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SDLRC - Scientific Articles all years by Author - P-Pd


The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation
The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation is compiled by Patricia Sheahan who publishes on a monthly basis a list of new scientific articles related to diamonds as well as media coverage and corporate announcementscalled the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service that is distributed as a free pdf to a list of followers. Pat has kindly agreed to allow her work to be made available as an online digital resource at Kaiser Research Online so that a broader community interested in diamonds and related geology can benefit. The references are for personal use information purposes only; when available a link is provided to an online location where the full article can be accessed or purchased directly. Reproduction of this compilation in part or in whole without permission from the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is strictly prohibited. Return to Diamond Resource Center
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Media/Corporate References by Name for all years
A B C D-Diam Diamonds Diamr+ E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Tips for Users
Posted/Published Reference CodesThe SDLRC provides 3 types of references identified in the reference code. DS for scientific article, DM for a media article, and DC for a corporate announcement. Consider DS0512-0001. The DS stands for "diamond scientific". 05 stands for 2005, the year the reference was posted. 12 represents the month the reference was posted. For all years prior to 2015 the default month is 12. -0001 is the reference's identifier and it does not mean anything. The number below the refence code, ie 2015, is the year the article was published. Note that the posted year may sometimes be later than the published year.
Sort OrderReferences are sorted by the "author" name and when the reference was posted to the compilation.
Most RecentIf the reference code is highlighted yellow, the reference was made available through the most recent monthly compilation of new literature. Use this to check out new references. When new references are posted, we make it our priority to track down an online link and obtain an abstract. With regard to older references, tracking down an abstract and an online link is a work in progress.
Link to external location of article: If the title has a link, it means we have found a location online where you can either retrieve the full article free, or purchase access to it. The Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is not a technical article procurement service; if you want a restricted article, you must deal directly with the vendor who controls the copyright to the article.
Searching this page for a specific term or authorIn your Firefox browser click Edit in the menu bar and then Find. In the Find box that shows up at the bottom of the web page enter your search term. Firefox will highlight all occurrences. This is particularly helpful when the author you are seeking was not the lead author by whom the compilation is sorted.
Sending or sharing a referenceThe left column (Posted/Published) has an embedded hyperlink for each reference. In Firefox, if you right click on it, you can obtain the link url for that reference's location within the page, which you can copy and paste into an email or any other document. You can also use the "share this link" option to tweet, facebook etc the link.
Author Index
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years - P-Pd
Posted/
Published
AuthorTitleSourceRegionKeywords
DS201911-2513
2019
P.Capitanio, F.A., Nebel, O. Cawood, P.A., Weinberg, R.F.. Chouddhury, P.Reconciling thermal regimes and tectonics of the early Earth.Geology, Vol. 47, pp. 923-927.Mantlegeothermometry

Abstract: Thermomechanical models of mantle convection and melting in an inferred hotter Archean Earth show the emergence of pressure-temperature (P-T) regimes that resemble present-day plate tectonic environments yet developed within a non-plate tectonics regime. The models’ P-T gradients are compatible with those inferred from evolving tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite series rocks and the paired metamorphic belt record, supporting the feasibility of divergent and convergent tectonics within a mobilized, yet laterally continuous, lithospheric lid. “Hot” P-T gradients of 10-20 °C km-1 form along asymmetric lithospheric drips, then migrate to areas of deep lithospheric downwelling within ~300-500 m.y., where they are overprinted by high-pressure warm and, later, cold geothermal signatures, up to ~8 °C km-1. Comparisons with the crustal production and reworking record suggest that this regime emerged in the Hadean.
DS202010-1858
2016
P.Lorenz, V. Suhr, P., Suhr, S.Phreatomagmatic maar-diatreme volcanoes and their incremental growth: a model.IN: Nemeth, K., Carrasco-Nunez, G., Aranda-Gomez, J.J., Smith, I.E.M. eds. Monogenetic volcanism GSL Special Volume, Vol 446, 31p. Pdf * note dateEurope, Germany , United States, Australia, Mexicomaars

Abstract: We report here a growth model for phreatomagmatic maar-diatreme volcanoes with respect to the number of eruptions documented in the tephra beds of maar tephra rings and the upper bedded diatreme facies. We show that the number of tephra beds in large diatremes is larger than that in maar tephra rings. Base surges that lack sufficient momentum to scale high maar crater walls deposit their tephra only inside the crater. Thus the total number of eruptions at large maar-diatreme volcanoes will be larger than the number recorded in maar tephra rings. As many maar-diatreme volcanoes erupt dominantly accidental clasts, an incremental mathematical model was applied to study the growth of diatremes. The model is based only on the ejection of distinct amounts of accidental clasts per unit eruption and the chosen number of eruptions is assumed to be identical. The incremental growth of cone-shaped diatremes follows cube-root functions with respect to diameter and depth and slows down with ongoing eruptions. In nature, small and large maar-diatreme volcanoes are formed and filled syn-eruptively, mostly by tephra, depending on the duration and quantity of magma involved in phreatomagmatic eruptions. In our opinion, this mathematical model is the only current method able to model the growth of diatremes.
DS201911-2513
2019
P.A.Capitanio, F.A., Nebel, O. Cawood, P.A., Weinberg, R.F.. Chouddhury, P.Reconciling thermal regimes and tectonics of the early Earth.Geology, Vol. 47, pp. 923-927.Mantlegeothermometry

Abstract: Thermomechanical models of mantle convection and melting in an inferred hotter Archean Earth show the emergence of pressure-temperature (P-T) regimes that resemble present-day plate tectonic environments yet developed within a non-plate tectonics regime. The models’ P-T gradients are compatible with those inferred from evolving tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite series rocks and the paired metamorphic belt record, supporting the feasibility of divergent and convergent tectonics within a mobilized, yet laterally continuous, lithospheric lid. “Hot” P-T gradients of 10-20 °C km-1 form along asymmetric lithospheric drips, then migrate to areas of deep lithospheric downwelling within ~300-500 m.y., where they are overprinted by high-pressure warm and, later, cold geothermal signatures, up to ~8 °C km-1. Comparisons with the crustal production and reworking record suggest that this regime emerged in the Hadean.
DS1970-0170
1970
Paarma, H.Paarma, H.A New Find of Carbonatite in North Finland, the Sokli Plug In Savukoski.Lithos, Vol. 3, PP. 129-133.GlobalAlnoite, Carbonatite
DS1975-0373
1976
Paarma, H.Paarma, H., Talvitie, J.Deep Fractures in the Sokli CarbonatiteContrib. Department Geophysics, University Oulu, No. 65, PP. 1-5.Norway, ScandinaviaStructure
DS1975-0595
1977
Paarma, H.Paarma, H., Vartiainen, H., Penninkilampi, J.Aspects of Photo geological Interpretation of Sokli Carbonatite Massif.Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. SPECIAL Publishing, PP. 25-29.GlobalRemote, Sensing
DS1975-1251
1979
Paarma, H.Vartianen, H., Paarma, H.Geological Characteristics of the Sokli Carbonatite Complex, Finland.Economic Geology, Vol. 74, PP. 1296-1306.GlobalUltramafic And Related Rocks
DS2002-1199
2002
Paava, J.Paava, J., Kabek, B., Dobe, P., VavAn, I., et al.Tin polymetric sulphide deposits in the eastern part of the Dachang tin field and role of black shales - originMineralium deposita, China, southCopper, sinx, tin, black shales, metallogeny, Deposit - Dachang
DS1930-0280
1938
Pabst, A.Pabst, A.Minerals of California (1938)California Division of Mines, Bulletin. No. 113, PP. 15-16.United States, California, West Coast, Amador, Montana, El Dorado, Fresno, NevadaBlank
DS2001-0509
2001
Pacaud, L.Ingrin, J., Pacaud, L., Jaoul, O.Anisotropy of oxygen diffusion in diopsideEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 192, No. 3, pp. 347-61.GlobalMineral chemistry - diopside
DS1990-0384
1990
Pacca, I.G.D'Agrella-Filho, M.S., Pacca, I.G., Renne, P.R., Onstott, T.C.Paleomagnetism and middle Proterozoic (1.01 to 1.08 Ga) mafic dykes in southeastern Bahia State-Sao Francisco Craton, BrasilEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 101, No. 2/4, December pp. 332-348BrazilPaleomagnetism, Dykes
DS1990-1221
1990
Pacca, I.G.Renne, P.R., Onstott, T.C., D'Agrella-Filho, M.S., Pacca, I.G.40 Ar-39 Ar dating of 1.0-1.1 Ga magnetizations from the Sao Francisco and Kalahari cratons: tectonic implicationsPan-African and Brasiliano mobilebeltsEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 101, No. 2/4, December pp. 349-367Brazil, southern AfricaPaleomagnetism, Argon, Craton
DS1995-1290
1995
Pacca, I.G.Montes-Lauar, C.R., Pacca, I.G., et al.The Anari and Tapirapua Jurassic formations: western Brasil, paleomagnetism, geochemistry and geochronologyPrecambrian Research, Vol. 70, No. 3-4, Jan. pp. 357-372BrazilPaleomagnetics, Geochemistry
DS1995-1291
1995
Pacca, I.G.Montes-Lauar, C.R., Pacca, I.G., Kawashita, K.Late Cretaceous alkaline complexes, southeastern Brasil: paleomagnetism andgeochronology.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 134, No. 3-4, Sept. 1, pp. 425-440.BrazilGeochronology, Alkaline rocks
DS1994-0363
1994
Pacca, I.I.G.D'Agrella Filho, M.S., Pacca, I.I.G.Tectonic implications for the development of late Proterozoic Pan-African and Brasiliano mobile belts.International Symposium Upper Mantle, Aug. 14-19, 1994, Extended abstracts pp. 88-90.BrazilTectonics, Proterozoic paleomagnetics, Sa Francisco craton
DS1998-0292
1998
Pacca, I.I.G.D'Agrella Filho, M.S., Pacca, I.I.G.Paleomagnetism of a Paleoproterozoic mafic dyke swarm from the Uauaregion..Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 23-34BrazilSao Francisco Craton, Tectonics
DS1998-0294
1998
Pacca, I.I.G.D'Agrella-Filho, M.S., Trindade, R.I.F., Pacca, I.I.G.Paleomagnetic constraints on Rodinia supercontinent: implications for its Neoproterozoic Break ups- GondwanaInternational.Geol. Rev, Vol. 40, No. 2, Feb. pp. 171-?Gondwana, RodiniaPalemagnetism, Tectonics
DS200412-0396
2004
Pacca, II.D'Agreela Filho, M.S., Pacca, II., Trinidade, R.I., Teixeira, W., Raposo, M.I., Onstott, T.C.Paleomagnetism and 40 Ar 39 Ar ages of mafic dikes from Salvador ( Brazil): new constraints on the Sao Francisco craton APW pathPrecambrian Research, Vol. 132, 1-2, pp. 55-77.South America, BrazilGeochronology
DS1993-1176
1993
Paces, .B.Paces, .B., Miller, J.D.Jr.Precise uranium-lead (U-Pb) (U-Pb) ages of Duluth Complex and related mafic northeastern Minnesota: geochronological insights to physical, petrogenetic, paleomagnetic, and tectJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 98, No. B 6, August 10, pp. 13, 997-14, 014MinnesotaLayered intrusions, Duluth Complex
DS201312-1005
2013
Paces, H.D.Zartman, R.E., Kempton, P.D., Kempton, J.B., Paces, H.D., Williams, I.S., Dobosi, G.,Futa, K.Lower crustal xenoliths from Jurassic kimberlite diatremes, Upper Michigan USA: evidence for Proterozoic orogenesis and plume magmatism in the lower crust of the southern Superior Province.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 54, 3, pp. 575-608.United States, MichiganDeposit - Lake Ellen, S69, S10
DS1987-0560
1987
Paces, J.B.Paces, J.B., Bornhorst, T.J.Geochemical constraints on tectonic models of late stagemidcontinentrifting: Portage Lake volcanics, MichiganGeological Society of America, Vol. 19, No. 4, March p. 237-238. (abstract)MichiganUSA, Geochemistry
DS1989-1164
1989
Paces, J.B.Paces, J.B.Geochemical Evolution of Cenozoic-Cretaceous magmatism and its relation to tectonic setting, southwestern Idaho, USANew Mexico Bureau of Mines Bulletin., Continental Magmatism Abstract Volume, Held, Bulletin. No. 131, p. 210 Abstract held June 25-July 1MidcontinentRift, Tectonics
DS1989-1165
1989
Paces, J.B.Paces, J.B., Bell, K.Non-depleted sub-continental mantle beneath the Superior Province of the Canadian shield: neodymium-Sr isotopic and trace element evid. from Midcont. rift basaltsGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 53, pp. 2023-2035MidcontinentTectonics, Rift
DS1990-0391
1990
Paces, J.B.Davis, D.W., Paces, J.B.Time resolution of geologic events on the Keweenaw Peninsula And implications for development of The midcontinent Rift systemEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 97, No. 1-2, February pp. 54-64MichiganMidcontinent Rift, Geochronology -Age deterM.
DS1990-1149
1990
Paces, J.B.Paces, J.B., Taylor, L.A.Petrography, mineral chemistry, and geothermobarometry of mafic granulite and eclogite nodules from upper Michigan kimberlitesInstitute on Lake Superior Geology Proceedings Volume, 36th. Annual Meeting held May 9-12, Thunder BayMichiganKimberlite, Geochemistry
DS1990-1150
1990
Paces, J.B.Paces, J.B., Zartman, R.E., Taylor, L.A., Futa, K., Kwak, L.M.lead isotopic evidence for multiple episodes of lower crustal growth and modification in granulite nodules from the Superior Province, MichiganGeological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting, Abstracts, Vol. 22, No. 7, p. A119Michigan, MidcontinentGeochronology, Granulite nodules
DS1993-1177
1993
Paces, J.B.Paces, J.B., Miller, J.D.Jr.Precise uranium-lead (U-Pb) (U-Pb) ages of Duluth Complex and related mafic northeastern Minnesota: geochronological insights to physical, petrogenetic, paleomagnetic.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 98, No. B8, August 10, pp. 13, 997-14, 014.MinnesotaGeochronology, Tectonics
DS2001-0618
2001
PachecoKogarko, L.N., Ryabchikov, I.D., Brey, Santin, PachecoMantle rocks uplifted to crustal levels: diffusion profiles in minerals spinel plagioclase lherzolitesGeochemistry International, Vol. 39, No. 4, pp. 311-26.GlobalLherzolites, Tallante area
DS1995-0983
1995
Pacheco, A.H.Kogarko, L.N., Henderson, M., Pacheco, A.H.Primary Ca-rich carbonatite magma and carbonate silicate sulphide liquidimmiscibility in upper mantle.Geological Society Africa 10th. Conference Oct. Nairobi, p. 113-4. Abstract.GlobalCarbonatite, Deposit -Montana Clara
DS1995-0986
1995
Pacheco, H.Kogarko, L.N., Pacheco, H., Henderson, C.M.B.Primary Calcium rich carbonatite magma, carbonate -silicate -sulphide liquid immiscibility in the upper mantle.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 121, No. 3, pp. 267-274.GlobalCarbonatite
DS200612-1259
2006
Pachero, A.H.Seghedi, I., Szakacs, A., Pachero, A.H., Matesanz, J-L.B.Miocene lamproite volcanoes in south eastern Spain - an association of phreatomagmatic and magmatic products.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, In press, availableEurope, SpainLamproite
DS1993-1178
1993
Pacific Comox Resources Ltd.Pacific Comox Resources Ltd.Corporate fact sheet as of October 18, 1993Pacific Comox Resources Ltd., 1p.GlobalNews item
DS1981-0175
1981
Pacific Exploration Co.Gates, A.H., Sas, Z., Esterle, J., Carson, M., Pacific Exploration Co.El 477 Terowie South Australia Progress Reports from 16/8/79South Australia Open File., No. E3612, 104P. UNPUBL.Australia, South AustraliaGeochemistry, Prospecting, Stream Sediment Sampling, Rock Chip
DS1981-0169
1981
Pacific Exploration Consultants Pty. Ltd., Gem Exploration and Minerals Ltd.Garlick, H.J., Pacific Exploration Consultants Pty. Ltd., Gem Exploration and Minerals Ltd.Pine Creek Area, Annual Report on the Gem Joint Venture 1980-1981.Northern Territory Geological Survey, OPEN FILE No. CR 81/270, 16P.Australia, Northern TerritoryKimberlite, Prospecting, Sampling, Geochemistry, Stream Sediment
DS1981-0170
1981
Pacific Exploration Consultants Pty. Ltd., Gem Exploration and Minerals Ltd.Garlick, H.J., Pacific Exploration Consultants Pty. Ltd., Gem Exploration and Minerals Ltd.El 2255 Pine Creek Area, Annual ReportNorthern Territory Geological Survey Open File., No. CR/277, 17P.Australia, Northern TerritoryProspecting, Geochemistry, Stream Sediment Sampling
DS1981-0171
1981
Pacific Exploration Consultants Pty. Ltd., Gem Exploration and Minerals Ltd.Garlick, H.J., Pacific Exploration Consultants Pty. Ltd., Gem Exploration and Minerals Ltd.El 1597 Port Keats and Fergusson River Annual Report 1980-81Northern Territory Geological Survey Open File Report, No. CR 81/273, SEPTEMBER 17P.Australia, Northern TerritoryDiamond Prospecting, Geochemistry
DS1981-0363
1981
Pacific exploration pty. ltd.Sas, Z., Gates, T., Pacific exploration pty. ltd.El 493 Echunga District South Australia Progress Reports 15/9/79 to 15/9/81.South Australia Open File., No. E3563, 129P. UNPUBL.Australia, South AustraliaGeophysics, Geochemistry, Prospecting, Airborne Magnetics
DS2002-1200
2002
Pacific Ridge Exploration Ltd.Pacific Ridge Exploration Ltd.Diamond discovery at Xeno propertyPacific Ridge Exploration, March 13, 1p.British ColumbiaNews item - press release
DS201412-0563
2014
Pack, A.Mayer, B., Jung, S., Romer, R.,Pfander, J., Klugel, A., Pack, A., Groner, E.Amphibole in alkaline basalts from intraplate settings: implications for the petrogenesis of alkaline lavas from the metasomatised lithospheric mantle.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 167, 3, pp. 1-22.MantleMetasomatism
DS1986-0618
1986
Packard, J.JOkulitch, A.V., Packard, J.J, Zolnai, A.I.Evolution of the Boothia Uplift, Arctic CanadaCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 23, pp. 350-8.Northwest TerritoriesTectonics
DS1960-1188
1969
Packham, G.H.Packham, G.H.The Geology of New South WalesGeological Society AUST. Journal, Vol. 16, No. 1, P. 654.AustraliaKimberlite, Diamond
DS200712-0794
2007
Pacweb.orgPacweb.orgOther facets: newsletter .. musings over news items of late..... Liberia; Book reviews: Merchant of Death; Satanic purses...Other Facets, October 4p.GlobalNews item - book reviews
DS201212-0536
2012
Paczkowski, K.Paczkowski, K., Bercovici, D., Landuyt, W., Brandon, M.T.Drip instabilities of continental lithosphere: acceleration and entrainment by damage.Geophysical Journal International, in press availableMantleRheology
DS201412-0652
2014
Paczkowski, K.Paczkowski, K., Laurent, G.J., Long, M.D., Thissen, C.J.Three dimensional flow in the subslab mantle.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 15, pp. 3989-4008.MantleSubduction
DS201412-0653
2014
Paczkowski, K.Paczkowski, K., Thissen, C.J., Montesi, M.D., Laurent, G.j.Deflection of mantle flow beneath subducting slabs and the origin of subslab anisotropy.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 41, 19, pp. 6734-42.MantleSubduction
DS1987-0384
1987
Padera, K.Kudryavtseva, G.P., Padera, K.Mantle derived pyrope bronzite inclusion inserpentinizedgarnet peridotite from Mohelno, CzechoslovakiaDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 287, No. 1-6, pp. 129-131RussiaBlank
DS200912-0797
2009
Paderin, I.A.P.A.Vetrin, V.A.R.A., Lepekhina, E.A.N.A., Paderin, I.A.P.A., Rodionov, N.A.V.A.Stages of the lower crust formation of the Belomorian mobile belt, Kola Peninsula.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 425, 2, pp. 269-273.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCraton
DS1975-1135
1979
Padgett, J.L.Mccallum, M.E., Kirkley, M.B., Padgett, J.L., Eggler, D.H.Textural and Mineral Compositional Ranges of Ultramafic Nodules from Kimberlites of Northern Colorado and Southern Wyoming #2Kimberlite Symposium Ii, Cambridge, England., PP. 1-5.United States, Colorado, Wyoming, State Line, Rocky MountainsBlank
DS1975-0564
1977
Padgett, J.P.Mccallum, M.E., Kirkley, M.B., Padgett, J.P., Eggler, D.H.Textural and Mineral Compositional Ranges of Ultramafic Nodules from Kimberlites of Northern Colorado and Southern Wyoming #1International Kimberlite Conference SECOND EXTENDED ABSTRACT VOLUME., United States, Colorado, Wyoming, State Line, Rocky MountainsBlank
DS1975-1136
1979
Padgett, J.P.Mccallum, M.E., Kirkley, M.B., Padgett, J.P.Compositional and Textural Ranges of Peridotite Nodules From Kimberlites of the Colorado-Wyoming State Line District.Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 11, No. 6, P. 279, (abstract.).United States, Colorado, Wyoming, State Line, Rocky MountainsBlank
DS1982-0132
1982
Padgett, J.P.Carlson, J.A., Johnson, R.B., Mccallum, M.E., Padgett, J.P.Evaluation of Geophysical Techniques for Diatreme Delineation in the Colorado-Wyoming Kimberlite Province. #1Proceedings of Third International Kimberlite Conference, TERRA, Vol. 2, No. 3, P. 203, (abstract.).United States, Colorado, Wyoming, State Line, Rocky MountainsKimberlite, Geophysics, Groundmag, Electromagnetic, Radioactivity
DS1982-0486
1982
Padgett, J.P.Padgett, J.P., Mccallum, M.E., Meyer, H.O.A.Relationship between Geochemistry and Color of Garnet Xenocrysts from Colorado-Wyoming Kimberlites.Proceedings of Third International Kimberlite Conference, TERRA COGNITA, ABSTRACT VOLUME., Vol. 2, No. 3, P. 224, (abstract.).United States, Colorado, Wyoming, State Line, Rocky MountainsBlank
DS1985-0511
1985
Padgett, J.P.Padgett, J.P.Exploration for Kimberlite in the Green Mountain Magnolia Area, Boulder county, Colorado.Msc. Thesis, Colorado State University, 268P.United States, State Line, ColoradoGeology, Lithology, Structure, Diatreme, Kimberlite, Mineralogy
DS1992-1154
1992
Padgham, W.A.Padgham, W.A.Mineral deposits in the Archean Slave Structural Province: lithological and tectonic setting.Precambrian Research, Vol. 58, pp. 1-24.Northwest TerritoriesMetallogeny - mineral deposits, Tectonics, Overview -no mention of diamonds - general base, gold
DS1994-0560
1994
Padgham, W.A.Fyson, W.K., Padgham, W.A.Geology of the Slave Structural Province; a tectonically oriented geological map of the Slave Craton drafted in autocad.Northwest Territories, EGS 1993-08, 1:1 million scale $ 15.00Northwest TerritoriesMap, Structure
DS1994-1326
1994
Padgham, W.A.Padgham, W.A.Slave Province: non-accretion Archean shield developmentGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstract Volume, Vol. 26, No. 7, ABSTRACT only p. A339.Northwest TerritoriesTectonics, Slave structural province
DS1995-1412
1995
Padgham, W.D.Padgham, W.D.Evolution of the Slave Craton: commentGeology, Vol. 23, No. 9, Sept. p. 863Northwest TerritoriesCraton, Slave Craton
DS1995-1413
1995
Padgham, W.D.Padgham, W.D.Evolution of the Slave craton: commentGeology, Vol. 23, No. 9, Sept. p. 863.Northwest TerritoriesSedimentology, Graywackes, graystones, geochronology
DS1992-1155
1992
Padilha, A.L.Padilha, A.L., Trivedi, N.B., Vitorello, I., Da Costra, J.M.Upper crustal structure of the northeast Parana Basin, Brasil, determined from integrated magnetotelluric and gravity measurementsJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 97, No. B3, March 10, pp. 3351-3366BrazilStructure, Crust
DS2000-0983
2000
Padilha, A.L.Vitorello, I., Padilha, A.L., Bologna, M.S., Padua, M.Upper mantle electrical structures beneath a stable craton and attached collisional zones.Igc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.BrazilTectonics - craton, Alta Paranabia Igneous Province
DS200512-0103
2005
Padilha, A.L.Bologna, M.S., Padilha, A.L., Vitorello, I.Geoelectric crustal structure off the SW border of the Sao Francisco Craton, central Brazil, as inferred from a magnetotelluric survey.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 162, 2, August pp.357-370.South America, BrazilGeophysics - magnetotelluric
DS200612-0147
2006
Padilha, A.L.Bologna, M., Padilha, A.L., Vitorello, Fontes, S.Tectonic insight into a pericratonic subcrustal lithosphere affected by anorogenic Cretaceous magmatism in Brazil inferred from long period magnetotellurices.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 241, 3-4, pp. 603-616.South America, BrazilTectonics
DS201012-0586
2010
Padilha, A.L.Pinto, L.G.R.,Banik de Padua, M., Ussami, N., Vitorello, I., Padilha, A.L., Braitenberg, C.Magnetotelluric deep soundings, gravity and geoid in the south Sao Francisco craton: geophysical indicators of cratonic lithosphere rejuvenation and underplating.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 297, pp. 423-434.South America, BrazilCarbonatite
DS201909-2068
2019
Padilha, A.L.Padilha, A.L., Vitorello, I., de Padua, M.B., Fuck, R.A.Magnetotelluric images of PaleoProterozoic accretion and Mesoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic reworking processes in the northern Sao Francico craton, central-eastern Brazil.Precambrian Research, in press available, 55p. pdfSouth America, Brazilcraton

