geologic timescale. However, for further understanding of water circulation in the deep planetary interior, more mineral physics investigations are required to reveal the mechanism of water absorption in the lower mantle and thermochemical interaction across the core-mantle boundary region, which can provide information on material properties to the geodynamics community. Moreover, future investigations should focus on determining the amount of water in the early planetary interior, as suggested by the planetary formation theory of rocky planets. Moreover, the supplying mechanism of water during planetary formation and its evolution caused by plate tectonics are still essential issues because, in geodynamics modeling, a huge amount of water seems to be required to preserve the surface seawater in the present day and to not be dependent on an initial amount of water in Earth's system.
DS202005-0752
2019
Nakakuki, T.Nakagawa, T., Nakakuki, T.Dynamics in the uppermost lower mantle: insights into the deep mantle water cycle based on the numerical modeling of subducted slabs and global-scale mantle dynamics.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 47, pp. 41-66. pdfMantlewater, subduction

Abstract: In this review, we address the current status of numerical modeling of the mantle transition zone and uppermost lower mantle, focusing on the hydration mechanism in these areas. The main points are as follows: (a) Slab stagnation and penetration may play significant roles in transporting the water in the whole mantle, and (b) a huge amount of water could be absorbed into the deep mantle to preserve the surface seawater over the geologic timescale. However, for further understanding of water circulation in the deep planetary interior, more mineral physics investigations are required to reveal the mechanism of water absorption in the lower mantle and thermochemical interaction across the core-mantle boundary region, which can provide information on material properties to the geodynamics community. Moreover, future investigations should focus on determining the amount of water in the early planetary interior, as suggested by the planetary formation theory of rocky planets. Moreover, the supplying mechanism of water during planetary formation and its evolution caused by plate tectonics are still essential issues because, in geodynamics modeling, a huge amount of water seems to be required to preserve the surface seawater in the present day and to not be dependent on an initial amount of water in Earth's system. 1) Slab stagnation and penetration of the hydrous lithosphere are essential for understanding the global-scale material circulation. 2) Thermal feedback caused by water-dependent viscosity is a main driving mechanism of water absorption in the mantle transition zone and uppermost lower mantle. 3) The hydrous state in the early rocky planets remains to be determined from cosmo- and geochemistry and planetary formation theory. 4) Volatile cycles in the deep planetary interior may affect the evolution of the surface environment.
DS200412-1805
2004
Nakamara, E.Shimizu, K., Nakamara, E., Kobayashi, K., Maruyama, S.Discovery of Archean continental and mantle fragments inferred from xenocrysts in komatiites, the Belingwe greenstone belt, ZimbGeology, Vol. 32, 4, pp. 285-288.Africa, ZimbabweXenocrysts
DS1987-0379
1987
NakamuraKrogh, T.E., Corfu, F., Davis, Dunning, Heaman, NakamuraPrecise uranium-lead (U-Pb) isotopic ages of diabase dikes and mafic to ultramafic rocks using trace amounts of baddeleyiteHalls and Fahrig, Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Special Vol., No. 34, pp. 147-52.Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology
DS2000-0398
2000
NakamuraHayashi, M., Komya, Nakamura, MaryamaArchean regional metamorphism of the Isua greenstone belt: implications driving force for plate tectonicsInternational Geology Review, Vol.42, 12, Dec. pp. 1055-1115.Greenland, southwestTectonics
DS200912-0867
2009
NakamuraZimmermann, U., Foruie, Naidoo, Van Staden, Chemalle, Nakamura, Koyayashi, Kosler, Beukes, Tait.Unroofing the Kalahari craton: provenance dat a from neoproterozoic to Paleozoic successions.Goldschmidt Conference 2009, p. A1536 Abstract.Africa, South AfricaTectonics
DS201112-0335
2011
NakamuraFourie, P.H., Zimmermana, U., Beukes, N.J., Naidoo, T., Kobayasji, K., Kosler, J., Nakamura, Tait, TheronProvenance and reconnaissance study of detrital zircons of the Paleozoic Cape Supergroup: revealing the interaction of Kalahari and Rio de la Plat a cratons.International Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 100, 2, pp. 527-541.Africa, South Africa, South America, BrazilGeochronology
DS2003-0993
2003
Nakamura, D.Nakamura, D.Stability of phengite and biotite in eclogites and characteristics of biotite orContribution to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 145, 5, August, pp. 550-567.GlobalEclogite - mineralogy
DS200412-1398
2003
Nakamura, D.Nakamura, D.Stability of phengite and biotite in eclogites and characteristics of biotite or orthopyroxene bearing eclogites.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 145, 5, August, pp. 550-567.TechnologyEclogite - mineralogy
DS200412-1399
2004
Nakamura, D.Nakamura, D., Svojtka, K., Naemura, T., HirajamaVery high pressure >4 GPa eclogite associated with the Moldanubian Zone garnet peridotite Nove Dory, Czech Republic.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 22, 6, pp. 593-603.Europe, Czech RepublicEclogite, UHP
DS200612-0965
2005
Nakamura, D.Nakamura, D., Hirajima, T.Experimental evaluation of garnet clinopyroxene geothermometry as applied to eclogites.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 150, 6, Dec. pp. 581-588.MantleEclogite
DS200912-0530
2009
Nakamura, D.Nakamura, D.A new formulation of garnet clinopyroxene geothermometer based on accumulation and statistical analysis of a large experimental dat a set.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 27, 7, pp. 495-508.TechnologyGeothermometry
DS1996-0866
1996
Nakamura, E.Mabako, M.A.H., Nakamura, E.neodymium and Strontium isotopic mapping of Archean Prot. boundary in southeast Tanzania using granites probes crustal growth.Precambrian Rseaerch, Vol.l 77, pp. 105-115.TanzaniaGeochronology, Tanzanian Craton
DS1996-0867
1996
Nakamura, E.Maboko, M.A.H., Nakamura, E.neodymium and Strontium isotopic mapping of the Archean Proterozoic boundary in southeastern Tanzania using granites ..Precambrian Research, Vol. 77, No. 1-2, March 1, pp. 105-116TanzaniaCrust, Geochronology
DS2000-0943
2000
Nakamura, E.Suzuki, T., Akaogi, M., Nakamura, E.Partioning of major elements between garnet structured minerals and silicate melt at pressure3-15 GPa.Physical Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 120, No.1-2, pp. 79-92.GlobalPetrology - experimental, Garnet - silicate melts
DS2001-0822
2001
Nakamura, E.Nakono, T., Nakamura, E.Boron isotope geochemistry of metasedimentary rocks and tourmalines in a subduction zone metamorphic suite.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 127, No. 1-4, Dec. 1, pp. 233-52.MantleSubduction - not related to diamonds
DS2003-0088
2003
Nakamura, E.Bebout, G.E., Nakamura, E.Record in metamorphic tourmalines of subduction zone devolatization and boronGeology, Vol. 31, 5, pp. 407-410.MantleSubduction, spectrometry, metamorphism
DS2003-0089
2003
Nakamura, E.Bebout, G.E., Nakamura, E.Record in metamorphic tourmalines of subduction zone devolatization and boronGeology, Vol. 31, 5, May pp. 407-10.Mantle, CrustSpectrometry, metamorphism
DS2003-1401
2003
Nakamura, E.Usui, T., Nakamura, E., Kobayashi, K., Maruyama, S., Helmstaedt, H.Fate of the subducted Farallon plate inferred from eclogite xenoliths in the ColoradoGeology, Vol. 31, 7, July, pp. 589-592.Colorado Plateau, New Mexico, WyomingSubduction
DS200412-0116
2003
Nakamura, E.Bebout, G.E., Nakamura, E.Record in metamorphic tourmalines of subduction zone devolatization and boron cycling.Geology, Vol. 31, 5, pp. 407-410.MantleSubduction, spectrometry, metamorphism
DS200412-2028
2003
Nakamura, E.Usui, T., Nakamura, E., Kobayashi, K., Maruyama, S., Helmstaedt, H.Fate of the subducted Farallon plate inferred from eclogite xenoliths in the Colorado Plateau.Geology, Vol. 31, 7, July, pp. 589-592.United States, ColoradoSubduction
DS200512-0535
2005
Nakamura, E.King, R.L., Bebout, G.E., Kobayashi, K., Nakamura, E., Van der Klauw, S.N.G.C.Ultrahigh pressure metabasaltic garnets as probes into deep subduction zone chemical cycling.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 5, Q12J14, doi:10.1029/2004 GC000746TechnologyUHP
DS200612-0861
2006
Nakamura, E.Manya, S., Kobayashi, K., Maboko, M.A., Nakamura, E.Ion microprobe zircon U Pb dating of the late Archean metavolcanics and associated granites of the Musoma Mara greenstone belt, northeast Tanzania: implicationsJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 45, 3, pp. 355-366.Africa, TanzaniaCraton, geochronology, not specific to diamonds
DS200612-1455
2006
Nakamura, E.Usui, T., Kobayashi, K., Nakamura, E., Helmstaedt, H.Trace element fractionation in deep subduction zones inferred from a lawsonite eclogite xenolith from the Colorado Plateau.Chemical Geology, in press available,United States, Colorado PlateauEclogite, subduction, Farallon plate, coesite
DS200612-1456
2006
Nakamura, E.Usui, T., Nakamura, E., Helmstaedt, H.Petrology and geochemistry of eclogite xenoliths from the Colorado Plateau: implications for the evolution of subducted oceanic crust.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 47, 5, pp. 929-964.United States, Colorado PlateauSubduction
DS200712-0175
2007
Nakamura, E.Cheng, H., King, R.L., Nakamura, E., Vervoort, J.D.Rates of eclogitic metamorphism of subducted continental slab.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A169.ChinaUHP, Danie Shan
DS200712-0176
2007
Nakamura, E.Cheng, H., Zhou, Z., Nakamura, E.Crystal size distribution and composition of garnets in eclogites from the Dabie Orogen, central China.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p. 267.ChinaDabie Orogen
DS200712-0177
2007
Nakamura, E.Cheng, H., Zhou, Z., Nakamura, E.Crystal size distribution and composition of garnets in eclogites from the Dabie Orogen, central China.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p. 267.ChinaDabie Orogen
DS200712-1067
2007
Nakamura, E.Tang, Y-J., Zhang, H-F., Nakamura, E., Moriguti, T., Kobayashi, K., Ying, J-F.Lithium isotopic systematics of peridotite xenoliths from Hannuoba, North Chin a Craton: implications for melt rock interaction in considerably thinned mantle lithospheric mantle.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 71, 17, Sept. 1, pp. 4327-4341.ChinaGeochronology
DS200712-1103
2007
Nakamura, E.Usui, T., Kobayahsi, K., Nakamura, E., Helmstaedt, H.Trace element fractionation in deep subduction zones inferred from a lawsonite eclogite xenolith from the Colorado Plateau.Chemical Geology, Vol. 239, 3-4, April 30, pp. 336-351.United States, Colorado PlateauSubduction
DS200712-1225
2007
Nakamura, E.Zhang, H-F., Nakamura, E., Sun, M., Kobayashi,K., Zhang, J., Yang, J-F., Tang, Y-J.Transformation of subcontinental lithospheric mantle through peridotite melt reaction: evidence from a highly fertile mantle xenolith from the North Chin a Craton.International Geology Review, Vol. 49, 7, July pp. 658-679.ChinaMelting
DS200812-0209
2008
Nakamura, E.Chen, H., King, R.L., Nakamura, E., Vervoort, J.D., Zhou, Z.Coupled Lu Hf and Sm Nd geochronology constraints garnet growth in ultra high pressure eclogites from the Dabie Orogen.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, in press availableChinaUHP, geochronology
DS200812-0213
2008
Nakamura, E.Cheng, H., King, R.L., Nakamura, E., Vervoort, J.D., Zhou, Z.Coupled Lu Hf and Sm Nd geochronology constrains garnet growth in ultra high pressure eclogites from the Dabie orogen.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 26. 7, pp. 741-758.ChinaUHP
DS200812-0214
2008
Nakamura, E.Cheng, H., King, R.L., Nakamura, E., Vervoort, J.D., Zhou, Z.Coupled LuHf and SmNd geochronology constrains garnet growth in ultra high pressure eclogites from the Dabie orogen.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 26, 7, Sept. pp. 741-758.ChinaUHP
DS200812-0215
2007
Nakamura, E.Cheng, H., Zhou, Z., Nakamura, E.Crystal size distribution of garnets in eclogites from the Dabie Orogen central China.American Mineralogist, Vol. 93, pp. 124-133.ChinaUHP
DS200812-0833
2008
Nakamura, E.Ota, T., Kobayashi, K., Kunihiro, T., Nakamura, E.Boron cycling by subducted lithosphere, insights from Diamondiferous tourmaline from the Kochetav ultrahigh pressure metamorphic belt.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 72, 14, pp. 3531-3541.Russia, KazakhstanCoesite, UHP
DS200912-0110
2009
Nakamura, E.Cheng, H., Nakamura, E., Zhou, Z.Garnet Lu Hf dating of retrograde fluid activity during ultrahigh pressure metamorphic eclogites exhumation.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 95, 3-4, pp. 315-326.MantleUHP
DS201012-0040
2010
Nakamura, E.Basu Sarbadhikari, A., Tsujimori, T., Moriguti, T., Kinihiro,T., Nakamura, E.In situ geochemistry of garnet peridotites of Lashaine, Tanzania Craton: re-fertilization in sub cratonic lithospheric mantle.Goldschmidt 2010 abstracts, PosterAfrica, TanzaniaGeochemustry
DS201012-0888
2010
Nakamura, E.Zhang, H-F., Nakamura, E., Kobayashi, K., Ying, J-F., Tang, Y-J.Recycled crustal melt injection into lithospheric mantle: implication from cumulative composite and pyroxenite xenoliths.International Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 99, pp. 1167-1186.ChinaNorth China craton
DS201112-1027
2011
Nakamura, E.Tang, Y-J., Zhang, H-F., Nakamura, E., Ying, J-F.Multistage melt fluid peridotite interactions in the refertilized lithospheric mantle beneath the North Chin a craton: constrains from the Li Sr Nd isotopicContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 161, 6, pp.MantlePeridotitic xenoliths
DS200912-0475
2009
Nakamura, H.Maruyama, S., Hasegawa, A., Santosh, M., Kogiso, T., Omori, S., Nakamura, H., Kawai, K., Zhao, D.The dynamics of big mantle wedge, magma factory, and metamorphic-metasomatic factory in subduction zones.Gondwana Research, Vol. 16, 3-4, pp. 414-430.MantleSubduction
DS201012-0315
2010
Nakamura, H.Iwamori, H., Albarede, F., Nakamura, H.Global structure of mantle isotopic heterogeneity and its implications for mantle differentiation and convection.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 299, 3-4, pp. 339-351.MantleConvection
DS201808-1773
2018
Nakamura, H.Nakao, A., Iwamori, H., Nakakakuki, T., Suzuki, Y.J., Nakamura, H.Roles of hydrous lithospheric mantle in deep water transportation and subduction dynamics.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 45, 11, pp. 5336-5343.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: Rocks on the Earth's surface are cooled, hardened, eventually forming rigid plates that move around relative to one another. When two plates converge, one plate overrides the other, which sinks into the Earth's deep mantle. The sinking plate carries water, which softens rocks and also affects the behavior of the sinking/overriding plates and surrounding mantle flows (“subduction dynamics”). To investigate the role of water in subduction dynamics, 2-D fluid dynamical simulations were performed. The simulations suggest that subduction dynamics change significantly with the level of hydration of the sinking plate, which is represented by the thickness of a hydrous layer. When the hydrous layer is thin, the plate sinks rapidly with a shifting boundary and stagnates above the lower mantle. In contrast, when the hydrous layer is thick, plate convergence is sluggish, the plate boundary remains stationary, and the sinking plate penetrates into the lower mantle. These results indicate that a small amount of water is expected for the northwest part of the Pacific Plate, characterized by the rapid convergence, plate boundary shifting, and stagnation of the sinking plate.
DS1988-0230
1988
Nakamura, K.Fukunaga, O., Nakamura, K.Synthesis of diamond. *JAPPatent: JPN Kokai Tokkyo Koho 88158126 A2, July 1, 1988 3p. JAP, GlobalDiamond synthesis
DS200712-1197
2007
Nakamura, M.Yamamoto, J., Kagi, H., Kawakami, Y., Hirano, N., Nakamura, M.Paleo-Moho depth determined from the pressure of CO2 fluid inclusions: Raman spectroscopic barometry of mantle crust derived rocks.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 253, 3-4, pp. 369-377.MantleGeothermometry
DS201904-0752
2019
Nakamura, M.Kobayashi, M., Sumino, H., Burgess, R., Nakai, S., Iizuka, T., Nagao, J. Kagi, H., Nakamura, M., Takahashi, E., Kogiso, T., Ballentine, C.J.Halogen heterogeneity in the lithosphere and evolution of mantle halogen abundances inferred from intraplate mantle xenoliths. Kilbourne HoleGeochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 20, 2, pp. 952-973.United States, New Mexicoxenoliths

Abstract: Elemental and isotopic compositions of volatile species such as halogens, noble gases, hydrogen, and carbon can be used to trace the evolution of these species in the Earth. Halogens are important tracers of subduction recycling of surface volatiles into the mantle: however, there is only limited understanding of halogens in the mantle. Here we provide new halogen data of mantle xenoliths from intraplate settings. The mantle xenoliths show a wide range of halogen elemental ratios, which are expected to be related to later processes after the xenoliths formed. A similar primary halogen component is present in the xenoliths sampled from different localities. This suggests that the mantle has the uniform halogen composition over a wide scale. The halogen composition in the convecting mantle is expected to have remained constant over more than 2 billion years, despite subduction of iodine-rich halogens. We used mass balance calculations to gain understanding into evolution rate of I/Cl ratio in the mantle. Calculations suggest that, in order to maintain the I/Cl ratio of the mantle over 2 Gyr, the I/Cl ratio of the subducted halogens must be no more than several times higher than the present-day mantle value.
DS1985-0021
1985
Nakamura, Y.Aoki, K.I., Yoshida, T., Yusa, K., Nakamura, Y.Petrology and Geochemistry of the Nyamuragira Volcano, ZaireJournal of VOLCANOLOGY, Vol. 25, No. 1-2, JUNE PP. 1-28.Central Africa, ZairePetrology
DS2001-0461
2001
Nakamura, Y.Hayashi, M., Komiya, T., Nakamura, Y., Maruyama, S.Archean regional metamorphism Isua supracrustal belt: implications for a driving force for Archean plate..International Geology Review, Vol. 42, No. 12, Dec. pp. 1055-1115.Greenland, southwestTectonics, metamorphism
DS201012-0527
2010
Nakamuta, Y.Nakamuta, Y., Toh, S., Aoki, T.Transformation mechanism of graphite to diamonds in ureilites revealed by TEM observation.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 183.TechnologyUrelilite
DS201312-0627
2013
Nakamuta, Y.Nakamuta, Y., Toh, S.Transformation of graphite to lonsdaleite and diamond in the Goalpara ureilite directly observed by TEM.American Mineralogist, Vol. 98, pp. 574-581.TechnologyMeteorite
DS201808-1773
2018
Nakao, A.Nakao, A., Iwamori, H., Nakakakuki, T., Suzuki, Y.J., Nakamura, H.Roles of hydrous lithospheric mantle in deep water transportation and subduction dynamics.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 45, 11, pp. 5336-5343.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: Rocks on the Earth's surface are cooled, hardened, eventually forming rigid plates that move around relative to one another. When two plates converge, one plate overrides the other, which sinks into the Earth's deep mantle. The sinking plate carries water, which softens rocks and also affects the behavior of the sinking/overriding plates and surrounding mantle flows (“subduction dynamics”). To investigate the role of water in subduction dynamics, 2-D fluid dynamical simulations were performed. The simulations suggest that subduction dynamics change significantly with the level of hydration of the sinking plate, which is represented by the thickness of a hydrous layer. When the hydrous layer is thin, the plate sinks rapidly with a shifting boundary and stagnates above the lower mantle. In contrast, when the hydrous layer is thick, plate convergence is sluggish, the plate boundary remains stationary, and the sinking plate penetrates into the lower mantle. These results indicate that a small amount of water is expected for the northwest part of the Pacific Plate, characterized by the rapid convergence, plate boundary shifting, and stagnation of the sinking plate.
DS2002-1113
2002
NakashimaMurakami, M., Hirose, K., Yurimoto, Nakashima, TakafujiWater in Earth's lower mantleScience, No. 5561, Mar. 8, pp. 1885-6.MantleWater
DS2003-0694
2003
Nakashima, S.Katayama, I., Nakashima, S.Hydroxyl in clinopyroxene from the deep subducted crust: evidence for H2O transportAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 88, No. 1, pp.MantleWater
DS2003-0695
2003
Nakashima, S.Katayama, I., Nakashima, S.Hydroxyl in clinopyroxene from the deep subducted crust: evidence for H2O transportAmerican Mineralogist, Vol.88, pp. 229-34.Mantle, Russia, KazakhstanSubduction - water, Kokchetav Massif
DS200412-0960
2003
Nakashima, S.Katayama, I., Hirose, K., Yurimoto, H., Nakashima, S.Water solubility in majoritic garnet in subducting oceanic crust.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 22, SDE 2 Nov. 15, 10.1029/2003 GLO18127MantleGeochemistry - subduction
DS200512-0498
2005
Nakashima, S.Katayama, I., Nakashima, S., Yurimoto, H.Water content in natural eclogite and implication for water transport into deep upper mantle.Lithos, In press,RussiaKokchetav Massif, UHP, subduction
DS200612-0669
2006
Nakashima, S.Katayama, I., Nakashima, S., Yurimoto, H.Water content in natural eclogite and implications for water transport into the deep upper mantle.Lithos, Vol. 86, 3-4, Feb. pp. 245-259.Mantle, RussiaSprectroscopy, Kokchetav Massif, subduction, diamond
DS201803-0466
2018
Nakashole, A.N.Nakashole, A.N., Hodgson, D.M., Chapman, R.J., Morgan, D.J., Jacob, R.J.Long term controls on continental scale bedrock river terrace deposition from integrated clast and heavy mineral assemblage analysis: an example from the Lower Orange River, Namibia. ( Diamondiferous gravel terraces)Sedimentary Geology, Vol. 364, pp. 103-120.Africa, Namibiadeposit - Orange River

Abstract: Establishing relationships between the long-term landscape evolution of drainage basins and the fill of sedimentary basins benefits from analysis of bedrock river terrace deposits. These fragmented detrital archives help to constrain changes in river system character and provenance during sediment transfer from continents (source) to oceans (sink). Thick diamondiferous gravel terrace deposits along the lower Orange River, southern Namibia, provide a rare opportunity to investigate controls on the incision history of a continental-scale bedrock river. Clast assemblage and heavy mineral data from seven localities permit detailed characterisation of the lower Orange River gravel terrace deposits. Two distinct fining-upward gravel terrace deposits are recognised, primarily based on mapped stratigraphic relationships (cross-cutting relationships) and strath and terrace top elevations, and secondarily on the proportion of exotic clasts, referred to as Proto Orange River deposits and Meso Orange River deposits. The older early to middle Miocene Proto Orange River gravels are thick (up to 50 m) and characterised by a dominance of Karoo Supergroup shale and sandstone clasts, whereas the younger Plio-Pleistocene Meso Orange River gravels (6-23 m thick) are characterised by more banded iron formation clasts. Mapping of the downstepping terraces indicates that the Proto gravels were deposited by a higher sinuosity river, and are strongly discordant to the modern Orange River course, whereas the Meso deposits were deposited by a lower sinuosity river. The heavy minerals present in both units comprise magnetite, garnet, amphibole, epidote and ilmenite, with rare titanite and zircon grains. The concentration of amphibole-epidote in the heavy minerals fraction increases from the Proto to the Meso deposits. The decrease in incision depths, recorded by deposit thicknesses above strath terraces, and the differences in clast character (size and roundness) and type between the two units, are ascribed to a more powerful river system during Proto-Orange River time, rather than reworking of older deposits, changes in provenance or climatic variations. In addition, from Proto- to Meso-Orange River times there was an increase in the proportion of sediments supplied from local bedrock sources, including amphibole-epidote in the heavy mineral assemblages derived from the Namaqua Metamorphic Complex. This integrated study demonstrates that clast assemblages are not a proxy for the character of the matrix, and vice versa, because they are influenced by the interplay of different controls. Therefore, an integrated approach is needed to improve prediction of placer mineral deposits in river gravels, and their distribution in coeval deposits downstream.
DS1994-1278
1994
Nakata, K.Nielson, J.E., Nakata, K.Mantle origin and flow sorting of megacrst-xenolith inclusions in mafic dikes of Black Canyon, ArizonaUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Paper, No. P 1541, 41p. $ 3.25ArizonaXenoliths
DS201511-1840
2015
Nakata, K.Harada, Y., Hishinuma, R., Terashima, C., Uetsuka, H., Nakata, K., Kondo, T., Yuasa, M., Fujishima, A.Rapid growth of diamond and its morphology by in-liquid plasma CVD.Diamond and Related Materials, in press available, 16p.TechnologySynthetics

Abstract: Diamond synthesis and its morphology by in-liquid plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method are investigated in this study. Diamond films were grown on Si substrates from mixed alcohol solution. Very high growth rate of 170 µm/h was achieved by this method. Microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond films were formed in different conditions. In the case of microcrystalline film, the shapes of diamond grains depend on the location in the film. All morphological differences in this study can be explained by the same mechanism of conventional gas phase CVD method. It means diamond morphology by in-liquid plasma CVD method can be controlled by process parameters as well as gas phase CVD method.
DS2003-0673
2003
Nakayama, E.Joseph, E.J., Segawa, J., Kusumoto, S., Nakayama, E., Ishihara, T., KomazawaAirborne gravimetry - a new gravimeter system and test resultsExploration Geophysics, Vol. 34, 1-2, pp. 82-86.GlobalGeophysics - gravimetry not specific to diamonds
DS200412-0932
2003
Nakayama, E.Joseph, E.J., Segawa, J., Kusumoto, S., Nakayama, E., Ishihara, T., Komazawa, M., Sakuma, S.Airborne gravimetry - a new gravimeter system and test results.Exploration Geophysics, Vol. 34, 1-2, pp. 82-86.TechnologyGeophysics - gravimetry not specific to diamonds
DS1993-0041
1993
Nakayama, K.Arima, M., Nakayama, K., Akaishi, M., Yamaoka, S., Kanda, H.Crystallization of diamond from a silicate melt of kimberlite composition in high temperature and high pressure experiments.Geology, Vol. 21, No. 11, November pp. 968-970.GlobalDiamond genesis, Experimental petrology
DS200512-0782
2005
Nakayama, K.Nishihara, Y., Nakayama, K., Iguchi, T., Funakoshi, K.P V T equation of state of stishovite to the mantle transition zone conditions.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 31, 10, pp. 660-670.MantleMineralogy
DS2003-1046
2003
Nakazato, H.Park, M.K., Takeuchi, M., Nakazato, H.Electrical resistivity prospecting for geo-environmental investigationExploration Geophysics, Vol. 34, 1-2, pp. 120-124.GlobalGeophysics - resistivity
DS200412-1502
2003
Nakazato, H.Park, M.K., Takeuchi, M.,Nakazato, H.Electrical resistivity prospecting for geo-environmental investigation.Exploration Geophysics, Vol. 34, 1-2, pp. 120-124.TechnologyGeophysics - resistivity
DS1985-0476
1985
Nakazawa, H.Nakazawa, H., Tagai, T., Hirai, H., Satow, Y.X-ray Section Topographs of a Cube Shaped DiamondMineralogical Journal, Vol. 12, No. 6, pp. 245-250GlobalDiamond Morphology
DS200912-0237
2009
Nakazawa, H.Furukawa, Y., Sekine, T., Oba, M., Kakegawa, T., Nakazawa, H.Biomolecule formation by oceanic impacts on early Earth. ( subducting .. conversion to graphite or diamond....)Nature Geoscience, Vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 62-66.MantleSubduction
DS1999-0272
1999
Nakicenovic, N.Grubler, A., Nakicenovic, N., Victor, D.G.Dynamics of energy technologies and global changeEnergy Policy, Vol. 27, pp. 247-80.GlobalGlobal warming, Modelling - changes, energy
DS201810-2359
2018
Nako, A.Nakagawa, T., Iwamori, H., Yanagi, R., Nako, A.On the evolutiom of the water ocean in the plate mantle system.Progress in Earth and Planetary Science, Vol. 5, pp. 51- 16p.Mantlewater