Abstract: Broadband and long period magnetotelluric (MT) data were collected along an east-west oriented, 580-km-long profile across the northern São Francisco Craton where extensive Proterozoic and Phanerozoic sedimentary cover and lack of deep-probing geophysical surveys have prevented to establish unequivocally the cratonic character of the Archean-Paleoproterozoic lithosphere. Following dimensionality analyses, the MT dataset was interpreted using both 2-D and 3-D inversion procedures. The near-surface structure is better resolved in the 2-D model due to its finer resolution. A huge upper crustal conductor is found all along the shallow early Neoproterozoic Irecê Basin in the central domain of the craton, extending laterally for approximately 150?km and restricting signal propagation below the basin. Its high conductance is explained by a combination of high porosity and high fluid salinity in the sedimentary package. Another upper crustal conductor is observed on the west side of the profile, interpreted as fractured metasedimentary rocks of the Rio Preto belt thrusted on top of the craton basement during Neoproterozoic marginal collision. The 3-D model explains significantly better the measured data related to deep structure. Contrary to what is expected for a stable cratonic block, the geoelectric model shows pronounced electrical complexity and heterogeneity, an indication that the cratonic lithosphere was multiply reworked in the past by tectonothermal events. Different lithospheric resistive blocks bounded by major conductive zones are identified. Constrained by geochemical and isotopic data, these vertical conductive interfaces are interpreted as cryptic suture zones due to large-scale amalgamation of continents and microcontinents leading to the assembly of the São Francisco Craton in the Paleoproterozoic. The conductivity enhancement is more likely explained by emplacement of sulfides along previous suture zones during mafic magmatism. At upper mantle depths, high conductivity observed below most of the profile indicates that metasomatism or refertilization processes with incompatible elements caused by the Paleoproterozoic subducting slabs and Mesoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic upwelling of deep fluids and melts reworked this portion of the craton mantle.
DS1993-0862
1993
Padma Kumari, V.M.Kumar, A., Padma Kumari, V.M., Dayal, A.M., Murthy, D.S.N., Gopalanrubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) ages of Proterozoic kimberlites of India: evidence for contemporaneous emplacementPrecambrian Research, Vol. 62, No. 3, June pp. 227-238IndiaKimberlites, Geochronology
DS1995-1037
1995
Padmakumari, V.M.Kumar, A., Gopalan, K., Padmakumari, V.M., Kornilova et al.Precise Rubidium-Strontium ages of Siberian kimberlitesProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 307.Russia, Yakutia, SiberiaGeochronology, Deposit - Alakit, Malo-Botuobia, Kharamay
DS2003-0758
2003
Padmakumari, V.M.Kumar, A., Dayal, A.M., Padmakumari, V.M.Kimberlite from Rajmahal magmatic province: Sr Nd Pb isotopic evidence forGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 108, 30, 20. SDE 9 Oct. 15, 10.1029/2003GLO18462IndiaMagmatism, geochronology
DS2003-0759
2003
Padmakumari, V.M.Kumar, A., Dayal, A.M., Padmakumari, V.M.Kimberlite from Rajmahal magmatic province: Sr Nd Pb isotopic evidence forGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 20, 2053 DOI.1029/2003GLO18462India, easternRajmahal-Sylhet-Bengal basalt, Group II, geochronology
DS200412-1066
2003
Padmakumari, V.M.Kumar, A., Dayal, A.M., Padmakumari, V.M.Kimberlite from Rajmahal magmatic province: Sr Nd Pb isotopic evidence for Kerguelen plume derived magmas.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 20, 2053 DOI.1029/2003 GLO18462IndiaRajmahal-Sylhet-Bengal basalt, Group II, geochronology
DS1991-1852
1991
Padman, R.White, G.J., Padman, R.Images of atomic carbon in the interstellar mediuMNature, Vol. 354, No. 6354, December 19.26, pp. 511-513GlobalCarbon, Meteorites, Galaxy
DS201802-0238
2018
Padoan, M.Garzanti, E., Dinis, P., Vermeesch, P., Ando, S., Hahn, A., Huvi, J., Limonta, M., Padoan, M., Resentini, A., Rittner, M., Vezzoli, G.Sedimentary processes controlling ultralong cells of littoral transport: placer formation and termination of the Orange sand highway in southern Angola.Sedimentology, Vol. 65, 2, pp. 431-460.Africa, Angolaplacers, alluvials

Abstract: This study focuses on the causes, modalities and obstacles of sediment transfer in the longest cell of littoral sand drift documented on Earth so far. Sand derived from the Orange River is dragged by swell waves and persistent southerly winds to accumulate in four successive dunefields in coastal Namibia to Angola. All four dunefields are terminated by river valleys, where aeolian sand is flushed back to the ocean; and yet sediment transport continues at sea, tracing an 1800 km long submarine sand highway. Sand drift would extend northward to beyond the Congo if the shelf did not become progressively narrower in southern Angola, where drifting sand is funnelled towards oceanic depths via canyon heads connected to river mouths. Garnet-magnetite placers are widespread along this coastal stretch, indicating systematic loss of the low-density feldspatho-quartzose fraction to the deep ocean. More than half of Moçamedes Desert sand is derived from the Orange River, and the rest in similar proportions from the Cunene River and from the Swakop and other rivers draining the Damara Orogen in Namibia. The Orange fingerprint, characterized by basaltic rock fragments, clinopyroxene grains and bimodal zircon-age spectra with peaks at ca 0•5 Ga and ca 1•0 Ga, is lost abruptly at Namibe, and beach sands further north have abundant feldspar, amphibole-epidote suites and unimodal zircon-age spectra with a peak at ca 2•0 Ga, documenting local provenance from Palaeoproterozoic basement. Along with this oblique-rifted continental margin, beach placers are dominated by Fe-Ti-Cr oxides with more monazite than garnet and thus have a geochemical signature sharply different from beach placers found all the way along the Orange littoral cell. High-resolution mineralogical studies allow us to trace sediment dispersal over distances of thousands of kilometres, providing essential information for the correct reconstruction of ‘source to sink’ relationships in hydrocarbon exploration and to predict the long-term impact of man-made infrastructures on coastal sediment budgets.
DS1975-0832
1978
Padovani, E.Padovani, E., Tracy, R.J.A Pyrope Spinel Xenolith from the Colorado Plateau Kimberlite: First Known North American Occurrence.Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 10, No. 7, P. 466, (abstract.).Colorado PlateauKimberlite, Rocky Mountains
DS1980-0268
1980
Padovani, E.Padovani, E., Simmons, G.Constraints on Crustal Hydration Beneath the Colorado Plateau from Major Element Chemistry and Physical Properties of Crustal Xenoliths.Eos, Vol. 61, No. 17, P. 388, (abstract.).Colorado PlateauKimberlite, Rocky Mountains
DS1982-0517
1982
Padovani, E.Reid, M., Hart, S.R., Padovani, E.Evolution of the Lower Crust Beneath Kilbourne Hole, New Mexico.Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 14, No. 7, P. 597, (abstract.).GlobalKimberlite, Rocky Mountains, Colorado Plateau
DS1975-1056
1979
Padovani, E.R.Hart, S.R., Padovani, E.R., Roden, H.K.Strontium Isotopic Relationships in Lower Crustal Nodules from Kilbourne Hole, New Mexico.Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 11, No. 7, P. 439. (abstract.).United States, New Mexico, Colorado PlateauBlank
DS1981-0328
1981
Padovani, E.R.Padovani, E.R., Tracy, R.J.A Pyrope-spinel Alkremite Xenolith from Moses Rock Dike; First Known North American Occurrence.American MINERALOGIST., Vol. 66, No. 7-8, PP. 741-745.GlobalKimberlite
DS1981-0422
1981
Padovani, E.R.Wasilewski, P.J., Padovani, E.R.Crustal Magnetization Beneath the Rio Grande Rift Based on Xenoliths from Kilbourne Hole and Potrillo Maar.In: Papers Presented To The Conference On The Processes of P, PP. 153-155.GlobalBlank
DS1985-0711
1985
Padovani, E.R.Wandless, G.A., Padovani, E.R.Trace Element Geochemistry of Lower Crustal Xenoliths from kilbourne Hole Maar, New Mexico.Eos, Vol. 66, No. 46, NOVEMBER 12, P. 1110. (abstract.).United States, Colorado Plateau, New MexicoGeochemistry
DS1986-0628
1986
Padovani, E.R.Padovani, E.R., Wandless, G.A., Reid, M., Hart, S.R.Characterization of the deep crust in an active intracontinental rift:evidence from xenoliths at Kilbourne Hole MaarGeological Society of America, Vol. 18, No. 2, p. 168. AbstractGlobalTectonics
DS1987-0561
1987
Padovani, E.R.Padovani, E.R.The infrared absorption spectra of diamonds expected to contain voiditesUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Circ.No. 956 Geophysics and petrology of the deep crust and upper, pp. 40-43GlobalXenoliths
DS201212-0208
2012
Padron-Navarta, J.A.Frets, E., Tommasi, A., Garrido, C.J., Padron-Navarta, J.A., Amri, I., Targuisti, K.Deformation processes and rheology of pyroxenites under lithospheric mantle conditions.Journal of Structural Geology, Vol. 39, pp. 138-157.Europe, Africa, MoroccoWebsterite, Beni-Bousera
DS2000-0983
2000
Padua, M.Vitorello, I., Padilha, A.L., Bologna, M.S., Padua, M.Upper mantle electrical structures beneath a stable craton and attached collisional zones.Igc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.BrazilTectonics - craton, Alta Paranabia Igneous Province
DS201609-1742
2016
Padua, P.Shigley, J.E., Shor, R., Padua, P., Breeding, C.M., Shirey, S.B., Ashbury, D.Mining diamonds in the Canadian Arctic: the Diavik mine.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 52, no. 2, Summer, pp. 104-131.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS201704-0637
2017
Padua, P.Lucas, A., Bhatt, N., Singhania, M., Sachdeva, K., Hsu, T., Padua, P.Jaipur India: the global gem and jewelery power of the pink city. Emerald, Tanzanite Gems & Gemology, Vol. 52, 4, pp. 332-367.IndiaGemstones - emerald, tanzanite

Abstract: In 2015, a field team from GIA visited the Indian city of Jaipur to capture the full scope of its gem and jewelry industry: colored stone cutting, wholesale trading, jewelry design, manufacturing, and retail. The authors documented the current state of the industry from a manufacturing as well as a business perspective. The results substantiated many of the team's prior assessments but also brought to light recent developments with far-reaching effects. The impact of vertical integration, consolidation, globalization, and jewelry television retail far exceeded expectations. Once known as a colored stone manufacturing center, Jaipur has rapidly climbed the value chain into jewelry manufacturing and retail by successfully incorporating experience and tradition with technology and innovation.
DS201712-2685
2017
Padua, P.Fortaleche, D., Lucas, A., Muyal, J., Hsu, T., Padua, P.The Colombian emerald industry: winds of change. Gems & Gemology, Vol. 53, 3, pp. 332-358.South America, Colombiaemerald

Abstract: Colombia is synonymous with fine emerald, and production is believed to date back well over a thousand years. Over the centuries the beautiful verdant gemstone, which emerges from areas that are also a lush green, has been linked to violence and human exploitation. Nevertheless, the desire of the Colombian people to mine for this treasure and strike it rich has endured, with enough dreams coming true to drive their passion. In recent years, industry changes have accelerated, perhaps more profoundly than ever before. While government ownership and regulation, criminal activity, and violence have affected production over the years, the industry’s greatest opportunities may still be ahead. Multinational companies are investing heavily in Colombian emerald mining, which has led to modernization. The government’s position on emerald mining has also improved dramatically in this period. Calls for transparency and traceability have led to branding and a revamping of the industry’s image. The loose system of independent miners (figure 1) is seeing efforts at formalization. These landmark changes are occurring at a time when most of the country’s emerald reserves have yet to be mined. In October 2015, a joint GIA and Colombian team met at the First International Emerald Symposium in Bogotá to interview industry leaders and government officials. Many topics involving industry change were discussed at the symposium. Afterward, the team traveled to Colombia’s major mines and visited dealers and cutters in Bogotá to document the current state of the mine-to-market industry. We were also able to collect rough emerald samples for the GIA laboratory’s country-of-origin reference collection.
DS201504-0222
2015
Paeth, H.Spiegl, T.C., Paeth, H., Frimmel, H.E.Evaluating key parameters for the initiation of a Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth with a single Earth System Model of intermediate complexity.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 415, April pp. 100-110.MantleModel
DS2001-0877
2001
Paganelli, F.Paganelli, F., Grunsky, E.C., Richards, J.P.Radarset Land sat 7 Thematic Mapper integration for kimberlite exploration in the Buffalo Head Hills area.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting Abstracts, Vol. 26, p. 110-11.abstract.AlbertaRemote sensing - LANDSAT.
DS2001-0878
2001
Paganelli, F.Paganelli, F., Grunsky, E.C., Richards, J.P.Structural emplacement of RADARSAT-1 principal component imagery and its potential application to kimberlitic exploration in the Buffalo Head Hills area.Alberta Energy and Utilities Board and Alberta Geological Survey, Report 2001-03, 47p.Alberta, north centralStructure - model
DS2002-1201
2002
Paganelli, F.Paganelli, F., Richards, J.P., Grunsky, E.C.Integration of Structural, Gravity and Magnetic Dat a Using the Weights of EvidenceNatural Resources Research, Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 219-236northern central AlbertaWeights of evidence method, favourability, kimberlite exploration, Buffalo
DS2003-1040
2003
Paganelli, F.Paganelli, F.RADARSAT - 1 and LANDSAT7 ETM+ integration for kimberlite exploration in theInternational Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Vol. 6, pp. VI 3653-55. Ingenta 1034975456 1034981934AlbertaRemote sensing
DS200412-1489
2003
Paganelli, F.Paganelli, F.RADARSAT - 1 and LANDSAT7 ETM+ integration for kimberlite exploration in the Buffalo Head Hills area, northern central Alberta.International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Vol. 6, pp. VI 3653-55. Ingenta 1034975456 1034981934Canada, AlbertaRemote sensing
DS201412-0654
2002
Paganelli, F.Paganelli, F., Richards, J.P., Grunsky, E.C.Integration of structural, gravity and magnetic dat a using the weights of evidence method as a tool for kimberlite exploration in the Buffalo Head Hills, northern central Alberta CanadaNatural Resources Research, Vol. 11, 3, pp. 219-Canada, AlbertaGeophysics
DS1983-0499
1983
Page, B.Page, B.The Diamond Rush... the Most Exciting Mineral Discovery in Decades Has Been Made at Smoke Creek, Australia.Telegraph Sunday Magazine., MARCH, PP. 19-25 (6P.)AustraliaHistory
DS1997-1303
1997
Page, B.M.Zonenshain, L.P., Kuzmin, M.I., Page, B.M.Paleogeodynamics.. The plate tectonic evolution of the earthAmerican Geophysical Union (AGU) Geodynamic Series, Special Paper, 218p. approx. $ 45.00MantleLithosphere, Plates, boundaries, Hot spots, Paleomagnetism
DS200512-0815
2004
Page, F.Z.Page, F.Z.Quartz exsolution in clinopyroxene is not proof of ultra high pressures: evidence from phase equilibration temperatures and eclogite from the eastern Blue Ridge, southern Appalachians.Geological Society of America Annual Meeting ABSTRACTS, Nov. 7-10, Paper 195-3, Vol. 36, 5, p. 453.United States, AppalachiaUHP, Ecologite
DS200712-0795
2007
Page, F.Z.Page, F.Z., Fu, B., Kita, N.T., Fournelle, Spicuzza, Schulze, Viljoen, Basei, ValleyZircons from kimberlite: new insights into oxygen isotopes, trace elements, and Ti in zircon thermometry.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 71, 15, pp. 3887-3903.TechnologyZircon thermometry
DS200712-0960
2007
Page, F.Z.Schulze, D.J., Page, F.Z., Valley, J.W., Harte, B., Kita, N., Channer, D.M.,Jaques, L.Quasi-correlation between carbon and oxygen isotope signatures in eclogitic diamonds and their mineral inclusions.Geological Association of Canada, Gac-Mac Yellowknife 2007, May 23-25, Volume 32, 1 pg. abstract p.73-74.South America, Venezuela, Australia, Africa, BotswanaGeochronology
DS200812-0372
2008
Page, F.Z.Fu, B., Page, F.Z., Cavosie, A.J., Fournelle, J., Kita, N.T., Lackey, J.S., Wilde, S.A., Valley, J.W.Ti in zircon thermometry: applications and limitations.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, 37p. in press availableTechnologyGeothermometry - kimberlites
DS201112-0982
2011
Page, F.Z.Sobolev, N.V., Schertl, H-P., Valley, J.W., Page, F.Z., Kita, N.T., Spicuzza, M.J., Neuser, R.D., Logvinova, A.M.Oxygen isotope variations of garnets and clinopyroxenes in a layered Diamondiferous calcsilicate rock from Kokchetav Massif, Kazakhstan: a window into geochemicalContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 162, 5, pp.1079-1092.Russia, KazakhstanDeeply subducted UHPM rocks
DS201312-0794
2013
Page, F.Z.Schulze, D., Harte, B., Page, F.Z., Valley, J.W., DeR Channer, D.M., Jaques, A.L.Anticorrelation between low d13c of eclogitic diamonds and high d180 of their coesite and garnet inclusions requires a subduction origin.Geology, Vol. No. 4, pp. 455-458.South America, Venezuela, Australia, Africa, BotswanaDeposit - Guaniamo, Arygle, Orapa
DS202012-2219
2020
Page, F.Z.Hoover, W.F., Page, F.Z., Schulze, D.J., Kitajima, K., Valley, J.W.Massive fluid influx beneath the Colorado Plateau ( USA) related to slab removal and diatreme emplacement: evidence from oxygen isotope zoning in eclogite xenoliths.Journal of Petrology, in press available, 52p. PdfUnited States, Colorado Plateaueclogite

Abstract: The Colorado Plateau has undergone as much as 1.8?km of uplift over the past 80?Ma, but never underwent the pervasive deformation common in the neighboring tectonic provinces of the western USA. To understand the source, timing and distribution of mantle hydration, and its role in plateau uplift, garnets from four eclogite xenoliths of the Moses Rock diatreme (Navajo Volcanic Field, Utah, USA) were analyzed in situ for d18O by secondary ion mass spectrometry. These garnets have the largest reported intra-crystalline oxygen isotope zoning to date in mantle-derived xenoliths with core-to-rim variations of as much as 3‰. All samples have core d18O values greater than that of the pristine mantle (~5.3‰, mantle garnet as derived from mantle zircon; Valley et al., 1998; Page et al., 2007) consistent with an altered upper oceanic crust protolith. Oxygen isotope ratios decrease from core to rim recording interaction with a low-d18O fluid at high temperature, likely derived from serpentinite in the foundering Farallon slab. All zoned samples converge at a d18O value of ~6‰, regardless of core composition, suggesting that fluid infiltration was widely distributed. Constraints on the timing of this fluid influx, relative to diatreme emplacement, can be gained from diffusion modeling of major element zoning in garnet. Modeling using best-estimates of peak metamorphic conditions (620ºC, 3.7?GPa) yield durations of?
DS201604-0610
2016
Page, L.Hall, E.M.G., McClenaghan, M.B., Page, L.Application of portable XRF to the direct analysis of till samples from various deposit types in Canada.Geochemistry, Exploration, Environment, Analysis, Vol. 16, pp. 62-84.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesKimberlite - Triple B mentioned

Abstract: In this study, results by direct portable XRF (‘pXRF’) on unsieved till samples were compared with those by established laboratory methods (aqua regia or fusion ICP-MS and ICP-ES) on the <0.063-mm fraction to determine if the application of direct pXRF in the field would serve as an acceptable guide for immediate follow-up work. Four test sites in Canada were chosen: the Halfmile Lake Cu-Pb-Zn VMS deposit; the intrusion-hosted W-Mo Sisson deposit; a Pb-Zn Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposit in the Pine Point district; and the Triple B kimberlite. Unsieved till samples from the GSC archive collection were used for this study and included samples from background areas, immediately overlying, and at various distances down-ice of each deposit. Ziploc® and Whirl-Pak® bags that were used to contain the samples in the field were tested for their properties of X-ray attenuation and contamination. In general, the performance of pXRF in the four test areas was very good where concentrations of elements of interest (indicator or pathfinder elements) were substantially above detection limits by this technique (in the low ppm range for many elements). The following elements, shown to be useful indicator elements (important constituents of the ore/commodity) or pathfinder elements (those associated with the commodity elements) by the established methodology, showed similar patterns by pXRF on the unsieved material: Zn, Cu, Pb, and As at Halfmile Lake; W, Mo, Cu, Zn, Pb, and As at the Sisson deposit; Zn, Pb, and Fe at Pine Point; and Ca, Sr, Cr, and Ni at Triple B. Pathfinder elements whose concentrations were too low for determination by pXRF include: Ag and Sb at Halfmile Lake; Ag and Cd at Sisson; Cd, S, and Se at Pine Point; and Co, Mg, P, U, and Th at Triple B. The high background for Bi by pXRF, equivalent to c. 50?ppm, and its noisy signal precluded its use at Halfmile Lake and Sisson. Elements which tended to show poor precision (three analyses each sample) by pXRF in some samples due to sample heterogeneity include Sn, V, and W. Mercury was erroneously reported for the majority of samples in the low ppm range by pXRF whereas its concentration in fact was in the low ppb range. Several Pb-, Zn- (c. 1% Pb, Zn) and Fe-rich (up to 16% Fe) samples demonstrated spectral interferences by: Pb on As, Th and Se; Zn on Cu; and Fe on Co. Results for six till samples analysed in Ziploc® and Whirl-Pak® bags showed that Ziploc® absorbs fewer low-energy photons and hence is preferable for determining light elements such as Si, K and Ca.
DS201811-2598
2018
Page, L.Page, L., Hattori, K., Guillot, S.Mantle wedge serpentinites: a transient reservoir of halogens, boron and nitrogen for the deeper mantle.Geology, Vol. 46, 9, pp. 883-886.Mantlenitrogen

Abstract: Fluorine (50-650 ppm), bromine (0.03-0.3 ppm), iodine (0.03-0.4 ppm), boron (20-100 ppm) and nitrogen (5-45 ppm) concentrations are elevated in antigorite-serpentinites associated with the Tso Morari ultrahigh-pressure unit (Himalayas) exhumed from >100 km depth in the mantle wedge. These fluid-mobile elements are likely released with fluids from subducted marine sediments on the Indian continental margin to hydrate overlying forearc serpentinites at shallow depths. Of these, F and B appear to remain in serpentinites during the lizardite-antigorite transition. Our results demonstrate serpentinites as transient reservoirs of halogens, B, and N to at least 100 km depth in the mantle wedge, and likely deeper in colder slabs, providing a mechanism for their transport to the deeper mantle.
DS201902-0305
2018
Page, L.Page, L., Hattori, K.Abyssal serpentinites: transporting halogens from Earth's surface to the deep mantle.MDPI Minerals, 14p. PdfMantlesubduction

Abstract: Serpentinized oceanic mantle lithosphere is considered an important carrier of water and fluid-mobile elements, including halogens, into subduction zones. Seafloor serpentinite compositions indicate Cl, Br and I are sourced from seawater and sedimentary pore fluids, while F may be derived from hydrothermal fluids. Overall, the heavy halogens are expelled from serpentinites during the lizardite-antigorite transition. Fluorine, on the other hand, appears to be retained or may be introduced from dehydrating sediments and/or igneous rocks during early subduction. Mass balance calculations indicate nearly all subducted F is kept in the subducting slab to ultrahigh-pressure conditions. Despite a loss of Cl, Br and I from serpentinites (and other lithologies) during early subduction, up to 15% of these elements are also retained in the deep slab. Based on a conservative estimate for serpentinite thickness of the metamorphosed slab (500 m), antigorite serpentinites comprise 37% of this residual Cl, 56% of Br and 50% of I, therefore making an important contribution to the transport of these elements to the deep mantle.
DS2001-0118
2001
Page, L.M.Bogdanova, S.V., Page, L.M., Skridlaite, G., Taran, L.Proterozoic tectonothermal history in the western part of the East European Craton: 40 Ar 39 Ar constraints..#2Tectonophysics, Vol. 339, No. 1-2, pp. 39-66.EuropeGeochronology, Craton
DS2001-0119
2001
Page, L.M.Bogdanova, S.V., Page, L.M., Skridlaite, G., Taran, L.N.Proterozoic tectonothermal history in the western part of the East European Craton: 40 Ar 39 Ar constraints #1Tectonophysics, Vol. 339, No. 1-2, pp. 183-92.EuropePaleomagnetics, Tectonics
DS201112-0452
2011
Page, M.Hough, S.E., Page, M.Toward a consistent model for strain accrual and release for the New Madrid Seismic Zone, central United States.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 116, B 3 B03311United StatesGeophysics - seismics
DS1985-0245
1985
Page, N.J.Gray, F., Page, N.J., Wilson, S.A., Carlson, R.R.Contrasting Petrology and Platinum Group Elements (pge) Geochemistry of Zoned Ultramafic Complexes, Klamath Mountains, California and Oregon.Canadian Mineralogist., Vol. 23, PT. 2, MAY P. 304. (abstract.).United States, West Coast, California, OregonGeochemistry, Geochronology, Petrography
DS1993-1170
1993
Page, N.J.Orris, G.J., Page, N.J., Bolm, K.S., Gray, F.Mines, prospects and occurrences of the Venezuelan Guayana ShieldUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Bulletin, No. B2062, pp. 29-53.Venezuela, GuyanaDiamonds
DS1995-2086
1995
Page, N.J.Wynn, J.C., Sidder, G.B., Gray, F., Page, N.J., Mendoza, V.Geology and mineral deposits of the Venezuelan Guayana shield... goldUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Bulletin, No. 2124-A, approx. 150pVenezuela, GuyanaBook -table of contents, Geophysics, Lo Increible, Sierra Verdun, Cerro ArrendaJ.
DS1995-1414
1995
Page, R.Page, R., Hoatson, D.high Pressure precision geochronology of Paleoproterozoic layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions in East KimberleyAgso Newsletter, No. 22, May pp. 7, 8AustraliaLayered complexes, Geochronology
DS1975-0374
1976
Page, R.W.Page, R.W., Blake, D.H., Mahon, M.W.Geochronology and Related Aspects of Acid Volcanics Associated Granites, and Other Proterozoic Rocks of the Granites-tanami Region.B.m.r. Journal of Aust. Geol. Geophys., Vol. 1, PP. 1-13.AustraliaKimberlite, Regional Geology
DS1995-1890
1995
Page, R.W.Taylor, W.R., Page, R.W., Esslemont, G., Rock, N., ChalmersGeology of the volcanic hosted Brockman rare metals deposit: volcanicenvironment, geochronology, petrographyMineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 52, No. 3-4, pp. 209-230.AustraliaHalls Creek Mobile Zone, rare earth, Deposit -Brockman
DS1995-1891
1995
Page, R.W.Taylor, W.R., Page, R.W., Esslemont, G., Rock, N., ChalmersGeology of the volcanic hosted Brockman rare metals deposit, Halls Creek Mobile Zone: environmentMineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 52, No. 3-4, pp. 209-230AustraliaRare earths, geochronology, petrography, Volcanics, Deposit -Brockman
DS1999-0752
1999
Page, R.W.Tyler, I.M., Page, R.W., Griffin, T.J.Depositional age and provenance of the Marboo Formation from SHRIMPgeochronology: Paleoproterozoic evolutionPrecambrian Research, Vol. 95, No. 3-4, May 15, pp. 225-43.Australia, Western AustraliaGeochronology, Kimberley area - not specific to diamonds
DS2000-0362
2000
Page, R.W.Griffin, T.J., Page, R.W., Sheppard, TylerTectonic implications of Paleoproterozoic post collisional high Potassium felsic igneous rocks Kimberley....Precambrian Research, Vol. 100, No. 1-3, pp. 1-23.AustraliaTectonics
DS1991-1282
1991
Pagel, M.Pagel, M., Leroy, J.L.Source, transport and deposition of metalsA.a. Balkema, 850p. approx. $ 95.00GlobalBook -table of contents -metallogeny, transport, deposits, Ore deposition, PTXt, source of metals, dating, structur
DS1999-0528
1999
Pagel, M.Pagel, M., Barbey, P.GeothermometersEncyclopedia Geochemistry, Marshall and Fairbridge, pp. 302-4.GlobalGeothermometry - definition
DS1980-0269
1980
Pagel-Theisen, V.Pagel-Theisen, V.Diamond Grading AbcNew York: Rubin And Son, 7th. Edition., 271P.GlobalKimberlite, Kimberley, Janlib, Diamond
DS1983-0500
1983
Pagel-Theisen, V.Pagel-Theisen, V.Diamond Grading Abc: Handbook of Diamond GradingRadnor: Chilton Publishing Jewellers Circular Keystone Keystone., 271P.GlobalKimberley
DS201512-1957
2015
Paget, M.Paget, M., Chiaramello, P.Goldsim water balance modeling of waste rock piles, Ekati waste rock storage area ( Ekati WRSA).43rd Annual Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts, abstract p. 77.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Ekati

Abstract: The Ekati Waste Rock Storage Piles (WRSA) water balance model was developed in Goldsim as a module designed to support water quality estimates. The water balance module accounts for direct precipitation, snowmelt, seepage, runoff, and delays to flow within the WRSA. As the Ekati Mine is located within a climate zone of continuous permafrost, a portion of the water infiltrating the WRSA’s becomes trapped within the waste rock as ice when it encounters sub-freezing internal temperatures. Seepage leaching from the WRSAs is thus limited to the outer surface of the WRSAs (active layer) where water produced by melting of seasonal surficial ice and snow. The active layer was modeled by detaining all water in the WRSA from October to the end of June. After June the water was released from the layer using a delay function, which is described below. The model divides seepage and runoff into three physically-based flow paths. ? The primary flow path is of water that falls infiltrates vertically through the waste rock until it encounters an impermeable lens of ice-saturate rock, and travels horizontally, to ultimately emerge at the toe of the WRSAs. ? The secondary flow path is water that falls on the outer slopes of the WRSAs and seeps under the outer slopes to the toe. ? The third flow path is also of water that falls on the outer slopes of the WRSAs and travels along the surface of the WRSA to the toe as runoff. Water losses were accounted at the surface of the pile prior to infiltration and within the pile as follows; ? water losses from evaporation is represented by a runoff coefficients; and ? water loss to the pile is modeled based on a percentage of volume of waste rock. As each WRSA is saturation flows exiting the pile increase. Flat infiltration is the slowest flow path and creates base flows that maintain flows out of the WRSAs during late summer and early winter periods. The slopes seepage is released more slowly over several days or weeks. While slopes runoff is the fastest flow path creating storm peaks during rainfall events. Results of the total WRSA discharge are a constant slow outflow at the toe with small increases due to precipitation events and the freshet, which is consistent with observations of waste rock drainage. Flows are attenuated using a time delay, which was simulated for each flow path using an Erlang function. The Erlang function refers to a two-parameter Gaussian distribution, where the shape parameter n is an integer. Hydrologically, the parameter n corresponds to the number of hypothetical linear reservoirs (Nash 1957). For the slopes runoff, n = 1 is assumed, which gives an exponential distribution. For the flats infiltration and slope seepage n = 2 is assumed, which gives a typical unit hydrograph shape with a delayed peak flow. The value of the lag parameter for each component was determined through model calibration.
DS200412-0432
2004
Pagli, C.De Zeeuw van Dalfsen, E., Pedersen, R., Sigmundsson, F., Pagli, C.Satellite radar interferometry 1993-1999 suggest deep accumulation of magma near the crust mantle boundary at the Krafla volcaniGeophysical Research Letters, Vol.31, 13, July 16, 10.1029/2004 GL020059Europe, IcelandGeophysics - boundary
DS1999-0529
1999
Pagnelli, F.Pagnelli, F., Rivard, B.Tracking geological structures in the central Alberta foothills, Canada using Radarsat imagery.Thematic Conference Remotes Sensing, 13, 1, p. 109. abstract.AlbertaStructure - fold belt, Brazeau, Ancona
DS2002-1202
2002
Pagnelli, F.Pagnelli, F., Richards, J.P., Grunsky, E.C.Integration of structural, gravity and magnetic dat a using the weights of evidenceNatural Resources Research, Vol. 11,3,pp. 219-36.AlbertaGeophysics - gravity, magnetics, Exploration techniques
DS200812-0836
2008
Pagot, E.Pagot, E., Pesaresi, M., Buda, D., Ehrlich, D.Development of an object oriented classification model using very high resolution satellite imagery for monitoring diamond mining activity.International Journal of Remote Sensing, Vol. 29, 2, Jan. pp. 499-512.AfricaRemote sensing - mine
DS2000-0066
2000
Pagulayan, R.Bauman, P.D., Kellett, R., Pagulayan, R., Hinnell, A.Borehole geophysics as an aid to kimberlite exploration in the Canadian Prairie region.Proceedings Symposium Application of Geophysics, pp. 563-5.Alberta, Western Canada Sedimentary BasinGeophysics - gamma ray
DS201901-0091
2018
Pahlevan, K.Wu, J., Desch, S.J., Schaefer, L., Elkins-Tanton, L.T., Pahlevan, K., Buseck, P.R.Origin of Earth's water: chondritic inheritance plus nebular ingassing and storage of hydrogen in the core.Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, doei:10.1029/ 2018JE005698Mantlewater