Abstract: Here, we investigate a possible scenario of surface seawater evolution in the numerical simulations of surface plate motion driven by mantle dynamics, including thermo-chemical convection and water migration, from the early to present-day Earth to constrain the total amount of water in the planetary system. To assess the validity of two hypotheses of the total amount of water inferred from early planetary formation processes and mineral physics, we examine the model sensitivity to the total water in the planetary system (both surface and deep interior) up to 15 ocean masses. To explain the current size of the reservoir of surface seawater, the predictions based on the numerical simulations of hydrous mantle convection suggest that the total amount of water should range from 9 to 12 ocean masses. Incorporating the dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) with a recently discovered hydrous mineral at lower mantle pressures (phase H) indicates that the physical mechanism of the mantle water cycle would not be significantly influenced, but the water storage region would be expanded in addition to the mantle transition zone. The DHMS solubility field may have a limited impact on the partitioning of water in the Earth’s deep mantle.
DS2001-0822
2001
Nakono, T.Nakono, T., Nakamura, E.Boron isotope geochemistry of metasedimentary rocks and tourmalines in a subduction zone metamorphic suite.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 127, No. 1-4, Dec. 1, pp. 233-52.MantleSubduction - not related to diamonds
DS2001-0092
2001
Nalbant, S.S.Bayrak, M., Nalbant, S.S.Conductive crust imaged in western Turkey by MTGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 28, No. 18, Sept. 15, pp. 3521-24.TurkeyTectonics
DS2003-0994
2003
Naldoo, P.Naldoo, P., Stiefenhofer, J., Field, M., Dobbe, R.Recent advances in the geology of Koffiefontein mine, Free State Province, South8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 1, AbstractSouth AfricaGeology, economics, Deposit - Koffiefontein
DS200412-1400
2003
Naldoo, P.Naldoo, P., Stiefenhofer, J., Field, M., Dobbe, R.Recent advances in the geology of Koffiefontein mine, Free State Province, South Africa.8 IKC Program, Session 1, AbstractAfrica, South AfricaGeology, economics Deposit - Koffiefontein
DS1987-0416
1987
Naldrett, A.J.Lightfoot, P.C., Naldrett, A.J., Hawkesworth, C.J.Re-evaluation of chemical variation in the Insizwa complex, TranskeiCanadian Mineralogist, Vol. 25, pt. 1, pp. 79-90South AfricaPetrology, Picrite
DS1990-1555
1990
Naldrett, A.J.Whitney, J.A., Naldrett, A.J.Oxygen fugacities of natural systems -xenoliths and megacrysts from alkali basalts and kimberlitesOre deposition associated with magmas, SEG Reviews in Economic Geology, Vol. 4, p. 23GlobalKimberlite, Oxygen fugacity
DS1992-0231
1992
Naldrett, A.J.Chai, G., Naldrett, A.J.The Jinchuan ultramafic intrusion - cumulates of a high magnesium basaltic magmaJournal of Petrology, Vol. 33, No. 2, April pp. 277-304ChinaMagma, Petrology
DS1994-0279
1994
Naldrett, A.J.Chai, G., Naldrett, A.J.Pyroxene mineral chemistry of the Jinchuan intrusion, ChinaMineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 51, No. 1, pp. 1-20ChinaLayered intrusion, Deposit -Jinchuan
DS2002-1466
2002
Naletov, A.Shiryaev, A., Dembo, K., Klyuev, Y., Naletov, A., Hutchison, M.T., Feigelson, B.Small angle X ray scattering investigation of extended defects in diamonds18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.75.MantleUHP mineralogy - type Ib and IIa
DS1985-0477
1985
Naletov, A.M.Naletov, A.M., Nepsha, V.I., Klyuev, YU.A., Bulygina, T.I.Structure and Properties of Lonsdaleite Containing Diamonds. (russian)Vopr. Povysh. Kchestva. Almaz. Odrab., (Russian) (POL), pp. 75-83RussiaDiamond Morphology
DS1985-0489
1985
Naletov, A.M.Nepsha, V.I., Naletov, A.M., Reshetnikov, N.F., Klyuev, YU.A.Effect of Carbon Defects on the Diamond Thermal Conductivity.(russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 284, No. 4, pp. 844-846RussiaDiamond Morphology
DS1986-0085
1986
Naletov, A.M.Bokii, G.B., Bexrukov, G.N., Klyuev, Yu.A., Naletov, A.M., Nepsha, V.I.Natural and synthetic diamonds.(Russian)Nauka Moscow (Russian), 224pRussiaDiamond
DS1986-0800
1986
Naletov, A.M.Tepishina, N.I., Nadezhdina, Ye. D., Klyuyev, Yu.A., Naletov, A.M.Hardness and toughness in brittle fracture of nature lonsdaleite containing polycrystalline diamondsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 276, January pp. 112-114RussiaCrystallography, Diamond morphology
DS1988-0360
1988
Naletov, A.M.Klyuev, Yu.A., Galymova, A., Korneeva, I.I., Naletov, A.M., NepshaPhotoluminescence tomography as a method to image point defect distributions in crystals- nitrogen-vacancy pairs in syntheticdiamonds*technical noteNov. Obl. Primeniya Tekn.Almazov, (Russian), pp. 24-30RussiaLuminescence
DS1990-0827
1990
Naletov, A.M.Kharlashina, N.N., Naletov, A.M.Pecularities of texture of natural lonsdaleyite-bearing diamonds.(Russian)Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), No. 8, August pp. 1179-1184RussiaDiamond inclusions, Lonsdaleyite
DS1991-0862
1991
Naletov, A.M.Kharlashina, N.N., Naletov, A.M.Textures of natural Lonsdaleite-bearing diamondsGeochemistry International, Vol. 28, No. 1, pp. 98-103RussiaDiamond morphology, Crsytallography -textures
DS1984-0787
1984
Naletov.Yepishina, N.I., Nadezhdina, Y.D., Klyuyev, Y.A., Naletov.Hardness, viscosity and defects due to the fragility of continuousnatural lonsdaleite in natural diamonds.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk. SSSR (Russian), Vol. 276, No. 1, pp. 232-234RussiaDiamond, Morphology
DS200712-0770
2007
Naliboff, J.B.Naliboff, J.B., Kellogg, L.H.Can large increases in viscosity and thermal conductivity preserve large scale heterogeneity in the mantle?Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 161, 1-2, pp. 86-102.MantleGeothermometry
DS201112-0718
2011
Naliboff, J.B.Naliboff, J.B., LKithgow-Bertolini, C., Ruff, L.J., De Koker, N.The effects of lithospheric thickness and density structure on Earth's stress.Geophysical Journal International, in press availableMantleDynamics - gravity, tectonics
DS200912-0147
2009
Nalini, H.A.Danderfer, A., De Waele, B., Pedeira, A.J., Nalini, H.A.New geochronological constraints on the geological evolution of Espinhaco basin within the San Francisco Craton- Brazil.Precambrian Research, Vol. 170, 1-2, pp. 116-128.South America, BrazilGeochronology - not specific to diamonds
DS1996-0183
1996
Nalpas, T.Brun, J.P., Nalpas, T.Graben invesrion in nature and experimentsTectonics, Vol. 15, No. 2, pp. 677-687.GlobalBasin, Structure - not specific to diamonds
DS1988-0495
1988
NamNam, Tom Leong, Burns, R.C., Keddy, R.J.Radiation detector from a mass of small diamond particlesPatent: S. African 87 06994 A June 29, 1988 16p. (De Beers), GlobalDiamond Application
DS1989-1088
1989
Nam, T.L.Nam, T.L., Fallon, P.J., Keddy, R.J., Vanrijn, H.J.Detection of nuclear radiation by scintillation-counting using syntheticdiamondAppl. Rad. Is, Vol. 40, No. 8, pp. 657-661GlobalDiamond synthesis
DS1993-0794
1993
Nam, T.L.Keddy, R.J., Nam, T.L.Diamond radiation detectorsRadiation Physics, C., Vol. 41, No. 4-5, April -May pp. 767-773South AfricaDiamond morphology, Radiation
DS2003-0995
2003
Namaki, A.Namaki, A.Can the mantle entrain D??Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B10, 2487 DOI. 1029/2002JB002315MantleMixing, upper and lower, MORB, OIB, volume, geodynamics
DS200412-1401
2003
Namaki, A.Namaki, A.Can the mantle entrain D??Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B10, 2487 DOI. 1029/2002 JB002315MantleMixing, upper and lower, MORB, OIB, volume, geodynamics
DS200512-0766
2004
Namakwa Diamond CompanyNamakwa Diamond CompanyNamakwa scores De Beers data. West coast of South Africa.Mineweb, Dec. 13, 1p.Africa, South AfricaNews item - Namakwa, De Beers
DS200512-0765
2005
Namakwa Diamond Company NL.Namakwa Diamond Company NL.Namakwa achieves record diamond sale prices.Minebox.com, Aug. 29, 1/2p.Africa, South AfricaNews item - Namakwa
DS1993-1111
1993
Nambian Ministry of Mines and EnergyNambian Ministry of Mines and EnergyConference on mining investment in Nambia held March 17-19th. AbstractsInvestment Centre for the Ministry of Mines and Energy, Abstract volume, 110pNamibiaEconomics, Mining, mineral policy
DS1985-0478
1985
Nambiar, A.R.Nambiar, A.R., Golani, P.R.A New Find of Carbonatite from MeghalayaCurrent Science., Vol. 54, No. 6, MARCH 20, PP. 281-283.India, MeghalayaBlank
DS1988-0496
1988
Nambiar, A.R.Nambiar, A.R.Petrology of lamprophyres from parts of East Garo Hills and West Khasi Hills districtsJournal of Geological Society India, Vol. 32, No. 2, August pp. 125-136IndiaLamprophyres, Petrology
DS2002-1467
2002
Nambiar, A.R.Shivana, S.,Srivastava, J.K.,Nambiar, A.R.Kimberlite occurrence in Raichur area, KarnatakaJournal Geological Society of India, Vol. 59,No.3,pp. 269-72.IndiaGeology, Deposit - Raichur area
DS2002-1470
2002
Nambiar, A.R.Shivanna, S., Srivastava, J.K., Nambiar, A.R.Kimberlite occurrence in Raichur area, Karnataka. Near UndraldoddiJournal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 59, March, pp. 269-271.IndiaGeology - kimberlite
DS2002-1471
2002
Nambiar, A.R.Shivanna, S., Srivastava, J.K., Nambiar, A.R.Kimberlite occurrence in Raichur area, KarnatakaJournal Geological Society of India, Vol. 59, pp. 269-71.India, KarnatakaKimberlite
DS2002-1472
2002
Nambiar, A.R.Shivanna, S., Srivastava, J.K., Nambiar, A.R.Kimberlite occurrence in Raichur area, KarnatakaJournal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 59, March pp. 269-271.India, KarnatakaPetrology
DS2003-0996
2003
Nambiar, A.R.Nambiar, A.R.Petrography and geochemistry of the Krishna lamproite field, Andhra PradeshJournal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 62, No. 2, August, pp. 255-256.India, Andhra PradeshBlank
DS200412-1402
2003
Nambiar, A.R.Nambiar, A.R.Petrography and geochemistry of the Krishna lamproite field, Andhra Pradesh. Comment and reply.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 62, No. 2, August, pp. 255-256.India, Andhra PradeshLamproite
DS200412-1811
2002
Nambiar, A.R.Shivanna, S., Srivastava, J.K., Nambiar, A.R.Kimberlite occurrence in Raichur area, Karnataka.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 59, March pp. 269-271.India, KarnatakaPetrology
DS200612-0966
2001
Nambiar, A.R.Nambiar, A.R., Shivanna, S., Ahmed, M., Srivastava, J.K.Search for kimberlites in Karnataka - status and scope.National Seminar on Exploration Survey, Geological Society of India Special Publication, No. 58, pp. 603-613.India, KarnatakaDiamond exploration
DS200612-0967
2005
Nambiar, A.R.Nambiar, A.R., Shivanna, S., Srivastava, J.K.A preliminary report on the occurrence of manganoan ilmenite in kimberlites of Karnataka.Geological Society of India, Bangalore November Meeting Group Discussion on Kimberlites and Related Rocks India, Abstract p. 65-66.India, Karnataka, Dharwar CratonMineralogy
DS200612-1288
2005
Nambiar, A.R.Shivanna, S., Srivastava, J.K., Nambiar, A.R.Kimberlites of Raichur kimberlite field, Raichur district, Karnataka, southern India.Geological Society of India, Bangalore November Meeting Group Discussion on Kimberlites and Related Rocks India, Abstract p. 52-54.India, Karnataka, Dharwar CratonKimberlites - Raichur
DS200612-1623
2005
Nambiar, A.R.Nambiar, A.R.Early Cretaceous lamprophyre dykes from Nonghram fault zone, Meghalaya northeastern India.Geological Society of India, Bangalore November Meeting Group Discussion on Kimberlites and Related Rocks India, Abstract p. 135-137.IndiaLamprophyre
DS1997-0991
1997
Nambiar, C.G.Sacks, P.E., Nambiar, C.G., Walters, L.J.Dextral Pan-African shear along the southwestern edge of the Achanovilshear belt, constraints on GondwanaJournal of Geology, Vol. 105, No. 2, March pp. 275-284India, GondwanaTectonics, Shear zone
DS1986-0437
1986
Namchur, G.P.Kharkiv, A.D., Serenko, V.P., Zinchuk, N.N., Namchur, G.P., MelnikCarbon isotope composition of carbonates from deep horizons In the MirpipeGeochem. Internat, Vol. 23, No. 7, pp. 79-84RussiaIsotope, Geochronology
DS1985-0282
1985
Namegabe, M.R.Hertogen, J., Vanlerberghe, L., Namegabe, M.R.Geochemical Evolution of the Nyiragongo VolcanoBulletin. Geological Society Finland, Vol. 57, pt. 1-2 pp. 21-35Democratic Republic of CongoMeliltite, Leucitite, Rift, Tectonics
DS201012-0775
2010
Namhey, L.Sverjensky, D.A., Namhey, L.The great oxidation event and mineral diversification.Elements, Vol. 6, pp. 31-36.MantleOxidation
DS200412-1403
2004
Namibian ResourcesNamibian ResourcesNamibian Resources seeks alternative invest market admission. Sonneberg Diamonds (Namibia) prospecting within Pomona concession,Namibian Resources, Feb. 23, 1p.Africa, NamibiaNews item - press release, Sonneberg Diamonds
DS1999-0501
1999
Namiki, A.Namiki, A., Kuritak, A.Influence of boundary heterogeneity in experimental models of mantleconvection.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 26, No. 13, July 1, pp. 1929-32.MantleConvection
DS2001-0823
2001
Namiki, A.Namiki, A., Kurita, K.The influence of boundary heterogeneity in experimental models of mantle convection with internal heat sources.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 128, No. 1-4, Dec. 10, pp. 195-205.MantleGeothermometry, convection, heat
DS2003-0997
2003
Namiki, A.Namiki, A.Can the mantle entrain?Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, 10, ETG 11 10.1029/2002JB002315MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS2003-0998
2003
Namiki, A.Namiki, A., Kurita, K.Heat transfer and interfacial temperature of two layered convection: implications for theGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 1, Jan. 10.1029/2002GLO015809MantleGeothermometry
DS200412-1404
2003
Namiki, A.Namiki, A., Kurita, K.Heat transfer and interfacial temperature of two layered convection: implications for the D'mantle coupling.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 1, Jan. 10.1029/2002 GLO015809MantleGeothermometry
DS200612-0879
2006
Namiki, A.Matsumoto, N., Namiki, A., Sumita, I.Influence of a basal thermal anomaly on mantle convection.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, in press availableMantleGeothermometry, mantle convection, hot spot, melting
DS201908-1786
2019
Nan, X-Y.Li, W-Y., Yu, H-M., Xu, J., Halama, R., Bell, K., Nan, X-Y., Huang, F.Barium isotopic composition of the mantle: constraints from carbonatites.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, in press available doi.org/10.1016 / j.gca.2019.06.041 36p.Africa, Tanzania, Canada, East Africa, Europe, Germany, Greenlanddeposit - Oldoinyo Lengai

Abstract: To investigate the behaviour of Ba isotopes during carbonatite petrogenesis and to explore the possibility of using carbonatites to constrain the Ba isotopic composition of the mantle, we report high-precision Ba isotopic analyses of: (1) carbonatites and associated silicate rocks from the only active carbonatite volcano, Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania, and (2) Archean to Cenozoic carbonatites from Canada, East Africa, Germany and Greenland. Carbonatites and associated phonolites and nephelinites from Oldoinyo Lengai have similar d137/134Ba values that range from +0.01 to +0.03‰, indicating that Ba isotope fractionation during carbonatite petrogenesis is negligible. The limited variation in d137/134Ba values from -0.03 to +0.09‰ for most carbonatite samples suggests that their mantle sources have a relatively homogeneous Ba isotopic composition. Based on the carbonatites investigated in this work, the average d137/134Ba value of their mantle sources is estimated to be +0.04?±?0.06‰ (2SD, n?=?16), which is similar to the average value of +0.05?±?0.06‰ for mid-ocean ridge basalts. The lower d137/134Ba value of -0.08‰ in a Canadian sample and higher d137/134Ba values of +0.14‰ and?+?0.23‰ in two Greenland samples suggest local mantle isotopic heterogeneity that may reflect the incorporation of recycled crustal materials in their sources.
DS202006-0931
2020
Nan, X-Y.Li, W-Ye., Yu, H-M., Xu, J., Halama, R., Bell, K., Nan, X-Y., Huang, F.Barium isotopic composition of the mantle: constraints from carbonatites.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 278, pp. 235-243. pdfAfrica, Tanzania, Canada, Europe, Germany, Greenlanddeposit - Oldoinyo Lengai

Abstract: To investigate the behaviour of Ba isotopes during carbonatite petrogenesis and to explore the possibility of using carbonatites to constrain the Ba isotopic composition of the mantle, we report high-precision Ba isotopic analyses of: (1) carbonatites and associated silicate rocks from the only active carbonatite volcano, Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania, and (2) Archean to Cenozoic carbonatites from Canada, East Africa, Germany and Greenland. Carbonatites and associated phonolites and nephelinites from Oldoinyo Lengai have similar d137/134Ba values that range from +0.01 to +0.03‰, indicating that Ba isotope fractionation during carbonatite petrogenesis is negligible. The limited variation in d137/134Ba values from -0.03 to +0.09‰ for most carbonatite samples suggests that their mantle sources have a relatively homogeneous Ba isotopic composition. Based on the carbonatites investigated in this work, the average d137/134Ba value of their mantle sources is estimated to be +0.04?±?0.06‰ (2SD, n?=?16), which is similar to the average value of +0.05?±?0.06‰ for mid-ocean ridge basalts. The lower d137/134Ba value of -0.08‰ in a Canadian sample and higher d137/134Ba values of +0.14‰ and?+?0.23‰ in two Greenland samples suggest local mantle isotopic heterogeneity that may reflect the incorporation of recycled crustal materials in their sources.
DS202007-1160
2020
Nan, X-Y.Li, W-Y., Yu, H-M., Xu, J., Halama, R., Bell, K., Nan, X-Y., Huang, F.Barium isotopic composition of the mantle: constraints from carbonatites.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 278, pp. 235-243.Mantlecarbonatite

Abstract: To investigate the behaviour of Ba isotopes during carbonatite petrogenesis and to explore the possibility of using carbonatites to constrain the Ba isotopic composition of the mantle, we report high-precision Ba isotopic analyses of: (1) carbonatites and associated silicate rocks from the only active carbonatite volcano, Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania, and (2) Archean to Cenozoic carbonatites from Canada, East Africa, Germany and Greenland. Carbonatites and associated phonolites and nephelinites from Oldoinyo Lengai have similar d137/134Ba values that range from +0.01 to +0.03‰, indicating that Ba isotope fractionation during carbonatite petrogenesis is negligible. The limited variation in d137/134Ba values from -0.03 to +0.09‰ for most carbonatite samples suggests that their mantle sources have a relatively homogeneous Ba isotopic composition. Based on the carbonatites investigated in this work, the average d137/134Ba value of their mantle sources is estimated to be +0.04?±?0.06‰ (2SD, n?=?16), which is similar to the average value of +0.05?±?0.06‰ for mid-ocean ridge basalts. The lower d137/134Ba value of -0.08‰ in a Canadian sample and higher d137/134Ba values of +0.14‰ and?+?0.23‰ in two Greenland samples suggest local mantle isotopic heterogeneity that may reflect the incorporation of recycled crustal materials in their sources.
DS2000-0694
2000
NanceMurphy, J.B., Strachan, R.A., Nance, Parker, FowlerProto-Avalonia: a 1.2 - 1.0 Ga tectonothermal event and constraints for the evolution of Rodinia.Geology, Vol. 28, No. 12, Dec. pp. 1071-4.GlobalGeodynamics, Geochronology
DS1996-1019
1996
Nance, D.Nance, D., Thompson, M.D.Avalonian and related per-Gondwanan terranes of the circum North AtlanticGeological Society of America, Special Paper, No. 304, 390pNewfoundland, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, FranceTectonostratigraphy, Table of contents
DS200812-0776
2008
Nance, D.R.Murphy, B.J., Nance, D.R., Cawood, P.A.Contrasting modes of supercontinent formation and the conundrum of Pangea.Gondwana Research, In press available, 62p.Mantle, PangeaSupercontinents
DS1989-1076
1989
Nance, R.D.Murphy, J.B., Nance, R.D.Model for the evolution of the Avalonian Cadomian beltGeology, Vol. 17, No. 8, August pp. 735-738AppalachiaTectonics, Stratigraphy
DS1991-1205
1991
Nance, R.D.Murphy, J.B., Nance, R.D.Supercontinent model for the contrasting character of Late Proterozoic orogenic beltsGeology, Vol. 19, No. 5, May pp. 469-472GlobalTectonics, Orogenic belts
DS1992-1104
1992
Nance, R.D.Murphy, J.B., Nance, R.D.Mountain belts and the Supercontinent cycleSci. American, Apr. pp. 84-91.GlobalPangea, Tectonics
DS1994-1262
1994
Nance, R.D.Nance, R.D., Murphy, J.B.Contrasting basement isotopic signatures, palinspastic restoration of peripheral orogens: eg. Neoproterozoic.Geology, Vol. 22, No. 7, July pp. 617-620.West AfricaGeochronology, Avalonian Cadomian belt, Tectonics
DS200412-1385
2004
Nance, R.D.Murphy, J.B., Nance, R.D.How do supercontinents assemble.American Scientist, Vol. 92, 4, July-August pp. 324-333.GlobalTectonics
DS200412-1386
2003
Nance, R.D.Murphy, J.B., Nance, R.D.Do supercontinents introvert or extrovert? Sm Nd isotope evidence.Geology, Vol. 31, 10, p;873-6.Africa, South America, BrazilGeochronology, Gondwana
DS200512-0758
2005
Nance, R.D.Murphy, J.B., Nance, R.D.Do supercontinents turn inside-in or inside out?International Geology Review, Vol. 47, 6, June pp. 591-619.MantleTectonics, Gondwanaland
DS200712-1046
2007
Nance, R.D.Strachan, R.A., Collins, A.S., Buchan, C., Nance, R.D., Murphy, J.C., DLemos, R.S.Terrane analysis along a neoproterozoic active margin of Gondwana: insights from U Pb zircon geochronology.Journal of the Geological Society, Vol. 164, 1, pp. 57-60.MantleGeochronology
DS200812-0778
2008
Nance, R.D.Murphy, J.B., Nance, R.D.The Pangea conundrum.Geology, Vol. 36, 9, Sept. pp. 703-706.Australia, PangeaGeodynamics
DS200912-0526
2009
Nance, R.D.Murphy, J.B., Nance, R.D., Cawood, P.A.Contrasting modes of supercontinent formation and the conundrum of Pangea.Gondwana Research, Vol. 15, 3-4, pp. 408-420.MantlePangea
DS200912-0527
2009
Nance, R.D.Murphy, J.B., Nance, R.D., Guterrez-Alfonso, G., Keppie, J.D.Supercontinent rconstruction from recognition of leading continental edges.Geology, Vol. 37, 7, July pp. 595-598.United States, CanadaSubduction
DS201312-0622
2013
Nance, R.D.Murphy, J.B., Nance, R.D.Speculations on the mechanisms for the formation and breakup of supercontinents.Geoscience Frontiers, Vol. 4, 2, pp. 185-194.MantleGeodynamics
DS201312-0628
2013
Nance, R.D.Nance, R.D., Murphy, J.B.Origins of the supercontinent cycle.Geoscience Frontiers, Vol. 4, pp. 439-448.MantleConvection
DS201312-0629
2014
Nance, R.D.Nance, R.D., Murphy, J.B., Santosh, M.The supercontinent cycle: a retrospective essay.Gondwana Research, Vol. 25, 1, pp. 4-29.Gondwana, RodiniaEarth history
DS201905-1060
2018
Nance, R.D.Nance, R.D., Murphy, B.Supercontinents and the case for Pannotia.IN: Cycle Concepts in Plate Tectonics, editors Wilson and Houseman , Geological Society of London special publication 470, 21p.MantlePannotia

Abstract: Disagreement about the existence of the late Neoproterozoic supercontinent Pannotia highlights the limitation of defining supercontinents simply on the basis of size, which, for pre-Pangaean supercontinents, is difficult to determine. In the context of the supercontinent cycle, however, supercontinent assembly and break-up, respectively, mark the end of one cycle and the beginning of the next and can be recognized by the tectonic, climatic and biogeochemical trends that accompany them. Hence supercontinents need only be large enough to influence mantle circulation in such a way as to enable the cycle to repeat. Their recognition need not rely solely on continental reconstructions, but can also exploit a variety of secular trends that accompany their amalgamation and break-up. Although the palaeogeographical and age constraints for the existence of Pannotia remain equivocal, the proxy signals of supercontinent assembly and break-up in the late Neoproterozoic are unmistakable. These signals cannot be readily attributed to either the break-up of Rodinia or the assembly of Gondwana without ignoring either the assembly phase of Pan-African orogenesis and the changes in mantle circulation that accompany this phase, or the reality that Gondwana cannot be a supercontinent in the context of the supercontinent cycle because its break-up coincides with that of Pangaea.
DS201909-2073
2019
Nance, R.D.Pastor-Galan, D., Nance, R.D., Murphy, J.B., Spencer, C.J.Supercontinents: myths, mysteries, and milestones.Researchgate, 26p. PdfGlobalsupercontinents

Abstract: There is an emerging consensus that Earth's landmasses amalgamate quasi-periodically into supercontinents, interpreted to be rigid super-plates essentially lacking tectonically active inner boundaries and showing little internal lithosphere-mantle interactions. The formation and disruption of supercontinents have been linked to changes in sea-level, biogeochemical cycles, global climate change, continental margin sedimentation, large igneous provinces, deep mantle circulation, outer core dynamics and Earth's magnetic field. If these hypotheses are correct, long-term mantle dynamics and much of the geological record, including the distribution of natural resources, may be largely controlled by these cycles. Despite their potential importance, however, many of these proposed links are, to date, permissive rather than proven. Sufficient data are not yet available to verify or fully understand the implications of the supercontinent cycle. Recent advances in many fields of geoscience provide clear directions for investigating the supercontinent cycle hypothesis and its corollaries but they need to be vigorously pursued if these far-reaching ideas are to be substantiated.
DS201911-2553
2019
Nance, R.D.Pastor-Galan, D., Nance, R.D., Murphy, J.B., Spencer, C.J.Supercontinents: myths, mysteries, and milestones.IN: Cycle Concepts in Plate Tectonics, editors Wilson and Houseman , Geological Society of London special publication 470, pp. 39-64.Mantleplate tectonics

Abstract: There is an emerging consensus that Earth's landmasses amalgamate quasi-periodically into supercontinents, interpreted to be rigid super-plates essentially lacking tectonically active inner boundaries and showing little internal lithosphere-mantle interactions. The formation and disruption of supercontinents have been linked to changes in sea-level, biogeochemical cycles, global climate change, continental margin sedimentation, large igneous provinces, deep mantle circulation, outer core dynamics and Earth's magnetic field. If these hypotheses are correct, long-term mantle dynamics and much of the geological record, including the distribution of natural resources, may be largely controlled by these cycles. Despite their potential importance, however, many of these proposed links are, to date, permissive rather than proven. Sufficient data are not yet available to verify or fully understand the implications of the supercontinent cycle. Recent advances in many fields of geoscience provide clear directions for investigating the supercontinent cycle hypothesis and its corollaries but they need to be vigorously pursued if these far-reaching ideas are to be substantiated.
DS200512-0382
2005
Nanda, J.Gupta, S., Nanda, J., Mukerjee, S.K., Santra, M.Alkaline magmatism versus collision tectonics in the eastern Ghats Belt, India: constraints from structural studies in the Koraput Complex.Gondwana Research, Vol. 8, 3, pp. 403-420.India, AsiaAlkaline rocks, magmatism
DS201709-2067
2017
Nanda, J.K.Upadhyay, D., Ranjan, S., Abhinay, K., Pruseth, K.L., Nanda, J.K.India-Antarica connection: constraints from deformed alkaline rocks and carbonatites.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Indiacarbonatites

Abstract: Deformed Alkaline Rocks and Carbonatites (DARCs) are markers of suture zones where continents have rifted apart and later amalgamated [1]. Petrological and geochronological data indicates that parts of India and East Antarctica may have been involved in several episodes of collision and breakup during the assembly of past supercontinents [2]. DARCs at the eastern margin of the Eastern Ghats Province (EGP) in India preserve the record of these amalgamation and breakup events. It is thought that the Napier Complex of East Antarctica collided with the Dharwar Craton of India at ca. 1.60 Ga forming the central and eastern Indian shield [3]. New zircon U-Pb ages from DARCs at the EGP margin show that the alkaline complexes (Kamakhyanagar: 1350±14 Ma Rairakhol: 1379±6 Ma; Khariar: 1478±5 Ma; Koraput: 1387±34 Ma; Kunavaram: 1360±5 Ma; Jojuru: 1352±6 Ma) were emplaced in a narrow time interval. The alkaline magmatism marks an episode of rifting in the Indo-Antarctic continental fragment, correlatable with breakup of the Columbia supercontinent. Metamorphic zircon from the alkaline rocks furnish age populations at 917-950 Ma, 792- 806 Ma and 562-569 Ma. The 917-950 Ma ages are correlated with the closure of an oceanic basin between the Ruker Terrane of East Antarctica and the Indian Shield during the assembly of the Rodinia supercontinent. This led to the collision of the Ruker Terrane with the combined India-Napier Complex producing the Grenville-age EGPRayner Complex orogen [2, 3]. The 792-806 Ma ages record the disintegration of Rodinia when Greater India started to break away from East Antarctica [4]. In the early Paleozoic, India reconverged towards Antarctica and Australia during Gondwanaland assembly. The 562-569 Ma zircon ages date the resulting collisions during Pan-African orogenesis.
DS201710-2272
2017
Nanda, J.K.Upadhyay, D., Ranjan, S., Abhinay, K., Pruseth, K.L., Nanda, J.K.India-Antarctica connection: constraints from deformed alkaline rocks and carbonatites.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractIndiacarbonatites

Abstract: Re-Os and platinum group element analyses are reported for peridotite xenoliths from the 533 Ma Venetia kimberlite cluster situated in the Limpopo Mobile Belt, the Neoarchaean collision zone between the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons. The Venetian xenoliths provide a rare opportunity to examine the state of the cratonic lithosphere prior to major regional metasomatic disturbance of Re-Os systematics throughout the Phanerozoic. The 32 studied xenoliths record Si-enrichment that is characteristic of the Kaapvaal lithospheric mantle and can be subdivided into five groups based on Re-Os analyses. The most pristine group I samples (n = 13) display an approximately isochronous relationship and fall on a 3.28 ± 0.17 Ga (95 % conf. int.) reference line that is based on their mean TMA age. This age overlaps with the formation age of the Limpopo crust at 3.35-3.28 Ga. The group I samples derive from ~50 to ~170 km depth, suggesting coeval melt depletion of the majority of the Venetia lithospheric mantle column. Group II and III samples have elevated Re/Os due to Re addition during kimberlite magmatism. Group II has otherwise undergone a similar evolution as the group I samples with overlapping 187Os/188Os at eruption age: 187Os/188OsEA, while group III samples have low Os concentrations, unradiogenic 187Os/188OsEA and were effectively Re-free prior to kimberlite magmatism. The other sample groups (IV and V) have disturbed Re-Os systematics and provide no reliable age information. A strong positive correlation is recorded between Os and Re concentrations for group I samples, which is extended to groups II and III after correction for kimberlite addition. This positive correlation precludes a single stage melt depletion history and indicates coupled remobilisation of Re and Os. The combination of Re-Os mobility, preservation of the isochronous relationship, correlation of 187Os/188Os with degree of melt depletion and lack of radiogenic Os addition puts tight constraints on the formation and subsequent evolution of Venetia lithosphere. First, melt depletion and remobilisation of Re and Os must have occurred within error of the 3.28 Ga mean TMA age. Second, the refractory peridotites contain significant Re despite recording >40 % melt extraction. Third, assuming that Si-enrichment and Re-Os mobility in the Venetia lithospheric mantle were linked, this process must have occurred within ~100 Myr of initial melt depletion in order to preserve the isochronous relationship. Based on the regional geological evolution, we propose a rapid recycling model with initial melt depletion at ~3.35 Ga to form a tholeiitic mafic crust that is recycled at ~3.28 Ga, resulting in the intrusion of a TTG suite and Si-enrichment of the lithospheric mantle. The non-zero primary Re contents of the Venetia xenoliths imply that TRD model ages significantly underestimate the true depletion age even for highly depleted peridotites. The overlap of the ~2.6 Ga TRD ages with the time of the Kaapvaal-Limpopo collision is purely fortuitous and has no geological significance. Hence, this study underlines the importance of scrutiny if age information is to be derived from whole rock Re-Os analyses.
DS201902-0264
2019
Nanda, J.K.Chakraborty, T., Upadhyay, D., Ranjan, S., Pruseth, K.L., Nanda, J.K.The geological evolution of the Gangpur schist belt, eastern India: constraints on the formation of the greater Indian landmass of the Proterozoic.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 37, 1, pp. 113-151.Indiageology