Abstract: People have long had curiosity in the origin of Earth's water (equivalently hydrogen). Solar nebula has been given the least attention among existing theories, although it was the predominating reservoir of hydrogen in our early solar system. Here we present a first model for Earth's water origin that quantifies contribution from the solar nebula in addition to that from chondrites, the primary building blocks of Earth. The model considers dissolution of nebular hydrogen into the early Earth's magma oceans and reaction between hydrogen and iron droplets within the magma ocean. Such processes not only delivered countless hydrogen atoms from the mantle to the core but also generated an appreciable difference in hydrogen isotopic composition (2H/1H ratio) between the mantle and core. Fitting the model to current knowledge about Earth's hydrogen produces best combinations of nebular and chondritic contributions to Earth's water. We find that nearly one out of every 100 water molecules on Earth came from the solar nebula. Our planet hides majority of its water inside, with roughly two oceans in the mantle and four to five oceans in the core. These results suggest inevitable formation of water on sufficiently large rocky planets in extrasolar systems.
DS1988-0532
1988
Pai, D.M.Pai, D.M., Huang, M.A generalized Haskell matrix method for borehole electromagnetics: theory and applicationsGeophysics, Vol. 53, No. 12, December pp. 1577-1586GlobalGeophysics, electromagnetic
DS201904-0729
2019
Paiement, J.P.Desharnais, G., Paiement, J.P., Hatfield, D., Poupart, N.Mining BIG data: the future of exploration targeting using machine learning.PDAC Short Course, 5p. PdfGlobaldata sets
DS1986-0629
1986
Paige, D.Paige, D.The application of cobble shape parameters in locating raised beach deposits in the Bogenfels basin,southwestern NamibiaPetros, Vol. 13, pp. 75-85Southwest Africa, NamibiaPlacers, Diamonds, sedimentology
DS1991-0275
1991
Paige, S.C.B.Coenraads, R.R., Paige, S.C.B., Sutherland, F.L.Ilmenite-mantle rutile crystals from the Uralla district, New South SOURCE[ Royal Soc. New South Wales Journal and ProceedingsRoyal Soc. New South Wales Journal and Proceedings, Vol. 124, pp. 23-34Australia, New South WalesHeavy minerals, Resemble kimberlite crystals
DS2001-0879
2001
Paillard, D.Paillard, D.Glacial cycles: towards a new paradigmReviews of Geophysics, Vol. 39, No. 3, Aug. pp. 325-46.GlobalGeomorphology
DS2002-1203
2002
Paim, M.M.Paim, M.M., Cid, J.P., Rosa, M.L.S., Conceicao, H., Nardi, L.V.S.Mineralogy of lamprophyres and mafic enclaves associated with Paleoproterozoic Cara Suja syenite, northeast Brazil.International Geology Review, Vol. 44, No. 11, Nov. pp. 1017-1036.Brazil, northeastLamprophyres
DS2003-1041
2003
Paim, M.M.Paim, M.M., Cid, J.P., Rosa, M.K\L.S., Conceicao, H., Nardi, L.V.S.Mineralogy of lamprophyres and mafic enclaves associated with the PaleoproterozoicInternational Geology Review, Vol. 44, 11, Nov. pp. 1017-36.BrazilDikes - lamprophyres
DS2003-1042
2003
Paim, M.M.Paim, M.M., Pla Cid, J., Rosa, M.L.S., Conceircao, H., Nardi, L.V.S.Mineralogy of lamprophyres and mafic enclaves associated with the PaleoproterozoicInternational Geology Review, Vol. 44, pp. 1017-36.BrazilDikes - alkaline potassic
DS200412-1490
2003
Paim, M.M.Paim, M.M., Cid, J.P., Rosa, M.K\L.S., Conceicao, H., Nardi, L.V.S.Mineralogy of lamprophyres and mafic enclaves associated with the Paleoproterozoic Cara Suja syenite, northeast Brazil.International Geology Review, Vol. 44, 11, Nov. pp. 1017-36.South America, BrazilDikes - lamprophyres
DS200512-0816
2002
Paim, M.M.Paim, M.M., Pia Cid, J., Rosa, M.L.S., Conceicao, H., Nardi, L.V.S.Mineralogy of lamprophyres and mafic enclaves associated with the Paleoproterozoic Cara Suja syenite, northeast Brazil.International Geology Review, Vol. 44, Nov. 11, pp. 1017-1036.South America, BrazilLamprophyre
DS201904-0764
2019
Paiment, J-P.Paiment, J-P.Database and input data.PDAC Short Course, 71p. Pdf availableGlobaldata sets
DS2002-0031
2002
Paine, M.Anand, R.R., Paine, M.Regolith geology of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia: implications for explorationAustralian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol.49,1,pp.3-162.AustraliaRegolith - geochemistry, overview
DS200612-1165
2006
Paino-Douce, A.E.Roden, M.F., Paino-Douce, A.E., Jagoutz, E., Lazko, E.E.High pressure petrogenesis of Mg rich garnet pyroxenites from Mir kimberlite, Russia.Lithos, Vol. 90, 1-2, pp. 77-91.Russia, SiberiaMajorite
DS1994-1327
1994
Painter, S.Painter, S., Cameron, E.M., Allan, R., Rouse, J.Reconnaissance geochemistry and its environmental relevanceJournal of Geochem. Explor, Vol. 51, No. 3, Sept. pp. 213-246CanadaGeochemistry, Environmental aspects
DS200412-0481
2004
Painter, T.H.Dozier, J., Painter, T.H.Multispectral and hyper spectral remote sensing of alpine snow properties.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 32, May pp. 465-494.TechnologyOverview - Hyperspectral remote sensing
DS1993-1179
1993
Pair, D.L.Pair, D.L., Rodriques, C.G.Late Quaternary deglaciation of the southwestern St. Lawrence Lowland, New York and Ontario.Geological Society of America Bulletin, Vol. 105, No. 9, September pp. 1151-1164.Ontario, New YorkGeomorphology, Glacial deposits
DS2002-0106
2002
PaivaBarreto, A.M., Bezerra, F.H., Suguio, tatumi, Yee, Paiva, MunitaLate Pleistocene marine terrace deposits in northeastern Brasil: sea level change and tectonic implications.Paleogeography Paleoclimatology Palaeoecology, Vol.179,1-2,pp,57-69.Brazil, north eastGeomorphlogy - not specific to diamonds
DS201112-0281
2010
Paiva de Oliveira, E.Donatti Filho, J.P., Paiva de Oliveira, E., Tappeb, S., Heaman, L.U Pb TIMS perovskite dating of the Brauna kimberlite field, Sao Francisco craton - Brazil: constraints on Neoproterozoic alkaline magmatism.5th Brasilian Symposium on Diamond Geology, Nov. 6-12, abstract p. 81.South America, BrazilGeochronology
DS200612-0463
2005
Paivi, R.J.Gilmore, E., Nils, G., Paivi, R.J.Conflict diamonds: a new dataset.Conflict Management and Peace Science , Vol. 22, 3, Fall, pp. 257-272.AfricaConflict diamonds
DS1983-0267
1983
Pajari, G.E.Gunter, W.D., Pajari, G.E., Hoinkes, G., Trembath, L.T.Mineral Flow Layering in the Leucite Hills VolcanicsGeological Association of Canada (GAC)/Mineralogical Association of Canada (MAC)/CGU, Vol. 8, ABSTRACT VOLUME, P. A32. ( abstract.)United States, Wyoming, Rocky MountainsLeucite, Wyomingite, Orendite
DS1990-0612
1990
Pajari, G.E.Gunter, W.D., Hoinkes, G., Ogden, P., Pajari, G.E.Origin of leucite rich and sanidine roch flow layers in the Leucite Hills volcanic field, WyomingJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 95, No. B 10, September 10, pp. 15, 911-15, 928WyomingLeucite, Lamproite -orendite
DS201412-0661
2014
Pajot-Metivier, G.Panet, I., Pajot-Metivier, G., Greff-Lefftz, M., Metivier, L., Diament, M.Mapping the mass distribution of Earth's mantle using satellite-derived gravity gradients.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 7, 2, Feb. pp. 131-135.MantleGeophysics - tomography
DS201610-1887
2016
Pajot-Metivier, G.Metivier, L., Caron, L., Greff-Lefftz, M., Pajot-Metivier, G., Fleitout, L., Rouby, H.Evidence for Post glacial signatures in gravity gradients: a clue in lower mantle viscosity. ( Hudson bay region)Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 453, pp. 146-156.Canada, OntarioGravity

Abstract: The Earth's surface was depressed under the weight of ice during the last glaciations. Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) induces the slow recession of the trough that is left after deglaciation and is responsible for a contemporary uplift rate of more than 1 cm/yr around Hudson Bay. The present-day residual depression, an indicator of still-ongoing GIA, is difficult to identify in the observed topography, which is predominantly sensitive to crustal heterogeneities. According to the most widespread GIA models, which feature a viscosity of on top of the lower mantle, the trough is approximately 100 m deep and cannot explain the observed gravity anomalies across North America. These large anomalies are therefore usually attributed to subcontinental density heterogeneities in the tectosphere or to slab downwelling in the deep mantle.
DS201912-2795
2019
PakhailovaKrivovichev, S.V., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Panikorovskii, T.L., Savchenko, E.E., Pakhailova, Yu, A., Selivanova, E.A., Kadyrova, G.I., Ivanyuk, G.Yu.,Krivovchev, S.V.Nikmelnikovite: Ca 12 Fe 2+ Fe 3+3 Al3(SiO4) 6(OH)20: a new mineral from the Kovdor Massif ( Kola Peninsula, Russia)Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 488, 2, pp. 1200-1202.Russia, Kola Peninsuladeposit - Kovdor
DS1991-1815
1991
Pakhlomovskii, Y.A.Voloshin, A.V., Subbotin, V.V., Pakhlomovskii, Y.A.Belkovite - a new barium-niobium silicate from carbonatites of the Vuoriyarvi Massif (Kola Peninsula) USSRNeues Jahrbuch fnr Mineralogie, No. 1, pp. 23-31GlobalCarbonatite, Mineralogy
DS1990-1190
1990
Pakholchenko, Yu.A.Plyusnin, G.S., Kolyago, Ye.K., Pakholchenko, Yu.A., KalmychkovaRubidium-strontium age and genesis of the Kiya alkalic pluton, YeniseyRidgeDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 305, No. 2, Sept. pp. 207-210RussiaAlkalic pluton, Geochronology -rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr)
DS1985-0633
1985
Pakhomov, Y.A.Smolkin, V.F., Pakhomov, Y.A.An Olivine Chromspinellid Paragenesis in Ultramafites of Pechenga and its Petrogenetic Significance.Geologii i Geofiziki, No. 4, PP. 57-73.RussiaPetrography
DS201904-0765
2018
Pakhomova, V.A.Pakhomova, V.A., Fedoseev, D.G., Kultenko, S.Y., Karabtsov, A.A., Tishkina, V.B., Solyanik, V.A., Kamynin, V.A.Synthetic moissanite coated with diamond film imitating rough diamond.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 54, 4, 4p.Russiamoissanite
DS201112-0539
2011
Pakhomovskii, Ya.A.Korchak, Yu.A., Menshikov, Yu.P., Pakhomovskii, Ya.A., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Ivanyuk, G.Yu.Trap formation of the Kola Peninsula.Petrology, Vol. 19, 1, pp. 87-101.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkaline rocks, Lovozero and Khibiny
DS1998-0874
1998
PakhomovskyLiferovich, R.P., Subbotin, V.V., Pakhomovsky, LyalinaA new type of scandium mineralization in phoscorites and carbonatites Of the Kovdor Massif, Russia.Can. Min., Vol. 36, No. 4, Aug. pp. 971-80.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite, mineralogy, Deposit - Kovdor Massif
DS2000-1036
2000
PakhomovskyYakubovich, O.V., Massa, W., Liferovich, PakhomovskyThe crystal structure of bakhchisaraitsevite: hydrothermal origin from Kovdor phoscorite carbonatiteCanadian Mineralogist, Vol. 38, 4, Aug. pp. 831-8.RussiaCarbonatite, Deposit - Kovdor
DS2001-0688
2001
PakhomovskyLifrovich, R.P., Pakhomovsky, Bogdanova, BalaganskayaCollinsite in hydrothermal assemblages related to carbonatites in the Kovdor Complex, northwestern RussiaCanadian Mineralogist, Vol. 39, No. 4, Aug. pp.1081-94.RussiaCarbonatite, mineralogy, Deposit - Kovdor
DS200612-0908
2006
PakhomovskyMenishikov, Y.P., Krivovichev, S.V., Pakhomovsky, Yakovenchuk, Ivanyuk, Mikhailova, Armbruster,SelivanovaChivruaiite, Ca(Ti,Nb)5(Si6O17)2 (OH,O)5.13-14H20, a new mineral from hydrothermal veins of Khibiny and Lovozero alkaline massifs.American Mineralogist, Vol. 91, 5-6, May pp. 922-928.Russia, Kola PeninsulaMineralogy - alkaline
DS2000-0919
2000
Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Sorokhtina, N.V., Voloshin, A.V., Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Hemimorphite from carbonatites of the Kola Peninsula. IN RUSSIANProceedings Russ. Min. Soc. *RUSS, Vol. 129, No. 2, pp.80-84.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS2003-0751
2003
Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Krivovichev, S.V., Armbruster, T., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Crystal structure of Lamprophyllite - 2M and Lamprophyllite -2O from the LovozeroEuropean Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 15, 4, pp. 711-18.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkaline rocks - mineralogy
DS200412-1056
2003
Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Krivovichev, S.V., Armbruster, T., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Crystal structure of Lamprophyllite - 2M and Lamprophyllite -2O from the Lovozero alkaline massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 15, 4, pp. 711-18.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkaline rocks, mineralogy
DS200712-1195
2007
Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Yakovenchuk, V.N., Pakhomovsky,Y.A., Menshikov, Y.P., Mikhailova, J.A., Ivanyuk, G.Y., Zalkind, O.A.Krivovichevite a new mineral species from the Lovozero alkaline massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia.The Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 45, 3, pp. 451-456.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkaline rocks, mineralogy
DS200712-1196
2007
Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Yakovenchuk, V.N., Pakhomovsky,Y.A., Menshikov, Y.P., Mikhailova, J.A., Ivanyuk, G.Y., Zalkind, O.A.Krivovichevite a new mineral species from the Lovozero alkaline massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia.The Canadian Mineralogist, Vol. 45, 3, pp. 451-456.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkaline rocks, mineralogy
DS201012-0414
2010
Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Krivovichev, S.V., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Zhitova, E.S., Zolotarev, A.A., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Ivanyuk, G.Yu.Crystal chemistry of natural layered double hydroxides, 1. Quintinite -2H-3c from the Kovdor alkaline massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 74, pp. 821-832.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS201112-1175
2011
Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Zolotarev, A.A., Krivovichev, S.V., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Zhitova, E.S., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Ivanyuk, G.Y.Crystal chemistry of natural layered double hydroxides from the Kovdor alkaline massif, Kola. Polytypes of quininite: cation ordering and superstructures.Peralk-Carb 2011, workshop held Tubingen Germany June 16-18, PosterRussia, Kola PeninsulaAlkalic
DS201507-0325
2015
Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Mikhailova, J.A., Kalashnikov, A.O., Sokharev, V.A., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Konopleva, N.G., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Bazai, A.V., Goryainov, P.M., Ivanyuk, G.Yu.3D mineralogical mapping of the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite complex, Russia.Mineralium Deposita, In press available. 19p.RussiaCarbonatite
DS201602-0226
2016
Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Mikhailova, J.A., Kalashnikov, A.O., Sokharev, V.A., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Konopleva, N.G., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Bazai, A.V., Goryainov, P.M., Ivanyuk, G.Y.3D mineralogical mapping of the Kovdor phoscorite carbonatite complex ( Russia).Mineralium Deposita, Vol. 51, 1, pp. 131-149.RussiaDeposit - Kovdor

Abstract: The Kovdor baddeleyite-apatite-magnetite deposit in the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite pipe is situated in the western part of the zoned alkali-ultrabasic Kovdor intrusion (NW part of the Fennoscandinavian shield; Murmansk Region, Russia). We describe major intrusive and metasomatic rocks of the pipe and its surroundings using a new classification of phoscorite-carbonatite series rocks, consistent with the IUGS recommendation. The gradual zonation of the pipe corresponds to the sequence of mineral crystallization (forsterite-hydroxylapatite-magnetite-calcite). Crystal morphology, grain size, characteristic inclusions, and composition of the rock-forming and accessory minerals display the same spatial zonation pattern, as do the three minerals of economic interest, i.e. magnetite, hydroxylapatite, and baddeleyite. The content of Sr, rare earth elements (REEs), and Ba in hydroxylapatite tends to increase gradually at the expense of Si, Fe, and Mg from early apatite-forsterite phoscorite (margins of the pipe) through carbonate-free, magnetite-rich phoscorite to carbonate-rich phoscorite and phoscorite-related carbonatite (inner part). Magnetite displays a trend of increasing V and Ca and decreasing Ti, Mn, Si, Cr, Sc, and Zn from the margins to the central part of the pipe; its grain size initially increases from the wall rocks to the inner part and then decreases towards the central part; characteristic inclusions in magnetite are geikielite within the marginal zone of the phoscorite-carbonatite pipe, spinel within the intermediate zone, and ilmenite within the inner zone. The zoning pattern seems to have formed due to both cooling and rapid degassing (pressure drop) of a fluid-rich magmatic column and subsequent pneumatolytic and hydrothermal processes.
DS201803-0487
2018
Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Yakovenchuk, V.N., Yu, G., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Panikorovskii, T.L., Britvin, S.N., Krivivichev, S.V., Shilovskikh, V.V., Bocharov, V.N.Kampelite, Ba3Mg1.5,Sc4(PO4)6(OH)3.4H2O, a new very complex Ba-Sc phosphate mineral from the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite complex ( Kola Peninsula) Russia.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 112, pp. 111-121.Russia, Kola Peninsulacarbonatite - Kovdor
DS201808-1799
2018
Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Zhitova, E.S., Krivocichev, S.V., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Ivanyuk, G.Y., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Mikhailova, J.A.Crystal chemistry of natural layered double hydroxides: 4. Crystal structures and evolution of structural complexity of quintinite polytypes from the Kovdor alkaline ultrabasic massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 82, no. 2, pp. 329-346.Russia, Kola Peninsuladeposit - Kovdor

Abstract: Two quintinite polytypes, 3R and 2T, which are new for the Kovdor alkaline-ultrabasic complex, have been structurally characterized. The crystal structure of quintinite-2T was solved by direct methods and refined to R1 = 0.048 on the basis of 330 unique reflections. The structure is trigonal, P c1, a = 5.2720(6), c = 15.113(3) Å and V = 363.76(8) Å3. The crystal structure consists of [Mg2Al(OH)6]+ brucite-type layers with an ordered distribution of Mg2+ and Al3+ cations according to the × superstructure with the layers stacked according to a hexagonal type. The complete layer stacking sequence can be described as …=Ab1C = Cb1A=…. The crystal structure of quintinite-3R was solved by direct methods and refined to R1 = 0.022 on the basis of 140 unique reflections. It is trigonal, R m, a = 3.063(1), c = 22.674(9) Å and V = 184.2(1) Å3. The crystal structure is based upon double hydroxide layers [M2+,3+(OH)2] with disordered distribution of Mg, Al and Fe and with the layers stacked according to a rhombohedral type. The stacking sequence of layers can be expressed as …=?B = BC = CA=… The study of morphologically different quintinite generations grown on one another detected the following natural sequence of polytype formation: 2H ? 2T ? 1M that can be attributed to a decrease of temperature during crystallization. According to the information-based approach to structural complexity, this sequence corresponds to the increasing structural information per atom (IG): 1.522 ? 1.706 ? 2.440 bits, respectively. As the IG value contributes negatively to the configurational entropy of crystalline solids, the evolution of polytypic modifications during crystallization corresponds to the decreasing configurational entropy. This is in agreement with the general principle that decreasing temperature corresponds to the appearance of more complex structures.
DS201905-1046
2019
Pakhomovsky, Y.A.Ivanyuk, G.Y., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Panikorovskii, T.L., Konoplyova, N., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Bazai, A.V., Bocharov, V.N., Krivovichev, S.V.Hydroxynatropyrochlore, ( Na, Ca, Ce)2 Nb2O6(OH), a new member of the pyrochlore group from the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite pipe, Kola Peninsula, Russia.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 83, pp. 107-113.Russia, Kola Peninsulacarbonatite

Abstract: Hydroxynatropyrochlore, (Na,?a,Ce)2Nb2O6(OH), is a new Na-Nb-OH-dominant member of the pyrochlore supergroup from the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite pipe (Kola Peninsula, Russia). It is cubic, Fd-3m, a = 10.3211(3) Å, V = 1099.46 (8) Å3, Z = 8 (from powder diffraction data) or a = 10.3276(5) Å, V = 1101.5(2) Å3, Z = 8 (from single-crystal diffraction data). Hydroxynatropyrochlore is a characteristic accessory mineral of low-carbonate phoscorite of the contact zone of the phoscorite-carbonatite pipe with host foidolite as well as of carbonate-rich phoscorite and carbonatite of the pipe axial zone. It usually forms zonal cubic or cubooctahedral crystals (up to 0.5 mm in diameter) with irregularly shaped relics of amorphous U-Ta-rich hydroxykenopyrochlore inside. Characteristic associated minerals include rockforming calcite, dolomite, forsterite, hydroxylapatite, magnetite,and phlogopite, accessory baddeleyite, baryte, barytocalcite, chalcopyrite, chamosite-clinochlore, galena, gladiusite, juonniite, ilmenite, magnesite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, quintinite, spinel, strontianite, valleriite, and zirconolite. Hydroxynatropyrochlore is pale-brown, with an adamantine to greasy lustre and a white streak. The cleavage is average on {111}, the fracture is conchoidal. Mohs hardness is about 5. In transmitted light, the mineral is light brown, isotropic, n = 2.10(5) (??= 589 nm). The calculated and measured densities are 4.77 and 4.60(5) g•cm-3, respectively. The mean chemical composition determined by electron microprobe is: F 0.05, Na2O 7.97, CaO 10.38, TiO2 4.71, FeO 0.42, Nb2O5 56.44, Ce2O3 3.56, Ta2O5 4.73, ThO2 5.73, UO2 3.66, total 97.65 wt. %. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of Nb+Ta+Ti = 2 apfu is (Na1.02Ca0.73Ce0.09Th0.09 U0.05Fe2+0.02)?2.00 (Nb1.68Ti0.23Ta0.09)?2.00O6.03(OH1.04F0.01)?1.05. The simplified formula is (Na, Ca,Ce)2Nb2O6(OH). The mineral slowly dissolves in hot HCl. The strongest X-ray powderdiffraction lines [listed as (d in Å)(I)(hkl)] are as follows: 5.96(47)(111), 3.110(30)(311), 2.580(100)(222), 2.368(19)(400), 1.9875(6)(333), 1.8257(25)(440) and 1.5561(14)(622). The crystal structure of hydroxynatropyrochlore was refined to R1 = 0.026 on the basis of 1819 unique observed reflections. The mineral belongs to the pyrochlore structure type A2B2O6Y1 with octahedral framework of corner-sharing BO6 octahedra with A cations and OH groups in the interstices. The Raman spectrum of hydroxynatropyrochlore contains characteristic bands of the lattice, BO6, B-O and O-H vibrations and no characteristic bands of the H2O vibrations. Within the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite pipe, hydroxynatropyrochlore is the latest hydrothermal mineral of the pyrochlore supergroup, which forms external rims around grains of earlier U-rich hydroxykenopyrochlore and separated crystals in voids of dolomite carbonatite veins. The mineral is named in accordance with the pyrochlore supergroup nomenclature.
DS201511-1849
2016
Pakhomovsky, Y.A.A.Kalashnikov, A.O., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Pakhomovsky, Y.A.A., Bazai, A.V., Sokharev, V.A., Konopleva, N.G., Mikhailova, J.A., Goryainov, P.M., Ivanyuk, G.Yu.Scandium of the Kovdor baddeleyite apatite magnetite deposit ( Murmansk region, Russia): mineralogy, spatial distribution, and potential source.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 72, pp. 532-537.RussiaCarbonatite
DS201602-0216
2015
Pakhomovsky, Ya.A.Konopleva, N.G., Ivanyuk, G.Yu., Pakhomovsky, Ya.A., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Mikhailova, Yu.A., Selivanova, E.A.Typochemistry of rinkite and products of its alteration in the Khibiny alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 57, 7, pp. 614-625.Russia, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Khibiny

Abstract: The occurrence, morphology, and composition of rinkite are considered against the background of zoning in the Khibiny pluton. Accessory rinkite is mostly characteristic of foyaite in the outer part of pluton, occurs somewhat less frequently in foyaite and rischorrite in the central part of pluton, even more sparsely in foidolites and apatite-nepheline rocks, and sporadically in fenitized xenoliths of the Lovozero Formation. The largest, up to economic, accumulations of rinkite are related to the pegmatite and hydrothermal veins, which occur in nepheline syenite on both sides of the Main foidolite ring. The composition of rinkite varies throughout the pluton. The Ca, Na, and F contents in accessory rinkite and amorphous products of its alteration progressively increase from foyaite and fenitized basalt of the Lovozero Formation to foidolite, rischorrite, apatite-nepheline rocks, and pegmatite-hydrothermal veins.
DS201602-0225
2015
Pakhomovsky, Ya.A.Menshikov, Yu.P., Mikhailova, Yu.A., Pakhomovsky, Ya.A., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Ivanyuk, G.Yu.Minerals of zirconolite group from fenitized xenoliths in nepheline syenites of Khibiny and Lovozero plutons, Kola Peninsula.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 57, 7, pp. 591-599.Russia, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Lovozero

Abstract: Zirconolite, its Ce-, Nd-, and Y-analogs, and laachite, another member of the zirconolite group, are typomorphic minerals of the fenitized xenoliths in nepheline syenite and foidolite of the Khibiny-Lovozero Complex, Kola Peninsula, Russia. All these minerals are formed at the late stage of fenitization as products of ilmentie alteration under the effect of Zr-bearing fluids. The diversity of these minerals is caused by the chemical substitutions of Na and Ca for REE, Th, and U compensated by substitution of Ti and Zr for Nb, Fe and Ta, as well as by the redistribution of REE between varieties enriched in Ti (HREE) or Nb (LREE). The results obtained can be used in the synthesis of Synroc-type titanate ceramics assigned for the immobilization of actinides.
DS201604-0611
2016
Pakhomovsky, Ya.A.Ivanyuk, G.Yu., Kalashnikov, A.O., Pakhomovsky, Ya.A., Mikhailov, J.A., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Konopleva, N.G., Sokharev, V.A., Bazai, A.V., Goryainov, P.M.Economic minerals of the Kovdor baddeleyite apatite magnetite deposit, Russia: mineralogy, spatial distribution and ore processing optimization.Ore Geology Reviews, in press available 73p.RussiaDeposit - Kovdor

Abstract: The comprehensive petrographical, petrochemical and mineralogical study of the Kovdor magnetite-apatite-baddeleyite deposit in the phoscorite-carbonatite complex (Murmansk Region, Russia) revealed a spatial distribution of grain size and chemical composition of three economically extractable minerals — magnetite, apatite, and baddeleyite, showing that zonal distribution of mineral properties mimics both concentric and vertical zonation of the carbonatite-phoscorite pipe. The marginal zone of the pipe consists of (apatite)-forsterite phoscorite carrying fine grains of Ti-Mn-Si-rich magnetite with ilmenite exsolution lamellae, fine grains of Fe-Mg-rich apatite and finest grains of baddeleyite, enriched in Mg, Fe, Si and Mn. The intermediate zone accommodates carbonate-free magnetite-rich phoscorites that carry medium to coarse grains of Mg-Al-rich magnetite with exsolution inclusions of spinel, medium-grained pure apatite and baddeleyite. The axial zone hosts carbonate-rich phoscorites and phoscorite-related carbonatites bearing medium-grained Ti-V-Ca-rich magnetite with exsolution inclusions of geikielite-ilmenite, fine grains of Ba-Sr-Ln-rich apatite and comparatively large grains of baddeleyite, enriched in Hf, Ta, Nb and Sc. The collected data enable us to predict such important mineralogical characteristics of the multicomponent ore as chemical composition and grain size of economic and associated minerals, presence of contaminating inclusions, etc. We have identified potential areas of maximum concentration of such by-products as scandium, niobium and hafnium in baddeleyite and REEs in apatite.
DS201605-0847
2016
Pakhomovsky, Ya.A.Ivanyuk, G.Yu., Kalashnikov, A.O., Pakhomovsky, Ya.A., Mikhailova, J.A., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Konopleva, N.G., Sokharev, V.A., Bazai, A.V., Goryainov, P.M.Economic minerals of the Kovdor baddeleyite apatite magnetite deposit, Russia: mineralogy, spatial distribution and ore procesing optimization.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 77, pp. 279-311.RussiaCarbonatite, Kovdor

Abstract: The comprehensive petrographical, petrochemical and mineralogical study of the Kovdor magnetite-apatite-baddeleyite deposit in the phoscorite-carbonatite complex (Murmansk Region, Russia) revealed a spatial distribution of grain size and chemical composition of three economically extractable minerals — magnetite, apatite, and baddeleyite, showing that zonal distribution of mineral properties mimics both concentric and vertical zonation of the carbonatite-phoscorite pipe. The marginal zone of the pipe consists of (apatite)-forsterite phoscorite carrying fine grains of Ti-Mn-Si-rich magnetite with ilmenite exsolution lamellae, fine grains of Fe-Mg-rich apatite and finest grains of baddeleyite, enriched in Mg, Fe, Si and Mn. The intermediate zone accommodates carbonate-free magnetite-rich phoscorites that carry medium to coarse grains of Mg-Al-rich magnetite with exsolution inclusions of spinel, medium-grained pure apatite and baddeleyite. The axial zone hosts carbonate-rich phoscorites and phoscorite-related carbonatites bearing medium-grained Ti-V-Ca-rich magnetite with exsolution inclusions of geikielite-ilmenite, fine grains of Ba-Sr-Ln-rich apatite and comparatively large grains of baddeleyite, enriched in Hf, Ta, Nb and Sc. The collected data enable us to predict such important mineralogical characteristics of the multicomponent ore as chemical composition and grain size of economic and associated minerals, presence of contaminating inclusions, etc. We have identified potential areas of maximum concentration of such by-products as scandium, niobium and hafnium in baddeleyite and REEs in apatite.
DS201608-1413
2016
Pakhomovsky, Ya.A.Ivanyuk, G.Yu., Kalashnikov, A.O., Pakhomovsky, Ya.A., Mikhailova, J.A., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Konopleva, N.G., Sokharev, V.A., Bazai, A.V., Goryainov, P.M.Economic minerals of the Kovdor baddeleyite apatite magnetite deposit, Russia: mineralogy, spatial distribution and ore processing optimization.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 77, pp. 279-311.RussiaDeposit - Kovdor

Abstract: The comprehensive petrographical, petrochemical and mineralogical study of the Kovdor magnetite-apatite-baddeleyite deposit in the phoscorite-carbonatite complex (Murmansk Region, Russia) revealed a spatial distribution of grain size and chemical composition of three economically extractable minerals — magnetite, apatite, and baddeleyite, showing that zonal distribution of mineral properties mimics both concentric and vertical zonation of the carbonatite-phoscorite pipe.The marginal zone of the pipe consists of (apatite)-forsterite phoscorite carrying fine grains of Ti-Mn-Si-rich magnetite with ilmenite exsolution lamellae, fine grains of Fe-Mg-rich apatite and finest grains of baddeleyite, enriched in Mg, Fe, Si and Mn. The intermediate zone accommodates carbonate-free magnetite-rich phoscorites that carry medium to coarse grains of Mg-Al-rich magnetite with exsolution inclusions of spinel, medium-grained pure apatite and baddeleyite. The axial zone hosts carbonate-rich phoscorites and phoscorite-related carbonatites bearing medium-grained Ti-V-Ca-rich magnetite with exsolution inclusions of geikielite-ilmenite, fine grains of Ba-Sr-Ln-rich apatite and comparatively large grains of baddeleyite, enriched in Hf, Ta, Nb and Sc. The collected data enable us to predict such important mineralogical characteristics of the multicomponent ore as chemical composition and grain size of economic and associated minerals, presence of contaminating inclusions, etc. We have identified potential areas of maximum concentration of such by-products as scandium, niobium and hafnium in baddeleyite and REEs in apatite.
DS201611-2118
2016
Pakhomovsky, Ya.A.Kalashnikov, A.O., Konpleva, N.G., Pakhomovsky, Ya.A., Ivanyuk, G.Yu.Rare earth deposits of the Murmansk region, Russia - a review.Economic Geology, Vol. 111, no. 7, pp. 1529-1559.RussiaRare earths

Abstract: This paper reviews the available information on the geology, mineralogy, and resources of the significant rare earth element (REE) deposits and occurrences in the Murmansk Region, northwest Russia. The region has one of the largest endowments of REE in the world, primarily the light REE (LREE); however, most of the deposits are of potential economic interest for the REE, only as by-products of other mining activity, because of the relatively low REE grade. The measured and indicated REE2O3 resources of all deposits in the region total 22.4, and 36.2 million tonnes, respectively. The most important resources occur in (1) the currently mined Khibiny titanite-apatite deposits, and (2) the Lovozero loparite-eudialyte deposit. The Kovdor baddeleyite-apatite-magnetite deposit is a potentially important resource of scandium. These deposits all have polymetallic ores, i.e., REE would be a by-product of P, Ti, and Al mining at Khibiny, Fe, Zr, Ta, and Nb mining at Lovozero, and Fe and Ti mining at Afrikanda. The Keivy block has potential for heavy REE exploitation in the peralkaline granite-hosted Yumperuaiv and Large Pedestal Zr-REE deposits and the nepheline syenite-hosted Sakharyok Zr-REE deposit. With the exception of the Afrikanda perovskite-magnetite deposit (LREE in perovskite) and the Kovdor baddeleyite-apatite-magnetite deposit (scandium in baddelyite), carbonatite-bearing complexes of the Murmansk Region appear to have limited potential for REE by-products. The sound transport, energy, and mining infrastructure of the region are important factors that will help ensure future production of the REE.
DS1982-0424
1982
Pakiser, L.C.Mckeown, F.A., Pakiser, L.C.Investigations of the New Madrid Missouri Earthquake RegionUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) PROF. PAPER., No. 1236, 201P.GlobalMid-continent
DS1982-0425
1982
Pakiser, L.C.Mckeown, F.A., Pakiser, L.C.Investigations of the New Madrid Missouri, Earthquake RegionUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) PROF. PAPER., No. 1236, 201P.United States, Mississippi, Missouri, Gulf Coast, ArkansasReelfoot, Upper Mississippi Embayment, Midcontinent
DS1990-1151
1990
Pakiser, L.C.Pakiser, L.C., Mooney, W.D.Geophysical framework of the continental United StatesGeological Society of America (GSA) Memoir, No. 172, 840p. 3 plates approx. $ 92.50United StatesGeophysics, Structure, crust, mantle
DS1990-1152
1990
Pakiser, L.C.Pakiser, L.C., Mooney, W.D.Geophysical framework of the continental United StatesGsa Mwr., No. 172, 840p. 3 plates $ 93.00United States, MidcontinentGeophysics
DS2003-0791
2003
Pakkanen, L.K.Lehtonen, M.L., O'Brien, H.E., Peltonen, P., Johanson, B.S., Pakkanen, L.K.Layered mantle at the edge of the Karelian craton: P-T of mantle xenocrysts and8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 6, POSTER abstractFinlandBlank
DS200412-1111
2004
Pakkanen, L.K.Lehtonen, M.L., O'Brien, H.E., Peltonen, B.S., Johanson, B.S., Pakkanen, L.K.Layered mantle at the Karelian Craton margin: P T of mantle xenocrysts and xenoliths from the Kaavi Kuopio kimberlites, Finland.Lithos, Vol. 77, 1-4, Sept. pp. 593-608.Europe, FinlandLithosphere, thermometry
DS200412-1112
2003
Pakkanen, L.K.Lehtonen, M.L., O'Brien, H.E., Peltonen, P., Johanson, B.S., Pakkanen, L.K.Layered mantle at the edge of the Karelian craton: P-T of mantle xenocrysts and xenoliths from eastern FIn land kimberlites.8 IKC Program, Session 6, POSTER abstractEurope, FinlandMantle petrology
DS200512-0616
2005
Pakkanen, L.K.Lehtonen, M.L., Marmo, J.S., Nissinen, A.J., Johanson, B.S., Pakkanen, L.K.Glacial dispersal studies using indicator minerals and till geochemistry around two eastern FIn land kimberlites.Journal of Geochemical Exploration, Vol. 87, 1, Oct. pp. 19-43.Europe, Finland, FennoscandiaKaavi-Kuopio, Kuhmo, geochemistry, Pipe 7, Karelian
DS200512-0617
2005
Pakkanen, L.K.Lehtonen, M.L., Pakkanen, L.K., Johanson, B.S., Lallukka, H.M.EMP analyses of kimberlite indicator minerals from Pipe 7 and Dyke 16 kimberlites and the basal till surrounding them.Geological Survey of Finland, Open File M 41.2/2005/2.Europe, FinlandGeochemistry
DS201603-0409
2015
Paktovskiy, Yu.G.Paktovskiy, Yu.G., Chaykovskiy, I.I. .New dat a on small volume sampling of diamond deposits of Vyatka-Kama basin. ***IN RUSSIANProblems of Mineralogy, petrography and metallogeny , No. 18, pp. 282-285.TechnologySampling ***
DS201603-0410
2015
Paktovskiy, Yu.G.Paktovskiy, Yu.G., Popov, A.G., Chaykovskiy, I.I. .New deposits in the Devonian diamond reservoirs of the northern Urals. *** IN RUSSIANProblems of Mineralogy, petrography and metallogeny , No. 18, pp. 286-289.RussiaDiamond occurrences ***
DS1986-0630
1986
Paktunc, A.D.Paktunc, A.D., Baer, A.J.Geothermobarometry of the northwestern margin of the Superiorprovince:implications for its tectonic evolutionJournal of Petrology, Vol. 27, No. 3, May pp. 381-394OntarioTectonics, Geothermometry
DS1998-1106
1998
Paktunc, A.D.Paktunc, A.D.MODAN- an interactive computer program for estimating mineral quantities based on bulk compositionComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 24, No.5, pp. 425-31.GlobalComputer, Program - MODAN.
DS201112-0409
2011
Paktunc, A.D.Hannam, S., Bailey, B.L., Lindsay, M.B.J., Gibson, B., Blowes, D.W., Paktunc, A.D., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.Diavik waste rock project: geochemical and mineralogical characterization of waste rock weathering at the Diavik diamond mine.Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts for 2011, abstract p. 43-44.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - waste rock
DS1995-1415
1995
Pakulnis, G.V.Pakulnis, G.V., Komarnitskii, G.M.The Khanneshin uranium deposit at the carbonatite volcano margin #1Petrology, Vol. 37, No. 5, pp. 372-380.AfghanistanCarbonatite
DS1995-1416
1995
Pakulnis, G.V.Pakulnis, G.V., Komarnitskii, G.M.The Khanneshin uranium deposit at the carbonatite volcano margin #2Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 37, No. 5, pp. 427-436.AfghanistanCarbonatite
DS200812-0837
2008
Pakzad, S.Pakzad, S.Winter roads: pipelines of Canada's North. (Brief overview).Mining.com, September issue pp. 72-73.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesNews item - TCWR
DS1990-1131
1990
Pal, P.C.Olasehinde, P.I., Pal, P.C., Annor, A.E.Aeromagnetic anomalies and structural lineaments in the Nigerian BasementComplexJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 11, No. 3/4, pp. 351-356NigeriaGeophysics -magnetics, Tectonics
DS202006-0930
2020
Pal, S.K.Kumar, S., Pal, S.K., Guha, A.Very low frequency electromagnetic ( VLF-EM) study over Wajrakakarur kimberlite pipe 6 in eastern Dharwar craton, India.Journal of Earth System Science, Vol. 129, 1, 102 10p. PdfIndiadeposit - Pipe 6