Abstract: The Central Indian Tectonic Zone (CITZ) is a Proterozoic suture along which the Northern and Southern Indian Blocks are inferred to have amalgamated forming the Greater Indian Landmass. In this study, we use the metamorphic and geochronological evolution of the Gangpur Schist Belt (GSB) and neighbouring crustal units to constrain crustal accretion processes associated with the amalgamation of the Northern and Southern Indian Blocks. The GSB sandwiched between the Bonai Granite pluton of the Singhbhum craton and granite gneisses of the Chhotanagpur Gneiss Complex (CGC) links the CITZ and the North Singhbhum Mobile Belt. New zircon age data constrain the emplacement of the Bonai Granite at 3,370 ± 10 Ma, while the magmatic protoliths of the Chhotanagpur gneisses were emplaced at c. 1.65 Ga. The sediments in the southern part of the Gangpur basin were derived from the Singhbhum craton, whereas those in the northern part were derived dominantly from the CGC. Sedimentation is estimated to have taken place between c. 1.65 and c. 1.45 Ga. The Upper Bonai/Darjing Group rocks of the basin underwent major metamorphic episodes at c. 1.56 and c. 1.45 Ga, while the Gangpur Group of rocks were metamorphosed at c. 1.45 and c. 0.97 Ga. Based on thermobarometric studies and zircon-monazite geochronology, we infer that the geological history of the GSB is similar to that of the North Singhbhum Mobile Belt with the Upper Bonai/Darjing and the Gangpur Groups being the westward extensions of the southern and northern domains of the North Singhbhum Mobile Belt respectively. We propose a three-stage model of crustal accretion across the Singhbhum craton - GSB/North Singhbhum Mobile Belt - GC contact. The magmatic protoliths of the Chhotanagpur Gneisses were emplaced at c. 1.65 Ga in an arc setting. The earliest accretion event at c. 1.56 Ga involved northward subduction and amalgamation of the Upper Bonai Group with the Singhbhum craton followed by accretion of the Gangpur Group with the Singhbhum craton-Upper Bonai Group composite at c. 1.45 Ga. Finally, continent-continent collision at c. 0.96 Ga led to the accretion of the CGC with the Singhbhum craton-Upper Bonai Group-Gangpur Group crustal units, synchronous with emplacement of pegmatitic granites. The geological events recorded in the GSB and other units of the CITZ only partially overlap with those in the Trans North China Orogen and the Capricorn Orogen of Western Australia, indicating that these suture zones are not correlatable.
DS201801-0002
2017
Nanda, L.K.Balasubramani, S., Sahoo, P., Bhattacharya, D., Rengarajan, M., Thangavel, S., Bhatt, A.K., Verma, M.B., Nanda, L.K.A note on anomalous concentration of scandium in the Pakkanadu alkaline complex, Salem District, Tamil Nadu, India.Carbonatite-alkaline rocks and associated mineral deposits , Dec. 8-11, abstract p. 46.Indiaalkaline rocks

Abstract: Pakkanadu Alkaline complex (PAC) of Neoproterozoic age is located at the southwestern end of Dharmapuri rift/shear zone on the northern part of southern granulitic terrain in Tamil Nadu, India. PAC mainly comprises carbonatite-syenitepyroxenite suite of rocks. Syenite is the predominant rock exposed on the eastern and western part of the explored area with enclaves of pyroxenite and dunite. The carbonatite (sovite) occurs as thin veins/bands and discontinuous lenticular bodies intrusive into highly deformed biotite schist that is considered as the fenitised product of pyroxenite traceable over a strike length of 1.5 km. Petromineralogical study of the biotite schist, pyroxenite containing carbonatite rock and carbonatite indicated presence of monazite, allanite, sphene and betafite as the main radioactive minerals occurring as inclusion within biotite or as discrete mineral grains. Other ore minerals are apatite, thorite, titanite, rutile and barite. Chloritisation, hematitisation, silicification and calcitisation are the main wall rock alteration observed in pyroxenite and syenite. Sub-surface exploration carried out by Atomic Minerals Directorate (AMD) in PAC revealed that biotite schist (n=166) contains anomalously high concentration of Scandium (11-1275 ppm, av.161 ppm), REE (67-58275 ppm, av. 14836 ppm,) and V (5-620 ppm, av. 127 ppm, with carbonatite veins and syenite (n=149) contain scandium (10-462 ppm, av.71 ppm,), REE (18-57510 ppm, av. 4106 ppm) and V (1-285 ppm, av. 48 ppm). In these rocks, LREE (12.5-57670 ppm, av. 9617 ppm, n=315) shows enrichment over HREE (7.1-774 ppm, av. 173 ppm, n=315). The concentration of Scandium (Av. 166 and 71 ppm in biotite schist and syenite respectively) is anomalous as compared to its crustal abundance (22 ppm). Geochemical analyses of the rock indicate that the radioactive biotite schist, pyroxenite containing carbonatite veins generally shows higher Sc and REE concentrations as compared to those of the other rocks (syenite). However, there is no significant correlation between REE and Sc. The higher concentration of scandium in PAC is possibly due to selective partitioning of it into minerals like apatite, pyrochlore, allanite, monazite and other REE bearing phases, apart from its concentration in the ferromagnesian minerals. Scandium rarely concentrates in nature as independent ore mineral. The demand for the metal is very high due to multiple high value commercial uses as an alloy with aluminum, specifically in aerospace and automobile industry, besides, in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) in electrical industries. Eight boreholes drilled as part of the preliminary subsurface exploration in PAC, covering an area of 0.05 sq. km, indicated an elevated Scandium content of about 6 times that of the average crustal abundance.
DS201508-0346
2015
Nanda, P.Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Atiullah, Kumar, A., Sahoo, S., Nanda, P., Chahong, N., Lehmann, B., Rao, K.V.S.Petrogenesis of Mesoproterozoic lamproite dykes from the Garledinne (Banganapalle) cluster, south western Cuddapah Basin, southern India.Mineralogy and Petrology, in press available 22p.IndiaLamproite

Abstract: We report mineral chemistry and whole-rock major and trace-element geochemistry for a recent find of Mesoproterozoic (~1.4 Ga) lamproites from the Garledinne (Banganapalle) cluster, south-western part of the Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah Basin, southern India. The Garledinne lamproites occur as WNW-ESE-trending dykes that have undergone varying degree of pervasive silicification and carbonate alteration. Nevertheless, their overall texture and relict mineralogy remain intact and provide important insights into the nature of their magmas. The lamproite dykes have porphyritic to weakly porphyritic textures comprising pseudomorphed olivine macrocrysts and microphenocrysts, titanian phlogopite microphenocrysts, spinel having a compositional range from chromite to rarely magnesiochromite, Sr-rich apatite and niobian rutile. The Garledinne and other Cuddapah Basin lamproites (Chelima and Zangamarajupalle) collectively lack sanidine, clinopyroxene, potassic richterite, and titanite and are thus mineralogically distinct from the nearby Mesoproterozoic lamproites (Krishna and Ramadugu) in the Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India. The strong correlation between various major and trace elements coupled with high abundances of incompatible and compatible trace elements imply that alteration and crustal contamination have had a limited effect on the whole-rock geochemistry (apart from K2O and CaO) of the Garledinne lamproites and that olivine fractionation played an important role in their evolution. The Garledinne lamproites represent small-degree partial melts derived from a refractory (previously melt extracted) peridotitic mantle source that was subsequently metasomatised (enriched) by carbonate-rich fluids/melts within the garnet stability field. The involvement of multiple reservoirs (sub-continental lithospheric mantle and asthenosphere) has been inferred in their genesis. The emplacement of the Garledinne lamproites is linked to extensional events, across the various Indian cratons, related to the break-up of the Proterozoic supercontinent of Columbia.
DS201601-0010
2015
Nanda, P.Chalapathai Rao, N.V., Atiullah, Burgess, A.R.,Nanda, P., Choudhary, A.K., Sahoo, S., Lehman, B., Chahong, N.Petrology, 40Ar/39Ar, Sr-Nd isotope systematics, and geodynamic significance of an ultrapotassic ( lamproitic) dyke with affinities to kamafugite from the easternmost margin of the Bastar Craton, India.Mineralogy and Petrology, in press available, 25p.IndiaLamproites - Nuapada field

Abstract: We report the mineralogy, bulk-rock geochemistry, 40Ar/39Ar (whole-rock) age and radiogenic (Sr and Nd) isotope composition of an ultrapotassic dyke from Sakri (Nuapada lamproite field) located at the tectonic contact between the easternmost margin of the Bastar craton and Eastern Ghats Mobile Belt, India. The Sakri dyke has a mineralogy which strongly resembles a lamproite sensu stricto (viz.,Ti-rich phlogopite, Na-poor diopside, Fe-rich sanidine, ulvospinel trend and Sr-rich apatite). However, its bulk-rock major element geochemical characteristics (viz., extreme silica-undersaturated nature) resemble sensu lato kamafugite from Toro Ankole, Uganda, East African Rift, and Alto Paranaiba Province, Brazil. The Sakri dyke also displays certain compositional peculiarities (viz., high degree of evolution of mica composition from phlogopite to biotite, elevated titanium and aluminum in clinopyroxene and significantly lower bulk Mg#) when compared to the ultrapotassic rocks from various Indian cratons. 40Ar/39Ar dating gave a plateau age of 1045?±?9 Ma which is broadly similar to that of other Mesoproterozoic (i) lamproites from the Bastar and Bundelkhand cratons, and (ii) kimberlites from the Eastern Dharwar craton. Initial bulk-rock Sr (0.705865-0.709024) and Nd (0.511063-0.511154) isotopic ratios reveal involvement of an ‘enriched’ source region with long-term incompatible element enrichment and a depleted mantle (TDM) Nd model age of 2.56 Ga straddling the Archaean-Proterozoic chronostratigraphic boundary. The bulk-rock incompatible trace element ratios (Ta/Yb, Th/Yb, Rb/Ba and Ce/Y) of the Sakri ultrapotassic dyke negate any significant influence of crustal contamination. Small-degree melting (1 to 1.5 %) of a mixed garnet-facies and spinel-facies phlogopite lherzolite can account for its observed REE concentrations. Whereas the emplacement of the Sakri ultrapotassic dyke is related to the amalgamation of the supercontinent of Rodinia, its overlapping geochemical characteristics of lamproite and kamafugite (also displayed by two other lamproites of the Nuapada field at Amlidadar and Parkom) are linked to the emplacement in a unique geological setting at the craton-mobile belt contact and hence of geodynamic significance.
DS201604-0598
2016
Nanda, P.Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Atiullah, Burgess, R., Nanda, P., Choudhary, A.K., Sahoo, S., Lehmann, B., Chahong, N.Petrology, 40Ar/39Ar age, Sr-Nd isotope systematics, and geodynamic significance of an ultrapotassic ( lamproitic) dyke with affinities to kamafugite from the easternmost margin of the Bastar Craton, India.Mineralogy and Petrology, in press available, 25p.IndiaDeposit - Sakri Nuapada

Abstract: We report the mineralogy, bulk-rock geochemistry, 40Ar/39Ar (whole-rock) age and radiogenic (Sr and Nd) isotope composition of an ultrapotassic dyke from Sakri (Nuapada lamproite field) located at the tectonic contact between the easternmost margin of the Bastar craton and Eastern Ghats Mobile Belt, India. The Sakri dyke has a mineralogy which strongly resembles a lamproite sensu stricto (viz.,Ti-rich phlogopite, Na-poor diopside, Fe-rich sanidine, ulvospinel trend and Sr-rich apatite). However, its bulk-rock major element geochemical characteristics (viz., extreme silica-undersaturated nature) resemble sensu lato kamafugite from Toro Ankole, Uganda, East African Rift, and Alto Paranaiba Province, Brazil. The Sakri dyke also displays certain compositional peculiarities (viz., high degree of evolution of mica composition from phlogopite to biotite, elevated titanium and aluminum in clinopyroxene and significantly lower bulk Mg#) when compared to the ultrapotassic rocks from various Indian cratons. 40Ar/39Ar dating gave a plateau age of 1045?±?9 Ma which is broadly similar to that of other Mesoproterozoic (i) lamproites from the Bastar and Bundelkhand cratons, and (ii) kimberlites from the Eastern Dharwar craton. Initial bulk-rock Sr (0.705865-0.709024) and Nd (0.511063-0.511154) isotopic ratios reveal involvement of an ‘enriched’ source region with long-term incompatible element enrichment and a depleted mantle (TDM) Nd model age of 2.56 Ga straddling the Archaean-Proterozoic chronostratigraphic boundary. The bulk-rock incompatible trace element ratios (Ta/Yb, Th/Yb, Rb/Ba and Ce/Y) of the Sakri ultrapotassic dyke negate any significant influence of crustal contamination. Small-degree melting (1 to 1.5 %) of a mixed garnet-facies and spinel-facies phlogopite lherzolite can account for its observed REE concentrations. Whereas the emplacement of the Sakri ultrapotassic dyke is related to the amalgamation of the supercontinent of Rodinia, its overlapping geochemical characteristics of lamproite and kamafugite (also displayed by two other lamproites of the Nuapada field at Amlidadar and Parkom) are linked to the emplacement in a unique geological setting at the craton-mobile belt contact and hence of geodynamic significance.
DS201801-0041
2017
Nanda. L.K.Nanda. L.K., Verma, M.B., Purohit, R.K., Khandelwal, M.K., Rai, S.D., Mundra, K.L.LREE and Nb multi metal potentiality of the Amba Dongar carbonatite complex, Chhota Udepur district, Gujarat.Carbonatite-alkaline rocks and associated mineral deposits , Dec. 8-11, abstract p. 43-44.Indiadeposit - Amba Dongar

Abstract: Rare earth elements (REE) are used in science innovations, due to their unique magnetic, fluorescent and chemical properties. REE are key components in rnany technological devices, like hybrid rechargeable batteries, catalysts, glass polishing, magnets, lasers, TV colour components, superconductors, ceramics etc. They are in great demand for hybrid cars, CD, cameras and high end defence systems. Similarly, niobium (Nb) finds its usage in diverse high tech applications including atomic energy. With increasing technological applications of REE and Nb, their global demand has enhanced over the years. To keep pace with the current demand, many carbonatite complexes in India including the Amba Dongar were revisited to assess their REE and Nb content. Amba Dongar is a classic carbonatite-alkalic rock complex of the Deccan basalt plateau and is emplaced in close proximity to Narmada rift zone. The main rock types of carbonatite affinity include sovite (calcium carbonatite), ankerite (Fe-Mg•Mn carbonatite), siderite (Fe carbonatite), carbonatite breccia (mixed rock. fragments with carbonate cement) etc. Sovite forms a large ring-dyke (nearly 1.5 km dia.) surrounding an incomplete ring of carbonatite breccia. Plugs of ankeritic carbonatite intrude the sovite. To assess rare metal and REE potential of the carbonatite complex geological and radiometric surveys followed by core drilling were carried out in western part of the complex. Rocks of carbonatite affinity have been intercepted in all the boreholes upto a maximum drilled depth of 150 m. It is for the first time that presence of carbonatite and carbonatite breccia has been reported below central basalt in the Amba Dongar complex. Continuity of carbonatites beyond the drilled depth is inferred. Petromineralogical and X-Ray Diffraction studies indicated presence of REE minerals such as monazite, thorite, cerite, synchisite and bastnasite. Besides, rare earth fluorocarbonates, parisite, florencite, barite, strontianite and columbite have also been reported by earlier investigators. Fairly good amount of pyrochlore (Nb mineral) is also present in all the variants of carbonatite. Detailed chemical analysis core at 1 m interval and of composite samples from every borehole was carried out. The results indicate homogeneity of mineralisation in the entire column upto an explored vertical depth of 120 m. Except a few lean zones, the entire column hosts REE mineralisation of the order of >1% SREE. Some zones have indicated REE mineralisation of the order of >4 % also. Major element analysis of a composite sample representing a small block (400 m x 100 m x 113 m) indicates 14.69% SiO2, 10.57% Fe2O3, 7 21% MgO, 32.23% CaO, 2.77%, Al2O3, 1.48% P2O5, 2.13% MnO, 0.84% FeO, 0.37% TiO2, 0.95% Na2O, 1.35% K2O, and 23.50% LOI. 1.16% LREE (including 161 ppm HREE), 215 ppm Y, 650 ppm Nb, 310 ppm Th and 467 ppm V appear to be of economic significance. Additionally, presence of high content of Ba (2.65%), Sr (0.50%), Pb (530 ppm), F (1.95%) and Zn (1248 ppm) is also important. Taking into consideration these results, resource estimation of a small block of 400 m x 100 m (0.04 sq. km) with an average depth of 113 m was carried out Inferred REE resources ~140000 tonnes contained in 12.00 million tonne ore have been estimated with an average grade of 1.16% REE. Additionally, this block contains 9,600 tonnes Nb2O5 at an average grade of 0 08 % Nb2O5. These values indicate high potential of Amba Dongar carbonatite complex.
DS201112-0719
2011
Nandedkar, R.H.Nandedkar, R.H., Mattsson, H.B., Ulmer, P.Petrology of the Lake Natron Engaruka monogenetic volcanic fields, Gregory Rift (northern Tanzania).Peralk-Carb 2011, workshop held Tubingen Germany June 16-18, PosterAfrica, TanzaniaAlkalic
DS201312-0589
2013
Nandedkar, R.H.Mattsson, H.B., Nandedkar, R.H., Ulmer, P.Petrogenesis of the melilititic and nephenilinitic rock suites in the Lake Natron-Engaruka monogenetic volcanic fields, northern Tanzania.Lithos, Vol. 179, pp. 175-192.Africa, TanzaniaMetasomatism
DS1990-1086
1990
Nandekar, A.S.Nandekar, A.S., Narayan, J.Atomic structure of dislocations in silicon, germanium and diamondPhil. Magazine A., Vol. 61, No. 6, June pp. 873-891GlobalCrystallography, Diamond
DS1950-0500
1959
Nandi, S.C.Sarma, K., Nandi, S.C.Report on the Magnetic and Electrical Surveys for Locating Additional Hidden Volcanic Pipes in the Panna Diamond Belt.India Geological Survey Report, (UNPUBL.)India, Panna, Madhya PradeshKimberlite, Geophysics
DS1960-0493
1964
Nandi, S.C.Sarma, K., Nandi, S.C.Magnetic and Electrical Surveys for Locating Additional Hidden Volcanic Pipes in the Panna Diamond Belt, Madhya Pradesh, India.International Geological Congress 22ND., PT. 2, PP. 90-106.India, Madhya PradeshKimberlite, Geophysics
DS1997-0835
1997
Nandigam, R.C.Nandigam, R.C., Clark, K.F.Zinc and light rare earth element (LREE) bearing carbonatites in northern MexicoGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstracts, Vol. 29, No. 2, March 20-21, p. 41-2.MexicoCarbonatite
DS201312-0631
2013
Nandini, C.V.Nandini, C.V., Sanjeevi, S., Bhaskar, A.S.An integrated approach to map certain paleochannels of south India using remote sensing, geophysics, and sedimentological techniques.International Journal of Remote Sensing, Vol. 34, no. 19, pp. 6507-6528.IndiaPaleochannels
DS201212-0712
2012
Nandish, V.Suryarayana Rao, K.V., Kumar, C., Kumar, A., Nandish, V., Swamy, R.T.Lamproites from the eastern margin of the Bhandara craton, Orissa, India: an exploration case study.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractIndia, OrissaLamproite
DS201412-0901
2013
Nandish, V.Suryanaryana Rao, K.V., Kumar, C., Kumar, A., Nandish, V., Swamy, R.T.Lamproites from the eastern margin of the Bhandara craton, Orissa, India: an exploration case study.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, pp. 129-142.India, OrissaLamproite
DS201503-0143
2015
Nandy, J.Dey, S., Nandy, J., Choudhary, A.K., Liu, Y., Zong, K.Neoarchean crustal growth by combined arc-plume action: evidence from the Kadiri greenstone belt, eastern Dharwar craton, India.Geological Society of London Special Publication: Continent formation through time., No. 389, pp. 135-163.IndiaGeotectonics

Abstract: Field and geochemical studies combined with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) zircon U-Pb dating set important constraints on the timing and petrogenesis of volcanic rocks of the Neoarchaean Kadiri greenstone belt and the mechanism of crust formation in the eastern Dharwar craton (EDC). The volcanic rocks are divided into three suites: tholeiitic basalts, calc-alkaline high-Mg# andesites and dominant dacites-rhyolites. The basalts (pillowed in places) show flat rare earth element (REE) and primordial mantle-normalized trace element patterns, but have minor negative Nb and Ta anomalies. They are interpreted as mantle plume-related oceanic plateau basalts whose source contained minor continental crustal input. The andesites are characterized by high Mg# (0.66-0.52), Cr and Ni, with depletion of high-field strength elements (HFSE) and enrichment of light REE (LREE) and large-ion lithophile elements (LILE). They were probably derived from a metasomatized mantle wedge overlying a subducted slab in a continental margin subduction zone. The dacites-rhyolites are silicic rocks (SiO2 = 61-72 wt%) with low Cr and Ni, K2O/Na2O mostly 0.5-1.1, highly fractionated REE patterns, enrichments of LILE and distinctly negative HFSE anomalies. One rhyolite sample yielded a zircon U-Pb age of 2353 ± 32 Ma. This suite is similar to potassic adakites and is explained as the product of deep melting of thickened crust in the arc with a significant older crustal component. Collision between a continental margin arc with an oceanic plateau followed by slab break-off, upwelling of hot asthenosphere and extensive crustal reworking in a sustained compressional regime is proposed for the geodynamic evolution of the area. This is in corroboration with the scenario of EDC as a Neoarchaean hot orogen as suggested recently by some workers.
DS201905-1061
2019
Nandy, J.Nandy, J., Dey, S., Heilimo, E.Neoarchean magmatism through arc and lithosphere melting: evidence from eastern Dharwar craton.Geological Journal, doi.10.1002/gj.3498Indiacraton