Abstract: The Wajrakarur kimberlite Pipe 6 in Eastern Dharwar Craton, is hardly explored using latest ground-based geophysical techniques. The present study uses the Very Low Frequency Electromagnetic (VLF-EM) method for understanding the aerial extension, depth and geometry of the kimberlite pipe. The VLF-EM data have been analyzed using Fraser filtering of in-phase component, 3D Euler deconvolution of Fraser filtered in-phase data, radially average power spectrum (RAPS) of VLF data (raw data) and 2D inversion of VLF data (raw data). The Fraser filtered in-phase grid anomaly map has witnessed as an effective tool for mapping extension of the kimberlite pipe. The maxima of Fraser filtered in-phase component has been observed as a key parameter to delineate the conducting bodies. The high apparent current density in Karous-Hjelt (K-H) pseudo section locate relatively conducting body possibly associated with kimberlite pipe. Two depth interfaces at about 15 and 32 m have been delineated using RAPS. 3D Euler solution indicate dyke-like structure associated with kimberlite pipe having depth solutions ranging from 6 to 40 m with mode of depth 17 m in the study area. 2D resistivity sections indicate that causative bodies are in the depth range of 15-50 m. The results of VLF-EM study are well validated using geological borehole data over the study area reported by Geological Survey of India.
DS200412-1491
2003
Pal, T.Pal, T., Chakaborty, P.P., Ghosh, R.N.PGE distribution in chromite placers from Andaman ophiolite and its boninitic parentage.Geological Society of India Journal, Vol. 62, 6, pp. 671-679.IndiaAlkaline rocks, not specific to diamonds
DS201212-0090
2012
Pal, T.Browmik, S.K., Wilde, S.A., Bhandari, A., Pal, T., Pant, N.C.Growth of the greater Indian landmass and its assembly in Rodinia:geochronological evidence from the Central Indian Tectonic Zone.Gondwana Research, Vol. 22, 1, pp. 54-72.IndiaGeochronology, tectonics, cratons
DS1991-1283
1991
Pala, S.Pala, S., Barnett, P.J., Babuin, D.Quaternary geology of Ontario, northern sheetOntario Geological Survey Map, No. 2553OntarioQuaternary, Geomorphology
DS1860-0855
1894
Palache, C.Palache, C.The Lherzolite Serpentine and Associated Rocks of the Potero,San Francisco.University California Department Geological Science Bulletin, No. 1, PP. 161-179.United States, CaliforniaRegional Geology
DS1920-0115
1922
Palache, C.Palache, C.Some Problems of Mineral Genesis in South Africa. Presidential Address to the Second Annual Meeting of the Mineralogical Society of America, Amherst, Massachusetts.American MINERALOGIST., Vol. 7, PP. 37-45.South AfricaGenesis
DS1998-0984
1998
PalaciosMcNulty, B.A., Farber, Wallace, Lopez, PalaciosRole of plate kinematics and plate slip vector partitioning in continental magmatic arcs: evidenceGeology, Vol. 26, No. 9, Sept. pp. 827-30PeruCordillera Blanca, Tectonics
DS200412-1966
2004
Palacios, T.Tassinari, C.C.G., Munha, J.M.U., Teixeira, W., Palacios, T., Nutman, A.P., Santos, A.P., Calado, B.O.The Imataca Complex, NW Amazonian Craton, Venezuela: crustal evolution and integration of geochronological and petrological coolEpisodes, March pp. 3-12.South America, VenezuelaMetamorphism, Archean, tectonics, not specific to diamo
DS1983-0501
1983
Palacky, G.J.Palacky, G.J.Electromagnetic Prospecting in Tropical Regionsin: Proceedings of the International Symposium on applied geophysics in tropical, pp. 173-202BrazilGeophysics, Kimberlite
DS1989-1166
1989
Palacky, G.J.Palacky, G.J.Human resources in geophysics: dissemination of research results in applied geophysicsGeophysics: the leading edge of exploration, Vol. 8, No. 10, October pp. 25-31. Database #18198GlobalGeophysics, Research
DS1990-1153
1990
Palacky, G.J.Palacky, G.J., Holladay, .S., Walker, P.W.Use of inversion techniques in interpretation of helicopter electromagneticdat a for mapping quaternary sediments near Kapuskasing, Ontario CanadaSociety of Exploration Geophysicists, 60th. Annual Meeting held, San, Vol. 1, pp. 689-692. Extended abstractOntarioKapuskasing, Geophysics -electromagnetic
DS1991-0744
1991
Palacky, G.J.Huang, H., Palacky, G.J.Damped least squares inversion of time domain airborne electromagnetic dat a based on singular value decompositionGeophysical Prospecting, Vol. 39, pp. 827-844GlobalGeophysics, electromagnetic methods
DS1991-1284
1991
Palacky, G.J.Palacky, G.J.Application of the multifrequency horizontal loop electromagnetic method in overburdeninvestigationsGeophysical Prospecting, Vol. 39, pp. 1061-1082OntarioKapuskasing area, Electromagnetics -overburden, Geophysics -electromagnetic
DS1991-1285
1991
Palacky, G.J.Palacky, G.J., Holladay, J.S., Walker, P.W.Mapping of Quaternary sediments near Kapuskasing, Ontario with a helicopter electromagnetic systemGeological Survey of Canada Forum held January 21-23, 1990 in Ottawa, p. 13 AbstractOntarioGeophysics -electromagnetic, Sediments
DS1991-1286
1991
Palacky, G.J.Palacky, G.J., Stephens, L.E.Results of multifrequency horizontal loop electromagnetic measurements along transects in northeastern OntarioGeological Survey of Canada Open File, No. 2343, 16p. text 80p. profilesOntarioGeophysics -electromagnetic
DS1991-1287
1991
Palacky, G.J.Palacky, G.J., West, G.F.Airborne electromagnetic methodsIn: Electromagnetic methods in applied geophysics, editors M.N., Vol. 2, pp. 811-877GlobalGeophysics, Electromagnetics -overview
DS1992-1156
1992
Palacky, G.J.Palacky, G.J., Holladay, J.S., Walker, P.Inversion of helicopter electromagnetic dat a along the Kapuskasingtransect, OntarioGeological Survey of Canada Paper, No. 92-1E, pp. 177-184OntarioGeophysics, Kapuskasing Rift
DS1992-1157
1992
Palacky, G.J.Palacky, G.J., Smith, S.L., Stephens, L.E.Quaternary investigations in Geary, Thorburn and Wilhelmin a townships, OntarioGeological Survey of Canada Paper, No. 92-1E, pp. 201-206OntarioGeophysics, Lithology
DS1992-1158
1992
Palacky, G.J.Palacky, G.J., Smith, S.L., Stephens, L.E.Use of ground electromagnetic measurements to locate sites for overburden drilling near Smoky Falls, OntarioGeological Survey of Canada Paper, No. 92-1E, pp. 195-200OntarioGeophysics, Overburden
DS1993-1180
1993
Palacky, G.J.Palacky, G.J.Results of helicopter electromagnetic surveys along the Kapuskasingtransect, District of Cochrane, Ontario.Geological Survey Canada Open File, No. 2590, 23p. 10 sheets $ 33.00OntarioGeophysics, rift, Electromagnetics
DS1993-1181
1993
Palacky, G.J.Palacky, G.J.Comparison of three electromagnetic techniques to determine conductivity of overburden in northeastern Ontario.Geological Survey Canada Paper, No. 93-1D, pp. 173-182.OntarioOverburden drilling, Kapuskasking structure
DS1991-0278
1991
PalaczCollerson, K.D., Campbell, Weaver, PalaczEvidence for extreme mantle fractionation in early Archean ultramafic rocks from northern Labrador.Nature, Vol. 349, No. 6306, Jan. 17, pp. 209-214.Labrador, QuebecUltramafic rocks
DS1986-0349
1986
Palacz, Z.Hawkesworth, C.J., Van Calsteren, P., Palacz, Z., Rogers, N.W.Crustal xenoliths from southern Africa: chemical and age variations within the continental crustProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 253-255South Africa, LesothoBlank
DS1986-0562
1986
Palacz, Z.Menzies, M., Halliday, A., Palacz, Z., Hunter, R., Hawkesworth, C.Barium and light rare earth element (LREE) enriched mantle below the Archean crust of ScotlandProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held, No. 16, pp. 294-295ScotlandBlank
DS1987-0281
1987
Palacz, Z.Hawkesworth, C.J., Kempton, P.D., Palacz, Z., Rogers, N.W.Mantle lithosphere as a source of continental flood basaltsEos, Vol. 68, No. 44, November 3, p. 1549. abstract onlyGlobalBlank
DS1987-0466
1987
Palacz, Z.Menzies, M.A., Halliday, A.N., Palacz, Z., Hunters, R.H., UptonEvidence from mantle xenoliths for an enriched lithospheric keel under the outer HebridesNature, Vol. 325, January 1, pp. 44-47GlobalMantle xenoliths
DS1988-0293
1988
Palacz, Z.A.Hawkesworth, C.J., Kempton, P.D., Mattey, D.P., Palacz, Z.A., Rogers, N.W.Intra-mantle fractionation VS lithosphere recycling:evidence from the sub-continental mantleD. Reidel Publishing Co., Nato Series, Asi C, Math. Phys. Sci., Vol., pp. 227-237Southern AfricaIsotopes- kimberlites, lamproites, Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB).
DS1992-1291
1992
Palacz, Z.A.Rogers, N.W., Hawkesworth, C.J., Palacz, Z.A.Phlogophite in the generation of olivine melilitites from Namaqualand, South Africa and implications for element fractionation processes in the uppermantle.Lithos, Vol. 28, No. 3-6. November pp. 347-365.South AfricaMelilitites, Petrology
DS1975-0427
1976
Palandzhyan, S.A.Veguni, A.T., Gevorkyan, R.G., Palandzhyan, S.A.Certain Geologic Tectonic Hypotheses of the Diamond Bearing capacity of Alpine Type Ultramafics of Armenia.Izd. Vyssh. Uchebn. Zaved. Geol. I Razv., No. 3, PP. 103-106.Russia, ArmeniaGenesis, Kimberlites
DS1991-1288
1991
Palandzhyan, S.A.Palandzhyan, S.A., Dmitrenko, G.G.Classification of mantle peridotites on the basis of the composition of their accessory chrome spinelsDoklady Academy of Sciences, Earth Sci. Section, Vol. 307, No. 1-6, pp. 140-143RussiaPeridotites, Mineral chemistry
DS201012-0560
2008
Palazhchencko, O.V.Palazhchencko, O.V.Integrated investigations of diamonds from deposits of the Arkhangelsk Diamondiferous province: generalization and genetic and applied consequences.Moscow University Geology Bulletin, Vol. 63, pp. 119-127.Russia, Archangel, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Archangel
DS200812-0380
2008
Palazhchenko, O.V.Galimov, E.M., Palazhchenko, O.V., Verichev, E.M., Garanin, V.K., Golovin, N.N.Carbon isotope composition of diamonds from the Archangelsk diamond province.Geochemistry International, Vol. 46, 10, pp. 961-970.Russia, Archangel, Kola PeninsulaDiamond chemistry
DS200812-0561
2008
Palazhchenko, O.V.Khachatryan, G.K., Palazhchenko, O.V., Garanin, V.K., Ivannikov, P.V., Verichev, E.M.Origin of disequilibrium diamond crystals from Parpinsky 1 kimberlite pipe using dat a from cathode luminescence and infra red spectroscopy.Moscow University Geology Bulletin, Vol. 63, 2, March-April pp. 86-94.RussiaDiamond morphology
DS200812-0838
2008
Palazhchenko, O.V.Palazhchenko, O.V.Integrated investigations of diamonds from deposits of the Arkangelsk Diamondiferous province: generalization and genetic and applied consequences.Moscow University Geology Bulletin, Vol. 63, 2, March-April pp. 119-127.Russia, Archangel, Kola PeninsulaDiamond genesis
DS200812-0839
2008
Palazhchenko, O.V.Palazhchenko, O.V., Garanin, V.K., Galimov, E.M.Isotope and mineralogical study of diamonds from northwestern Russia.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A718.Russia, Kola Peninsula, ArchangelDeposit - Lomonosov, Grib
DS201012-0354
2008
Palazhchenko, O.V.Khachatryan, G.K., Palazhchenko, O.V., Garanin, V.K., Ivannikov, P.V., Verichev, E.M.Origin of disequilibrium diamond crystals from Karpinsky - 1 kimberlite pipe using dat a from cathode luminescence and infra red spectroscopy.Moscow University Geology Bulletin, Vol. 63, pp. 86-94.RussiaSpectroscopy
DS200912-0651
2009
Palazhenko, O.V.Rubanova, E.V., Palazhenko, O.V., Garanin, V.K.Diamonds from the V. Grib pipe, Arkangelsk kimberlite province, Russia.Lithos, In press availableRussia, Archangel, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Grib
DS1999-0773
1999
Palchik, N.A.Vishnevskii, S.A., Palchik, N.A., Raitala, J.Diamonds in impactites of the Lappajarvi impact craterRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 40, No. 10, pp. 1487-90.FinlandImpact crater
DS201812-2842
2018
Paleari, A.Lorenzi, R., Zullino, A., Prosperi, L., Paleari, A.Visible light excited red-emitting vacancies at carbon interstitials as indicators of irradiated and annealed Type Ia diamonds.Diamond & Related Materials, Vol. 90, pp. 188-193.Europe, Italydiamond radiation

Abstract: During the last decades many studies have been carried out to investigate how point defects and aggregates respond and evolve in natural Type Ia diamonds as a result of treatments, and a number of underlying mechanisms have been identified and interpreted. However, the analysis of radiation-induced creation/ionization of defects, as well as their migration and aggregation in secondary defect structures, often requires experimental approaches which can hardly constitute a simple-to-use diagnostic tool for the identification of artificially treated diamonds. Here we disclose a novel simple indicator of artificial exposure of Type Ia diamonds to ionizing radiations and subsequent annealing. This indicator consists in narrow photoluminescence lines in the red region, between 681 and 725?nm, we recently found to result from vacancies trapped by interstitial carbon aggregates and platelets. Our results demonstrate that interstitial structures become sites of vacancy trapping - by thermal migration of radiation-induced vacancies - only when diamond undergoes treatments. We give the rigorous validation of the new spectroscopic probe of artificial treatments analysing photoluminescence and infrared absorption spectra of well-known H1b and H1c centres in a hundred samples. Importantly, the method is based on emission lines which do not require neither high photon-energy excitation nor cryogenic temperatures.
DS201510-1759
2014
Paleeskiy, V.S.Ashchepkov, I.V., Vladykin, N.V., Ntaflos, T., Logvinova, A.M., Yudin, D.S., Karpenko, M.A., Paleeskiy, V.S., Alymova, N.V., Khmelnikova, O.S.Deep seated xenoliths and xencrysts from Sytykanskaya pipe: evidence for the evolution of the mantle beneath Alakit, Yakutia.Deep-seated magmatism, its sources and plumes, Proceedings of XIII International Workshop held 2014., Vol. 2014, pp. 203-232.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Sytykanskaya

Abstract: The concentrate from two phases of the kimberlite (breccia and porphyritic kimberlite) and about 130 xenoliths from the Sytykanskaya pipe of the Alakit field (Yakutia) were studied by EPMA and LAM ICP methods. Reconstructions of the PTXfO2 mantle sections were made separately for the two phases. The porphyritic kimberlites and breccia show differences in the minerals although the layering and pressure interval remains the same. For the porphyritic kimberlite the trends P- Fe# - CaO in garnet, fO2 are sub-vertical while the xenocrysts from the breccia show stepped and curved trends possibly due to interaction with fluids. Minerals within xenoliths show the widest variation in all pressure intervals. PT points for the ilmenites which trace the magmatic system show splitting of the magmatic source into two levels at the pyroxenite lens (4GPa) accompanied by peridotite contamination and an increase in Cr in ilmenites. Two groups of metasomatites with Fe#Ol ~ 10-12% and 13-15% were created by the melts derived from protokimberlites and trace the mantle columns from the lithosphere base (Ilm - Gar - Cr diopside) to Moho becoming essentially pyroxenitic (Cr-diopside with Phl). The first Opx-Gar-based mantle geotherm from the Alakit field has been constructed from15 associations and is close to 35 mw/m2 in the lower part of mantle section but deviates to high temperatures in the upper part of the mantle section. The oxidation state for the protokimberlite melts determined from ilmenites is higher than for the other pipes in the Yakutian kimberlite province which probably accounts for the decrease in the diamond grade of this pipe. The geochemistry of the minerals (garnets and clinopyroxenes) from breccias, metasomatic peridotite xenoliths and pyroxenites systematically differ. Xenocrysts from the breccia were produced by the most differentiated melts and enriched protokimberlite or carbonatite; they show highly inclined nearly linear REE patterns and deep troughs of HFSE. Minerals of the metasomatic xenoliths are less inclined with lower La/Cen ratios and without troughs in spider diagrams. The garnets often show S-shaped patterns. Garnets from the Cr websterites show round REE patterns and deep troughs in Ba-Sr but enrichment in Nb-Ta-U. The clinopyroxenes reveal the inclined and inflected on Gd spectrums with variations in LREE due to AFC differentiation. The 40Ar-39Ar ages for micas from the Alakit field reveal three intervals for the metasomatism. The first (1154 Ma) relates to dispersed phlogopites found throughout the mantle column, and probably corresponds to the continental arc stage in the early stage of Rodinia. Veined highly alkaline and Ti-rich veins with richterite ~1015 Ma corresponds to the plume event within the Rodinia mantle. The ~600-550 Ma stage marks the final Rodinia break-up. The last one near 385 Ma is protokimberlite related.
DS201412-0023
2014
Palesskiy, V.S.Ashchepkov, I.V., Vladykin, N.V., Ntaflos, T., Yudin, D.S., Karpenko, M.A., Palesskiy, V.S., Khmelnikova, O.S.Deep seated xenoliths and xencrysts from Stykanskaya pipe: evidence for the evolution of the mantle beneath Alakit, Yakutia.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., pp. 203-229.RussiaDeposit - Stykanskaya
DS201510-1758
2015
Palesskiy, V.S.Ashchepkov, I.V., Logvinova, A.M., Reimers, L.F., Ntaflos, T., Spetisus, Z.V., Vladykin, N.V., Downes, H., Yudin, D.S., Travin, A.V., Makovchuk, I.V., Palesskiy, V.S., KhmelNikova, O.S.The Sytykanskaya kimberlite pipe: evidence from deep seated xenoliths and xenocrysts for the evolution of the mantle beneath Alakit, Yakutia, Russia.Geoscience Frontiers, Vol. 6, 5, pp. 687-714.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Sytykanskaya