Abstract: The Neoarchaean era is characterized by rapid crustal growth corresponding to some fundamental global changes in geodynamic processes. However, the nature of crustal growth including the mechanism and tectonic setting of the Neoarchaean are controversial issues. The eastern Dharwar Craton (EDC) exposes widespread Neoarchaean granite-greenstone belts, which provide an opportunity to evaluate the various models proposed for Neoarchaean crustal growth. In this study, we present field, petrographic, and geochemical data and discuss the petrogenesis and significance for crustal evolution for a suite of previously undescribed banded gneisses, TTG (tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite), biotite granites, alkali feldspar granite and gabbro. These rocks are associated with Neoarchaean metavolcanic and metapelites rocks of the Tsundupalle greenstone belt, in the eastern fringe of the EDC. Whole-rock major and trace element geochemical data are consistent with diverse sources, including both crust and enriched mantle in an evolving subduction zone. A convergent orogenic setting is proposed for interpreting the association of various granitoids in the Tsundupalle area. Finally, intrusion of crustally derived, highly silicic, alkali-rich granite, and mantle-derived gabbro emplaced in a post-subduction regime is proposed. Lithospheric delamination and attendant mantle melting are suggested as possible mechanisms for generation of these rocks. The understanding of generation of the different granitoid types along with gabbro provides significant insights into the mechanism of Neoarchaean crustal growth.
DS1950-0487
1959
Nane, E.Lonsdale, K., Milledge, H.J., Nane, E.X-ray Studies of Synthetic DiamondsMineralogical Magazine., Vol. 32, No. 246, PP. 185-201.GlobalBlank
DS1997-0995
1997
Nangia, A.Sarma, J.A.R.O., Nangia, A., Dunitz, J.D.Even odder carbonsNature, Vol. 387, No. 6632, May 29, pp. 464-65.GlobalCarbon, Mineralogy
DS200512-0767
2005
Nanjo, K.Z.Nanjo, K.Z., Turcotte, D.L., Shcherbakov, R.A model of damage mechanics for the deformation of the continental crust.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 110, B7, B07403 10.1029/2004 JB003438MantleGeodynamics
DS201112-0720
2010
Nannini, F.Nannini, F., De Assis Janasi, V., Svisero, D.P.Quimica mineral de xenolitos do kimberlito indaia, Monte Carmelo, Minas Gerais.5th Brasilian Symposium on Diamond Geology, Nov. 6-12, abstract p. 84.South America, Brazil, Minas GeraisGeochemistry
DS201112-0721
2010
Nannini, F.Nannini, F., Svisero, D.P., De Assis Janasi, V.Petrografia de xenolitos mantelicos do kimberlito indaia, Mount Carmelo, Minas Gerais.5th Brasilian Symposium on Diamond Geology, Nov. 6-12, abstract p. 89.South America, Brazil, Minas GeraisPetrology
DS201412-0612
2014
Nannini, F.Nannini, F., Janasi, V.de A.Prospeccao de depositos primarios de diamante por tomografia sismica: uma prosposta de integracao entre geologia e geofisica.6 Simposio Brasileiro de Geologia do Diamante, Aug. 3-7, 4p. AbstractSouth America, BrazilGeophysics - seismics
DS201602-0228
2015
Nannini, F.Neto, I.C., Cunha, L.M., Silveira, F.V., Nannini, F., de Oliveira, R.G., deSouza, W.S., Bezerra, A.K.Discovery and confirmation of the first kimberlitic intrusion in the Bororema Province, NE Brazil.CPRM, Informe Technico in Port ( abstract in english), No. 2, Nov. 7p.South America, BrazilDeposit - Santa Fe-1,2
DS201701-0023
2016
NanodiamondsNanodiamondsHow these microscopic diamonds are going to shape the future.Google GIZMODO and nanodiamonds, 10p. OverviewTechnologyNanodiamonds
DS1989-0638
1989
Nantel, S.Higgins, M.D., Feininger, T., Martignole, J., Nantel, S.The Sept Iles layered mafic intrusion and the anorthosite complex of Riviere PentecoteGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Field Trip, May 17-21, NoQuebecXenoliths
DS201012-0336
2009
Naov, O.Kamenetsky, V.S., Kamenetsky, M.B., Weiss, Y., Naov, O., Nielsen, T.F.D., Mernagh, T.P.How unique is the Udachnaya East kimberlite? Comparison with kimberlites from the Slave Craton (Canada) and SW Greenland.Lithos, Vol. 112 S pp. 334-346.Russia, Canada, Northwest Territories, Europe, GreenlandOlivine, phenocrysts
DS1995-1324
1995
NAPEGGNAPEGGReporting of diamond exploration results, identified mineral resources and ore reserves.Association Prof. Engineers, northwest Territories., 9p.Northwest TerritoriesLegal, Diamond exploration -reserves
DS1995-0907
1995
Napier, R.Kamber, B.S., Kramers, J.D., Napier, R., Cliff, R.A.The Triangle shearzone, Zimbabwe revisited: new dat a on event at 2.0 Ga in Limpopo Belt.Precambrian Research, Vol. 70, No. 3-4, Jan. pp. 191-214.ZimbabweGeochronology, Limpopo Belt
DS1995-0908
1995
Napier, R.Kamber, B.S., Kramers, J.D., Napier, R., et al.The Triangle shear zone, Zimbabwe: revisited: new dat a document event at2.0 Ga in Limpopo BeltPrecambrian Research, Vol. 70, No. 3-4, Jan. pp. 191-214ZimbabweGeochronology, Limpopo Belt
DS201212-0427
2012
Napier, S.Macdonald, A., Napier, S.Chemical and textural characterisation of non-kimberlitic chromian spinel populations from diamond exploration programs.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractAfrica, South Africa, Botswana, GabonDeposit - Malopo Farms
DS200712-0771
2007
Napieralski, J.Napieralski, J., Harbor, J., Li, Y.Glacial geomorphology and geographic information systems.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 85, 1-2, pp. 1-22.TechnologyGIS
DS1997-0045
1997
Napier-MunnAsomah, A.K., Napier-MunnAn empirical model of hydrocyclones, incorporating angle of cycloneinclination.Minerals Engineering, Vol. 10, No. 3, pp. 339-347.GlobalMineral processing, Diamonds
DS200712-1160
2006
Napier-Munn, T.Wills, B., Napier-Munn, T.Will's Mineral processing. Revised 7th, edition.min-eng.com, GlobalBook - mineral processing
DS1970-0893
1974
Napier-Munn, T.J.Chaston, I.R.M., Napier-Munn, T.J.Design and Operation of Dense Medium Cyclone Plants for The recovery of Diamonds in Africa.South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. Journal, Vol. 75, No. 5, PP. 120-133.South AfricaDiamond Mining Recovery, Kimberlite Pipes
DS1975-0584
1977
Napier-Munn, T.J.Napier-Munn, T.J.Die Gewinnung von NaturdiamantIndustrie Diamanten Rundschau, Vol. 11, No. 2, PP. 80-87.South AfricaDiamond Mining Recovery, Kimberlite Pipes
DS1975-0822
1978
Napier-Munn, T.J.Napier-Munn, T.J.Dense Medium Cyclones in Diamond RecoveryMsc. Thesis, Johannesburg, South AfricaMetallurgy
DS1989-1089
1989
Napier-Munn, T.J.Napier-Munn, T.J., Reeves, T.J., Hansen, J.O.The monitoring of medium rheology in dense medium cyclone plantsAustralian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (AusIMM) Bulletin Proceedings Vol, Vol. 294, No. 3, May pp. 85-94AustraliaMineral processing, Heavy minerals
DS1995-1325
1995
Napier-Munn, T.J.Napier-Munn, T.J., et al.Some causes of medium loss in dense medium plantsMinerals Engineering, June pp. 659-678.GlobalMineral processing
DS2000-0805
2000
Napier-Munn, T.J.Rayner, J.G., Napier-Munn, T.J.The mechanism of magnetics capture in the wet drum magnetic separatorMinerals Eng., Vol. 13, No. 3, pp. 277-85.GlobalMineral processing - DMS
DS2003-1141
2003
Napier-Munn, T.J.Rayner, J.G., Napier-Munn, T.J.A mathematical model of concentrate solids content for the wet drum magneticInternational Journal of Mineral Processing, Vol. 70, 1-4. June pp. 53-65.GlobalTechnology - dense media, low concentrate density
DS2003-1142
2003
Napier-Munn, T.J.Rayner, J.G., Napier-Munn, T.J.A mathematical model of recovery of dense medium magnetics in the wet drumInternational Journal of Mineral Processing, Vol. 69, 1-4, March pp. 157-173.GlobalTechnology - magnetic separator, DMS, ferrosilicon, mag
DS200412-1639
2003
Napier-Munn, T.J.Rayner, J.G., Napier-Munn, T.J.A mathematical model of concentrate solids content for the wet drum magnetic separator.International Journal of Mineral Processing, Vol. 70, 1-4. June pp. 53-65.TechnologyTechnology - dense media, low concentrate density
DS1991-1214
1991
Napier-Nunn, T.J.Napier-Nunn, T.J., Alford, R.A.The causes of heavy mineral loss from mineral sands wet concentratorsAusIMM Proceedings, No. 1, 1991 pp. 19-30AustraliaHeavy minerals, Gravity concentration
DS200812-1255
2006
Napier-Nunn, T.J.Wills, B.A.,Napier-Nunn, T.J.Will's mineral processing technology: an introduction to the practical aspects of ore treatment and mineral recovery.Butterworth ( Elsevier), 7th. edition, 456p. $ 59.95TechnologyReminder of excellent overview book
DS201312-0632
2013
Napoletani, D.Napoletani, D., Panza, M., Struppa, D.Artificial diamonds are still diamonds.Foundations of Science, Vol. 18, 3, pp. 591-594.TechnologySynthetics
DS200412-1219
2004
Naqvi, S.M.Maniyamba, C., Kerrich, R., Naqvi, S.M., Ram Mohan, M.Geochemical systematics of tholeitic basalts from the 2.7 Ga Ramagiri Hungund composite greemstone belt, Dharwar Craton.Precambrian Research, Vol. 134, no. 1-2, Sept. 20, pp. 21-39.IndiaGeochronology - not specific to diamonds
DS200512-0681
2005
Naqvi, S.M.Manikyamba, C., Naqvi, S.M., Subba Rao, D.V., Ram Mohan, M., Khanna, T.C., Rao, T.G., Reddy, G.L.Boninites from the Neoarchean Gadwal greenstone belt, eastern Dharwar Craton, India, implications for Archean subduction processes.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 230, 1-2, pp. 65-83.IndiaBoninites
DS201312-0625
2012
Nara, M.Nagashima, K., Nara, M., Matsuda,J-I.Raman spectroscopic study of diamond and graphite in ureilites and the origin of diamonds.Meteorites and Planetary Science, Vol. 47, 11, pp. 1728-1737. (thanks Grant)TechnologyUrelilite
DS1998-0320
1998
Naradi, L.V.S.De Lima, E.F., Naradi, L.V.S.The Lavras do Sul shoshonitic association: implications for origin and evolution of Neoproterozoic magmatismJournal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 67-78Brazil, southernShoshonites, Magmatism
DS1985-0479
1985
Narae, M.H.Narae, M.H., Thomaz, M.F., Jorge, M.I.B.Luminescence Bands in Natural Brown DiamondsSolid State Communications, Vol. 55, No. 7, PP. 577-582.GlobalBlank
DS1997-1230
1997
Naraoka, H.Watanabe, Y., Naraoka, H., Wronkiewicz, D.J., Condie, K.Carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur geochemistry of Archean and Proterozoic shales from Kaapvaal Craton, SA.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 61, No. 16, Aug. pp. 3441-3459South AfricaKaapvaal Craton, organic, Carbon, geochronology
DS1996-1020
1996
Narasimha Rao, B.Narasimha Rao, B., et al.MAPROS - a computer program basement mapping, filtering of gravity and magnetic data- Hartley transforM.Computers and Geosciences, Vol. 22, No. 3, pp. 197-218GlobalComputers, Program -MAPROS
DS1970-0188
1970
Narasimha rao, CH.Sen, S.N., Narasimha rao, CH.Chelima Dykes. #2Proceedings SECD Symposium ON UPPER MANTLE PROJECT., SESSION 5 DECEMBER PP. 435-439.IndiaLamproite
DS1970-0371
1971
Narasimham, C.V.Narasimham, C.V., Raju, K.K.Photogeologic Studies in and Around Panna, District, A.pI.p.i. Dehra Dun Unpubl. Report, India, Andhra PradeshPhotgeology
DS1990-1086
1990
Narayan, J.Nandekar, A.S., Narayan, J.Atomic structure of dislocations in silicon, germanium and diamondPhil. Magazine A., Vol. 61, No. 6, June pp. 873-891GlobalCrystallography, Diamond
DS2002-1310
2002
Narayana, B.L.Rao, M.V.S., Narayana, B.L.Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Kunduru Betta calc alkaline ring complex in the Dharwar Craton.Gondwana Research, Vol. 5,2,pp. 453-66.India, southernAlkaline rocks
DS201012-0319
2010
Narayana, B.L.Jafri, S.S.H., Moeen, S., Dayal, A.M., Narayana, B.L.High silica lamproite dykes from Schirmacher Oasis, Queen Maud Land, Antarctica.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractAntarcticaLamproite
DS200712-0820
2007
Narayana, C.Pavan Kumar, G.V., Narayana, C.Adapting a fluorescence microscope to perform surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.Current Science, Vol. 93, 6, Sept. 25, pp. 778-781.TechnologySpectroscopy
DS1970-0372
1971
Narayanaswami, S.Narayanaswami, S., Hunday, A., Rajaraman, S., Deshpande, M.L.The Current Exploration for Diamond in Different Host Rocks of Andhra Pradesh by the Geological Survey of India.India Geological Survey Miscellaneous Publishing, No. 19, PP. 42-48.IndiaProspecting
DS1999-0346
1999
NarbonneKah, L.C., Sherman, A.G., Narbonne, Knoll, KaufmanDelta 13 C stratigraphy of the Proterozoic Bylot Supergroup Baffin Island:implications for regionalCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 36, No. 3, Mar. pp. 313-332.Northwest Territories, Baffin IslandLithostratigraphy, Correlations
DS200412-1022
2004
Narbonne, G.M.Knoll, A.H., Walter, M.R., Narbonne, G.M., Christie Blick, N.A new period for the Geologic Time Scale.Science, No. 5684, July 30, p. 621.TechnologyTime scale
DS2001-0932
2001
Nardhi, L.V.S.Pla Cid, J., Nardhi, L.V.S., Coneicao, H., Bonin, B.Anorogenic alkaline granites from northeastern Brasil: major, trace and rare element in magmatic minerals...Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 19, No. 3, Apr. pp.375-98.BrazilMagmatism - metamorphic biotite and Na mafics
DS2003-1084
2003
Nardi, L.V.Pla Cid, J., Nardi, L.V., Stabel, L.Z., Conceicao, R.V., Balzetti, N.M.High pressure minerals in mafic microgranular enclaves: evidence for co-minglingContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 145, 4, pp. 444-459.MantleMagmatism
DS200412-1555
2003
Nardi, L.V.Pla Cid, J., Nardi, L.V., Stabel, L.Z., Conceicao, R.V., Balzetti, N.M.High pressure minerals in mafic microgranular enclaves: evidence for co-mingling between lamprophyric and syenitic magmas at manContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 145, 4, pp. 444-459.MantleMagmatism
DS200912-0034
2009
Nardi, L.V.Barros, M.A., Junior, F.C., Nardi, L.V., Lima, E.F.Paleoproterozoic bimodal post collisional magmatism in the southwestern Amazonian Craton, mato Grosso, Brazil: geochemistry and isotopic evidence.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 11-23.South America, Brazil, Mato GrossoMagmatism
DS1989-1351
1989
Nardi, L.V.S.Schiebe, L.F., Formoso, M.L.L., Nardi, L.V.S., Hartmann, L.A.Geochemistry of rare earth elements of alkalic rocks,carbonatites and kimberlite rocks; study of Brazilianoccurrence.(in Portugese).In: Geochemistry of rare earth elements in Brasil, Co. Pesqui Rec. Miner., pp. 37-46BrazilAlkaline rocks, Kimberlites -geochemistry
DS2000-0158
2000
Nardi, L.V.S.Cid, J.P., Nardi, L.V.S., Conciecao, Bonin, Jardim deSaThe alkaline silica saturated ultrapotassic magmatism of the Riacho do Pontal Fold Belt.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 13, No. 7, Dec. 1, pp. 661-683.Brazil, northeastAlkaline rocks - not specific to diamonds
DS2002-1203
2002
Nardi, L.V.S.Paim, M.M., Cid, J.P., Rosa, M.L.S., Conceicao, H., Nardi, L.V.S.Mineralogy of lamprophyres and mafic enclaves associated with Paleoproterozoic Cara Suja syenite, northeast Brazil.International Geology Review, Vol. 44, No. 11, Nov. pp. 1017-1036.Brazil, northeastLamprophyres
DS2003-1041
2003
Nardi, L.V.S.Paim, M.M., Cid, J.P., Rosa, M.K\L.S., Conceicao, H., Nardi, L.V.S.Mineralogy of lamprophyres and mafic enclaves associated with the PaleoproterozoicInternational Geology Review, Vol. 44, 11, Nov. pp. 1017-36.BrazilDikes - lamprophyres
DS2003-1042
2003
Nardi, L.V.S.Paim, M.M., Pla Cid, J., Rosa, M.L.S., Conceircao, H., Nardi, L.V.S.Mineralogy of lamprophyres and mafic enclaves associated with the PaleoproterozoicInternational Geology Review, Vol. 44, pp. 1017-36.BrazilDikes - alkaline potassic
DS200412-1490
2003
Nardi, L.V.S.Paim, M.M., Cid, J.P., Rosa, M.K\L.S., Conceicao, H., Nardi, L.V.S.Mineralogy of lamprophyres and mafic enclaves associated with the Paleoproterozoic Cara Suja syenite, northeast Brazil.International Geology Review, Vol. 44, 11, Nov. pp. 1017-36.South America, BrazilDikes - lamprophyres
DS200512-0816
2002
Nardi, L.V.S.Paim, M.M., Pia Cid, J., Rosa, M.L.S., Conceicao, H., Nardi, L.V.S.Mineralogy of lamprophyres and mafic enclaves associated with the Paleoproterozoic Cara Suja syenite, northeast Brazil.International Geology Review, Vol. 44, Nov. 11, pp. 1017-1036.South America, BrazilLamprophyre
DS200612-0255
2006
Nardi, L.V.S.Cid, J.P., Nardi, L.V.S.Alkaline ultrapotassic A type granites derived from ultrapotassic syenite magmas generated from metasomatized mantle.International Geology Review, Vol. 48, 10, pp. 942-956.MantleAlkalic
DS201312-0634
2013
Nardi, L.V.S.Nardi, L.V.S., Pla Cid, J., Pla Cid, C.C., Gisbert, P.E., Balzaretti, N.M.Granite compositions in a veined flower mantle, as indicated by mineral inclusions in diamonds from Juin a deposits, Brazil.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractSouth America, BrazilDeposit - Juina
DS201412-0691
2014
Nardi, L.V.S.Pla Cid, J., Nardi, L.V.S., Pla Cid, C., Gisbert, P.E., Balzaretti, N.M.Acid composition in a veined lower mantle, as indicated by inclusions of ( K, Na) - hollandite + SiO2 in diamonds.Lithos, Vol. 196-197, pp. 42-53.South America, BrazilDeposit - Juina area
DS201412-0692
2014
Nardi, L.V.S.Pla Cid, J., Nardi, L.V.S., Pla Cid, C., Gisbert, P.E., Balzaretti, N.M.Acid compositions in a veined lower mantle, as indicated by inclusions of ( K, Na)- Hollandite + SiO2 in diamonds.Lithos, Vol. 196-197, pp. 42-53.South America, BrazilDeposit - Juina
DS2000-0767
2000
Nardi. ConceicaoPla Cid, J., Bitencourt, M.F., Nardi. Conceicao, BoninPaleoproterozoic late orogenic and anorogenic alkaline granitic magmatism from northeast Brasil.Precambrian Research, Vol. 104, No.1-2, Oct.15, pp. 47-75.BrazilOrogeny, Alkaline magmatism
DS1984-0543
1984
Narian, A.Narian, A.Petrology of picrites of Bakhatgarh region, Jhabua Region,MadhyaPradeshGeological Survey India Spec. Publishing Series, No. 14, pp. 72-77IndiaPicrite
DS2003-0419
2003
Narland, J.H.Foulger, G.R., Narland, J.H.Is hotspot volcanism a consequence of plate tectonics?Science, No. 5621, May 9, pp. 921-5.MantleTectonics
DS200412-0571
2003
Narland, J.H.Foulger, G.R., Narland, J.H.Is hotspot volcanism a consequence of plate tectonics?Science, No. 5621, May 9, pp. 921-5.MantleTectonics
DS1994-1263
1994
Narr, W.Narr, W., Suppe, J.Kinematics of basement involved compressive structuresAmerican Journal of Science, Vol. 294, No. 7, pp. 802-860MantleTectonics, Structure, geodynamics
DS1982-0089
1982
Narsayya, B.L.Basu, S.K., Narsayya, B.L.Note on a Zone of Probable Carbonatite Alkali Metasomatic Rock Association in the Eastern Part of the Khetri Copper Belt,northeastern Rajasthan.Indian Minerals, Vol. 36, No. 1, PP. 29-31.IndiaRelated Rocks
DS201802-0248
2017
Narseev, V.F.Letnikov, F.A., Los, V.L., Narseev, V.F.Technical diamond deposit Kumdy-Kul ( northern Kazakhstan). ***IN RUSStarosin, V.I. (ed) Problems of the mineralogy, economic geology and mineral resources. MAKS Press, Moscow *** IN RUS, pp. 197-206.Russia, Kazakhstandeposit - Kumdy-Kul
DS200412-1405
2004
Narsimha Reddy, M.Narsimha Reddy, M.Petrography, mineral chemistry and geothermobarometry of the Inukurti anorthosite complex and associated rocks from Nelore SchisJournal Geological Society of India, Vol. 62, 4, pp. 413-428.India, Andhra PradeshGeothermometry
DS2001-0824
2001
Narteau, C.Narteau, C., Le Mouel, Poirier, Sepulveda, ShnirmanOn a small scale roughness of the core mantle boundaryEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 191, No. 1-2, Aug. 30, pp. 49-60.MantleCore - boundary
DS200612-0778
2006
Narteau, C.Le Mouel, J.L., Narteau, C., Greff-Lefftz, M., Holschneider, M.Dissipation at the core mantle boundary on a small scale topography.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 111, 10p. B04413MantleCMB - friction
DS1993-0036
1993
Nartey, R.S.Appiah, H. , Norman, D.I., Kuma, J.S., Nartey, R.S., DankwaSource of diamonds in the Bonsa fieldGeological Society Africa and Ghana, Proceedings 9th. International Conference, pp. 78-79.GhanaDiamond, Deposit -Bonsa field
DS201312-0635
2013
Narvekar, P.Narvekar, P.The global diamond industry finds itself in a quagmire of its own doing. India's top diamond industry analyst examines the health of the industry.Solitaire International - the India Gem and Jewellery Magazine, August pp. 41-49.Global, IndiaEconomics, markets
DS201412-0232
2014
Narvekar, P.Even-Zohar, C., Narvekar, P.GIA: too big to fail. Economic impact represents concentration risk to industry. Turnover time for certificates.Diamond Intelligence Briefs, Vol. 29, no. 800, Feb. 27, pp. 8475-78.GlobalDiamond certification
DS201412-0613
2014
Narvekar, P.Narvekar, P.Lab-grown diamonds: a reality check.Solitaire International - the India Gem and Jewellery Magazine, Feb. pp. 55-59.TechnologySynthetic diamonds
DS201907-1543
2019
Narvekar, P.Even-Zohar, C., Narvekar, P.The 2018 diamond pipeline: faking the diamond dream. Thediamondloupe, May 7p. Pdf availableGlobaldiamond pipeline

Abstract: Last year the diamond pipeline pretty well succeeded in Faking the Diamond Dream. Some of the largest companies discovered that defaulting on debts of hundreds of millions of dollars had become the new source of value. Lenders tried to recover lost value by suing clients - some of whom responded in kind. Court appointed forensic investigators revealed the myriad of fake corporate conduits established to facilitate carefully premeditated roundtripping, money laundering, banking and trading frauds, and schemes to syphon (other people's) money out of the diamond pipeline. Banks en masse were recusing themselves from future participation in the diamond pipeline. Selling undisclosed synthetic diamonds, especially in smaller goods, continues to remain the new source of value for some. This was the year in which De Beers betrayed its own slogans and revealed its ambitions to become a huge lab-grown gem diamond supplier, undercutting competitor pricing well before it sold its very first Lightbox stone. For the squeezed mid-stream of the diamond pipeline to succeed, it needed to fake the diamond dream. Or else. Or else - what? Some exasperated players came to believe that if you are a decent, honest, hardworking player, fully respecting all the treasured ethical, moral and legal norms, when you take pride in honoring commitments to fellow players, clients, suppliers, banks, etc. - then you most likely did not make money and were eroding your equity. Planning one's exit out of the business or "compromise" (and criminalize yourself) by joining the Diamond Dream Fakers too often seem the more viable option.
DS202012-2235
2020
Narvekar, P.Narvekar, P., Even Zolar, C.The 2019 pipeline Prelude to the storm. Also 1p. GraphIdexonline.com, 12p. Pdf, 1p. PdfGlobaldiamond pipeline

Abstract: The 2019-2020 period is evolving as a dramatic game changer for the entire world. This is even more so for the diamond industry where a gradual pipeline restructuring process finally matured into an inevitable and, in fact, a most desirable conclusion for the midstream sector - the manufacturers of the rough and the traders of the polished. Finally, this quite squeezed sector from a profitability aspect, began to act purely in their own economic, financial, and commercial self-interest less burdened by producer pressures to “relieve” them of their stocks. Led by the massive Indian diamond sector, the manufacturers put four months break on their rough diamond purchases. In 2019 the producers were faced with considerable resistance to purchase their rough allocation which was met, to quote the CEO of De Beers, with unprecedented flexibility in the way it sold its diamonds to sightholders because of the nature of the market”. In February 2020, well before the pandemic struck the world in full force, the heads of both De Beers and Anglo American announced that they would change their allocation system (sights) and that no buyer will be "unaffected" by the changes in the sight system. The Indian industry didn’t wait to find out what scheme the producer would introduce.
DS200812-0728
2008
Narygina, O.McCammon, C., Kantor, I., Narygina, O., Roquette, J., Ponkratz, Sergieev, Mezouar, Prakapenka, DubrovinskyStable intermediate spin ferrous iron in lower mantle perovskite.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 1, 10, pp. 684-687.MantlePerovskite
DS200912-0366
2008
Narygina, O.Keepler, H., Dubrovinsky, L.S., Narygina, O., Kantor, I.Optical absorption and radioactive thermal conductivity silicate perovskite to 125 Gpa at high pressures, silicate perovskite, abundant in Earth's mantle....Science, Vol. 322, 5907 Dec. 5, pp. 1529-1531.MantleGeothermometry Radioactive heat important in deep Earth
DS201312-0720
2014
Narygina, O.Prescher, C., Weigel, C., McCammon, C., Narygina, O., Potapkin, V., Kupenko, I., Sinmyo, R., Chumakov, A.I., Dubrovinsky, L.Iron spin state in silicate glass at high pressure: implications for melts in the Earth's lower mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 385, pp. 130-136.MantleUHP
DS201412-0566
2013
Narygina, O.McCammon, C., Glazyrin, K., Kantor, A., Kantor, I., Kupenko, I., Narygina, O., Potapin, V., Vasily, P., Sinmyo, C., Chumakov, Ruffer, Sergueev, Smirnov, DubrovinskyIron spin state in silicate perovskite at conditions of Earth's deep interior.International Journal of High Pressure Research, Vol. 33, 3, pp. 663-672.MantlePerovskite
DS201712-2708
2017
Nascimento, D.B.Nascimento, D.B., Schmitt, R.S., Ribeiro, A., Trouw, R.A.J., Paschier, C.W., Basei, M.A.S.Depositional ages and provenance of the Neoproterozoic Damara Supergroup ( Northwest Namibia): implications for the Angola-Congo and Kalahari cratons connection.Gondwana Research, Vol. 52, pp. 153-171.Africa, Namibiacraton

Abstract: The Damara Orogen is composed of the Damara, Kaoko and Gariep belts developed during the Neoproterozoic Pan-African Orogeny. The Damara Belt contains Neoproterozoic siliciclastic and carbonate successions of the Damara Supergroup that record rift to proto-ocean depositional phases during the Rodinia supercontinent break up. There are two conflicting interpretations of the geotectonic framework of the Damara Supergroup basin: i) as one major basin, composed of the Outjo and Khomas basins, related to rifting in the Angola-Congo-Kalahari paleocontinent or, ii) as two independent passive margin basins, one related to the Angola-Congo and the other to the Kalahari proto-cratons. Detrital zircon provenance studies linked to field geology were used to solve this controversy. U-Pb zircon age data were analyzed in order to characterize depositional ages and provenance of the sediments and evolution of the succession in the northern part of the Outjo Basin. The basal Nabis Formation (Nosib Group) and the base of the Chuos Formation were deposited between ca. 870 Ma and 760 Ma. The upper Chuos, Berg Aukas, Gauss, Auros and lower Brak River formations formed between ca. 760 Ma and 635 Ma. It also includes the time span recorded by the unconformity between the Auros and lower Brak River formations. The Ghaub, upper Brak River, Karibib and Kuiseb formations were deposited between 663 Ma and 590 Ma. The geochronological data indicate that the main source areas are related to: i) the Angola-Congo Craton, ii) rift-related intrabasinal igneous rocks of the Naauwpoort Formation, iii) an intrabasinal basement structural high (Abbabis High), and iv) the Coastal Terrane of the Kaoko Belt. The Kalahari Craton units apparently did not constitute a main source area for the studied succession. This is possibly due to the position of the succession in the northern part of the Outjo Basin, at the southern margin of the Congo Craton. Comparison of the obtained geochronological data with those from the literature shows that the Abbabis High forms part of the Kalahari proto-craton and that Angola-Congo and Kalahari cratons were part of the same paleocontinent in Rodinia times.
DS202001-0031
2019
Nascimento, M.A.Nascimento, M.A., Correia Rio, D., Lopes dos Santos, I.P., Conceicao, H.Mangoan ilmenite and implications for diamond bearing kimberlites: a case study at the Aroeira kimberlitic dyke, Nordestina kimberlitic Province, Bahia. ( abstract only in english) ***PORTwww.annuario.igeo .ufrj.br ( researchgate.com), 15p. Pdf.South America, Brazil, Bahiadeposit - Aroeira
DS201312-0036
2013
Nascimento, R.Assumpcao, M., Bianchi, M., Julia, J., Dias, F.L., Nascimento, R., Drouet, S., Pavao, C.G., Albuquerque, D.F., Lopes, A.E.V.Crustal thickness map of Brazil: dat a compilation and main features.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 609, pp. 82-96.South America, BrazilMOHO map
DS200512-0113
2005
NasdalaBrenker, F.E., Vincze, L., Velemans, Nasdala, Stachel, Vollmer, Kersten, Somogyi, Adams, Joswig, HarrisDetection of a Ca rich lithology in the Earth's deep ( >300km) convecting mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 236, 3-4, pp. 579-587.Africa, GuineaKankan, diamond inclusions, spectroscopy
DS200712-0106
2007
NasdalaBrenker, F.E., Vollmer, C., Vincze, L., Vekemans, B., Szymanski, Janssens, Szaloki, Nasdala, Joswig, KaminskyCarbonates from the lower part of transition zone or even the lower mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 260, 1-2, pp. 1-9.MantleCarbonates
DS200712-0107
2007
NasdalaBrenker, F.E., Vollmer, C., Vincze, L., Vekemans, B., Szymanski, Janssens, Szaloki, Nasdala, Joswig, KaminskyCarbonates from the lower part of transition zone or even the lower mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 260, 1-2, pp. 1-9.MantleCarbonates
DS200712-0108
2007
NasdalaBrenker, F.E., Vollmer, Vincze, Vekemans, Szymanski, Janssens, Szaloki, Nasdala, Joswig, KaminskyCarbonates from the lower part of transition zone or even the lower mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 260, 1-2, pp. 1-9.MantleCarbonates
DS201112-0454
2011
NasdalaHowell, D., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., O'Neill, C., Pearson, N., Piazolo, Stachel, Stern, NasdalaMixed habit diamonds: evidence of a specific mantle fluid chemistry?Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1051.TechnologyDiamond morphology, growth
DS2000-0698
2000
Nasdala, L.Nasdala, L., Masonne, H.J.Microdiamonds from the Saxonian Erzgebirge, Germany: in situ micro-Raman characterization.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 12, pp. 495-8.GermanyMicro diamonds, Metamorphism - ultra high pressure (UHP)
DS2003-0888
2003
Nasdala, L.Massone, H.J., Nasdala, L.Characterization of an early metamorphic stage through inclusions in zircon of aAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 88, 5/6, pp. 883-889.GermanyDiamond - microdiamonds
DS200412-0676
2004
Nasdala, L.Glinnemann, J., Burghammer, M., Winkler, B., Nasdala, L., Harris, J.W.Single crystal graphite inclusions in natural diamonds.Lithos, ABSTRACTS only, Vol. 73, p. S44. abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDiamond morphology, Panda, Ekati
DS200412-1242
2003
Nasdala, L.Massone, H.J., Nasdala, L.Characterization of an early metamorphic stage through inclusions in zircon of a Diamondiferous quartzofeldspathic rock from theAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 88, 5/6, pp. 883-889.Europe, GermanyDiamond - microdiamonds
DS200412-1406
2003
Nasdala, L.Nasdala, L., Brenker, F.E., Glinnemann, J., Hofmeister, W., Gasparik, T., Harris, J.W., Stachel, T., Reese, I.Spectroscopic 2D tomography: residual pressure and strain around mineral inclusions in diamonds.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol.15, 6, pp. 931-36.TechnologyTechnology - tomography inclusions
DS200512-0768
2005
Nasdala, L.Nasdala, L., Hofmeister, W., Harris, J.W., Glinnemann, J.Growth zoning and strain patterns inside diamond crystals as revealed by Raman maps.American Mineralogist, Vol. 90, pp. 745-748.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesRaman mapping technology - Panda, Ekati
DS200612-0171
2006
Nasdala, L.Brenker, F.E., Vollmer, C., Vincze, L., Vekemans, B., Szymanski, A., Janssens, K., Szaloki, I., Nasdala, L., Joswig, W., Kaminsky, F.CO2 recycling to the deep convecting mantle.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 1, abstract only.MantleConvection
DS200812-0719
2007
Nasdala, L.Massonne, H.J., Kennedy, A., Nasdala, L., Theya, T.Dating of zircon and monazite from Diamondiferous quartsofeldapathic rocks of the Saxonian Erzebirge hints at burial and exhumation veolocities.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 71, 4, pp. 407-425.Europe, GermanyGeochronology
DS200812-0786
2008
Nasdala, L.Nasdala, L., Gigler, Wildner, Grambole, Zaitsev, Harris, Hofmeister, Milledge, SatitkuneAlpha radiation damage in diamond.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A672.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201012-0292
2010
Nasdala, L.Howell, D., Wood, I.G., Dobson, D.P., Jones, A.P., Nasdala, L., Harris, J.W.Quantifying strain birefringence halos around inclusions in diamond.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 160, pp. 705-717.TechnologyDiamond genesis, inclusion remnant pressure
DS201112-0722
2011
Nasdala, L.Nasdala, L.Radio-coloration of diamond.GIA International Symposium 2011, Gems & Gemology, Summer abstract p. 105.TechnologyDiamond color
DS201212-0312
2012
Nasdala, L.Howell, D., Wood, I.G., Nestola, F., Nimis, P., Nasdala, L.Inclusions under remnant pressure in diamond: a multi-technique approach.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 24, 4, pp. 563-573.TechnologyDiamond inclusions
DS201312-0636
2013
Nasdala, L.Nasdala, L., Gotze, J., Hanchar, J.M.Luminescence spectroscopy and imaging: analytical advances and perspectives in the Earth Sciences and related disciplines.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 107, 3, pp. 349-351.TechnologySpectroscopy
DS201312-0637
2013
Nasdala, L.Nasdala, L., Grambole, D., Wildner, M., Gigler, A.M., Hainschwang, T., Zaitsev, A.M., Harris, J.W., Milledge, J., Schulze, D.J., Hofmeister, W., Balmer, W.A.Radio-colouration of diamond: a spectroscopic study.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 165, pp. 843-861.Africa, South Africa, Democratic Republic of Congo, South America, Brazil, VenezuelaDiamond - colour
DS201412-0614
2014
Nasdala, L.Nasdala, L., Kostrovitsky, S., Kennedy, A.K., Zeug, M., Esenkulova, S.A.Retention of radiation damage in zircon xenocrysts from kimberlites, northern Yakutia.Lithos, Vol. 206-207, pp. 252-261.Russia, YakutiaKuoika, Ary-Mastakh fields
DS201412-0668
2014
Nasdala, L.Pearson, D.G., Brenker, F., Nestola, F., McNeil, J., Nasdala, L., Hutchison, M., Mateev, S., Mather, K., Silversmit, G., Schmitz, S., Vekemans, B., Vinczw=e, L.A hydrous mantle transition zone indicated by ring woodite included within diamond.Goldschmidt Conference 2014, 1p. AbstractMantleDiamond inclusion
DS201412-0669
2014
Nasdala, L.Pearson, D.G., Brenker, F.E., Nestola, F., McNeill, J., Nasdala, L., Hutchinson, M.T., Mateev, S., Mather, K., Silversmit, G., Schmitz, S., Vekemans, B., Vincze, L.Hydrous mantle transition zone indicated by ring woodite included in diamond.Nature, Vol. 507, March 13, pp. 221-224.Mantle, South America, Brazil, Mato GrossoDiamond inclusion - water storage capacity, magmatism
DS201603-0392
2016
Nasdala, L.Kostrovitsky, S.I., Skuzovatov, S.Y., Yakolev, D.A., Sun, J., Nasdala, L., Wu, F.Age of Siberian craton crust beneath the northern kimberlite fields: insights to the craton evolution. ( Olenek -Anabar)Gondwana Research, in press available 70p.RussiaGeochronology

Abstract: Comprehensive studies of zircon xenocrysts from kimberlites of the Kuoika field (northeastern Siberian craton) and several kimberlite fields of the eastern Anabar shield, along with data compilation on the age of kimberlite-hosting terranes, reveal details of the evolution of the northern Siberian craton. The age distribution and trace element characteristic of zircons from the Kuoika field kimberlites (Birekte terrane) provide evidence of significant basic and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism in northern Siberia in the Paleozoic and Mesozoic periods. The abundance of 1.8-2.1 Ga zircons in both the Birekte and adjacent Hapchan terranes (the latter hosting kimberlites of the eastern Anabar shield) supports the Paleoproterozoic assembly and stabilization of these units in the Siberian craton and the supercontinent Columbia. The abundance of Archean zircons in the Hapchan terrane reflects the input of an ancient source other than the Birekte terrane and addresses the evolution of the terrane to west (Magan and Daldyn terranes of the Anabar shield). The present study has also revealed the oldest known remnant of the Anabar shield crust, whose 3.62 Ga age is similar to that of the other ancient domain of Siberia, the Aldan shield. The first Hf isotope data for the Anabar shield coupled with the U-Pb systematics indicate three stages of crustal growth (Paleoproterozoic, Neoarchean and Paleoarchean) and two stages of the intensive crustal recycling in the Paleoproterozoic and Neoarchean. Intensive reworking of the existing crust at 2.5-2.8 Ga and 1.8-2.1 Ga is interpreted to provide evidence for the assembly of Columbia. The oldest Hf model age estimation provides a link to Early Eoarchean (3.7-3.95 Ga) and possibly to Hadean crust. Hence, some of the Archean cratonic segments of the Siberian craton could be remnants of the Earth's earliest continental crust.
DS201611-2126
2016
Nasdala, L.Nasdala, L., Dobrzhinetskaya, L.F., Korsakov, A.V., Massone, J-J., Reissner, C.UHP phases versus preparation materials - be cautious when using micro-raman spectroscopy.European Mineralogical Conference held Sept. 11-15, Italy, p. 219. abstract 1p.TechnologyRaman Spectroscopy
DS201611-2138
2016
Nasdala, L.Schultz, D.J., Nasdala, L.Unusual paired pattern of radiohaloes on a diamond crystal from Guaniamo, Venezuela.Lithos, in press available 28p.South America, VenezuelaDeposit - Guaniamo
DS201612-2323
2016
Nasdala, L.Nasdala, L., Steger, S., Reissner, C.Raman study of diamond based abrasives, and possible artefacts in detecting UHP microdiamond.Lithos, Vol. 265, pp. 317-327.TechnologyUHP - microdiamond

Abstract: Raman spectral characteristics of a range of diamond-based abrasives (powders and sprays) and drilling and cutting tools, originating from preparation laboratories worldwide, are presented. Some abrasives show strong broadening of the main diamond band [FWHM (full width at half band-maximum) > 5 cm- 1] accompanied by strong band-downshift (View the MathML source?˜ = 1316-1330 cm- 1). Others are characterised by moderate band broadening (FWHM = 1.8-5 cm- 1) at rather regular band position (View the MathML source?˜ = 1331-1333 cm- 1). In addition we found that a "fresh" abrasive and its used analogue may in some cases show vast differences in their Raman spectra. The Raman parameters of diamond-based abrasives overlap widely with Raman parameters of UHP (ultra-high pressure) microdiamond. It is hence impossible to assign diamond detected in a geological specimen to either an introduced artefact or a genuine UHP relict, from the Raman spectrum alone. Raman is an excellent technique for the detection of minute amounts of diamond; however it does not provide conclusive evidence for the identification of UHP microdiamond. The latter requires thorough verification, for instance by optical microscopy or, if doubts cannot be dispelled, transmission electron microscopy.
DS201709-2038
2017
Nasdala, L.Nasdala, L., Broska, I., Harlov, D.E., Macdonald, R.Recent progress in the study of accessory minerals. Outline of special volume.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 111, 4, pp. 431-433.Technologymineralogy

Abstract: Accessory minerals are a common species in igneous and metamorphic rocks that are not considered characteristic of the host rock and hence do not affect its root name. Accessories tend to be complex in terms of their chemical and isotopic composition and their structural state. In spite of not being major rock constituents, they are, however, of enormous petrologic interest as they contain a record of the formation and post-formation history of their host rock. The study of accessory minerals hence has increased continuously during the past years, and still increases (Fig. 1). Recent progress is driven by new analytical opportunities of (in situ) micro-techniques. More and more the internal textures, that is, elemental, isotopic, and/or structural distribution patterns within individual grains, have come into the focus of researchers; a few examples are compiled in Fig. 2.
DS201810-2360
2018
Nasdala, L.Nasdala, L., Corfu, F., Schoene, B., Tapster, S.R., Wall, C.J., Schmitz, M.D., Ovtcharova, M., Schaltegger, U., Kennedy, A.K., Kronz, A., Reiners, P.W., Yang, Y-H., Wu, F-Y., Gain, S.E.M., Griffin, W.L., Szymanowski, D., Chanmuang, C., Ende, N.M., ValleyGZ7 and GZ8 - two zircon reference materials for SIMS U-Pb geochronology.Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research, http://orchid.org/0000-0002-2701-4635 80p.Asia, Sri Lankageochronology

Abstract: Here we document a detailed characterization of two zircon gemstones, GZ7 and GZ8. Both stones had the same mass at 19.2 carats (3.84 g) each; both came from placer deposits in the Ratnapura district, Sri Lanka. The U-Pb data are in both cases concordant within the uncertainties of decay constants and yield weighted mean ²°6Pb/²³8U ages (95% confidence uncertainty) of 530.26 Ma ± 0.05 Ma (GZ7) and 543.92 Ma ± 0.06 Ma (GZ8). Neither GZ7 nor GZ8 have been subjected to any gem enhancement by heating. Structure-related parameters correspond well with the calculated alpha doses of 1.48 × 10¹8 g?¹ (GZ7) and 2.53 × 10¹8 g?¹ (GZ8), respectively, and the (U-Th)/He ages of 438 Ma ± 3 Ma (2s) for GZ7 and 426 Ma ± 9 Ma (2s) for GZ8 are typical of unheated zircon from Sri Lanka. The mean U concentrations are 680 µg g?¹ (GZ7) and 1305 µg g?¹ (GZ8). The two zircon samples are proposed as reference materials for SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry) U-Pb geochronology. In addition, GZ7 (Ti concentration 25.08 µg g?¹ ± 0.18 µg g?¹; 95% confidence uncertainty) may prove useful as reference material for Ti-in-zircon temperature estimates.
DS202006-0941
2020
Nasdala, L.Nasdala, L., Schmidt, C.Applications of raman spectroscopy in mineralogy and geochemistry.Elements, Vol. 16, pp. 99-104.Africa, South Africadeposit - Finsch

Abstract: The application of Raman spectroscopy for the identification and characterization of minerals and related materials has increased appreciably during recent years. Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a most valuable and versatile analytical tool. Successful applications cover virtually all the mineralogical sub-disciplines, and have become more numerous in geochemistry. We present a general summary of present applications, illustrated by selected examples. In addition, we briefly point out several aspects of spectral acquisition, data reduction, and interpretation of Raman results that are important for the application of Raman spectroscopy as a reliable analytical tool.
DS1980-0249
1980
Nash, C.R.Nash, C.R., Boshier, P.R., Coupard, M.M., Theron, A.C., Wilson.Photogeology and Satellite Image Interpretation in Mineral Exploration.Minerals Sci. Eng., Vol. 12, No. 4, PP. 216-244.Australia, South Africa, South AustraliaKimberlite, Tectonics, Regional Geology, Gawler Craton
DS2003-0303
2003
Nash, C.R.Crowe, W.A., Nash, C.R., Harris, L.B., Leeming, P.M., Rankin, L.R.The geology of the Rengali province: implications for the tectonic development ofJournal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 21, 7, pp. 697-710.IndiaTectonics - not specific to diamonds
DS200412-0390
2003
Nash, C.R.Crowe, W.A., Nash, C.R., Harris, L.B., Leeming, P.M., Rankin, L.R.The geology of the Rengali province: implications for the tectonic development of northern Orissa, India.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 21, 7, pp. 697-710.IndiaTectonics - not specific to diamonds
DS1998-1062
1998
Nash, D.J.Nash, D.J., Shaw, P.A.Silica and carbonate relationships in silcrete calcrete intergrade duricrusts from the Kalahari of Botswana..Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, No. 1, pp. 11-25.GlobalAlteration, Duricrusts
DS1994-1177
1994
Nash, W.F.Meyer, C.E., Nash, W.F.Mineralogy and petrology of alkalic dikes in the la Sal Mountains, southeast Utah.Geological Society of America Abstracts, Vol. 26, No. 6, April p. 54. Abstract.UtahPetrology, Alkaline dikes
DS1982-0454
1982
Nash, W.P.Nash, W.P., Brown, F.H.Alkaline Lavas and Ultramafic Xenoliths from Marsabit, Eastafrica.Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 14, No. 7, P. 574, (abstract.).East Africa, KenyaKimberlite, Lherzolite, Wehrlite
DS1984-0500
1984
Nash, W.P.Mccandless, T.E., Nash, W.P.Detrital Minerals from a Mantle Source, Green River Basin, WyomingAmerican Mineralogist., IN PRESSUnited States, Wyoming, Rocky Mountains, Green River BasinGeochemistry
DS1995-1326
1995
Nash, W.P.Nash, W.P., McCandless, T.E.Geochemical and morphological evaluation of indicator mineral anomalies in northeastern Utah and southwest Wyoming.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 393-395.Utah, WyomingGeochemistry, Green River Basin
DS1996-0913
1996
Nash, W.P.McCandless, T.E., Nash, W.P.Detrital mantle indicator minerals in southwestern Wyoming, USA: evaluation of mantle environment, hostExploration and Mining Geology, Vol. 5, No. 1, Jan. pp. 33-44.WyomingGreen River Basin, Igneous, diamond exploration, technology
DS200412-1407
2004
Nashimura, T.Nashimura, T.Pressure recovery in magma due to bubble growth.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 31, 12, June 28, 10.1029/2004 GLO19810TechnologyMagmatism - (not specific to diamonds)
DS1980-0250
1980
Nasht, S.Nasht, S.Victorian Hope Springs EternalThe Age (melbourne), Jan. 22ND., P. 3.Australia, New South Wales, VictoriaFreeport Minerals, Prospecting
DS1860-1057
1899
Nashville AmericanNashville AmericanOrigin of Diamonds. It Seems to Be Explained by a Recent Discovery of "eclogite".Nashville American., JULY 30TH.Africa, South AfricaDiamond Genesis
DS1900-0439
1906
Nashville NewsNashville NewsDiamond Mines of Arkansas. #1Nashville News Supplement., AUGUST, 8P.United States, ArkansasHistorical Review
DS200812-0263
2008
Nasipuri, P.Das, S., Nasipuri, P., Bhattachaya, A., Swaminathan, S.The thrust contact between the Eastern Ghats belt and the adjoining Bastar craton, Eastern India: evidence from mafic granulites and tectonic implications.Precambrian Research, Vol. 162, 1-2, pp. 70-85.IndiaCraton
DS201112-0665
2011
Nasipuri, P.Menegon, L., Nasipuri, P., Stunitz, H., Behrens, H., Ravna, E.Dry and strong quartz during deformation of the lower crust in the presence of melt.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 116, B10, B10410MantleMelting
DS201511-1875
2015
Nasipuri, P.Saha, L., Frei, D., Gerdes, A., Pat, J.K., Sarkar, S., Patole, V., Bhandari, A., Nasipuri, P.Crustal geodynamics from the Archean Bundelk hand craton, India: constraints from zircon U-Pb-Hf isotope studies.Geological Magazine, Rapid communication Oct. 14p.IndiaTectonics, geochronology

Abstract: A comprehensive study based on U-Pb and Hf isotope analyses of zircons from gneisses has been conducted along the western part (Babina area) of the E–W-trending Bundelkhand Tectonic Zone in the central part of the Archaean Bundelkhand Craton. 207Pb-206Pb zircon ages and Hf isotopic data indicate the existence of a felsic crust at ~ 3.59 Ga, followed by a second tectonothermal event at ~ 3.44 Ga, leading to calc-alkaline magmatism and subsequent crustal growth. The study hence suggests that crust formation in the Bundelkhand Craton occurred in a similar time-frame to that recorded from the Singhbhum and Bastar cratons of the North Indian Shield.
DS201602-0234
2016
Nasipuri, P.Saha, L., Frei, D., Gerdes, A., Pati, J.K., Sarkar, S., Patole, V., Bhandari, A., Nasipuri, P.Crustal geodynamics from the Archean Bundelk hand Craton, India: constraints from zircon U-Pb-Hf isotope studies.Geological Magazine, Vol. 153, 1, pp. 179-192.IndiaGeochronology, tectonics

Abstract: A comprehensive study based on U-Pb and Hf isotope analyses of zircons from gneisses has been conducted along the western part (Babina area) of the E-W-trending Bundelkhand Tectonic Zone in the central part of the Archaean Bundelkhand Craton. 207Pb-206Pb zircon ages and Hf isotopic data indicate the existence of a felsic crust at ~ 3.59 Ga, followed by a second tectonothermal event at ~ 3.44 Ga, leading to calc-alkaline magmatism and subsequent crustal growth. The study hence suggests that crust formation in the Bundelkhand Craton occurred in a similar time-frame to that recorded from the Singhbhum and Bastar cratons of the North Indian Shield.
DS1995-1327
1995
Nasir, S.Nasir, S.Mafic lower crustal xenoliths from the northwestern part of the ArabianPlate.Euro. J. Mineralogy, Vol. 7, pp.217-230.GlobalArabian plate, Xenoliths
DS1996-1021
1996
Nasir, S.Nasir, S.PERIDOT: software package for the estimation of pressure-temperature-oxygen fugacity of upper mantle..Computers and Geosciences, Vol. 22, No. 5, pp. 589-592.GlobalLower crustal assemblages, Computer -program Peridot
DS1998-1063
1998
Nasir, S.Nasir, S., Klemd, R.New carbonatite occurrences along the Hatta transform fault zone ( northern Oman Mountains).Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, No. 1, pp. 3-10.GlobalCarbonatite
DS2000-0699
2000
Nasir, S.Nasir, S., Safarjalani, A.Lithospheric petrology beneath the northern part of the Arabian Plate in Syria: evidence from xenoliths...Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 30, No. 1, pp. 149-68.SyriaAlkali basalts, Xenoliths - Shamah volcanic fields
DS2003-0999
2003
Nasir, S.Nasir, S., Hanna, S., Hajari, S.The petrogenetic association of carbonatite and alkaline magmatism: constraints fromMineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 77, 3/4, pp. 235-258.OmanCarbonatite
DS2003-1000
2003
Nasir, S.Nasir, S., Hanna, S., Hajari, S.The petrogenetic association of carbonatite and alkaline magmatism: constraints fromMineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 77, 3-4, pp. 235-58.OmanCarbonatite
DS200412-1408
2003
Nasir, S.Nasir, S., Hanna, S., Hajari, S.The petrogenetic association of carbonatite and alkaline magmatism: constraints from the Masfut-Rawda Ridge, Northern Oman MountMineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 77, 3/4, pp. 235-258.Africa, Arabia, OmanCarbonatite
DS200712-0772
2006
Nasir, S.Nasir, S.Newly discovered kimberlites in Oman.6th Conference on Middle East Geology, 1p. abstractAfrica, Arabia, OmanKimberlite
DS200712-0773
2007
Nasir, S.Nasir, S., Al-Khirbashi, S., Al-Sayigh, Alharthy, Mubarek, Rollinson, Lazki, Belouova, Griffin, KaminskyThe first record of allochthonous kimberlite within the Batain Nappes, eastern Oman.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A706.Africa, OmanBatain melange
DS200712-0774
2006
Nasir, S.Nasir, S., Al-Sayigh, A., Alharthy, A., Al-Lazki, A.Geochemistry and petrology of Tertiary volcanic rocks and related ultramafic xenoliths from the central and eastern Oman Mountains.Lithos, Vol. 90, 3-4, Sept. pp. 249-270.Africa, Arabia, OmanBasanites, xenoliths
DS200812-0787
2008
Nasir, S.Nasir, S., Al-Khirbash, Rollinson, Al-Harthy, Al-Sayigh, Al-Lazki, Belousa, Kaminsky, Theye, Massone, Al-BuaidiEvolved carbonatitic kimberlite from the Batain Nappes, eastern Oman continental margin.9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractAfrica, Arabia, OmanPetrography
DS200812-0788
2008
Nasir, S.Nasir, S., Al-Khirbash, Rollinson, Al-Harthy, Al-Sayigh, Al-Lazki, Belousa, Kaminsky, Theye, Massone, Al-BuaidiLate Jurassic Early Cretaceous kimberlite, carbonatite and ultramafic lamprophyric sill and dyke swarms from the Bomethra area, northeastern Oman.9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractAfrica, Arabia, OmanPetrography
DS200912-0531
2009
Nasir, S.Nasir, S., Theye, T., Massone, H-J.REE rich aeschynite in apatite dolomite carbonatite, Oman Mountains.The Open Mineralogy Journal, Vol. 3, pp. 17-27.Africa, Arabia, OmanCarbonatite
DS201012-0528
2010
Nasir, S.Nasir, S., Al-Khirbash, S., Rollinson, Al-Harthy, Al-Sayigh, Al-Lazki, A., Theye, T.Massonne, BelousovaPetrogenesis of early Cretaceous carbonatite and ultramafic lamprophyres in a diatreme in the Batain Nappes, eastern Oman continental margin.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, in press available, 28p.Africa, OmanCarbonatite
DS201112-0723
2011
Nasir, S.Nasir, S., Al-Khirbash, S., Rollinson, H., Al-Harthy, A., Al-Sayigh, A., Al-Lazki, A.Petrogenesis of early Cretaceous carbonatite and ultramafic lamprophryes in a diatreme in the Batain Nappes, eastern Oman continental margin.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 161, 1, pp.Africa, OmanCarbonatite
DS201112-0724
2011
Nasir, S.Nasir, S., Al-Khirbash, S., Rollinson, H., Al-Harthy, Al-Sayigh, Al-Lazki, Theye, Massonne, BelousovaPetrogenesis of early Cretaceous carbonatite and ultramafic lamprophyres in a diatreme in the Batain Nappes, eastern Oman continental margin.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 161, 1, pp. 47-74.Asia, OmanCarbonatite
DS200912-0532
2009
Nasir, S.J.Nasir, S.J.Late Jurassic ultramafic lamprophyres with kimberlitic affinity in the allochthonous Batain nappes of eastern Oman.GAC/MAC/AGU Meeting held May 23-27 Toronto, Abstract onlyAfrica, OmanMineralogy
DS200412-1409
2002
Naskar, D.C.Naskar, D.C.Geophysical approach for delineation of shallow crustal structure along Borgaon-Sanwer Transect, Madhya Pradesh.Journal Geological Society of India, Vol. 60, 2, pp. 173-182.India, Madhya PradeshGeophysics, Gondwana, Deccan basalts
DS200512-0210
2005
Naskar, D.C.Das, L.K., Das, B., Chowdbury, S.N., Naskar, D.C., Karunakar, G., Dey, S.K.Configuration of kimberlite bodies, Indravati basinal area, Bastar District, Chhattisgarh.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 65, 5, pp. 679-688.India, Bastar CratonTectonics
DS1989-1090
1989
Naslund, H.R.Naslund, H.R., Birnie, R.W., Parr, J.T.Lithologic mapping of mafic intrusions in east Greenland using Landsat thematic mapper dataNational Technical Information Service N89-28047/3, 63pGreenlandRemote sensing, Mafic intrusions
DS201906-1351
2019
Nason, P.Smith, M.P., Estrade, G., Marquis, E., Goodenough, K., Nason, P., Xu, C., Kynicky, J., Borst, A.M., Finch, A.A., Villanova de Benevent, C.Ion adsorption deposits: a comparison of deposits in Madagascar and China.3rd International Critical Metals Meeting held Edinburgh, 1p.abstract p. 53.Africa, Madagascar, ChinaREE

Abstract: Link to presentation pdf.
DS201909-2037
2019
Nason, P.Estrade, G., Marquis, E., Smith, M., Goodenough, K.,Nason, P.REE concentration processes in ion absorption deposits: evidence from the Ambohimirahavavy alkaline complex in Madagascar.Ore Geology Reviews, in press available, 21p. pdfAfrica, MadagascarREE
DS2003-1001
2003
Nason, T.Nason, T.Selection of plant for diamond ore concentration.. primary concentration stage cost andRough Diamond Review, No. 2, September, pp.30-36.AustraliaMining - plant design, recovery
DS200412-1410
2003
Nason, T.Nason, T.Selection of plant for diamond ore concentration.. primary concentration stage cost and efficiency implications.Rough Diamond Review, No. 2, September, pp.30-36.AustraliaMining - plant design, recovery
DS200812-0220
2007
Nasonova, L.P.Chujkova, N.A., Nasonova, L.P., Maximova, T.G.Gravity anomalies in the Earth's crust and upper mantle.Astronomical and Astrophysical Transactions, Vol. 26, 4-5, pp. 391-399.MantleGeophysics - gravity
DS1995-2017
1995
Nasraoui, M.Wall, F., Williams, C.T., Woolley, A.R., Nasraoui, M.Pyrochlore from weathered carbonate at Lueshe, ZaireGeological Society Africa 10th. Conference Oct. Nairobi, p. 158-9. Abstract.Democratic Republic of CongoCarbonatite, Deposit -Lueshe
DS1996-1498
1996
Nasraoui, M.Wall, F., Williams, C.T., Nasraoui, M.Pyrochlore from weathered carbonatite at Luesche, ZaireMineralogical Magazine, Vol. 60, No. 5, Oct 1, pp. 731-750.Democratic Republic of CongoCarbonatite
DS1996-1499
1996
Nasraoui, M.Wall, F., Williams, C.T., Woolley, A.R., Nasraoui, M.Pyrochlore from weathered carbonatite at Luashe ZaireMineralogical Magazine, Vol. 60, No. 5, Oct. pp. 731-750.Democratic Republic of CongoCarbonatite, Mineralogy
DS2000-0700
2000
Nasraoui, M.Nasraoui, M., Bilal, E.Pyrochlores from Lueshe carbonatite complex: a geochemical record of different alteration stages.Journal of Asian Earth Science, Vol. 18, No.2, Apr. pp.237-51.GlobalCarbonaites, geochemistry - alteration
DS2001-0825
2001
Nasraoui, M.Nasraoui, M., Waerenborogh, J.C.iron speciation in weathered pyrochlore group minerals from Lueshe and Araxa Barreiro carbonatites-Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 39, No. 4, Aug. pp.1073-80.Brazil, Democratic Republic of CongoSpectroscopy - weathering
DS2001-0810
2001
Nasraqui, M.Moutte, J., Nasraqui, M.Geochemistry of carbonatites and related rocks: the Lueshe Complex, Kivu Congo.Journal of South African Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 1, p. A 25. (abs)GlobalCarbonatite, Lueshe Complex
DS2001-0826
2001
Nasraqui, M.Nasraqui, M., Waerenborgh, J.C.Iron speciation in weathered pyrochlores by iron Mossbauer spectroscopyJournal of South African Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 1, p. A 26. (abs)Brazil, Democratic Republic of CongoCarbonatite, Leushe, Araxa Complexes
DS2001-0981
2001
Nasraqui, M.Rocha, E.B., Nasraqui, M., Soubies, BilalGeochemical evolution of pyrochlore during supergene alteration of CatalaoII ore deposits.Journal of South African Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 1, p. A 29.(abs)BrazilCarbonatite, Catalao II
DS201502-0058
2015
Nassar, N.T.Graedel, T.E., Nassar, N.T.The criticality of metals: a perspective for geologists.In: Ore deposits of an evolving Earth, Geological Society of London,, Special Publication no. 393, pp. 291-302.GlobalEconomics
DS1975-0823
1978
Nassau, J.Nassau, K., Nassau, J.The History and Present Status of Synthetic Diamond. Part IiLapidary Journal, Vol. 32, No. 2, MAY PP. 490-508.United StatesSynthetic Diamonds
DS1975-0823
1978
Nassau, K.Nassau, K., Nassau, J.The History and Present Status of Synthetic Diamond. Part IiLapidary Journal, Vol. 32, No. 2, MAY PP. 490-508.United StatesSynthetic Diamonds
DS1984-0544
1984
Nassau, K.Nassau, K.The Early History of Gemstone TreatmentsGems And Gemology, Vol. 20, No. 1, SPRING PP. 22-23.GlobalHistory, Diamond
DS1985-0480
1985
Nassau, K.Nassau, K.A Note on the History of Diamond SynthesisJournal of Gemology and Proceedings of Gemm. Association of Great Britain, Vol. 19, No. 8, pp. 660-663GlobalDiamond Morphology
DS1987-0502
1987
Nassau, K.Nassau, K.Irradiated gemstones- could the ice be hot?Lapidary Journal, Vol. 41, No. 5 August, pp. 41-46GlobalDiamond, Irradiated
DS1990-1087
1990
Nassau, K.Nassau, K.Synthetic gem materials in the 1980's. Diamond featured p. 57-58Gems and Gemology, Vol. 26, Spring pp. 50-63GlobalGemstones, Synthetics -diamond
DS1991-1215
1991
Nassau, K.Nassau, K.Two types of historical traps: on diamond softening and the antiquity of emerald oilingJournal of Gemology, Vol. 22, No. 7, pp. 399-403GlobalPliny -diamond softening
DS1997-0836
1997
Nassau, K.Nassau, K., McClure, S.F., Elen, S., Shigley, J.E.Synthetic moissanite: a new diamond substituteGems and Gemology, Vol. 33, winter, pp. 260-275.GlobalDiamond synthesis, Moissanite
DS1995-1328
1995
Nassichuk, W.Nassichuk, W., McIntyrem D.Cretaceous and Tertiary fossils discovered in kimberlites at Lac de Gras Slave Province.Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) Paper, No. 1995-B, pp. 109-114.Northwest TerritoriesPaleontology
DS1991-0484
1991
Nassichuk, W.W.Fipke, C.E., Nassichuk, W.W.Heavy mineral geochemical exploration for lamproiteThe Canadian Mining and Metallurgical Bulletin (CIM Bulletin) ., Session on Diamonds at The Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) Annual Meeting April, Vol. 84, No. 947, March p. 99. AbstractAustralia, Arkansas, British ColumbiaGeochemistry, Lamproite
DS1995-1821
1995
Nassichuk, W.W.Stasiuk, L.D., Nassichuk, W.W.Thermal history and petrology of wood and other organic inclusions In kimberlite pipes at Lac de Gras.Geological Survey of Canada, Paper 1995-B, pp. 115-124.Northwest TerritoriesThermal history, Lac de Gras area kimberlite pipes
DS1996-1022
1996
Nassichuk, W.W.Nassichuk, W.W., McIntyre, D.J.Fossils from Diamondiferous kimberlites at Lac de Gras: age andpaleogeography.Geological Survey of Canada, LeCheminant ed, OF 3228, pp. 43-46.Northwest TerritoriesPaleontology, Deposit -Lac de Gras area
DS1996-1365
1996
Nassichuk, W.W.Stasiuk, L.D., Nassichuk, W.W.Thermal dat a from petrographic analysis of organic matter in kimberlitepipes, Lac de Gras.Geological Survey of Canada, LeCheminant ed, OF 3228, pp. 147-149.Northwest TerritoriesReflectance data, Thermal history, Lac de Gras area
DS1998-1404
1998
Nassichuk, W.W.Stasiuk, L.D., Lockhart, G.D., Nassichuk, W.W., CarlsonKimberlite emplacement temperatures derived from the thermal history of organic matter, Lac de Gras.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 865-7.Northwest TerritoriesHuminites, diatreme facies, Deposit - Hawk, Point Lake, Gazelle, Caribou W.
DS2000-0924
2000
Nassichuk, W.W.Stasiuk, L.D., Nassichuk, W.W., Lockhart, G.D., CarlsonThermal maturity, evaluation of organic matter from kimberlite pipes: discriminating therml zones in...Geological Association of Canada (GAC)/Mineralogical Association of Canada (MAC) 2000, 1p. abstract.Northwest TerritoriesKimberlites - organics - brief
DS2003-1353
2003
Nassichuk, W.W.Sweet, A.R., Stasiuk, L.D., Nassichuk, W.W., Catunneau, O., McIntrye, D.J.Paleontology and diamonds: geological environments associated with kimberlite8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 1 POSTER abstractNorthwest TerritoriesKimberlite geology and economics, Paleontology
DS1999-0710
1999
Nassiuk, W.Stasiuk, L.D., Lockhart, G.D., Nassiuk, W., Carlson, J.Thermal maturity evaluation of dispersed organic matter inclusions From kimberlite pipes, Lac de Gras.International Journal of Coal. Geol., Vol. 40, No. 1, Jan. pp. 1-25.Northwest TerritoriesOrganic inclusions, Deposit - Lac de Gras pipes
DS1998-1064
1998
Nassiuk, W.W.Nassiuk, W.W., Dyck, D.R.Fossils recovered from kimberlite pipes in the Lac de Gras field, Slave Province - geological indicators.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 612-14.Northwest TerritoriesPaleontology, Deposit - Point Lake, Nancy, Sue
DS1989-1669
1989
NasurdinovYegorov, K.N., Vladimirov, B.M., Zaborovskiy, V.V., NasurdinovFind of a potassic trachyte dike near the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe, Yakutia #2Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 298, No. 1-6, April pp. 116-118RussiaPetrography, Trachyte
DS1995-1329
1995
Nasurdinov, T.G.Nasurdinov, T.G., Sarychev, I.K., Fomin, A.S.The features of the geological structure of the Upper Horizons of the Yubileinaya pipe.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Almazy Rossii Sakha abstract, p. 25.Russia, YakutiaStructure, Deposit -Jubilee
DS1992-0856
1992
NasyrivaKhamrabayev, I.Kh., Iskandarov, E., Khamrabeyeva, Z.I., NasyrivaGlimmerites and similar rocks from central AsiaInternational Geology Review, Vol. 34, No. 6, June pp. 629-638RussiaGlimmerites, Alkaline rocks
DS1993-1112
1993
Nataf, H.C.Nataf, H.C., VanDecar, J.Seismological detection of a mantle plume?Nature, Vol. 364, No. 6433, July 8, pp. 115-120MantleGeophysics -seismics, Hotspot
DS2001-0542
2001
Nataf, H.C.Jolivet, L., Nataf, H.C.Geodynamics and rheology of the lithosphere along the DSS profile SVEKA in the central Scandinavian Shield.Balkema Publishing, 236p. approx. $ 90.00GlobalBook - ad, Tectonics, plate boundaries
DS1991-1216
1991
Nataf, H-C.Nataf, H-C.Mantle convection, plates and hotpsotsTectonophysics, Vol. 187, pp. 361-371GlobalMantle, Hotspots
DS1996-1023
1996
Nataf, H-C.Nataf, H-C., Ricard, Y.3SMACA: an a priori tomographic model of the upper mantle based on geophysical modeling.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 95, pp. 101-122.MantleGeophysics - tomography, Tomography
DS2000-0701
2000
Nataf, H-C.Nataf, H-C.Seismic imaging of mantle plumesAnnual Review Earth Plan. Sci., Vol. 28, pp. 391-417.MantleGeophysics - seismics, Hot spots
DS200712-1094
2006
Natale, G.De.Troise, C., Natale, G.De., Kilburn, C.R.J.Mechanisms of activity and unrest at large calderas.Geological Society of London , SP 269, Nov. 208p. $ 135.TechnologyMagmatsim, modeling calderas
DS201112-0088
2011
Natali, C.Bianchini,G., Bryce, J.G., Blichert-Toft, J., Beccaluca, L., Natali, C.Pb Hf Nd isotopic decoupling in peridotite xenoliths from Mega ( Ethiopia): insights into multistage evolution of the East African lithosphere.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.528.Africa, EthiopiaTanzanian Craton
DS201212-0510
2012
Natali, C.Natali, C., Beccaluva, L., Bianchini, G., Ellam, R.M., Siea, F., Stuart, F.M.Carbonated alkali silicate metasomatism in the North Africa lithosphere: evidence from middle Atlas spinel lherzolites, Morocco.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, in press availableAfrica, MoroccoGeochemistry
DS201312-0638
2013
Natali, C.Natali, C., Beccaluva, L., Bianchini, G., Ellam, R.M., Siena, F., Stuart, F.M.Carbonated alkali silicate metasomatism in the North Africa lithosphere: evidence from Middle Atlas spinel lherzolites, Morocco.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 41, pp. 113-121.Africa, MoroccoMetasomatism
DS201702-0194
2017
Natali, C.Beccaluva, L., Bianchini, G., Natali, C., Siena, F.The alkaline carbonatite complex of Jacupiranga ( Brazil): magma genesis.Gondwana Research, Vol. 44, pp. 157-177.South America, BrazilCarbonatite