Abstract: Mantle xenoliths (>150) and concentrates from late autolithic breccia and porphyritic kimberlite from the Sytykanskaya pipe of the Alakit field (Yakutia) were analyzed by EPMA and LAM ICP methods. In P-T-X-f(O2) diagrams minerals from xenoliths show widest variations, the trends P-Fe#-CaO, f(O2) for minerals from porphyric kimberlites are more stepped than for xenocrysts from breccia. Ilmenite PTX points mark moving for protokimberlites from the lithosphere base (7.5 GPa) to pyroxenite lens (5-3.5 GPa) accompanied by Cr increase by AFC and creation of two trends P-Fe#Ol ~10-12% and 13-15%. The Opx-Gar-based mantle geotherm in Alakit field is close to 35 mW/m2 at 65 GPa and 600 °C near Moho was determined. The oxidation state for the megacrystalline ilmenites is lower for the metasomatic associations due to reduction of protokimberlites on peridotites than for uncontaminated varieties at the lithosphere base. Highly inclined linear REE patterns with deep HFSE troughs for the parental melts of clinopyroxene and garnet xenocrysts from breccia were influenced by differentiated protokimberlite. Melts for metasomatic xenoliths reveal less inclined slopes without deep troughs in spider diagrams. Garnets reveal S-shaped REE patterns. The clinopyroxenes from graphite bearing Cr-websterites show inclined and inflected in Gd spectrums with LREE variations due to AFC differentiation. Melts for garnets display less inclined patterns and Ba-Sr troughs but enrichment in Nb-Ta-U. The 40Ar/39Ar ages for micas from the Alakit mantle xenoliths for disseminated phlogopites reveal Proterozoic (1154 Ma) age of metasomatism in early Rodinia mantle. Veined glimmerites with richterite - like amphiboles mark ~1015 Ma plume event in Rodinia mantle. The ~600-550 Ma stage manifests final Rodinia break-up. The last 385 Ma metasomatism is protokimberlite-related.
DS200412-0063
2004
PalesskyAshchepkov, I.V., Vladykin, N.V., Nikolaeva, I.V., Palessky, Logvinova, Saprykin, Khmelnikova, AnoshinMineralogy and geochemistry of mantle inclusions and mantle column structure of the Yubileinaya kimberlite pipe, Alakit field, YDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 395, 4, March-April, pp. 378-384.Russia, YakutiaDiamond - mineralogy, Jubilenya
DS200512-0032
2003
PalesskyAshchepkov, I.V., Vladykin, N.V., Loginova, A.M., Nikolaeva, Palessky, Khmelnikova, Saprykin, RotmanYubileynaya pipe: from mineralogy to mantle structure and evolution.Plumes and problems of deep sources of alkaline magmatism, pp. 20-38.RussiaGenesis - Jubileynaya
DS200512-0035
2003
PalesskyAshchepkov, I.V., Vladykin, N.V., Rotman, A.Y., Nikolaeva, Palessky, Anoshin, Khmelnikova, SaprykinMinerals from Zarnitsa pipe kimberlite: the key to enigma of the mantle composition and construction.Plumes and problems of deep sources of alkaline magmatism, pp. 51-64.RussiaMineralogy - Zarnitsa
DS200512-0036
2004
PalesskyAshchepkov, I.V., Vladykin, Rotman, Loginova, Afanasiev, Palessky, Saprykin, Anoshin, Kuchkin, KhmelnikovaMir and Internationalnaya kimberlite pipes - trace element geochemistry and thermobarometry of mantle minerals.Deep seated magmatism, its sources and their relation to plume processes., pp. 194-208.RussiaGeobarometry - Mir, International
DS200612-0046
2005
PalesskyAshchepkov, I.V., Vladykin, Rotman, Afansiev, Loginova, Kuchkin, Palessky, Nikolaeva, Saprykin, AnoshinVariations of the mantle mineralogy and structure beneath Upper - Muna kimberlite field.Problems of Sources of Deep Magmatism and Plumes., pp. 170-187.RussiaMineralogy
DS200712-0032
2007
PalesskyAshchepkov, I.V., Pokhilenko, N.P., Logvinova, A.M., Vladykin, N.P., Rotman, Palessky, Alymova, VishnyakovaEvolution of kimberlite magmatic sources beneath Siberia.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A39.RussiaMir
DS200812-0050
2008
PalesskyAshcheperov, I.V., Pokhilenko, N.P., Vladykin, N.P., Logovina, A.M., Nikoleva,I., Palessky, RotmanMelts in mantle columns beneath Siberian kimberlites.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A35.Russia, SiberiaDeposit - Alkite
DS200812-0052
2007
PalesskyAshchepkov, I.V., Vladykin, Pkhilenko, Logvinova, Palessky, Afansiev, Alymova, Stegnitsky, Khmelnikova RotamanVariations of ilmenite compositions from Yakutian kimberlites and the problem of their origin.Vladykin Volume 2007, pp. 71-89.Russia, YakutiaIlmenite, kimberlite
DS201012-0016
2010
PalesskyAshchepkov, I., Afanasiev, Vladykin, Pokhilenko, Ntaflos, Travin, Ionov, Palessky, Logvinova, Kuligin, MityukhinReasons of variations of the mineral compositions of the mantle rocks beneath the Yakutian kimberlite province.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 141.Russia, YakutiaGeothermometry
DS201012-0019
2009
PalesskyAshchepkov, I.V., Rotman, Nossyko, Somov, Shimupi, Vladykin, Palessky, Saprykin, KhmelnikovaComposition and thermal structure of mantle beneath the western part of the Congo-Kasai craton according to xenocrysts from Angola kimberlites.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., p. 158-180.Africa, AngolaGeothermometry
DS201112-0037
2010
PalesskyAshchepkov, Ntaflos, Vladykin, Ionov, Kuligin, Malygina, Pokhilenko, Logvinova, Mityukhin, Palessky, Khmelnikova, RotmasDeep seated xenoliths from the phlogopite bearing brown breccia of the Udachnaya pipe.Vladykin, N.V., Deep Seated Magmatism: its sources and plumes, pp. 164-186.RussiaMetasomatism
DS201412-0020
2014
Palessky, S.Ashchepkov, I., Remirs, L., Ntaflos, T., Vladykin, N., Logvinova, A., Travin, A., Yudin, D., Karpenko, K., Makovchuk, I., Palessky, S., Salikhov, R.Evolution of mantle column of pipe Sytykanskaya, Yakutia kimberlite.Goldschmidt Conference 2014, 1p. AbstractRussia, YakutiaDeposit - Sytykanskaya
DS200612-1273
2006
Palessky, S.V.Shatsky, V.S., Sitnikova, E.S., Kozmenko, O.A., Palessky, S.V., Nikolaeva, I.V., Zayachkowsky, A.A.Behaviour of incompatible elements during ultrahigh pressure metamorphism. Kokchetav MassifRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 47, 4, pp. 482-496.Russia, KazakhstanUHP - geochemistry
DS200712-0646
2007
Palessky, S.V.Logvinova, A.M., Ashchepkov, I.V., Palessky, S.V.LAM ICP study of cloudy diamonds: implications for diamond formation.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A593.Russia, SiberiaYubileynaya
DS201112-0035
2011
Palessky, S.V.Ashchepkov, I.V., Downes, H., Vladykin, N.V., Mitchell, R., Nigmatulina, E., Palessky, S.V.Reconstruction of mantle sequences beneath the Wyoming craton using xenocrysts from Sloan and Kelsey Lake -1 kimberlite pipes, northern Colorado.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., pp. 213-233.United States, Colorado PlateauPyrope compositions -geothermobarometry
DS201112-0036
2011
Palessky, S.V.Ashchepkov, I.V., Ionov, D.A., Ntaflos, T., Downes, H., Palessky, S.V.Origin of craton mantle layering according to PT reconstruction.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.459.Russia, YakutiaKimberlite
DS201212-0027
2012
Palessky, S.V.Ashchepkov, Downes, H., Mitchell, R.H., Vladykin, N.V., Palessky, S.V.Mantle lithosphere beneath Wyomng is based on Sloan and Kelsy Lake - 1 kimberlite xenocrysts.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractUnited States, Wyoming, Colorado PlateauDeposit - Sloan, Kelsey Lake
DS201212-0037
2012
Palessky, S.V.Ashchepkov, IV., Nntalfos, T., Pokhilenko, L.N., Ionov, D.A., Vladykin, N.V., Kuligin, S.S., Mityukhin, S.I., Palessky, S.V.Mantle structure beneath Udachnaya pipe reconstructed by fresh mantle xenoliths from brown breccia.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractRussia, YakutiaDeposit - Udachnaya
DS201312-0007
2013
Palessky, S.V.Afanasiev, V.P., Aschepkov, I.V., Verzhak, V.V., O'Brien, H., Palessky, S.V.PT conditions and trace element variations of picroilmenites and pyropes from placers and kimberlites in the Arkhangelsk region, NW Russia.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 70, pp. 45-63.Russia, Kola Peninsula, ArchangelDeposit - Verkhotinskoe , Kepinskoe fields
DS201312-0035
2013
Palessky, S.V.Ashchepkov, I.V., Downes, H., Mitchell, R.H., Vladykin, N.V., Coopersmith, H., Palessky, S.V.Wyoming craton mantle lithosphere: reconstructions based on xenocrysts from Sloan and Kelsey Lake kimberlites.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 1, Special Issue of the Journal of the Geological Society of India,, Vol. 1, pp. 13-27.United States, Colorado PlateauDeposit - Sloan, Kelsey Lake
DS200512-0034
2004
Palessky, V.S.Ashchepkov, I.V., Vladykin, N.V., Rotman, A.Y., Loginova, A.M., Nikolaeva, L.A., Palessky, V.S., Saprykin, A.I., Anoshin, G.N., Kuchkin, A., Khmelnikova, O.S.Reconstructions of the mantle layering beneath the Alakite kimberlite field: comparative characteristics of the mineral geochemistry and TP sequences.Deep seated magmatism, its sources and their relation to plume processes., pp. 160-177.RussiaGeochemistry - Alakite
DS201312-0032
2013
Palessky, V.S.Ashchepkov, I.V., Alymova, N.V., Logvinova, A.M., Vladykin, N.V., Kuligin, S.S., Mityukhin, S.I., Stegnitsky, Y.B., Prokopyev, S.A., Salikhov, R.F., Palessky, V.S., Khmelnikova, O.S.Picroilmenites in Yakutian kimberlites: variations and genetic models.Solid Earth, Vol. 5, pp. 1259-1334.Russia, YakutiaDeposits
DS201412-0021
2014
Palessky, V.S.Ashchepkov, I.V., Alymova, N.V., Lognova, A.M., Vladykin, N.V., Kuligin, S.S., Lityukhin, S.I., Downes, H., Stegnitsky, Yu.B., Prokopiev, S.A., Salikhov, R.F., Palessky, V.S., Khmelnikova, O.S.Picroilmenites in Yakutian kimberlites: variations and genetic models.Solid Earth, Vol. 5, pp. 915-938.Russia, YakutiaKimberlite genesis
DS202010-1829
2013
Palessky, V.S.Ashchepkov, I.V., Alymova, N.V., Loginova, A.M., Vladykin, N.V., Kuligin, S.S., Mityukhin, S.I., Stegnitsky, Y.B., Prokopiev, S.A., Salikhov, R.F., Palessky, V.S., Khmelnikova, O.S.Picroilmenites in Yakutian kimberlites: variations and genetic models. Solid Earth Discussions, Vol. 5, pp. 1-75. pdf * note dateRussia, Yakutiapicroilmenites

Abstract: Major and trace element variations in picroilmenites from Late Devonian kimberlite pipes in Siberia reveal similarities within the region in general, but show individual features for ilmenites from different fields and pipes. Empirical ilmenite thermobarometry (Ashchepkov et al., 2010), as well as common methods of mantle thermobarometry and trace element geochemical modeling, shows long compositional trends for the ilmenites. These are a result of complex processes of polybaric fractionation of protokimberlite melts, accompanied by the interaction with mantle wall rocks and dissolution of previous wall rock and metasomatic associations. Evolution of the parental magmas for the picroilmenites was determined for the three distinct phases of kimberlite activity from Yubileynaya and nearby Aprelskaya pipes, showing heating and an increase of Fe# (Fe# = Fe / (Fe + Mg) a.u.) of mantle peridotite minerals from stage to stage and splitting of the magmatic system in the final stages. High-pressure (5.5-7.0 GPa) Cr-bearing Mg-rich ilmenites (group 1) reflect the conditions of high-temperature metasomatic rocks at the base of the mantle lithosphere. Trace element patterns are enriched to 0.1-10/relative to primitive mantle (PM) and have flattened, spoon-like or S- or W-shaped rare earth element (REE) patterns with Pb > 1. These result from melting and crystallization in melt-feeding channels in the base of the lithosphere, where high-temperature dunites, harzburgites and pyroxenites were formed. Cr-poor ilmenite megacrysts (group 2) trace the high-temperature path of protokimberlites developed as result of fractional crystallization and wall rock assimilation during the creation of the feeder systems prior to the main kimberlite eruption. Inflections in ilmenite compositional trends probably reflect the mantle layering and pulsing melt intrusion during melt migration within the channels. Group 2 ilmenites have inclined REE enriched patterns (10-100)/PM with La / Ybn ~ 10-25, similar to those derived from kimberlites, with high-field-strength elements (HFSE) peaks (typical megacrysts). A series of similar patterns results from polybaric Assimilation + fractional crystallization (AFC) crystallization of protokimberlite melts which also precipitated sulfides (Pb < 1) and mixed with partial melts from garnet peridotites. Relatively low-Ti ilmenites with high-Cr content (group 3) probably crystallized in the metasomatic front under the rising protokimberlite source and represent the product of crystallization of segregated partial melts from metasomatic rocks. Cr-rich ilmenites are typical of veins and veinlets in peridotites crystallized from highly contaminated magma intruded into wall rocks in different levels within the mantle columns. Ilmenites which have the highest trace element contents (1000/PM) have REE patterns similar to those of perovskites. Low Cr contents suggest relatively closed system fractionation which occurred from the base of the lithosphere up to the garnet-spinel transition, according to monomineral thermobarometry for Mir and Dachnaya pipes. Restricted trends were detected for ilmenites from Udachnaya and most other pipes from the Daldyn-Alakit fields and other regions (Nakyn, Upper Muna and Prianabarie), where ilmenite trends extend from the base of the lithosphere mainly up to 4.0 GPa. Interaction of the megacryst forming melts with the mantle lithosphere caused heating and HFSE metasomatism prior to kimberlite eruption.
DS1993-1182
1993
Palethorpe, C.Palethorpe, C.Global business opportunities -examining the differencesGlobal Business Opportunities, northwest Mining, pp. 27-40AustraliaEconomics, Financing and profits
DS201012-0399
2010
Palfi, A.G.Koller, F., Palfi, A.G., Szabo, Cs., Niku-Paavola, V., Popp, F.Alkaline rocks in the Aris area, central Namibia, Africa.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 571.Africa, NamibiaAlkaline rocks, phonolite chemistry
DS200612-0200
2006
Palhol, F.Burnard, P., Basset, R., Marty, B., Fischer, T., Palhol, F., Mangasini, F., Makene, C.Xe isotopes in carbonatites: Oldonyo Lengai, East African Rift.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 1, abstract only.Africa, TanzaniaCarbonatite
DS1994-1328
1994
Palidwor, G.Palidwor, G.A paragenetic classification system for garnets from mantle xenoliths andkimberlites.Bsc. Thesis, Uni. Of Ottawa, 37p.Mantle, OntarioXenoliths, Garnet
DS201012-0120
2010
Palin, J.M.Cooper, A.F., Boztug, D., Palin, J.M., Martin, C.E., Numata, M.Petrology and petrogenesis of carbonatitic rocks in syenites from central Anatolia, Turkey.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, in press available, 18p.Europe, TurkeyCarbonatite
DS201012-0121
2010
Palin, J.M.Cooper, A.F., Durmus, B., Palin, J.M.Petrology and petrogenesis of carbonatitic rocks in syenites from Central Anatolia, Turkey.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 551.Europe, TurkeyCarbonatite
DS201112-0206
2011
Palin, J.M.Cooper, A.F., Boztug, D., Palin, J.M., Martin, C.E., Numata, M.Petrology and petrogenesis of carbonatitic rocks in syenites from central Anatolia, Turkey.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 161, 5, pp. 811-828.Europe, TurkeyCarbonatite
DS201412-0958
2014
Palin, J.M.Waight, T.E., Van der Meer, H.A., Palin, J.M., Cooper, A.F.,Munker, C.Metasomatized ancient lithospheric mantle beneath the young Zealandia microcontinent and its role in HIMU-like intraplate magmatism. Geophysics, Geochemistry, Geosystems, Vol. 15, pp. 3477-3501.New ZealandMagmatism
DS201906-1335
2019
Palin, R.M.Piccolo, A., Palin, R.M., Kaus, B.J.P., White, R.W.Generation of Earth's early continents from a relatively cool Archean mantle.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 20, 4, pp. 1679-1697.Mantleplate tectonics

Abstract: It has been believed that early Earth featured higher mantle temperature. The mantle temperature affects the geodynamic processes, and, therefore, the production of the continental crust, which has been a stable environment for the developing of life since Earth's infancy. However, our knowledge of the processes operating during the early Earth is still not definitive. The wide range of the mantle temperature estimation (from 1500 to 1600 °C) hampered our ability to understand early Earth's dynamic and geological data alone cannot provide a definitive answer. Therefore, it is necessary to integrate them with numerical modeling. Our contribution conjugates petrological modeling with thermal-mechanical simulations to unveil the effect of continental crust production. Continental crust's extraction from partially melted hydrated basalts leaves behind dense rocks that sink into the mantle dragging part of surface hydrated rocks. These drips produce a major compositional change of the mantle and promote the production of new basaltic/continental crust. The combination of these processes cools the mantle, suggesting that it could not have been extremely hot for geological timescales. We show that such processes can be active even in a relatively cool mantle (1450-1500 °C), providing new constraints to understand the infancy of our planet.
DS202007-1168
2020
Palin, R.M.Palin, R.M., Santosh, M., Cao, W., Li, S-S., Hernandez-Uribe, D.Secular change and the onset of plate tectonics on Earth.Earth Science Reviews, in press available 41p. PdfMantleplate tectonics

Abstract: The Earth as a planetary system has experienced significant change since its formation c. 4.54 Gyr ago. Some of these changes have been gradual, such as secular cooling of the mantle, and some have been abrupt, such as the rapid increase in free oxygen in the atmosphere at the Archean-Proterozoic transition. Many of these changes have directly affected tectonic processes on Earth and are manifest by temporal trends within the sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rock record. Indeed, the timing of global onset of mobile-lid (subduction-driven) plate tectonics on our planet remains one of the fundamental points of debate within the geosciences today, and constraining the age and cause of this transition has profound implications for understanding our own planet's long-term evolution, and that for other rocky bodies in our solar system. Interpretations based on various sources of evidence have led different authors to propose a very wide range of ages for the onset of subduction-driven tectonics, which span almost all of Earth history from the Hadean to the Neoproterozoic, with this uncertainty stemming from the varying reliability of different proxies. Here, we review evidence for paleo-subduction preserved within the geological record, with a focus on metamorphic rocks and the geodynamic information that can be derived from them. First, we describe the different types of tectonic/geodynamic regimes that may occur on Earth or any other silicate body, and then review different models for the thermal evolution of the Earth and the geodynamic conditions necessary for plate tectonics to stabilize on a rocky planet. The community's current understanding of the petrology and structure of Archean and Proterozoic oceanic and continental crust is then discussed in comparison with modern-day equivalents, including how and why they differ. We then summarize evidence for the operation of subduction through time, including petrological (metamorphic), tectonic, and geochemical/isotopic data, and the results of petrological and geodynamical modeling. The styles of metamorphism in the Archean are then examined and we discuss how the secular distribution of metamorphic rock types can inform the type of geodynamic regime that operated at any point in time. In conclusion, we argue that most independent observations from the geological record and results of lithospheric-scale geodynamic modeling support a global-scale initiation of plate tectonics no later than c. 3 Ga, just preceding the Archean-Proterozoic transition. Evidence for subduction in Early Archean terranes is likely accounted for by localized occurrences of plume-induced subduction initiation, although these did not develop into a stable, globally connected network of plate boundaries until later in Earth history. Finally, we provide a discussion of major unresolved questions related to this review's theme and provide suggested directions for future research.
DS202012-2237
2020
Palin, R.M.Palin, R.M., Santosh, M.Plate tectonics: what, where, why, and when?Gondwana Research, in proof available, 105p. Pdf 10.1016/j.gr.2020.11.001Globalplate tectonics
DS200912-0038
2009
Palitschek, M.Batumike, J.M., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., Belousova, E.A., Palitschek, M.Crustal evolution in the central Congo -Kasai Craton, Luebo, D.R. Congo: insights from zircon U Pb ages, Hf isotope and trace element data.Precambrian Research, Vol. 170, 1-2, pp. 107-115.Africa, Democratic Republic of CongoGeochronology
DS201909-2069
2019
Palke, A.Palke, A., Hapeman, J.R.Rubies from Rock Creek, Montana. PotentateGems & Gemology, Vol. 55, 7, pp. 286-288.United States, Montanaruby
DS202003-0364
2019
Palke, A. C.Sun, Z., Palke, A. C., Muyal, J., DeGhionno, D., McClaure, S.F.Geographic origin determination of alexandrite.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 55, 4, pp. 660-681.Russia, South America, Brazil, Africa, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, India, Asia, Sri Lankaalexandrite

Abstract: The gem and jewelry trade has come to place increasing importance on the geographic origin of alexandrite, as it can have a significant impact on value. Alexandrites from Russia and Brazil are usually more highly valued than those from other countries. In 2016, GIA began researching geographic origin of alexandrite with the intent of offering origin determination as a laboratory service. Unfortunately, collecting reliable samples with known provenance can be very difficult. Alexandrite is often recovered as a byproduct of mining for other gemstones (e.g., emerald and corundum), so it can be difficult to secure reliable parcels of samples because production is typically erratic and unpredictable. The reference materials studied here were examined thoroughly for their trace element chemistry profiles, characteristic color-change ranges under daylight-equivalent and incandescent illumination, and inclusion scenes. The data obtained so far allow us to accurately determine geographic origin for alexandrites from Russia, Brazil, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, and India. Future work may help to differentiate alexandrites from other localities.
DS201112-0766
2011
Palke, A.C.Palke, A.C., Stebbins, J.F.Variable temperature 27Al and 29Si NMR studies of synthetic forsterite and Fe bearing Dora Maira pyrope garnet: temperature dependence and mechanisms of paramagnetically shifted peaks.American Mineralogist, Vol. 96, pp. 1090-1099.Europe, ItalySpectroscopy, paramagnetic shifts
DS201604-0633
2015
Palke, A.C.Sun, Z., Palke, A.C., Renfro, N.Vanadium and chromium bearing pink pyrope garnet: characterization and quantitative colorimetric analysis. Gems & Gemology, Vol. 51, 4, winter pp. 348-369.Africa, TanzaniaGarnet, pyrope

Abstract: A type of pink pyrope garnet containing vanadium and chromium, believed to have been mined in Tanzania, appeared at the 2015 Tucson shows. The material shows a noticeable color difference from purplish pink under incandescent light (A) to purple under daylight-equivalent light (D65). This study reports a quantitative analysis of the difference in color between the two lighting conditions, based on the use of high-quality visible absorption spectroscopy to calculate CIELAB 1976 colorimetric coordinates. L*, a*, and b* colorimetric parameters were calculated for a wide range of path lengths as extrapolated from visible absorption spectra of thinner samples. Using this method, the path length of light through the stone that produces the optimal color difference can be calculated. This path length can then be used to determine the optimal depth range to maximize color change for a round brilliant of a specific material. The pink pyrope studied here can be designated as "color-change" garnet according to certain classification schemes proposed by other researchers. In many of these schemes, however, the material fails to exceed the minimum requirements for quantitative color difference and hue angle difference to be described as "color-change." Nonetheless, there is no simple solution to the problem of applying color coordinates to classify color-change phenomena. Also presented is a method by which spectra can be corrected for reflection loss and accurately extrapolated to stones with various path lengths.
DS201608-1429
2016
Palke, A.C.Palke, A.C., Renfro, N.D., Berg, R.B.Origin of sapphires from lamprophyre dike at Yogo Gulch, Montana USA: clues to their melt inclusions.Lithos, Vol. 260, pp. 339-344.United States, MontanaSapphires