Abstract: A comprehensive study including new field, petrological and geochemical data is reported on the Jacupiranga alkaline-carbonatite complex (133-131 Ma) which, together with other alkaline complexes, occurs in southern Brazil and is coeval with the Paraná CFB province. It consists of a shallow intrusion (ca. 65 km2) in the Precambrian crystalline basement, and can be subdivided in two main diachronous plutonic bodies: an older dunite-gabbro-syenite in the NW and a younger clinopyroxenite-ijolite (s.l.) in the SE, later injected by a carbonatitic core (ca. 1 km2). An integrated petrogenetic model, based on bulk rock major and trace element analyses, mineral chemistry and Sr-Nd-Pb-C isotopic data, suggests that the two silicate intrusions generated from different mantle-derived magmas that evolved at shallow level (2-3 km depth) in two zoned cup-shaped plutonic bodies growing incrementally from independent feeding systems. The first intrusion was generated by OIB-like alkaline to mildly alkaline parental basalts that initially led to the formation of a dunitic adcumulate core, discontinuously surrounded by gabbroic cumulates, in turn injected by subanular syenite intrusive and phonolite dykes. Nephelinitic (± melilite) melts - likely generated deep in the lithosphere at = 3 GPa - were the parental magmas of the second intrusion and gave rise to large coarse-grained clinopyroxenite ad- to meso-cumulates, in turn surrounded, and partially cut, by semi-annular fine-layered melteigite-ijolite-urtite ortho-cumulates. The available isotopic data do not evidence genetic links between carbonatites and the associated silicate intrusions, thus favouring an independent source from the mantle. Moreover, it may be suggested that, unlike gabbro-syenites and carbonatites, mostly generated from lithospheric mantle sources, the parental magmas of the ijolite-clinopyroxenite intrusion also record the influence of sublithospheric (plume-related?) geochemical components.
DS201801-0042
2018
Natali, C.Natali, C., Beccaluva, L., Bianchini, G., Siena, F.Coexistence of alkaline carbonatite complexes and high MgO CFB in the Parana-Etendeka province: insights on plume lithosphere interactions in the Gondwana realm.Lithos, Vol. 296-299, pp. 54-66.South America, Brazilcarbonatites
DS1993-1425
1993
Natalin, B.A.Sengor, A.M., Burke, K., Natalin, B.A.Asia: a continent made and assembled during the PhanerozoicShort Course NOtes for Geological Society of America Meeting, Boston, 261p.AsiaCraton, Continent evolution
DS1993-1426
1993
Natalin, B.A.Sengor, A.M., Natalin, B.A., Burtman, V.S.Evolution of the Altaid tectonic collage and Paleozoic crustal growth inEurasiaNature, Vol. 364, July 22, pp. 299-306AsiaAngaran Craton, Plate tectonics
DS1994-0186
1994
Natalin, B.A.Borukaev, Ch.B., Natalin, B.A.Accretionary tectonics of the southern part of Russian far EastRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 35, No. 7-8, pp. 73-77.RussiaTectonics
DS1996-1283
1996
Natalin, B.A.Sengor, A.N.C., Natalin, B.A.Turkic-type orogeny and its role in the making of the continental crustAnnual Rev. Earth Planetary Sciences, Vol. 24, pp. 263-337GlobalOrogeny, Tectonics, Collisional mountain building
DS2001-0869
2001
NatapovO'Reilly, S. Griffin, Djomani, Natapov, Pearson, DaviesThe mantle beneath the Slave Craton: composition and architectureSlave-Kaapvaal Workshop, Sept. Ottawa, 5p. abstractNorthwest TerritoriesPetrology, Tectonics - geochemistry, geophysics, plume
DS200912-0042
2009
NatapovBegg, G.C., Griffin, W.L., Natapov, O'Reilly, Grand, O'Neill, Hronsky, Poudjom Djomeni, Swain, Deen, BowdenThe lithospheric architecture of Africa: seismic tomography, mantle petrology, and tectonic evolution.Geosphere, Vol. 5, pp. 23-50.AfricaGeophysics - seismic, tectonics
DS201012-0499
2010
NatapovMints, M.V., Belousova, E.A., Konilov, A.N., Natapov, Shchipansky, Griffin, O'Reilly, Dokukina, KaulinaMesoarchean subduction processes: 2.87 Ga eclogites from the Kola Peninsula, Russia.Geology, Vol. 38, 8, pp. 739-742.Russia, Kola PeninsulaBelomorian
DS201012-0500
2010
NatapovMints, M.V., Konilov, A.N., Dokukina, Kaulina, Belousova, Natapov, Griffin, O'ReillyThe Belomorian eclogite province: unique evidence of Meso-Neoarchean subduction and collisionsDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 434, 2, pp. 1311-1316.RussiaEclogite
DS1998-0534
1998
Natapov, L.Griffin, W.L., Djomani, P., Natapov, L., O'Reilly, S.Y.Detecting lithosphere scale structures: Siberian PlatformGemoc 1998 Annual Report, p. 22-3. abstractRussia, SiberiaGeophysics - gravity, Mantle petrology
DS1998-1065
1998
Natapov, L.Natapov, L., Griffin, W.L.Geodynamic controls on the distribution of Diamondiferous kimberlites7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 615-7.Russia, AngolaTectonics, Olenek, Lucappe, Kimberlite magmatism, hot spots
DS200912-0041
2009
Natapov, L.Begg, G., Belousova, E., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., Natapov, L.Continental versus crustal growth: resolving the paradox.Goldschmidt Conference 2009, p. A103 Abstract.MantleArchean - Boundary
DS201711-2501
2015
Natapov, L.Begg, G.C., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., Natapov, L.Geoscience dat a integration: insights into mapping lithospheric architecture.ASEG-PESA 2015, 2 p. abstract Mantledata integration

Abstract: In order to develop a 4D understanding of the architecture of the entire lithosphere, it is necessary to embrace integration of multi-disciplinary, multi-scale data in a GIS environment. An holistic understanding has evolved whereby geologic, geochemical and geophysical signals are consistent with a subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) dominated by a mosaic of domains of Archean ancestry, variably overprinted by subsequent tectonothermal events. Pristine Archean SCLM is mostly highly depleted (high Mg#), low density, high velocity and highly resistive, and preserves intact Archean crust. There is a first order relationship between changes to these signals and the degree of tectonothermal overprint (by melts, fluids). Continental crust is comprised largely of reconstituted Archean components, variably diluted by juvenile addition, symptomatic of the various overprinting events. These events impart crustal fabrics and patterns dictated by SCLM architecture, influenced by the free surface and crust-mantle decoupling.
DS1990-1641
1990
Natapov, L.M.Zonenshain, L.P., Kuzmin, M.I., Natapov, L.M.Geology of the USSR: a plate tectonic synthesisAmerican Geophysical Union (AGU) Geodynamic Series, Table of contents attached, Vol. 21, 242pRussiaTectonics, Platform, Siberia, Structure
DS1992-0904
1992
Natapov, L.M.Kushev, V.G., Sinitsyn, A.V., Mishnin, V.M., Natapov, L.M.Kimberlite structural environments and their productivity in the East Siberian (Yakutian) ProvinceRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 33, No. 10, pp. 50-60Russia, Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), Siberia, YakutiaStructure, Kimberlites -diamondiferous
DS1995-1609
1995
Natapov, L.M.Rosen, O.M., Condie, K., Natapov, L.M., Nozhkin, A.D.Archean and early Proterozoic evolution of the Siberian Craton: apreliminary assessment.Condie, Archean Crustal Evolution, Chap. 10, pp. 411-460.Russia, SiberiaTerranes, Aldan, Stanovoy, Olenek, Anabar
DS1999-0266
1999
Natapov, L.M.Griffin, W.L., Doyle, B.J., Natapov, L.M.Layered mantle lithosphere in the Lac de Gras area, Slave Craton:composition, structure and origin.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 40, No. 5, May, pp. 705-28.Northwest TerritoriesMantle, Tectonics
DS2001-0413
2001
Natapov, L.M.Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., Natapov, L.M.Lithospheric mantle beneath southern Africa: composition, structure and evolution.Slave-Kaapvaal Workshop, Sept. Ottawa, 6p. abstractSouth AfricaGeochemistry, geochronology, Tomography - Kalahari supercraton
DS2003-0504
2003
Natapov, L.M.Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., Natapov, L.M., Ryan, C.G.The evolution of lithospheric mantle beneath the Kalahari Craton and its marginsLithos, Vol. 71, 2-4, pp. 215-241.South Africa, BotswanaTectonics
DS2003-1080
2003
Natapov, L.M.Pisarevsky, S.A., Natapov, L.M.Siberia and RodiniaTectonophysics, Vol. 375, 1-4, pp. 221-245.RussiaTectonics
DS200412-0726
2003
Natapov, L.M.Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., Natapov, L.M., Ryan, C.G.The evolution of lithospheric mantle beneath the Kalahari Craton and its margins.Lithos, Vol. 71, 2-4, pp. 215-241.Africa, South Africa, BotswanaTectonics
DS200412-1552
2003
Natapov, L.M.Pisarevsky, S.A., Natapov, L.M.Siberia and Rodinia.Tectonophysics, Vol. 375, 1-4, pp. 221-245.RussiaTectonics
DS200512-0004
2004
Natapov, L.M.Afanasiev, V.P., Griffin, W.L., Natapov, L.M., Zinchuk, N.N., Matukhin, R.G., Mikrtychiyan, G.A.Diamond prospects in the southwestern flank of the Tungusk synclise.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 47, 1, pp. 45-62.Russia, YakutiaDaldyn, Tychany, geochemistry
DS200512-0234
2005
Natapov, L.M.Djomani, Y.H.P., O'Reilly, S.Y., Griffin, W.L., Natapov, L.M., Pearson, N.J., Doyle, B.J.Variations of the effective elastic thickness (Te) and structure of the lithosphere beneath the Slave Province, Canada.Exploration Geophysics, Vol. 36, 3, pp. 266-271.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeophysics - seismics, telurics
DS200512-0369
2005
Natapov, L.M.Griffin, W.L., Natapov, L.M., O Reilly, S.Y., Van Acterbergh, E., Cherenkova, A.F., Cherenkov, V.G.The Kharamai kimberlite field, Siberia: modification of the lithospheric mantle by the Siberian Trap event.Lithos, Vol. 81, 1-4, pp. 167-187.Russia, SiberiaMetasomatism
DS201112-0388
2011
Natapov, L.M.Griffin, W.L., Begg, G.C., Dunn, D., O'Reilly, S.Y., Natapov, L.M., Karlstrom, K.Archean lithospheric mantle beneath Arkansas: continental growth by microcontinent accretion.Geological Society of America Bulletin, Vol. 123, 9-10, pp. 1763-1775.United States, ArkansasPrairie Creek lamproites
DS201112-0389
2011
Natapov, L.M.Griffin, W.L., Begg, G.C., Dunn, D., O'Reilly, S.Y., Natapov, L.M., Karlstrom, K.Archean lithospheric mantle beneath Arkansas: continental growth by microcontinent accretion.Geological Society of America Bulletin, Vol. 123, 9/10 pp. 1763-1775.United States, ArkansasPrairie Creek lamproites
DS1997-0829
1997
Nataraja, R.Murthy, D.S.N., Dayal, A.M., Nataraja, R.Petrology and geochemistry of peridotite xenoliths from the Letlhkanekimberlite, Botswana.Journal of Geological Society India, Vol. 49, No. 2, Feb. pp. 123-132.IndiaPetrology, Deposit - Chigicherla
DS200512-0769
2005
Natarajam, R.Natarajam, R., Savitha, G., Dominiak, P., Wozniak, K., Moorthy, J.N.Corundum, diamond and PtS metal organic frameworks with a difference: self assembly of a unique pair of 3-connecting D2d symmetric 3,3',5,5' tetrakis(4-pyridyl)bimesity1.Angewandie Chemie, Vol. 44, 14, March 29, pp. 2115-2119.Chemistry - framework
DS1994-1264
1994
Natarajan, M.Natarajan, M., Bhaskar Rao, B., Parthasarathy, R., Kumar, A., Gopalen, K.2.0 Ga old pyroxenite-carbonatite complex of Hogenakai, Tamil Nadu, SouthIndia.Precambrian Research, Vol. 65, No. 1-4, January pp. 167-182.IndiaCarbonatite
DS1994-1265
1994
Natarajan, M.Natarajan, M., Rao, B.B., Parthasan, R., Kumar, A.2, 0 GA old pyroxenite-carbonatite complex of Hogenakal, Tamil-Nadu, SouthIndia.Precambrian Research, Vol. 65, No. 1-4, January pp. 167-181.IndiaCarbonatite, Geochronology
DS1994-1257
1994
Natarajan, R.Murthy, D.S.N., Dayal, A.M., Natarajan, R.Mineralogy and geochemistry of Chigicherla kimberlite and its xenoliths, Anantapur district, South India.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 43, April pp. 329-341.IndiaKimberlite mineralogy, Deposit -Chigicherla
DS1994-1258
1994
Natarajan, R.Murthy, D.S.N., Dayal, A.M., Natarajan, R.Mineralogy and chemistry of Chigicherla kimberlite and its xenoliths, Anatapur District, South India.Journal of Geological Society India, Vol. 43, No. 4, April pp. 329-341.IndiaMineralogy, Deposit -Chigicherla
DS1975-0276
1976
Naterstad, J.Faerseth, R.B., Macintyre, R.M., Naterstad, J.Mesozoic Alkaline Dikes in the Sunnhordaland Region. Western Norway: Ages, Geochemistry and Regional Significance.Lithos, Vol. 9, PP. 331-345.Norway, ScandinaviaUltramafic And Related Rocks
DS1860-0520
1886
Nathan, G.S.Nathan, G.S.The Diamond Fields of South Africa (1886) Orange and Vaal riversLongmans Magazine, Vol. 8, PP. 535-546.Africa, South AfricaTravelogue, History
DS1920-0039
1920
Nathan, M.Nathan, M.The Diamond Laws of South Africa Being the Statute Laws Related to Mining and Trade in Precious Stones.Johannesburg: Central News Agency, 154P.South AfricaLaws, Kimberley
DS1992-1106
1992
Nathanail, C.P.Nathanail, C.P., Rosenbaum, M.S.The use of low cost geostatistical software in reserve estimationGeological Society Special Publication, Case histories and methods in mineral, No. 63, pp. 169-177GlobalComputer, Ore reserves, geostatistics, Program
DS201810-2319
2018
Nathwani, C.Gaudet, M., Kopylova, M., Muntener, C., Zhuk, V., Nathwani, C.Geology of the Renard 65 kimberlite pipe, Quebec, Canada.Mineralogy and Petrology, doi.org/10.1007/ s00710-018-0633-4 13p.Canada, Quebecdeposit - Renard

Abstract: Renard 65, a diamondiferous pipe in the Neoproterozoic Renard kimberlite cluster (Québec, Canada), is a steeply-dipping and downward-tapering diatreme comprised of three pipe-filling units: kimb65a, kimb65b, and kimb65d. The pipe is surrounded by a marginal and variably-brecciated country rock aureole and is crosscut by numerous hypabyssal dykes: kimb65c. Extensive petrographic and mineralogical characterization of over 700 m of drill core from four separate drill holes, suggests that Renard 65 is a Group I kimberlite, mineralogically classified as phlogopite kimberlite and serpentine-phlogopite kimberlite. Kimb65a is a massive volcaniclastic kimberlite dominated by lithic clasts, magmaclasts, and discrete olivine macrocrysts, hosted within a fine-grained diopside and serpentine-rich matrix. Kimb65b is massive, macrocrystic, coherent kimberlite with a groundmass assemblage of phlogopite, spinel, perovskite, apatite, calcite, serpentine and rare monticellite. Kimb65c is a massive, macrocrystic, hypabyssal kimberlite with a groundmass assemblage of phlogopite, serpentine, calcite, perovskite, spinel, and apatite. Kimb65d is massive volcaniclastic kimberlite with localized textures that are intermediate between volcaniclastic and coherent, with tightly packed magmaclasts separated by a diopside- and serpentine-rich matrix. Lithic clasts of granite-gneiss in kimb65a are weakly reacted, with partial melting of feldspars and crystallization of richterite and actinolite. Lithic clasts in kimb65b and kimb65d are entirely recrystallized to calcite + serpentine/chlorite + pectolite and display inner coronas of diopside-aegirine and an outer corona of phlogopite. Compositions are reported for all minerals in the groundmass of coherent kimberlites, magmaclasts, interclast matrices, and reacted lithic clasts. The Renard 65 rocks are texturally classified as Kimberley-type pyroclastic kimberlites and display transitional textures. The kimberlite units are interpreted to have formed in three melt batches based on their distinct spinel chemistry: kimb65a, kimb65b and kimb65d. We note a strong correlation between the modal abundances of lithic clasts and the textures of the kimberlites, where increasing modal abundances of granite/gneiss are observed in kimberlites with increasingly fragmental textures.
DS1990-1088
1990
National Academy PressNational Academy PressDiamond and diamond like materials: an emerging technologyNational Academy Press, Washington, D.C., GlobalDiamond synthesis, CVD.
DS200412-1411
2004
National Diamond StrategyNational Diamond StrategyNational diamond strategy: an industry response.National Diamond Strategy, March, 32p.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesLegal, policy, background, cutting industry
DS200412-1412
2004
National Diamond StrategyNational Diamond StrategyNational Diamond strategy action plan for the industry.National Diamond Strategy, 18p. August 2004.Canada, Northwest Territories, OntarioNews item - legal
DS1990-1089
1990
National Materials Advisory BoardNational Materials Advisory BoardStatus and applications of diamond and diamond like materials: an emergingtechnologyNational Academy Press, copy held Canmet, 115p. Table of contents on fileGlobalDiamond uses, Diamond synthesis
DS200512-0770
2005
National Post Business MagazineNational Post Business MagazineFlying low.... one page outline of Universal Wing Geophysics - profile of company and Buddy Doyle.National Post, May p. 11.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesNews item - geophysics
DS1900-0144
1903
National RepublicNational RepublicChinese Diamonds. #1National Republic (new York), AUG. 15TH. 1P.China, ShandongHistory, Diamond Occurrence
DS1990-1090
1990
National Research CouncilNational Research CouncilRole of fluids in crustal processesNational Academy Press, Washington, 170p. approx. $ 24.50BookBook -ad, Mantle
DS1996-1024
1996
National Research CouncilNational Research Councilhigh pressureerformance computing in seismologyNational Research Council, USA, 69pGlobalSeismology -challenges
DS1983-0475
1983
National Technical Information ServiceNational Technical Information ServiceDiamond Use in Grinding, Drilling and Machining Operations.1964-november 1982.National Technical Information Service, PB83-802173, 194P.United StatesBlank
DS1986-0592
1986
National Technical Information ServiceNational Technical Information ServiceDiamond technology 1970-August 1985 citations from EngineeringIndexDatabaseNational Technical Information Service, No. PB86-872751/XAD August 1986, 195pGlobalMethodology
DS1989-1091
1989
National Technical Information ServiceNational Technical Information ServiceMineralogical resources: remote sensing January 1972- September 1989National Technical Information Service, No. PB 90-850181, 130pGlobalBibliography
DS1989-1092
1989
National Technical Information ServiceNational Technical Information ServiceDiamond like carbon films. January 1975- March 1989.CitationsfromINSPEC.National Technical Information Service PB 89-858971/XAD, April, 105p. 148 citationsGlobalDiamond Applications, Carbon films
DS1990-1091
1990
National Technical Information ServiceNational Technical Information ServiceSemiconducting diamonds. January 1970 -January 1990Citations from Compendex database. 153 citationsNational Technical Information Service, No. PB90-857806/XAD Cost PC NO1 $ 60.00 United StatesGlobalBibliography, Semiconducting diamonds
DS1991-1217
1991
National Technical Information ServiceNational Technical Information ServiceGeographic information systems updateNational Technical Information Service, $ 60.00GlobalGIS, Bibliography
DS1994-1266
1994
National Technical Information ServiceNational Technical Information ServiceInternational land reclamation and mine drainage coneferenceInternational Conference Proceedings, 4 volumesUnited StatesBook -table of contents, Reclamation, mine drainage
DS1996-1025
1996
National Technical Information ServiceNational Technical Information ServiceEnvironment - user's guide clarifies superfund site evaluation method-hazard ranking system (EPA report)National Technical Information Service, United StatesEnvironment, Book - ad
DS1995-1876
1995
Natland, J.Taylor, B., Natland, J.Active margins and marginal basins of the western pacificAmerican Geophysical Union (AGU) Geophysical Monograph, No. 88, 410pPacific Oceanvolcanism, Arc systems, Rifting, tectonics, fluids, Table of contents
DS1985-0481
1985
Natland, J.H.Natland, J.H., Wright, E.Alkaline Volcanism in the Southwest PacificConference Report of The Meeting of The Volcanic Studies Gro, 1P. ABSTRACT.GlobalStructure
DS1997-0837
1997
Natland, J.H.Natland, J.H.At Vulcan's shoulder: James Dwight Dana and the beginnings of planetaryvolcanologyAmerican Journal of Science, Vol. 297, No. 3, March pp. 312-339GlobalProfile - Dana, Volcanology - planetary
DS2003-0420
2003
Natland, J.H.Foulger, G.R., Natland, J.H., Anderson, D.L.Iceland is fertile: the geochemistry of Icelandic lavas indicates extensive melting ofJournal of Geothermal Research, IcelandBlank
DS200412-0572
2003
Natland, J.H.Foulger, G.R., Natland, J.H., Anderson, D.L.Iceland is fertile: the geochemistry of Icelandic lavas indicates extensive melting of subducted Iapetus crust in the CaledonianJournal of Geothermal Research, Vol. June 27p.Europe, IcelandEclogite, volcanism, subduction
DS200512-0019
2005
Natland, J.H.Anderson, D.L., Natland, J.H.A brief history of the plume hypothesis and its competitors: concept and controversy.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, pp. 119-146. ( total book 861p. $ 144.00)GlobalOrigin - history
DS200512-0299
2005
Natland, J.H.Foulger, G.R., Natland, J.H., Anderson, D.L.A source for Icelandic magmas in remelted Iapetus crust.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, Vol. 141, 1-2, March 1, pp.23-44.Europe, IcelandRecycled, subduction, tectonics, plates, gechemistry
DS200512-0300
2005
Natland, J.H.Foulger, G.R., Natland, J.H., Anderson, D.L.Genesis of Iceland melt anomaly by plate tectonic processes.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, pp. 595-626. ( total book 861p. $ 144.00)Europe, IcelandTectonics - melting
DS200512-0771
2005
Natland, J.H.Natland, J.H.Layered mantle alternatives to mantle plumes: evidence from the Pacific Plate.Chapman Conference held in Scotland August 28-Sept. 1 2005, 1p. abstractMantleMantle plume
DS200512-0772
2005
Natland, J.H.Natland, J.H.Influence of eclogite in mantle sources on hot spot temperatures.Chapman Conference held in Scotland August 28-Sept. 1 2005, 1p. abstractMantle, Europe, Iceland, GreenlandMantle plume, geothermometry
DS1990-1092
1990
NatoNatoAdvances study Institute diamond and diamond like films and coatingsNational Technical Information Service, AD-A225 517, (Geological Society of Canada (GSC) Listing)GlobalDiamond synthesis, CVD.
DS1994-1267
1994
Natural Resources CanadaNatural Resources CanadaMarket trends for industrial minerals 1994Natural Resources Canada, 19pCanadaEconomics, Industrial minerals
DS2002-1125
2002
Natural Resources CanadaNatural Resources CanadaImportant notice on the Kimberley Process Certificiation Scheme for International Trade in rough diamonds.Nrcan Www.mmmsd1.mms.nrcan.gc.ca/kimberleyprocess/note_e.asp, 1/2p. overviewCanadaNews item, Kimberley Process
DS1996-1026
1996
Natural Resources forumNatural Resources forumRecent developments in a small scale mining - a report of the InternationalCommissionNatural Resources forum, Vol. 20, No. 3, Aug. pp. 215-229GlobalSmall scale mining, Overview -problems
DS1860-0096
1870
NatureNatureGeology of the Diamond Fields of South AfricaNature., Vol. 3, Nov. 3RD. PP. 2-3.Africa, South Africa, Cape ProvinceGeology
DS1860-0328
1880
NatureNatureThe Artificial Production of DiamondNature., Vol. 22, PP. 404-421.GlobalSynthetics
DS1860-0424
1884
NatureNatureDiamonds; Nature, 1884Nature, AUGUST 5TH. P. 325.Africa, South AfricaDiamond Occurrence
DS1860-0918
1896
NatureNatureLes Mines de Diamant du Cap et Au TransvaalNature, Vol. 24, PT. 2, JULY 18TH. PP. 99-100.Africa, 'South AfricaMining Engineering
DS1900-0613
1908
NatureNatureArtificial Diamonds. #3Nature., Vol. 78, P. 177.GlobalSynthesis
DS1989-1093
1989
NatureNatureBrasil walks the tightrope.A comprehensive overview of science inBrasil. Researchers and economicsNature, Vol. 342, November 23, pp. 355-374BrazilEconomics, Research overview
DS1997-0838
1997
NatureNatureMantle mineralogy: a new aluminous phase?Nature, Vol. 387, No. 6632, May 29, pp. 486-470.MantleMineralogy - aluminous
DS2001-0827
2001
NatureNatureA chip off the old continentNature, Vol. 409, No. 6817, Jan. 11, p. 175 ( 1/4p.)MantleTectonics
DS201502-0085
2015
Nature GeoscienceNature GeoscienceRussia's scientific legacy. See Feb hilight Front cover page for search stringNature Geoscience, Vol. 8, 1p.TechnologyHistory - Lomonosov University
DS201512-1954
2015
Nature GeoscienceNature GeoscienceProtect sites and samples…. Field samples.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 8, 11, p. 815.GlobalField samples
DS201705-0859
2017
Nature GeoscienceNature GeoscienceTo probe a core. Psyche spacecraft could bring a close-up view.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 10, p. 241.MantleGeodynamics
DS201809-1998
2018
Naude, N.Boshoff, E.T., Morkel, J., Naude, N.Identifying critical parameters in the settling of African kimberlites. SlurriesMineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy Review, Vol. 39, pp. 136-144.Africa, Angolamineral processing

Abstract: Kimberlite is the host rock of diamonds and varies widely in geological and mineralogical features as well as color, processing capability, and dewatering characteristics. This study investigated the dewatering behavior of problematic Angolan kimberlites. The presence of clay minerals in kimberlite causes difficulties in dewatering due to high flocculant demand, poor supernatant clarity, and low settling rates. Identifying critical parameters governing the settling behavior will assist in managing the settling behavior of different kimberlite slurries. The influence of particle size, pH of the kimberlite slurry, cation exchange capacity, exchangeable sodium percentage, and smectite content of the kimberlite on the settling rate were investigated for 18 different African kimberlite samples. The settling rate and slurry bed compaction during natural settling were also measured for the kimberlite slurries. Seventeen different Angolan clay-rich kimberlites and one South African clay-rich kimberlite were tested, and, except for two kimberlites, colloidal stability was experienced during natural settling. The pH values of the kimberlite slurries ranged between 9 and 11, which is similar to the pH band where colloidal stability was found during earlier research. The results indicate that colloidal stable slurries were experienced with kimberlites that had exchangeable sodium percentages as low as 0.7%. The cation exchange capacity of the various kimberlites differentiated more distinctly between colloidal stability and instability. A new model is proposed whereby clay-rich kimberlites with a cation exchange capacity of more than 10cmol/kg will experience colloidal stability if the pH of the solvent solution is within the prescribed pH range of 9-11.
DS201412-0615
2014
Nauheimer, G.Nauheimer, G., Fradkov, A.S., Neugebaurer, H.J.Mantle convection behaviour with segregation in the core-mantle boundary.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 23, 16, pp. 2061-2064.MantleConvection
DS201112-0605
2011
Naumann, R.Lippmann-Pipke, J., Sherwood Lollar, B., Niedermann, S., Stroncik, N.A., Naumann, R., Van Heerden, E., Onstott, T.C.Neon identifies two billion year old fluid component in Kaapvaal Craton.Chemical Geology, Vol. 283, 3-4, pp. 287-296.Africa, South AfricaGeochronology
DS201412-0275
2014
Naumchik, E.Gaubas, E., Ceponis, T., Jasiunas, A., Kalendra, V., Pavlov, J., Kazuchits, N., Naumchik, E., Rusetsky, M.Lateral scan profiles of the recombination parameters correlated with distribution of grown-in impurities in HPHT diamond.Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 47, pp. 15-26.TechnologySynthetics
DS2001-0031
2001
Naummov, V.B.Andreeva, I.A., Kovalenko, V.I., Naummov, V.B.Crystallization conditions, magma compositions, and genesis of silicate rocks Mushugai Khuduk carbonatitePetrology, Vol. 9, No. 6, pp. 489-515.Russia, MongoliaAlkaline complex, Melt inclusions
DS201012-0681
2010
Naumov, E.Seltmann, R., Solovive, S., Shatov, V., Piranjo, F., Naumov, E., Cherkasov, S.Metallogeny of Siberia: tectonic, geologic and metallogenic settings of selected significant deposits.Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 57, no. 8, pp. 655-706.Russia, SiberiaOverview ... brief mention of diamonds
DS1998-1069
1998
Naumov, G.B.Nechaev, S.V., Naumov, G.B.Zonation in distribution of mineral deposits and occurrences on the Ukrainian Shield:patterns....Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 40, No. 2, March-Apr. pp. 109-120UKraine, RussiaTectonics, paleotectonics, Metallogeny
DS1991-1635
1991
Naumov, V.Solovova, I., Girnis, A., Naumov, V., Guzhova, A.Immiscible salt and silicate melts: dat a from Micro inclusions in minerals of alkali basaltsEuropean Current Research Fluid Inclusions, Firenze, Italy April 10-12, Abstracts, ECROFI XI, p. 205RussiaCarbonatite, Fluid inclusions
DS1987-0701
1987
Naumov, V.B.Solovova, I.P., Kovalenko, V.I., Naumov, V.B., Ryabchikov, I.D.Carbon dioxide sulfide silicate inclusions in clinopyroxenes ofmantlexenolithsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 285, No. 1-6, August pp. 111-114RussiaBlank
DS1988-0607
1988
Naumov, V.B.Samoylov, V.S., Kovalenko, V.I., Ivanov, V.G., Naumov, V.B.Immiscible carbonatite phases in alkalic rocks of the Mossogay Hudagcomplex, southern MongoliaDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 294, No. 1-6, October pp. 167-169RussiaCarbonatite, Mossogay Hudag
DS1988-0652
1988
Naumov, V.B.Solovova, I.P., Kogarko, L.N., Ryabchikov, I.D., Naumov, V.B.high pressureotassium magmas of Spain and evidence of their formation depth from thermobaro geochemical data.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 303, No. 1, pp. 182-185GlobalLamproite, Geothermometry
DS1996-0035
1996
Naumov, V.B.Andryeva, I.A., Naumov, V.B., et al.Magmatic celestite in melt inclusions in apatite from the Mushugay Khuduk alkai volcano plutonic complex.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 339A, No. 9 Feb., pp. 154-159.GlobalNephelinite, melaleucite, Carbonatite
DS1997-0839
1997
Naumov, V.B.Naumov, V.B., Kovalenko, V.I., Dorofeeva, V.A.Magmatic volatile components and their role in the formation of ore formingfluidsGeology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 39, No. 6, pp. 451-460RussiaMagma, Genesis
DS1998-0030
1998
Naumov, V.B.Andreeva, I.A., Naumov, V.B., Kovalenko, V., KononkovaThe chemical composition of melt inclusions in sphene from theralites Of the Mushugai Khudak carbonatite...Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 361, No. 5, pp. 708-12.GlobalCarbonatite - genesis
DS1998-0031
1998
Naumov, V.B.Andreeva, I.A., Naumov, V.B., Kovalenko, V.I., KononkovaFluoride sulfate and chloride sulfate salt melts of carbonatite bearing complex Mushugai Khudak.Petrology, Vol. 6, No. 3, June, pp. 274-83.GlobalCarbonatite, Deposit - Mushugai Khudak
DS2001-0032
2001
Naumov, V.B.Andreeva, I.A., Kovalenko, V.I., Naumov, V.B.Crystallization conditions, magma compositions and genesis of silicate rocks of Mushugai Khuduk ...Petrology, Vol. 9, No. 6, pp. 489-515.Mongolia, southernCarbonatite bearing alkalic complex, Melt inclusions - evidence
DS2001-0033
2001
Naumov, V.B.Andreeva, I.A., Kovalenko, V.I., Naumov, V.B.Crystallization conditions, magma compositions and genesis of silicate rocks Mushugai Khuduk carbonatitePetrology, Vol. 9, No. 6, pp. 489=515.Mongolia, southernMelting, inclusions, Alkalic complex
DS2002-0895
2002
Naumov, V.B.Kovalenko, V.I., Naumov, V.B., Yarmolyuk, V.V., Dorofeeva, V.A., MigdisovBalance of H2O and Cl between the Earth's mantle and outer shellsGeochemistry International, Vol. 40, 10, Oct. pp. 943-71.MantleWater, chlorine
DS200412-0040
2004
Naumov, V.B.Andreeva, I.A., Kovalenko, V.I., Naumov, V.B., Kononkova, N.N.Composition and formation conditions of silicate and salt magmas forming the garnet syenite porphyries (Sviatonossites) of the cGeochemistry International, Vol. 42, 6, pp. 497-512.Asia, MongoliaCarbonatite, Mushagi-Khudak Complex
DS200512-1216
2004
Naumov, V.B.Yarmolyuk, V.V., Kovalenko, V.I., Naumov, V.B.Volatile component flows in the upper shells of the Earth caused by deep-seated geodynamic processes.Deep seated magmatism, its sources and their relation to plume processes., pp. 5-28.MantleGeodynamics
DS200512-1217
2005
Naumov, V.B.Yarmolyuk, V.V., Kovalenko, V.I., Naumov, V.B.Geodynamics, flows of volatile components and their exchange between the mantle and the Earth's upper shells.Geotectonics, Vol.39, 1,pp. 39-55.MantleTectonics
DS200612-0739
2006
Naumov, V.B.Kovalenko, V.I., Naumov, V.B., Girnis, A.V., Dorofeeva, V.A., Yarmolyuk, V.V.Composition and chemical structure of oceanic mantle plumes.Petrology, Vol. 14, 5, pp. 452-476.MantleGeochemistry - hot spots
DS200712-0578
2007
Naumov, V.B.Kovalenko, V.I., Naumov, V.B., Girnis, A.V., Dorofeeva, V.A., Yarmoluk, V.V.Average contents of incompatible and volatile components in depleted, oceanic plume, and within plate continental mantle types.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 445, 6, pp. DOI:10.1134/S1028334 X07060116MantleGeochemistry - plumes
DS201012-0409
2009
Naumov, V.B.Kovalenko, V.I., Naumov, V.B., Girnis, A.V., Dorofeeva, V.A., Yarmolyuk, V.V.Average compositions of magmas and mantle sources of Mid-Ocean Ridges and intraplate Oceanic and Continental settings estimated from the dat a of melt inclusionsDeep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., p.35-78,MantleGlasses of basalts
DS201012-0529
2009
Naumov, V.B.Naumov, V.B., Dorofeeva, V.A., Mironova, O.F.Principal physiochemical parameters of natural mineral forming fluids.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., p. 117-150.MantleMineral chemistry
DS201112-0549
2010
Naumov, V.B.Kovalenko, V.I., Naumov, V.B., Girnis, A.V., Dorofeeva, V.A., Yarmolyuk, V.V.Average composition of basic magmas and mantle sources of island arcs and active continental margins estimated from the dat a on melt inclusions and quenched glassesVladykin, N.V., Deep Seated Magmatism: its sources and plumes, pp. 22-53.MantlePetrology
DS201112-0725
2010
Naumov, V.B.Naumov, V.B., Kovalenker, V.A., Rusinov, V.L.Chemical composition, volatile components, and trace elements in the magmatic melt of the Kurama mining district, middle Tien Shan: evidence investigation of quartz inclusionsVladykin, N.V., Deep Seated Magmatism: its sources and plumes, pp. 75-92.ChinaGeochemistry - quartz
DS201112-0726
2011
Naumov, V.B.Naumov, V.B., Kovanenko, V.I., Dorofeeva, V.A., Girnis, A.V., Yarmolyuk,V.V.Average compositions of igneous melts from main geodynamic settings according to the investigation of melt inclusions in minerals& quenched glasses of rocks.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., pp. 171-204.MantleMelt inclusion database
DS201112-0727
2010
Naumov, V.B.Naumov, V.B., Tolstykh, M.L., Grib, E.N., Leonov, V.L., Kononkova, N.N.Chemical composition, volatile components, and trace elements in melts of the Karymskii volcanic centre, Kamchatka and Golovnin a volcano, Kunashir Island....Vladykin, N.V., Deep Seated Magmatism: its sources and plumes, pp. 104-127.RussiaMineral inclusions
DS200512-0790
2004
NaumovaNokleberg, W.J., Bararch, G.Berzin, Diggles, Hwang, Khanchuk, Miller, Naumova, Oblenskiy, Ogasawara, ParfemicDigital files for northeast Asia, geodynamics, mineral deposit location and metallogenic belt maps. stratigraphic columns, map units.U.S. Geological Survey, Open file 2004-1252Russia, ChinaMaps - geodynamics - not specific to diamonds
DS1975-1035
1979
Naumova, I.S.Golovnya, S.V., Naumova, I.S., Khvostova, V.P.Moissanite in Eclogites from Shubino, Southern UralsIzved. Akad. Nauk Sssr Geol. Ser., No. 1, PP. 118-120.RussiaMineralogy
DS1992-0055
1992
Naumova, V.V.Avchenko, O.V., Naumova, V.V.Garnet orthopyroxene geobarometersRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 33, No. 8, pp. 70-76.GlobalGeobarometry, Experimental petrology not specific to kimberlites
DS201312-0169
2013
Nauret, F.Condamine, P., Medard, E., Laporte, D., Nauret, F.Experimental melting of phlogopite peridotite at 1 Gpa - implications for potassic magmatism.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractMantleSubduction
DS1975-0585
1977
Nautiyal, S.P.Nautiyal, S.P., Jain, R.S.On the Prospect of Locating New Diamondiferous Areas in IndiIndia Geological Survey Records, Vol. 108, PT. 2, PP. 157-166.IndiaDiamond Occurrences, Prospecting
DS1983-0476
1983
Nava, S.J.Nava, S.J.New Madrid Seismic Zone: Test Case for Naturally Induced Seismicity.American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin., Vol. 67, No. 9, P. 1458. (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent
DS1982-0164
1982
Navaneetham, K.V.Das, G.R.N., Sharma, C.V., Navaneetham, K.V., Chadha, S.K.Carbonatite-alkaline Complex of MundwaraGeological Society INDIA Journal, Vol. 23, No. 12, PP. 604-609.IndiaRelated Rocks
DS202005-0728
2020
Navarro, G.R.B.Conceicao, F.T., Vasconcelos, P.M., Godoy, L.H., Navarro, G.R.B.40Ar/40Ar geochronological evidence for multiple magmatic events during the emplacement of Tapira alkaline-carbonatite complex, Minas Gerais, Brazil.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 97, 102416, 7p. PdfSouth America, Brazil, Minas Geraiscarbonatite

Abstract: The Alto Parnaíba Igneous Province (APIP) is a voluminous magmatic province composed of various alkaline-carbonatite complexes emplaced in the Brasilia Mobile Belt during the Cretaceous. Relative timing of emplacement of silicate and carbonate magmas in most of these complexes remains mostly unresolved due to conflicting geochronological results. To determine the duration of magmatism and to test the possible existence of multiple magmatic events, we employ 40Ar/39Ar phlogopite single crystal dating to determine the history of magma emplacement at the Tapira alkaline-carbonatite complex, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The new single crystal data indicate at least two magmatic events during the emplacement of this complex, the first at > 96.2 ± 0.8 Ma and the second at 79.15 ± 0.6 Ma. The first igneous event was responsible for emplacement of the silicate plutonic series, while the second event corresponds to the emplacement of primarily carbonatitic magmas, generating metasomatic phlogopite alteration in bebedourites. The ages of intrusion and cooling of the alkaline-carbonatite complexes in the APIP must be investigated in other complexes to determine if intrusion intervals of ~17 Ma or more are common regionally. Protracted intrusive events, if related to magma generation by passage of South America over a stationary Trindade plume, requires complex ponding and lateral magma flow below a slow-moving continent.
DS201907-1565
2019
Navarro, M.Oliveira, E.P., Talavera, C., Windley, B.F., Zhao, L., Semprich, J.J., McNaughton, N.J., Amaral, W.S., Sombini, G., Navarro, M., Silva, D.Mesoarchean ( 2820 Ma )high pressure mafic granulite at Uaus, Sao Francisco craton, Brazil, and its potential significance for the assembly of Archean supercraton.Precambrian Research, Vol. 331, 105266 20p.South America, Brazilcraton
DS1960-0581
1965
Nave, E.Meyer, H.O.A., Melledoe, H.J., Nave, E.Natural Irradiation Damage in Ivory Coast DiamondsNature., Vol. 206, P. 392.GlobalDiamond Genesis
DS1989-0855
1989
Navez, J.Lavreau, J., Buyagu, S., Liegeois, J.P., Navez, J.Geochemical evidence for a non-alkalic origin for the carbonatitic bodies of Kibuye, RwandaJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 9, No. 2, pp. 335-340GlobalCarbonatite, Geochemistry
DS1998-0873
1998
Navez, J.Liegeois, J.P., Navez, J., Hertogen, J., Black, R.Contrasting origin of post collisional high Potassium calc-alkaline and shoshonitic versus alkaline granitesLithos, Vol. 45, pp. 1-28.GlobalGeochemistry - sliding normalization, Shoshonites
DS1988-0497
1988
Navon, D.Navon, D., Hutcheon, I.D., Rossman, G.R., Wasserburg, G.J.Mantle derived fluids in diamond micro inclusionsNature, Vol. 335, No. 6193, pp. 784-789GlobalMantle, Diamond inclusions
DS1987-0503
1987
Navon, O.Navon, O., Hutcheon, I.D., Rossman, C.R., Wasserburg, C.J.Ultrapotassic sub-micron inclusions in diamondEos, Vol. 68, No. 44, November 3, p. 1552, abstract onlyGlobalLamproites
DS1989-0564
1989
Navon, O.Guthrie, G.D., Navon, O., Veblen, D.R.Analytical and transmission electron microscopy of turbid coateddiamondsEos, Vol. 70, No. 15, April 11, p. 510. (abstract.)GlobalMineralogy, Coated diamonds
DS1989-1094
1989
Navon, O.Navon, O.Chemical and mineralogical characterization of Micro inclusions indiamondsPh.d. Thesis California Institute Tech. Order No. da 9000588, 347pGlobalDiamond inclusions, Mineral chemistry
DS1989-1095
1989
Navon, O.Navon, O., Spettel, B., Hutcheon, I.H., Rossman, G.R, WasserburgMicro-inclusions in diamonds from Zaire and BotswanaDiamond Workshop, International Geological Congress, July 15-16th. editors, pp. 69-72. AbstractGlobalDiamond Inclusions, Diamond morphology
DS1991-0639
1991
Navon, O.Guthrie, G.D.Jr., Veblen, D.R., Navon, O., Rossman, G.R.Submicrometer fluid inclusions in turbid diamond coatsEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 105, pp. 1-12Democratic Republic of CongoDiamond morphology, Diamond inclusions
DS1991-1218
1991
Navon, O.Navon, O.Radial variation in the composition of micro-inclusions and the chemical evolution of fluids trapped in diamondsProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 307-309BotswanaDiamond morphology, Diamond inclusions, Jwaneng, analyses
DS1991-1219
1991
Navon, O.Navon, O.High internal pressures in diamond fluid inclusions determined by infraredabsorptionNature, Vol. 353, October 24, pp. 746-748GlobalDiamond morphology, Diamond inclusions
DS1991-1220
1991
Navon, O.Navon, O.Pressure -temperature -volume path of micro-inclusion bearing diamondsProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 304-306GlobalSpectroscopy, IR absorption, Diamond inclusions
DS1993-1398
1993
Navon, O.Schrauder, M., Navon, O.Solid carbon dioxide in a natural diamondNature, Vol. 365, No. 6441, September 2, pp. 42-44.GlobalDiamond morphology, Carbon dioxide
DS1994-1548
1994
Navon, O.Schrauder, M., Navon, O.Hydrous and carbonatitic mantle fluids in fibrous diamonds from Jwaneng, Botswana.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 58, No. 2, January pp. 761-771.BotswanaDiamond genesis, Diamond morphology
DS1994-1549
1994
Navon, O.Schrauder, M., Navon, O., Sizafranek, D., Kaminsky, F.V.Fluids in Yakutian and Indian kimberlitesMineralogical Magazine, Vol. 58A, pp. 813-814. AbstractRussia, Yakutia, IndiaDiamond morphology, Fluid inclusions
DS1996-1027
1996
Navon, O.Navon, O., Frey, F.A., Takazawa, E.Magma transport and metasomatism in the mantle: a critical review of current geochemical models -discAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 81, May-June pp. 754-765MantleMetasomatism, Magma transport
DS1996-1261
1996
Navon, O.Schrauder, M., Koeberl, C., Navon, O.Trace element analyses of fluid bearing diamonds from Jwaneng, BotswanaGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 60, No. 23, Dec. 1, pp. 4711-24.BotswanaGeochemistry - diamonds, Deposit - Jwaneng
DS1997-1100
1997
Navon, O.Stein, M., Navon, O., Kessel, R.Chromatographic metasomatism of the Arabian Nubian lithosphereEarth and Plan. Sci. Letters, Vol. 152, No. 1-4, pp. 75-91GlobalNubian shield, models, Metasomatism
DS1998-0669
1998
Navon, O.Izaeli, E., Schrauder, M., Navon, O.On the connection between fluid and mineral inclusions in diamonds7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 352-4.Russia, YakutiaDiamond inclusions, Deposit - Udachnaya
DS1998-0670
1998
Navon, O.Izaeli, E., Wilcock, I.C., Navon, O.Raman shifts of diamond inclusions - a possible barometer7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 355-7.GlobalDiamond inclusions, Spectroscopy
DS1998-1066
1998
Navon, O.Navon, O.Diamond formation of the earth's mantle7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 618-21.MantleDiamond genesis, carbon source, diamond inclusions, Geochronology
DS1999-0502
1999
Navon, O.Navon, O.Diamond formation in the Earth's mantle7th International Kimberlite Conference Nixon, Vol. 2, pp. 584-604.MantleDiamond genesis - source region, thermobarometry, Geochronology, nitrogen, overview
DS2003-0629
2003
Navon, O.Izraeli, E.S., Harris, J.W., Navon, O.Mineral inclusions in cloudy diamonds from Koffiefontein, South Africa8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, POSTER abstractSouth AfricaDiamonds - inclusions, Deposit - Koffiefontein
DS2003-0725
2003
Navon, O.Klein Ben David, O., Logvinova, A.M., Izraeli, E.S., Sobolev, N.V., Navon, O.Sulfide melt inclusions in Yubileinaya ( Yakutia) diamonds8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, POSTER abstractRussia, Siberia, YakutiaDiamonds - inclusions, Deposit - Yubileinaya
DS2003-0726
2003
Navon, O.Klein-BenDavid, O., Izraeli, E.S., Navon, O.Volatile rich brine and melt in Canadian diamonds8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, AbstractNorthwest TerritoriesDiamonds - melting, Deposit - Diavik
DS2003-0794
2003
Navon, O.Lensky, N.G., Niebo, R.W., Holloway, J.R., Lyakhovsky, V., Navon, O.Bubble nucleation as a trigger for xenolith entrapment in mantle melts8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 1 POSTER abstractGlobalKimberlite geology and economics
DS2003-0837
2003
Navon, O.Loginova, A.M., Klein-Ben David, O., Israeli, E.S., Navon, O., Sobolev, N.V.Micro inclusions in fibrous diamonds from Yubileinaya kimberlite pipe, Yakutia8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, POSTER abstractRussia, YakutiaDiamonds - inclusions, Deposit - Yubileinaya
DS2003-1002
2003
Navon, O.Navon, O., Izraeli, E.S., Klein-BenDavid, O.Fluid inclusions in diamonds - the carbonatitic connection8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, AbstractGlobalDiamonds - inclusions, Carbonatite
DS2003-1269
2003
Navon, O.Shiryaev, A., Izraeli, E.S., Hauri, E.., Galimov, E.M., Navon, O.Fluid inclusions in Brazilian coated diamonds8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, POSTER abstractBrazilDiamonds - inclusions
DS200412-0887
2004
Navon, O.Izraeli, E.S., Harris, J.W., Navon, O.Fluid and mineral inclusions in cloudy diamonds from Koffiefontein, South Africa.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 68, 11, pp. 2561-2575.Africa, South AfricaDiamond inclusions
DS200412-1014
2003
Navon, O.Klein-BenDavid, O., Izraeli, E.S., Navon, O.Volatile rich brine and melt in Canadian diamonds.8 IKC Program, Session 3, AbstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDiamonds - melting Deposit - Diavik
DS200412-1413
2003
Navon, O.Navon, O., Izraeli, E.S., Klein-BenDavid, O.Fluid inclusions in diamonds - the carbonatitic connection.8 IKC Program, Session 3, AbstractTechnologyDiamonds - inclusions Carbonatites
DS200512-0320
2004
Navon, O.Gazit, O., Navon, O., Halicz, L., Stein, M.The petrogenesis and thermal history of lower crustal xenoliths from Karnei-hitin, northern Israel.Israel Geological Society, p. 34. 1p. Ingenta 1045591078.Europe, IsraelGeothermometry
DS200512-0543
2004
Navon, O.Klein Ben David, O., Israeli, E.S., Wirth, R., Hauri, E., Navon, O.Brine and carbonatitic melts in a diamond from Diavik - implications for mantle fluid evolution.Israel Geological Society, p. 60. 1p. Ingenta 1045591104Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDiamond inclusions
DS200612-0712
2006
Navon, O.Klein Ben David, O., Wirth, R., Navon, O.TEM imaging and analysis of Micro inclusions in diamonds: a close look at diamond growing fluids.American Mineralogist, Vol. 91, 2/3. pp. 353-365.TechnologyMineralogy - diamond inclusions
DS200612-0714
2006
Navon, O.Klein-Ben David, O., Wirth, R., Navon, O.TEM imaging and analysis of Micro inclusions in diamonds: a close look at diamond growing fluids.American Mineralogist, Vol. 91, Feb-March, pp. 353-365.Canada, Northwest Territories, Russia, SiberiaDiamond morphology, microinclusions
DS200612-0800
2006
Navon, O.Lensky, N.G., Nicho, R.W., Holloway, J.R., Lyakhovsky, V., Navon, O.Bubble nucleation as a trigger for xenolith entrapment in mantle melts.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 245, 1-2, pp. 278-288.MantleMelting
DS200612-1286
2005
Navon, O.Shiryaev, A.A., Izraeli, E.S., Hauri, E.H., Zakharchenko, O.D., Navon, O.Chemical optical and isotopic investigation of fibrous diamonds from Brazil.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 46, 12, pp. 1185-1201.South America, BrazilDiamond morphology
DS200612-1518
2006
Navon, O.Weinstein, Y., Navon, O., Altherr, R., Stein, M.The role of lithospheric mantle heterogeneity in the generation of Plio-Pleistocene alkali basaltic suites from NW Harrat Ash Sham (Israel).Journal of Petrology, Vol. 47, 5, pp. 1017-1050.Europe, IsraelBasalts - not specific to diamonds
DS200712-0520
2007
Navon, O.Kelin-BenDavid, O., Wirth, R., Navon, O.TEM imaging and analysis of sub micrometer inclusions and dissolution cavities in diamonds: a close look into diamond growth and dissolution events.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p. 92.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200712-0521
2007
Navon, O.Kelin-BenDavid, O., Wirth, R., Navon, O.TEM imaging and analysis of sub micrometer inclusions and dissolution cavities in diamonds: a close look into diamond growth and dissolution events.Frontiers in Mineral Sciences 2007, Joint Meeting of Mineralogical societies Held June 26-28, Cambridge, Abstract Volume p. 92.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200712-0551
2007
Navon, O.Klein, Ben David, O., Izraeli, E.S., Hauri, E., Navon, O.Fluid inclusions in diamonds from the Diavik mine, Canada and the evolution of diamond forming fluids.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 71, 3, pp. 723-744.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDiavik - diamond inclusions, geochemistry
DS200712-0552
2007
Navon, O.Klein, Ben David, O., Wirth, R., Navon, O.Micrometer scale cavities in fibrous and cloudy diamonds - a glance into diamond dissolution events.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 264, 1-2, pp. 89-103.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200812-0540
2008
Navon, O.Kamenetsky, V.S., Kamenetsky, M.B., Weiss, Y., Navon, O., Nielsen, T.F.D., Mernagh, T.P.Alkali carbonates and chlorine in kimberlites from Canada and Greenland: evidence from melt inclusions and serpentine.9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractCanada, Northwest Territories, Greenland, RussiaMelting
DS200812-0587
2008
Navon, O.Kopylova, M., Navon, O., Dubrovinsky, L., Khachatryan, G.Mineralogy and natural diamond forming fluids.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A490.Africa, Democratic Republic of CongoDiamond mineralogy
DS200812-1245
2008
Navon, O.Weiss, Y., Griffin, W.L., Elhlou, S., Navon, O.Comparison between LA-ICP MS and EPMA analysis of trace elements in diamonds.Chemical Geology, Vol. 252, 3-4, pp. 158-168.TechnologyDiamond inclusions
DS200912-0404
2009
Navon, O.Kopylova, M.G., Navon, O., Dubrovisnky, L.Carbonatitic affinity of natural diamond forming fluids.37th. Annual Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, Abstracts p. 37.TechnologyDiamond morphology - cubic fibrous
DS200912-0810
2009
Navon, O.Weiss, Y., Kessel, R., Griffin, W.L., Kiflawi, I., Klein-BenDavid, O., Bell, D.R., Harris, J.W., Navon, O.A new model for the evolution of diamond forming fluids: evidence from Micro inclusion bearing diamonds from Kankan, Guinea.Lithos, In press - available 43p.Africa, GuineaDeposit - Kankan
DS201012-0361
2010
Navon, O.Kiflawi, I., Weiss, Y.,Griffin, W.L., Navon, O.EPMA, FTIR and LA ICP MS determination of the composition of fluid microinclsuions in diamonds.Goldschmidt 2010 abstracts, abstractTechnologyDiamond inclusions
DS201012-0394
2009
Navon, O.Klein-BenDavid, O., Logvinova, A.M., Schrauder, M., Spetius, Z.V., Weiss, Hauri, Kaminsky, Sobolev, Navon, O.High Mg carbonatitic Micro inclusions in some Yakutian diamonds - a new type of diamond forming fluid.Lithos, Vol. 112 S pp. 648-659.RussiaMineral chemistry - end member
DS201012-0402
2010
Navon, O.Kopylova, M., Navon, O., Dubrovinsky, L., Khachatryan, G.Carbonatitic mineralogy of natural diamond forming fluids.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 291, 1-4, pp. 126-137.MantleCarbonatite
DS201012-0530
2010
Navon, O.Navon, O., Weiss, Y., Griffin, W.L.Sources of diamond forming fluids.Goldschmidt 2010 abstracts, abstractTechnologyDiamond genesis
DS201012-0840
2010
Navon, O.Weiss, Y., Kiflawi, I., Navon, O.IR spectroscopy: quantitative determination of the mineralogy and bulk composition of fluid Micro inclusions in diamonds.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 667.TechnologyIR - diamond inclusions
DS201012-0841
2010
Navon, O.Weiss, Y., Kiflawi, I., Navon, O.IR spectrocopy: quantitative determination of the mineralogy and bulk composition of fluid Micro inclusions in diamonds.Chemical Geology, Vol. 275, pp. 26-34.TechnologyIR absorption, HDF
DS201012-0842
2010
Navon, O.Weiss, Y., Navon, O., Griffin, W.L.Fibrous diamonds.Goldschmidt 2010 abstracts, abstractTechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201112-0468
2011
Navon, O.Ittai, K., Lyakovsky, V., Navon, O.Bubble growth in visco-elastic magma: implications to magma fragmentation and bubble nuceation.Bulletin Volcanology, Vol. 73, pp. 39-54.MantleMagmatism
DS201112-0518
2011
Navon, O.Kiflawi, I., Weiss, Y., Griffin, W.L., Navon, O.Fluid inclusions in octahedral diamonds.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1182.Africa, South Africa, GuineaFinsch, Kankan
DS201112-0728
2011
Navon, O.Navon, O., Griffin, W.L., Weiss, Y.Table vs bench trace elements in fibrous diamonds.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1528.TechnologyDiamond morphology - high density fluids
DS201112-0979
2011
Navon, O.Smith, E.M., Kopylova, M.G., Dubrovinsky, L., Navon, O., Ryder, J.E., Tomlinson, L.Transmission X-ray diffraction as a new tool for diamond fluid inclusion studies.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 75, 5, Oct. pp. 2657-2675.Africa, Democratic Republic of Congo, Canada, Ontario, Wawa, Northwest Territories, NunavutDeposit - Mbuji-Mayi, Wawa, Panda, Jericho
DS201112-1109
2011
Navon, O.Weiss, Y., Griffin, W.L., Bell, D.R., Navon, O.High Mg carbonatitic HDFs, kimberlites and SCLM.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.2143.RussiaFibrous diamonds
DS201212-0355
2012
Navon, O.Kiflawi, I.,Weiss, Y., Navon, O.The IR absorption spectrum of water in Micro inclusions in diamonds.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractAfrica, Lesotho, Canada, Northwest Territories, RussiaDiamond inclusions
DS201212-0431
2012
Navon, O.Maimon, O., Lyakhovsky, V., Melnik, O., Navon, O.The propagation of a dyke driven by gas saturated magma.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 189, 2, pp. 956-966.MantleDykes
DS201212-0511
2012
Navon, O.Navon, O., Griffin, W.L., Weiss, Y.Tables vs "benchs": trace elements in fibrous diamonds,10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractGlobalDiamonds - fibrous
DS201212-0767
2012
Navon, O.Weiss, Y., Griffin, W.L., Bell, D.R., Navon, O.High Mg carbonatitic HDFS, kimberlites and the SCLM.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractMantleCarbonatite
DS201212-0768
2012
Navon, O.Weiss, Y., Kiflawi, I., Griffin, W.L.,Navon, O.Fluid Micro inclusions in monocrystalline diamonds.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractRussiaDeposit - Yakutia
DS201312-0961
2013
Navon, O.Weiss, Y., Griffin, W.L., Navon, O.Diamond forming fluids in fibrous diamonds: the trace element perspective.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 376, pp. 110-125.Canada, Northwest Territories, Africa, Guinea, South AfricaHDFs
DS201312-0962
2013
Navon, O.Weiss, Y., Griffin, W.L., Navon, O.Diamond - forming fluids: the trace element perspective.Goldschmidt 2013, 1p. AbstractMantleHDF, planed, ribbed
DS201312-0963
2013
Navon, O.Weiss, Y., Kiflawi, I., Navon, O.The IR absorption spectrum of water in microinclusion-bearing diamonds.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 1, Special Issue of the Journal of the Geological Society of India,, Vol. 1, pp. 271-280.TechnologyDiamond inclusions
DS201412-0972
2014
Navon, O.Weiss, Y., Kiflawi, I., Davies, N., Navon, O.High density fluids and the growth of monocrystalline diamonds.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 141, pp. 145-159.Africa, South Africa, GuineaDiamond morphology
DS201505-0241
2015
Navon, O.Elazar, O., Kessel, R., Navon, O.Fluids and melts in equlibrium with carbonated hydrous eclogite system at 4-6 Gpa and 900-1200 C.Israel Geological Society, Abstracts 1p.TechnologyEclogite
DS201505-0242
2015
Navon, O.Jablon, M., Navon, O.The role of high density Micro inclusion fluids in the growth of monocrystalline diamonds.Israel Geological Society, Abstracts 1p.Africa, Guinea, South AfricaFibrous diamonds
DS201505-0244
2015
Navon, O.Navon, O.Granulitic xenoliths and the formation of the lower crust below southern Syria and northern Israel and Jordan.Israel Geological Society, Abstracts 1p.Europe, Syria, Israel, JordanMineralogy
DS201605-0878
2016
Navon, O.Navon, O.The formation of fibrous and monocrystalline lithospheric diamonds.DCO Edmonton Diamond Workshop, June 8-10TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201704-0642
2017
Navon, O.Navon, O., Wirth, R., Schmidt, C., Matat Jabion, B., Schreiber, A., Emmanuel, S.Solid molecular nitrogen ( delta -N2) inclusions in Juin a diamonds: exsolution at the base of the transition zone.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 464, pp. 237-247.South America, BrazilDeposit - Juina
DS201708-1721
2017
Navon, O.Navon, O.Solid molecular nitrogen (N2) inclusions in Juin a diamonds: exsolution at the base of the transition zone.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, OralSouth America, Brazildeposit - Juina

Abstract: Diamonds originating from the transition zone or lower mantle were previously identified based on the chemistry of their silicate or oxide mineral inclusions. Here we present data for such a super-deep origin based on the internal pressure of nitrogen in sub-micrometer inclusions in diamonds from Juina, Brazil. Infrared spectroscopy of four diamonds, rich in such inclusions revealed high concentrations of fully aggregated nitrogen (average of 900 ppm, all in B centers) and almost no platelets. Raman spectroscopy indicated the presence of solid, cubic d-N2 at 10.9±0.2 GPa (corresponding to a density of 1900 kg/m3). Transmission electron microscopy of two diamonds found two generations of octahedral inclusions: microinclusions (average size: 150 nm, average concentration: 100 ppm) and nanoinclusions (20–30 nm, 350 ppm). EELS detected nitrogen and a diffraction pattern of one nanoinclusion yielded a tetragonal phase, which resembles ?-N2 with a density of 1400 kg/m3 (internal pressure = 2.7 GPa). We also observed up-warping of small areas (~150 nm in size) on the polished surface of one diamond. The ~2 nm rise can be explained by a shallow subsurface microinclusion, pressurized internally to more than 10 GPa. Using available equations of state for nitrogen and diamond, we calculated the pressures and temperatures of mechanical equilibrium of the inclusions and their diamond host at the mantle geotherm. The inclusions originated at the deepest part of the transition zone at pressures of ~22 GPa (630 km) and temperatures of ~1640?°C. We suggest that both generations are the result of exsolution of nitrogen from B centers and that growth took a few million years in a subducting mantle current. The microinclusions nucleated first, followed by the nanoinclusions. Shortly after the exsolution events, the diamonds were trapped in a plume or an ascending melt and were transported to the base of the lithosphere and later to the surface.
DS201708-1722
2017
Navon, O.Navon, O.The chemical and isotopic composition of Diavik fibrous diamonds and their microinclusions.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, PosterCanada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Diavik
DS201804-0722
2018
Navon, O.Navon, O.Diamond forming fluids.4th International Diamond School: Diamonds, Geology, Gemology and Exploration Bressanone Italy Jan. 29-Feb. 2nd., pp. 30-32. abstractTechnologydiamond inclusions
DS201805-0992
2018
Navon, O.Weiss, Y., Navon, O., Goldstein, S.L., Harris, J.W.Inclusions in diamonds constrain thermo-chemical conditions during Mesozoic metasomatism of the Kaapvaal cratonic mantle.Earth Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 491, pp. 134-147.Africa, South Africadeposit - De Beers-Pool

Abstract: Fluid/melt inclusions in diamonds, which were encapsulated during a metasomatic event and over a short period of time, are isolated from their surrounding mantle, offering the opportunity to constrain changes in the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) that occurred during individual thermo-chemical events, as well as the composition of the fluids involved and their sources. We have analyzed a suite of 8 microinclusion-bearing diamonds from the Group I De Beers Pool kimberlites, South Africa, using FTIR, EPMA and LA-ICP-MS. Seven of the diamonds trapped incompatible-element-enriched saline high density fluids (HDFs), carry peridotitic mineral microinclusions, and substitutional nitrogen almost exclusively in A-centers. This low-aggregation state of nitrogen indicates a short mantle residence times and/or low mantle ambient temperature for these diamonds. A short residence time is favored because, elevated thermal conditions prevailed in the South African lithosphere during and following the Karoo flood basalt volcanism at ~180 Ma, thus the saline metasomatism must have occurred close to the time of kimberlite eruptions at ~85 Ma. Another diamond encapsulated incompatible-element-enriched silicic HDFs and has 25% of its nitrogen content residing in B-centers, implying formation during an earlier and different metasomatic event that likely relates to the Karoo magmatism at ca. 180 Ma. Thermometry of mineral microinclusions in the diamonds carrying saline HDFs, based on Mg-Fe exchange between garnet-orthopyroxene (Opx)/clinopyroxene (Cpx)/olivine and the Opx-Cpx thermometer, yield temperatures between 875-1080?°C at 5 GPa. These temperatures overlap with conditions recorded by touching inclusion pairs in diamonds from the De Beers Pool kimberlites, which represent the mantle ambient conditions just before eruption, and are altogether lower by 150-250?°C compared to P-T gradients recorded by peridotite xenoliths from the same locality. Oxygen fugacity differs as well. The calculated for the saline HDF compositions (to -1.34) are higher by about a log unit compared with that recorded by xenoliths at 4-7 GPa. We conclude that enriched saline HDFs mediated the metasomatism that preceded Group I kimberlite eruptions in the southwestern Kaapvaal craton, and that their ‘cold and oxidized’ nature reflects their derivation from a deep subducting slab. This event had little impact on the temperature and redox state of the Kaapvaal lithosphere as a reservoir, however, it likely affected its properties along limited metasomatized veins and their wall rock. To reconcile the temperature and oxygen fugacity discrepancy between inclusions in diamonds and xenoliths, we argue that xenoliths did not equilibrate during the last saline metasomatic event or kimberlite eruption. Thus the P-T-gradients they record express pre-existing lithospheric conditions that were likely established during the last major thermal event in the Kaapvaal craton (i.e. the Karoo magmatism at ca. 180 Ma).
DS201807-1518
2018
Navon, O.Navon, O., Stachel, T., Stern, R.A., Harris, J.W.Carbon and nitrogen systematics in nitrogen-rich, ultradeep diamonds from Sao Luiz, Brazil.Mineralogy and Petrology, 10.1007/ s710-018-0576 -9, 10p.South America, Brazildeposit - Sao Luiz

Abstract: Three diamonds from Sao Luiz, Brazil carrying nano- and micro-inclusions of molecular d-N2 that exsolved at the base of the transition zone were studied for their C and N isotopic composition and the concentration of N utilizing SIMS. The diamonds are individually uniform in their C isotopic composition and most spot analyses yield d13C values of -3.2?±?0.1‰ (ON-SLZ-390) and?-?4.7?±?0.1‰ (ON-SLZ-391 and 392). Only a few analyses deviate from these tight ranges and all fall within the main mantle range of -5?±?3‰. Most of the N isotope analyses also have typical mantle d15N values (-6.6?±?0.4‰, -3.6?±?0.5‰ and?-?4.1?±?0.6‰ for ON-SLZ-390, 391 and 392, respectively) and are associated with high N concentrations of 800-1250 atomic ppm. However, some N isotopic ratios, associated with low N concentrations (<400 ppm) and narrow zones with bright luminescence are distinctly above the average, reaching positive d15N values. These sharp fluctuations cannot be attributed to fractionation. They may reflect arrival of new small pulses of melt or fluid that evolved under different conditions. Alternatively, they may result from fractionation between different growth directions, so that distinct d15N values and N concentrations may form during diamond growth from a single melt/fluid. Other more continuous variations, in the core of ON-SLZ-390 or the rim of ON-SLZ-392 may be the result of Rayleigh fractionation or mixing.
DS201809-2018
2018
Navon, O.Elazar, O., Kessel, R., Huang, J-X., Navon, O.Silicic fluid Micro inclusions in a metasomatised eclogite from Roberts Victor.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractAfrica, South AfricaDeposit - Roberts Victor

Abstract: We report preliminary results of a systematic search for fluid/melt microinclusions in mantle minerals. “Dusty” garnets from xenolith XRV6 [1], a heavily metasomatised Type I eclogite from Roberts Victor mine, SA, carry many microinclusions (<1 µm). FTIR analyses of "dusty" zones indicate the presence of molecular water in the inclusions and hydroxyl groups in the garnet. EPMA analysis of 136 microinclusions constrains the bulk composition of the microinclusions. Compared to the host garnet, they are enriched in TiO2, FeO, CaO, Na2O and K2O and depleted in Al2O3 and MgO. The silica contents seem to be similar to that of the host garnet. Figure 1: a. Backscatter image of the microinclusions in XRV6 garnet. b. K2O vs. MgO of the clear garnet (red) and the microinclusions (+ their surrounding garnet, blue). Most of the elements form compositional mixing arrays of microinclusion+garnet (Fig. 1b). The arrays trend away from the compositions of large melt pools or secondary minerals found in the xenolith. They point towards the array of silicic to low-Mg carbonatitic high density fluids (HDFs) trapped in diamonds, indicating the role of such fluids in mantle metasomatism.
DS201809-2074
2018
Navon, O.Navon, O., Elazar, O., Kessel, R.Mantle metasomatism and diamond bearing fluids. BultfonteinGoldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractMantlecarbon

Abstract: Diamonds and the fluids that form them are important players in the deep carbon cycle that transforms carbon between mantle and surface reservoirs. However, the role of the high-density fluids (HDFs) that are found in microinclusions in diamonds is not limited to diamond formation. Examination of literature data on metasomatized rocks suggests that some may have formed by interaction of peridotites and eclogites with HDF-like melts. For example, silicic HDFs can explain the evoltion of an orthopyroxenerich vein in a garnet hartzburgite from Bulfontein,SA [1]. The composition that was added to the harzburgite and turned it into an orthopyroxene+olivine+phlogopite+garnet+carbonate +sulfide vein (green ellipse in the figure) lies at the extention of the array of silicic to low-Mg carbonatitic HDFs found in fibrous diamonds (pink diamonds). A silicic HDF (blue diamond) that contributed the added component would evolve into more carbonatitic compositions (arrow). Saline melts found in diamonds carry chloride, carbonate and silicate components, similar to saline hydrous fluids found in harzburgites xenoliths from Pinatubo, Phillipeens [2]. The higher water content in Pinatubo is, most probably, the result of lower temperatures and shallower level, but it attests for the role of saline fluids in metasomatism at the arc environment. In a companion abstract (Elazar et al., this volume) we report the finding of potassium-rich microinclusions in garnets in an eclogite xenolith from Robert Victor, SA. Their composition falls close to that of silicic to low-Mg carbonatitic HDFs in diamonds. Their lower potassium and higher aluminum content suggests derivation by higher degree of partial melting compared with the diamond forming fluids. All of the above observations support the important role of HDF-like melts and fluids in mantle processes.
DS201901-0081
2018
Navon, O.Stachel, T., Luth, R.W., Navon, O.Diamond precipitation from high-density CHO fluids.Gems & Gemology, Sixth International Gemological Symposium Vol. 54, 3, 1p. Abstract p. 271-2.Globaldiamond inclusions

Abstract: Through research on inclusions in diamonds over the past 50 years, a detailed picture has emerged of the mineralogical and chemical composition of diamond substrates in Earth’s mantle and of the pressure-temperature conditions during diamond formation. The exact diamond-forming processes, however, are still a subject of debate. One approach to constrain diamond-forming processes is through model calculations that aim to obtain the speciation and the carbon content of carbon-hydrogen-oxygen (CHO) fluids at particular O/(O+H) ratios and pressure-temperature conditions (using GFluid of Zhang and Duan, 2010, or other thermodynamic models of fluids). The predictions of such model calculations can then be tested against carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes and nitrogen content fractionation models, based on in situ analyses across homogenously grown diamond growth layers. Based on this approach, Luth and Stachel (2014) proposed that diamond precipitation occurs predominantly from cooling or ascending CHO fluids, composed of water with minor amounts of CO2 and CH4 (which in response to decreasing temperature may react to form diamond: CO2+ CH4 ? 2C + 2H2O). The second approach focuses on constraining the diamondforming medium by studying submicrometer fluid inclusions in fibrous-clouded and, more recently, gem diamonds. Such studies established the presence of four compositional end members of inclusions: hydrous-saline, hydrous-silicic, high-Mg carbonatitic, and low-Mg carbonatitic (e.g., Navon et al., 1988; Weiss et al., 2009). Although these fluid inclusions only depict the state of the diamond-forming medium after formation, they nevertheless provide unique insights into the major and trace-element composition of such fluids that otherwise could not be obtained. The apparent dichotomy between the two approaches—models for pure CHO fluids and actual observation of impure fluids (socalled high-density fluids) in clouded and fibrous diamonds—relates to the observation that in high-pressure and high-temperature experiments close to the melting temperature of mantle rocks, hydrous fluids contain 10–50% dissolved solid components (e.g., Kessel et al., 2015). Although at this stage the impurity content in natural CHO fluids cannot be included in numerical models, the findings for clouded and fibrous diamonds are not in conflict with the isochemical diamond precipitation model. Specifically, the fact that observed high-density inclusions are often carbonate bearing is not in conflict with the relatively reducing redox conditions associated with the O/(O+H) ratios of modeled diamond-forming CHO fluids. The model for the minimum redox stability of carbonate - bearing melts of Stagno and Frost (2010) permits fluid carbonate contents of up to about 30% at such redox conditions. Although additional data need to be obtained to build a thermodynamic model for CHO fluids with dissolved silicates and to better characterize the major and trace-element composition of high-density CHO fluids in equilibrium with typical diamond substrates (the rock types peridotite and eclogite), we already see sufficient evidence to suggest that the two approaches described above are converging to a unified model of isochemical diamond precipitation from cooling or ascending high-density CHO fluids.
DS201904-0731
2019
Navon, O.Elazar, O., Frost, D., Navon, O., Kessel, R.Melting H2O and CO2 bearing eclogite at 4-6 GPa and 900-1200 C: implications for the generation of diamond forming fluids.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, in press available 47p.Mantlemelting, subduction
DS201906-1290
2019
Navon, O.Elazar, O., Frost, D., Navon, O., Kessel, R.Melting H2O and CO2 bearing eclogite at 4-6 Gpa and 900-1200C: implications for the generation of diamond forming fluids.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 255, pp. 69-87.Mantlediamond genesis

Abstract: Eclogites play a significant role in geodynamic processes, transferring large amounts of basaltic material and volatiles (chiefly CO2 and H2O species) into the earth's mantle via subduction. Previous studies of eclogite melting focused on two end member systems: either carbonated or hydrous eclogites. Here we focus on the hydrous carbonated eclogitic system in order to define the position of its solidus and determine the near solidus fluid and melt compositions at 4-6?GPa and 900-1200?°C. Experiments were performed on a rocking multi-anvil press. The total dissolved solids in the equilibrated fluids were analyzed following the cryogenic technique using a LA-ICP-MS. H2O and CO2 content were determined by mass balance calculations. Solid phases were chemically characterized using an EPMA. Garnet and clinopyroxene are present in all experiments, assembling the eclogitic rock. A carbonate phase was detected at all temperatures at 4?GPa and at temperatures below 1200?°C at 5 and 6?GPa. Coesite was observed at all pressures below 1200?°C. The solidus was crossed between 1000 and 1100?°C at 4 and 5?GPa. At 6?GPa we observed a relatively smooth decrease in the H2O and CO2 content of the fluid phase with rising temperature, suggesting the presence of a supercritical fluid. The second critical endpoint is thus defined in this system at ~5.5?GPa and 1050?°C. The composition of fluids and melts reported in this study indicates that the hydrous carbonated eclogite system is a plausible source-rock for high density fluids (HDFs) found in microinclusions in diamonds, specifically for the intermediate compositions along the array spanned between low-Mg carbonatitic HDFs and hydrous-silicic ones. Our results suggest that the whole array reflects melting in a heterogeneous mantle. Melting of water-rich eclogite produces silicic HDFs, carbonate-rich zones will produce carbonatitc HDFs, while source-rocks with varying H2O/CO2 ratios produce intermediate compositions.
DS201912-2825
2020
Navon, O.Shirey, S.B., Smit, K.V., Pearson, D.G., Walter, M.J., Aulbach, S., Brenker, F.E., Bureau, H., Burnham, A.D., Cartigny, P., Chacko, T., Frost, D.J., Hauri, E.H., Jacob, D.E., Jacobsen, S.D., Kohn, S.C., Luth, R.W., Mikhail, S., Navon, O., Nestola, F., NimDiamonds and the mantle geodynamics of carbon: deep mantle carbon and evolution from the diamond record.IN: Deep carbon: past to present, Orcutt, Daniel, Dasgupta eds., pp. 89-128.Mantlegeodynamics

Abstract: The science of studying diamond inclusions for understanding Earth history has developed significantly over the past decades, with new instrumentation and techniques applied to diamond sample archives revealing the stories contained within diamond inclusions. This chapter reviews what diamonds can tell us about the deep carbon cycle over the course of Earth’s history. It reviews how the geochemistry of diamonds and their inclusions inform us about the deep carbon cycle, the origin of the diamonds in Earth’s mantle, and the evolution of diamonds through time.
DS202001-0039
2020
Navon, O.Shirey, S.B., Smit, K.V., Pearson, D.G., Walter, M.J., Aulbach, S., Brenker, F.E., Bureau, H., Burnham, A.D., Cartigny, P., Chacko, T., Frost, D.J., Hauri, E.H., Jacob, D.E., Jacobsen, S.D., Kohn, S.C., Luth, R.W., Mikhail, S., Navon, O., Nestola, F., NimDiamonds and mantle geodynamics of carbon: IN: Deep Carbon: past to present. Editors Orcutt, Danielle, Dasgupta, pp. 89-128.Mantlegeodynamics

Abstract: The science of studying diamond inclusions for understanding Earth history has developed significantly over the past decades, with new instrumentation and techniques applied to diamond sample archives revealing the stories contained within diamond inclusions. This chapter reviews what diamonds can tell us about the deep carbon cycle over the course of Earth’s history. It reviews how the geochemistry of diamonds and their inclusions inform us about the deep carbon cycle, the origin of the diamonds in Earth’s mantle, and the evolution of diamonds through time.
DS202004-0519
2020
Navon, O.Howell, D., Stachel, T., Stern, R.A., Pearson, D.G., Nestola, F., Hardman, M.F., Harris, J.W., Jaques, A.L., Shirery, S.B., Cartigny, P., Smit, K.V., Aulbach, S., Brenker, F.E., Jacob, D.E., Thomassot, E., Walter, M.J., Navon, O.Deep carbon through time: Earth's diamond record and its implications for carbon cycling and fluid speciation in the mantle.(peridotite and eclogite used)Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 275, pp. 99-122.Mantlecarbon

Abstract: Diamonds are unrivalled in their ability to record the mantle carbon cycle and mantle fO2 over a vast portion of Earth’s history. Diamonds’ inertness and antiquity means their carbon isotopic characteristics directly reflect their growth environment within the mantle as far back as ~3.5 Ga. This paper reports the results of a thorough secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) carbon isotope and nitrogen concentration study, carried out on fragments of 144 diamond samples from various locations, from ~3.5 to 1.4 Ga for P [peridotitic]-type diamonds and 3.0 to 1.0 Ga for E [eclogitic]-type diamonds. The majority of the studied samples were from diamonds used to establish formation ages and thus provide a direct connection between the carbon isotope values, nitrogen contents and the formation ages. In total, 908 carbon isotope and nitrogen concentration measurements were obtained. The total d¹³C data range from -17.1 to -1.9 ‰ (P = -8.4 to -1.9 ‰; E = -17.1 to -2.1‰) and N contents range from 0 to 3073 at. ppm (P = 0 to 3073 at. ppm; E = 1 to 2661 at. ppm). In general, there is no systematic variation with time in the mantle carbon isotope record since > 3 Ga. The mode in d¹³C of peridotitic diamonds has been at -5 (±2) ‰ since the earliest diamond growth ~3.5 Ga, and this mode is also observed in the eclogitic diamond record since ~3 Ga. The skewness of eclogitic diamonds’ d¹³C distributions to more negative values, which the data establishes began around 3 Ga, is also consistent through time, with no global trends apparent. No isotopic and concentration trends were recorded within individual samples, indicating that, firstly, closed system fractionation trends are rare. This implies that diamonds typically grow in systems with high excess of carbon in the fluid (i.e. relative to the mass of the growing diamond). Any minerals included into diamond during the growth process are more likely to be isotopically reset at the time of diamond formation, meaning inclusion ages would be representative of the diamond growth event irrespective of whether they are syngenetic or protogenetic. Secondly, the lack of significant variation seen in the peridotitic diamonds studied is in keeping with modeling of Rayleigh isotopic fractionation in multicomponent systems (RIFMS) during isochemical diamond precipitation in harzburgitic mantle. The RIFMS model not only showed that in water-maximum fluids at constant depths along a geotherm, fractionation can only account for variations of <1‰, but also that the principal d¹³C mode of -5 ± 1‰ in the global harzburgitic diamond record occurs if the variation in fO2 is only 0.4 log units. Due to the wide age distribution of P-type diamonds, this leads to the conclusion that the speciation and oxygen fugacity of diamond forming fluids has been relatively consistent. The deep mantle has therefore generated fluids with near constant carbon speciation for 3.5 Ga.
DS201809-2112
2018
Navon, O..Weiss,Y., Navon, O.., Goldstein, S.L., Harris, J.W.Inclusions in diamonds constrain thermo-chemical conditions of the Kaapvaal cratonic mantle.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractAfrica, South Africadeposit - De Beers Pool

Abstract: Mineral and fluid/melt inclusions in diamonds, which are encapsulated and isolated during a metasomatic event, offer the opportunity to constrain changes in the sub-continental lithospheric mantle that occurred during individual thermochemical events. Fibrous diamonds from the Group I De Beers Pool kimberlites, South Africa (SA), trapped incompatibleelement enriched saline high-density fluids (HDFs) and peridotitic mineral microinclusions. Their substitutional nitrogen resides almost exclusively in A-centers. With regard to the elevated thermal conditions that prevailed in the SA lithosphere during and following Karoo volcanism at ~180 Ma, this low-aggregation state of nitrogen suggests a short mantle residence time, constraining the time of saline metasomatism to be close to the eruption of the kimberlites at ~85 Ma. Thermometry of mineral microinclusions yield temperatures between 875-1080 ºC (at 5 GPa). These temperatures overlap with conditions recorded by touching inclusion pairs, which represent the mantle ambient conditions just before eruption, and are altogether lower by 150-250°C compared to P-T gradients recorded by peridotite xenoliths from the same locality. In addition, the oxygen fugacity calculated for the saline HDF compositions (?log??O2(FMQ) = -2.5 to -1.3) are higher by about a log unit compared with that recorded by xenoliths at 4-7 GPa. We conclude that enriched saline HDFs mediated the metasomatism that preceded Group I kimberlite eruptions in the southwestern Kaapvaal craton, and that their ‘cold and oxidized’ nature reflects their derivation from a deep subducting slab. To reconcile the temperature and oxygen fugacity discrepancy between inclusions in diamonds and xenoliths, we argue that xenoliths did not equilibrate during the last saline metasomatic event or kimberlite eruption. Thus the P-T-??O2 gradients they record express pre-existing lithospheric conditions that were likely established during the last major thermal event in the Kaapvaal craton (i.e. the Karoo magmatism at ca. 180 Ma).
DS201606-1086
2016
Navotsky, A.Feng, D., Maram, P.S., Mielewczyk-Gryn, A., Navotsky, A.Thermochemistry of rare earth perovskites Na3xRE.067-xTiO3 ( Re=La, Ce)American Mineralogist, Vol. 101, 5, pp. 1125-1128.TechnologyPerovskite
DS1989-1096
1989
Navrotsky, A.Navrotsky, A., Weidner, D.J.Perovskite: a structure of great interest to geophysics and materialscienceAmerican Geophysical Union (AGU) Geophysical Monograph Series, No. GM 45, 146p. ISBN 0-87590-071-2 @ 27.00GlobalPerovskite, Geophysics
DS1990-1093
1990
Navrotsky, A.Navrotsky, A.Thermochemistry of lower mantle phasesV.m. Goldschmidt Conference Held May 2-4, 1990, Program And Abstract, p. 68. Abstract onlyGlobalMantle, Geochemistry
DS1993-1113
1993
Navrotsky, A.Navrotsky, A.How much do we know about mantle thermochemistry?Science, Vol. 261, July 9, pp. 168-169.MantleGeochronology, Geophysical report card
DS1994-1268
1994
Navrotsky, A.Navrotsky, A.Physics and chemistry of earth materialsCambridge Press, 430p. approx. $ 35.00 paperbackGlobalBook -ad, Physics, chemistry
DS1998-1067
1998
Navrotsky, A.Navrotsky, A.Thermodynamics of high pressure phasesReviews in Mineralogy, Vol. 37, pp. 319-342.MantleMineralogy, Petrology - experimental
DS201606-1117
2016
Navrotsky, A.Shivaramaiah, R., Anderko, A., Riman, R.E., Navrotsky, A.Thermodynamics of Bastnaesite: a major rare earth mineral.American Mineralogist, Vol. 101, 5, pp. 1129-1134.TechnologyBastanesite

Abstract: Bastnaesite, [RE-CO3-OH/F] (RE = rare earth) is one of the major sources of rare earth elements found in commercial deposits at Mountain Pass, California, Bayan Obo, China, and elsewhere. Synthetic forms of bastnaesite have been explored for applications including optical devices and phosphors. Determination of thermodynamic properties of these phases is critical for understanding their origin, mining, and processing. We report the first experimental determination of formation enthalpies of several OH and F bastnaesites based on high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry of well-characterized synthetic samples. The formation enthalpies from binary oxides and fluorides for all the bastnaesite samples are highly exothermic, consistent with their stability in the garnet zone of the Earth’s crust. Fluoride bastnaesite, which is more abundant in nature than its hydroxide counterpart, is thermodynamically more stable. For both OH and F bastnaesite, the enthalpy of formation becomes more negative with increasing ionic radius of the RE3+ cation. This periodic trend is also observed among rare earth phosphates and several other rare earth ternary oxides. For a given RE, the formation enthalpies from binary oxides are more negative for orthophosphates than for bastnaesites, supporting the argument that monazite could have formed by reaction of bastnaesite and apatite at high temperature. The difference in formation enthalpy of monazite and bastnaesite provides insight into energetics of such reactions along the rare earth series.
DS201707-1352
2017
Nayak, B.Nayak, B., Meyer, F.M.Manganilmenite in the magnetite ore body from Pokphur area of Nagaland, north east India and the possibility of microdiamonds in the ophiolites of Indo-Myanmar rangens.Current Science, Vol. 112, 1, pp. 155-160.Indiamineralogy

Abstract: Manganilmenite is found to be associated with the magnetite ore body of Pokphur area in the Nagaland ophiolites, North East India. There is perhaps no earlier description of the mineral from the Indian subcontinent. It occurs as an accessory mineral with magnetite and Fe-chlorite (chamosite). Electron probe micro-analytical data reveal that the mineral contains 5.6–8.5 wt% MnO and traces of MgO, ZnO and Cr2O3, while the TiO2 content remains within narrow limits of 50–53 wt%. The calculated pyrophanite end-member varies from 13% to 18%. Although the magnetite body of Pokphur has been reasonably proved to be a hydrothermally altered product of basic and ultrabasic igneous rocks, and most of the minerals in the magnetite body are supergene in nature, different end-member compositions of mangan–ilmenite indicate that it has originally crystallized with the basic suite of rocks and has survived the alteration process with only marginal effects. Since manganilmenite has been considered as a diamond indicator mineral and ophiolites are a newly documented host of microdiamonds elsewhere in the world, the presence of manganilmenite in the Pokphur magnetite hints towards occurrence of microdiamonds in the ophiolite suite of rocks of the Indo-Myanmar ranges.
DS1988-0498
1988
Nayak, S.S.Nayak, S.S., Viswanathan, C.V.K., Reddy, T.A.K., Rao, B.K.N.New find of kimberlitic rocks in Andhra Pradesh near Maddur,MahaboobnagarDistrictJournal of Geological Society India, Vol. 31, No. 3, March pp. 343-346IndiaBlank
DS1991-1221
1991
Nayak, S.S.Nayak, S.S.Assessment of Diamondiferous gravels in Valadikottapalem Block of Chandralapadu area, Krishna District, Andhra Pradesh.Records Geological Survey of India, Vol. 124, pt. 5, pp. 47-49.IndiaAlluvials, Diamonds
DS1999-0503
1999
Nayak, S.S.Nayak, S.S., Kudari, S.A.D.Search for kimberlites in Kalyandurg block, Anantapur district, Andhra Pradesh and Bellary and Tumkur districts.Geological Society of India Records, Vol. 132,5, pp.35-39.India, KarnatakaKimberlite
DS200412-1067
2001
Nayak, S.S.Kumar, A., Gopalan, K., Rao, K.R.P., Nayak, S.S.Rb Sr ages of kimberlites and lamproites from eastern Dhawar Craton, South India.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 58, pp. 135-142.IndiaGeochronology
DS200412-1414
2001
Nayak, S.S.Nayak, S.S., Rao, K.R.P., Kudari, S.A.K., Ravi, S.Geology and tectonic setting of kimberlites and lamproites of southern India.Geological Society of India Special Publication, No.58, pp. 603-613.IndiaTectonics
DS200612-0968
2001
Nayak, S.S.Nayak, S.S., Rao, K.R.P., Kudati, S.A.D., Ravi, S.Geology and tectonic setting of the kimberlites and lamproites of southern India. Wajrakarur, Natayanpet, Dharwar Craton, Chigicherla.National Seminar on Exploration Survey, Geological Society of India Special Publication, No. 58, pp. 567-575.India, Andhra PradeshTectonics
DS200612-0969
2005
Nayak, S.S.Nayak, S.S., Ravi, S., Reddy, N.S., Rau, T.K.Petrology and geochemistry of the kimberlites of Dharwar Craton.Geological Society of India, Bangalore November Meeting Group Discussion on Kimberlites and Related Rocks India, Abstract p. 58-59.India, Andhra Pradesh, Dharwar CratonPetrology
DS200612-0970
2005
Nayak, S.S.Nayak, S.S., Ravi, S., Sridhar, M., Reddy, N.S., Chowdary, V.S., Bhaskara Rao, K.S., Sinha, K.K., Rao, T.K.Geology and tectonic setting of kimberlites of Dharwar Craton.Geological Society of India, Bangalore November Meeting Group Discussion on Kimberlites and Related Rocks India, Abstract p. 36-38.India, Andhra Pradesh, Dharwar CratonTectonics
DS200612-1052
2005
Nayak, S.S.Paul, D.K., Nayak, S.S., Pant, N.C.Indian kimberlites and related rocks: petrology and geochemistry.Geological Society of India, Bangalore November Meeting Group Discussion on Kimberlites and Related Rocks India, Abstract p. 7.IndiaBrief overview
DS200612-1053
2006
Nayak, S.S.Paul, D.K., Nayak, S.S., Pant, N.C.Indian kimberlites and related rock: petrology and geochemistry. Majhgawan, Wajrakarur, Kota Konda, Mudalbid, Ramanapeta, Chelima.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 67, pp. 328-355.IndiaReview - maps, petrography, geochronology
DS200612-1125
2001
Nayak, S.S.Rao, K.R.P., Nayak, S.S., Reddy, T.A.K., Dhakate, M.V., Chowdary, V.S., Ravi, S., Suresh, G., Rao, K.S.B.Geology, petrology, geochemistry and mineral chemistry of new kimberlite fields in the Wajrakarur kimberlite field, Anantapur district, Andhra Pradesh.National Seminar on Exploration Survey, Geological Society of India Special Publication, No. 58, pp. 593-602.India, Andhra PradeshGeochemistry
DS200612-1126
2001
Nayak, S.S.Rao, K.R.P., Rao, K.N., Dhakate, M.V., Nayak, S.S.Petrology and mineralogy of mantle xenoliths of Wajrakarur and Narayanpet kimberlite fields, Andhra Pradesh, India.National Seminar on Exploration Survey, Geological Society of India Special Publication, No. 58, pp. 577-591.India, Andhra PradeshXenoliths
DS200612-1136
2005
Nayak, S.S.Ravi, S., Rau, T.K., Reddy, N.S., Nayak, S.S.Discovery of a new kimberlite field - the Tungaghadra kimberlite field, Kurnool District, Andhra Pradesh.Geological Society of India, Bangalore November Meeting Group Discussion on Kimberlites and Related Rocks India, Abstract p. 42-44.India, Andhra Pradesh, Dharwar CratonKimberlite - Tungaghadra
DS200612-1228
2005
Nayak, S.S.Satyanarayana, S.V., Nayak, S.S.Ancient diamond mines vis a vis current exploration in India.Geological Society of India, Bangalore November Meeting Group Discussion on Kimberlites and Related Rocks India, Abstract p. 138-140.IndiaHistory, diamond exploration
DS200612-1229
2005
Nayak, S.S.Satyanarayana, S.V., Nayak, S.S., Bhaskara Rao, K.S., Sivaji, K.Morphological characters of diamond from southern India.Geological Society of India, Bangalore November Meeting Group Discussion on Kimberlites and Related Rocks India, Abstract p. 80-84.India, Andhra Pradesh, Dharwar CratonDiamond morphology
DS200812-0858
2008
Nayak, S.S.Patel, S.C., Ravi, S., Rao, C.R.M., Rama Rao, G., Nayak, S.S.Mineralogy and geochemistry of Wajrakaruru kimberlites, southen India.9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractIndiaDeposit - Wajrakarur petrography
DS201212-0512
2012
Nayak, S.S.Nayak, S.S., Ravi, S., Patel, S.C., Akhtar, J.Ilmenite macrocrysts in Proterozoic kimberlites from southern India.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractIndiaDeposit - Wajrakarur, Lattavaram, Timmasamudram, Chigicherla
DS201212-0579
2012
Nayak, S.S.Ravi, S., Nayak, S.S., Bhaskara Rao, K.S.Field Guide to southern Indian kimbrlites.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, 63p.IndiaGuidebook
DS1988-0499
1988
Nayak, V.K.Nayak, V.K.Lonar Lake and co-linear carbonatites of western IndiaJournal of Geological Society India, Vol. 32, No. 5, pp. 433-434IndiaImpact crater, Carbonatite
DS1987-0056
1987
Nayar, R.K.Bindal, M.M., Singhal, S.K., Nayar, R.K., Chopra, R.A study of the friability of synthetic diamondsJournal of Material Sci.letters, Vol. 6, No. 9, September pp. 1945-1046GlobalSynthetic diamond
DS201905-1069
2019
Nayebi, N.Raeisi, D., Gholoizade, K., Nayebi, N., Babazadeh, S., Nejadhadad, M.Geochemistry and mineral composition of lamprophyre dikes, central Iran: implications for petrogenesis and mantle evolution.Journal of Earth System Science, Vol. 128:74Europe, Iranlamprophyre

Abstract: Late Proterozoic-Early Cambrian magmatic rocks that range in composition from mafic to felsic have intruded into the Hour region of the central Iranian micro-continent. The Hour lamprophyres are alkaline, being characterized by low contents of SiO2 and high TiO2, Mg# values, high contents of compatible elements, and are enriched in LREE and LILE but depleted in HFSE. Mineral chemistry studies reveal that the lamprophyres formed within a temperature range of ~1200° to 1300°C and relatively moderate pressure in subvolcanic levels. The Hour lamprophyres have experienced weak fractional crystallization and insignificant crustal contamination with more primitive mantle signatures. They were derived from low degree partial melting (1-5%) of the enriched mantle characterized by phlogopite/amphibole bearing lherzolite in the spinel-garnet transition zone at 75-85 km depth, and with an addition of the asthenospheric mantle materials. We infer the Hour lamprophyres to be part of the alkaline rock spectrum of the Tabas block and their emplacement, together with that of other alkaline complexes in the central Iran, was strongly controlled by pre-existing crustal weakness followed by the asthenosphere-lithospheric mantle interaction during the Early Cambrian.
DS201112-0729
2011
Naygina, O.<