Abstract: Gem corundum (sapphire) has been mined from an ultramafic lamprophyre dike at Yogo Gulch in central Montana for over 100 years. The sapphires bear signs of corrosion showing that they were not in equilibrium with the lamprophyre that transported them; however, their genesis is poorly understood. We report here the observation of minute glassy melt inclusions in Yogo sapphires. These inclusions are Na- and Ca-rich, Fe-, Mg-, and K-poor silicate glasses with compositions unlike that of the host lamprophyre. Larger, recrystallized melt inclusions contain analcime and calcite drawing a striking resemblance to leucocratic ocelli in the lamprophyre. We suggest here that sapphires formed through partial melting of Al-rich rocks, likely as the lamprophyre pooled at the base of the continental crust. This idea is corroborated by MELTS calculations on a kyanite-eclogite protolith which was presumably derived from a troctolite precursor. These calculations suggest that corundum can form through peritectic melting of kyanite. Linking the melt inclusions petrologically to the lamprophyre represents a significant advancement in our understanding of sapphire genesis and sheds light on how mantle-derived magmas may interact with the continental crust on their ascent to the surface.
DS201705-0869
2017
Palke, A.C.Palke, A.C., Renfro, N.D., Berg, R.B.Melt inclusions in alluvial sapphires from Montana, USA: formation of sapphires as a restitic component of lower crustal melting?Lithos, Vol. 278-281, pp. 43-53.United States, MontanaSapphires

Abstract: We report here compositions of glassy melt inclusions hosted in sapphires (gem quality corundum) from three alluvial deposits in Montana, USA including the Rock Creek, Dry Cottonwood Creek, and Missouri River deposits. While it is likely that sapphires in these deposits were transported to the surface by Eocene age volcanic events, their ultimate origin is still controversial with many models suggesting the sapphires are xenocrysts with a metamorphic or metasomatic genesis. Melt inclusions are trachytic, dacitic, and rhyolitic in composition. Microscopic observations allow separation between primary and secondary melt inclusions. The primary melt inclusions represent the silicate liquid that was present at the time of sapphire formation and are enriched in volatile components (8-14 wt.%). Secondary melt inclusions analyzed here for Dry Cottonwood Creek and Rock Creek sapphires are relatively volatile depleted and represent the magma that carried the sapphires to the surface. We propose that alluvial Montana sapphires from these deposits formed through a peritectic melting reaction during partial melting of a hydrated plagioclase-rich protolith (e.g. an anorthosite). The heat needed to drive this reaction was likely derived from the intrusion of mantle-derived mafic magmas near the base of the continental lithosphere during rollback of the Farallon slab around 50 Ma. These mafic magmas may have ended up as the ultimate carrier of the sapphires to the surface as evidenced by the French Bar trachybasalt near the Missouri River deposit. Alternatively, the trachytic, rhyolitic, and dacitic secondary melt inclusions at Rock Creek and Dry Cottonwood Creek suggests that the same magmas produced during the partial melting event that generated the sapphires may have also transported them to the surface. Determining the genesis of these deposits will further our understanding of sapphire deposits around the world and may help guide future sapphire prospecting techniques. This work is also important to help reveal the history of mantle-derived mafic magmas as they pass through the continental crust.
DS201804-0725
2018
Palke, A.C.Palke, A.C., Wong, J., Verdel, C., Avila, J.N.A common origin for Thai/Cambodian rubies and blue and violet sapphires from Yogo Gulch, Montana, U.S.A?American Mineralogist, Vol. 103, pp. 469-479.United States, Montanadeposit - Yogo Gulch

Abstract: A wide number of genetic models have been proposed for volcanically transported ruby and sapphire deposits around the world. In this contribution we compare the trace element chemistry, mineral and melt inclusions, and oxygen isotope ratios in blue to reddish-violet sapphires from Yogo Gulch, Montana, U.S.A., with rubies from the Chantaburi-Trat region of Thailand and the Pailin region of Cambodia. The similarities between Thai/Cambodian rubies and Yogo sapphires suggest a common origin for gem corundum from both deposits. Specifically, we advance a model whereby sapphires and rubies formed through a peritectic melting reaction when the lamprophyre or basalts that transported the gem corundum to the surface partially melted Al-rich lower crustal rocks. Furthermore, we suggest the protolith of the rubies and sapphires was an anorthosite or, in the case of Thai/Cambodian rubies, an anorthosite subjected to higher pressures and converted into a garnet-clinopyroxenite. In this model the rubies and sapphires are rightfully considered to be xenocrysts in their host basalts or lamprophyre; however, in this scenario they are not "accidental" xenocrysts but their formation is intimately and directly linked to the magmas that transported them to the surface. The similarities in these gem corundum deposits suggests that the partial melting, non-accidental xenocryst model may be more wide-reaching and globally important than previously realized. Importantly, in both cases the gem corundum has an ostensibly "metamorphic" trace element signature, whereas the presence of silicate melt (or magma) inclusions shows they ought to be considered to be "magmatic" rubies and sapphires. This discrepancy suggests that existing trace element discriminant diagrams intended to separate "metamorphic" from "magmatic" gem corundum ought to be used with caution.
DS201809-2080
2018
Palke, A.C.Renfro, N.D., Palke, A.C., Berg, R.B.Gemological characterization of sapphires from Yogo Gulch, Montana.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 54, 2, pp. 184-201.United States, Montanadeposit - Yogo Gulch

Abstract: Yogo Gulch in central Montana is one of the most important gem deposits in the United States. Although very little material has been recovered there in recent years, it has produced several million carats of rough sapphire over the course of its history (Voynick, 2001). These stones, known for their vibrant untreated blue color and high clarity, have always commanded a price premium, especially in sizes larger than 0.75 ct. This paper offers a thorough gemological characterization of Yogo sapphire, which may be unfamiliar to many gemologists. Fortunately, Yogo sapphires are unique and experienced gemologists can easily separate them from gem corundum of different geographic origins throughout the world, making it possible to determine the provenance of important stones from this deposit.
DS202003-0341
2019
Palke, A.C.Groat, L.A., Giuilani, G.,, Stone-Sundberg, J., Sun, Z., Renfro, N.D., Palke, A.C.A review of analytical methods used in geographic origin determination of gemstones.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 55, 4, pp. 512-535.Globalemerald, sapphire

Abstract: Origin determination is of increasing importance in the gem trade. It is possible because there is a close relationship between the geological environment of formation and the physical and chemical properties of gemstones, such as trace element and isotopic compositions, that can be measured in the laboratory using combinations of increasingly sophisticated instrumentation. Origin conclusions for ruby, sapphire, and emerald make up the bulk of demand for these services, with growing demand for alexandrite, tourmaline, and spinel. However, establishing origin with a high degree of confidence using the capabilities available today is met with varying degrees of success. Geographic origin can be determined with a high level of confidence for materials such as emerald, Paraíba-type tourmaline, alexandrite, and many rubies. For some materials, especially blue sapphire and some rubies, the situation is more difficult. The main problem is that if the geology of two deposits is similar, then the properties of the gemstones they produce will also be similar, to the point where concluding an origin becomes seemingly impossible in some cases. Origin determination currently relies on a combination of traditional gemological observations and advanced analytical instrumentation.
DS202003-0355
2019
Palke, A.C.Palke, A.C., Saeseaw, S., Renfro, N.D., Sun, Z., McClure, S.F.Geographic origin of ruby.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 55, 4, pp. 580-579.Global, Asia, Myanmar, Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Africa, Madagascar, Mozambique, Europe, Afghanistanruby

Abstract: Over the last several decades, geographic origin determination for fine rubies has become increasingly important in the gem trade. In the gemological laboratory, rubies are generally broken down into two groups based on their trace element chemistry: marble-hosted (low-iron) rubies and high-iron rubies. High-iron rubies are usually a straightforward identification based on their inclusions and trace element profiles. Marble-hosted rubies can be more challenging, with some deposits showing overlap in some of their inclusion scenes. But many marblehosted rubies, especially Burmese stones from Mogok and Mong Hsu, can be accurately identified based on their internal features and trace element profiles. This contribution will outline the methods and criteria used at GIA for geographic origin determination for ruby.
DS202003-0359
2019
Palke, A.C.Saeseaw, S., Renfro, N.D., Palke, A.C., Sun, Z., McClure, S.F.Geographic origin of emerald.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 55, 4, pp. 614-647.South America, Colombia, China, Europe, Afghanistan, Africa, Zambiaemerald

Abstract: The gem trade has grown to rely on gemological laboratories to provide origin determination services for emeralds and other fine colored stones. In the laboratory, this is mostly accomplished by careful observations of inclusion characteristics, spectroscopic analysis, and trace element profile measurements by laser ablation–inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Inclusions and spectroscopy can often separate Colombian emeralds from other sources (although there is some overlap between Colombian, Afghan, and Chinese [Davdar] emeralds). For non-Colombian emeralds, trace element analysis by LA-ICP-MS is needed in addition to information from the stone’s inclusions. The relative chemical diversity of emeralds from worldwide deposits allows confidence in origin determination in most cases. This contribution outlines the methods and criteria used at GIA for geographic origin determination for emerald.
DS202003-0369
2019
Palke, A.C.Vertriest, W., Palke, A.C., Renfro, N.D.Field gemology: building a research collection and understanding the development of gem deposits.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 55, 4, pp. 490-511.United StatesGIA

Abstract: GIA’s field gemology program was established in late 2008 to support research on geographic origin determination of colored gemstones. By building and maintaining an extensive collection of gem materials with known origins, GIA’s research scientists have been able to study and analyze rubies, sapphires, emeralds, and other gemstones using the best available reference samples. This has led to improved origin determination services while supporting numerous research and education projects. To date the collection has accumulated during more than 95 field expeditions on six continents and currently includes more than 22,000 samples. GIA’s field gemology efforts require a thorough understanding of the gem trade, including the evolution of gemstone deposits and the development of treatments. It is important to recognize potential new deposits and gemstone enhancement procedures immediately because they can change rapidly and leave a lasting impact on the trade. Field expeditions also involve documenting the mines and local conditions. These factors provide context for the gemstones and are becoming increasingly important in the eyes of the public.
DS1986-0136
1986
Palkina, E.Yu.Chashka, A.I., Palkina, E.Yu., Khrenov, A.Ya., Gritsik, E.P.Morphology and some physical properties of small diamonds.(Russian)Mineral. Sb. (Lvov), (Russian), Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 81-84RussiaBlank
DS1995-1417
1995
Palkina, E.Yu.Palkina, E.Yu., Smirnov, G.I., Ghashkin, A.I., TarasyukTypomorphism of various genetic types of the Ukrainian diamondsProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 413-414.UKrainePlacers, alluvials, Diamond morphology
DS202012-2209
2020
Palladino, D.M.Buono, G., Fanara, S., Macedonio, G., Palladino, D.M., Petrosino, P., Sottili, G., Pappalardo, L.Dynamics of degassing in evolved alkaline magmas: petrological, experimental and theoretical insights.Earth-Science Reviews, Vol. 211, 103402, 23p. PdfMantlealkaline

Abstract: In the last few decades, advanced monitoring networks have been extended to the main active volcanoes, providing warnings for variations in volcano dynamics. However, one of the main tasks of modern volcanology is the correct interpretation of surface-monitored signals in terms of magma transfer through the Earth's crust. In this frame, it is crucial to investigate decompression-induced magma degassing as it controls magma ascent towards the surface and, in case of eruption, the eruptive style and the atmospheric dispersal of tephra and gases. Understanding the degassing behaviour is particularly intriguing in the case of poorly explored evolved alkaline magmas. In fact, these melts frequently feed hazardous, highly explosive volcanoes (e.g., Campi Flegrei, Somma-Vesuvius, Colli Albani, Tambora, Azores and Canary Islands), despite their low viscosity that usually promotes effusive and/or weakly explosive eruptions. Decompression experiments, together with numerical models, are powerful tools to examine magma degassing behaviour and constrain field observations from natural eruptive products and monitoring signals. These approaches have been recently applied to evolved alkaline melts, yet numerous open questions remain. To cast new light on the degassing dynamics of evolved alkaline magmas, in this study we present new results from decompression experiments, as well as a critical review of previous experimental works. We achieved a comprehensive dataset of key petrological parameters (i.e., 3D textural data for bubbles and microlites using X-ray computed microtomography, glass volatile contents and nanolite occurrence) from experimental samples obtained through high temperature-high pressure isothermal decompression experiments on trachytic alkaline melts at super-liquidus temperature. We explored systematically a range of final pressures (from 200 to 25 MPa), decompression rates (from 0.01 to 1 MPa s-1), and volatile (H2O and CO2) contents. On these grounds, we integrated coherently literature data from decompression experiments on evolved alkaline (trachytic and phonolitic) melts under various conditions, with the aim to fully constrain the degassing mechanisms and timescales in these magmas. Finally, we simulated numerically the experimental conditions to evaluate strengths and weaknesses in decrypting degassing behaviour from field observations. Our results highlight that bubble formation in evolved alkaline melts is primarily controlled by the initial volatile (H2O and CO2) content during magma storage. In these melts, bubble nucleation needs low supersaturation pressures (= 50-112 MPa for homogeneous nucleation, = 13-25 MPa for heterogeneous nucleation), resulting in high bubble number density (~ 1012-1016 m-3), efficient volatile exsolution and thus in severe rheological changes. Moreover, the bubble number density is amplified in CO2-rich melts (mole fraction XCO2 = 0.5), in which continuous bubble nucleation predominates on growth. These conditions typically lead to highly explosive eruptions. However, moving towards slower decompression rates (= 10-1 MPa s-1) and H2O-rich melts, permeable outgassing and inertial fragmentation occur, promoting weakly explosive eruptions. Finally, our findings suggest that the exhaustion of CO2 at deep levels, and the consequent transition to a H2O-dominated degassing, can crucially enhance magma vesiculation and ascent. In a hazard perspective, these constraints allow to postulate that time-depth variations of unrest signals could be significantly weaker/shorter (e.g., minor gas emissions and short-term seismicity) during major eruptions than in small-scale events.
DS2000-0234
2000
Pallamreddy, K.Dikshit, A.K., Pallamreddy, K., Saha, J.C.Arsenic in groundwater and its sorption by kimberlite tailingsJournal of Environ. Science and Health, pt.A Environ. Vol. 35, No. 1, pp. 65-GlobalMineral processing
DS1993-1183
1993
Pallaum Minerals Ltd.Pallaum Minerals Ltd.The Saskatchewan diamond discoveryPromotional Brochure, Handout From Two Day Seminar Held Vancouver, B.c. May, 4p.SaskatchewanPromotional brochure, Company information
DS1995-1418
1995
Pallett, J.Pallett, J.The Sperrgebiet: Namibia's least known wildernessNamibia, Windhoek, 84p. $ approx. 20.00NamibiaEnvironmental profile, Orange River, Diamond mining
DS1970-0650
1973
Pallett, J.J.Colchester, D.M., Oglesby, J.C., Pallett, J.J.Sml 706 Formerly Sml 307 Nackara South Australia Progress And Final Report from 25/5/72 to 24/5/73.South Australia Geological Survey, No. E 2046, 19P.Australia, South AustraliaProspecting, Bulk Sampling, Geochemistry
DS1970-0676
1973
Pallett, T.J.Everett, M.P., Colchester, D.M., Stracke, K.J., Pallett, T.J.El 18 Pualco West Area South Australia Progress Report and Final ReportsSouth Australia Geological Survey, No. E 2181, 21P.Australia, South Australia, Mununda CreekGeochemistry, Prospecting, Stream And Soil Sampling
DS1987-0562
1987
Pallister, J.S.Pallister, J.S., Aleinikoff, J.N.Gabbroic plutons south of the Cheyenne belt: underpinnings of an early Proterozoic continental margin arcGeological Society of America, Vol. 19, p. 325. abstract onlyUnited StatesTectonics
DS1990-0430
1990
Pallister, J.S.DuBray, E.A., Quick, J.E., Sekner, G.I., Pallister, J.S.SAVEWARE I: a dozen programs designed to read DATASAVE files, perform various petrologic calculations and produce printed and graphical dataanalysisUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open file, No. 90-616-A, B, C $ 4.50, $6.00, $12.00GlobalComputer, Program -SAVEWAREI
DS1970-0378
1971
Pallister, J.W.Pallister, J.W.The Tectonics of East AfricaUnesco Earth Sci. Ser., No. 6, PP. 511-542.East AfricaRegional Tectonics
DS1999-0344
1999
Palm, H.Juhlin, C., Palm, H.3 D structure below Avro Island from high resolution reflection seismicstudies, southeastern Sweden.Geophysics, Vol. 64, No. 3, May-June pp. 662-667.SwedenGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics - not specific to diamonds
DS2002-0796
2002
Palmason, G.Kaban, M.K., Flovenz, O.G., Palmason, G.Nature of the crust mantle transition zone and the thermal state of the upper mantle ... gravity modellingGeophysical Journal International, Vol.149,2,pp.281-99., Vol.149,2,pp.281-99.MantleGeophysics - gravity, Boundary
DS2002-0797
2002
Palmason, G.Kaban, M.K., Flovenz, O.G., Palmason, G.Nature of the crust mantle transition zone and the thermal state of the upper mantle ... gravity modellingGeophysical Journal International, Vol.149,2,pp.281-99., Vol.149,2,pp.281-99.MantleGeophysics - gravity, Boundary
DS202008-1429
2020
Palmato, M.G.Palmato, M.G., Nestola, F., Novella, D, Pearson, D.G., Stachel, T.In-situ mineralogical characterization of sulphide inclusions in diamonds.Goldschmidt 2020, 1p. AbstractCanada, Ontariodeposit - Victor

Abstract: Among mineral inclusions in diamond, sulphides are the most abundant. Also, they are the keel tool for dating diamond formation given their high concentration of highlysiderophile elements. However, the mineralogical nature of these inclusions is not well understood, mainly due to the exsolution of the original, high temperature monosulphide solid solution (Mss) to Fe-, Ni- and Cu-rich endmembers during cooling, obscuring the original composition. This complex exsolution observed in sulphide inclusions in diamonds can also cause problems with Re-Os age determinations if the whole inclusion is not extracted. To overcome this issue, recently, sulphide inclusions have been homogenized at high temperature and controlled oxygen fugacity [1]. However, X-ray diffraction or Raman spectroscopy analyses, required to accurately identify the inclusion phases, and define their degree of crystallographic plus compositional homogeneity, have not been reported. Here we combine for the first time a thorough nondestructive multi-technique characterization of sulphide inclusions in diamonds from the Victor Mine (Canada) with homogenization experiments and isotopic analyses. In particular, we report X-ray diffraction data of the sulphides before and after homogenization, confirming a change from a polycrystalline assemblage of pyrrothite, pentlandite and chalcopyrite to single-crystal Mss. The data are used to reconstruct the Mss’ original bulk composition, define the true bulk isotopic ratios and document any difference in Re- Os isotope systematics.
DS1989-0714
1989
Palme, H.Jochum, K.P., McDonough, W.F., Palme, H., Spettel, B.Compositional constraints on the continental lithospheric mantle from trace elements in spinel peridotite xenolithsNature, Vol. 340, No. 6234, August 17, pp. 548-550GlobalMantle, Xenoliths
DS1990-1154
1990
Palme, H.Palme, H.Geochemistry: back to the earth's beginningsNature, Vol. 343, No. 6153, January 4, p. 23GlobalGeochemistry, Brief -earth
DS1996-0386
1996
Palme, H.Dreibus, G., Palme, H.Cosmochemical constraints on the sulphur content of the Earth's coreGeochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 60, No. 7, pp. 1125-30.MantleDensity - core
DS1996-1062
1996
Palme, H.Palme, H., O'Neill, H. St. C.Formation of the Earth's coreGeochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 60, No. 7, pp. 1106-8.MantleModel
DS1998-1107
1998
Palme, H.Palme, H., Borisov, A., Holzheid, SchmidtOrigin and significance of highly siderophile elements in the upper mantle of the earth.Mineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 1127-8.MantleHSE silicate melts
DS1999-0530
1999
Palme, H.Palme, H.Earth's formation and geochemical evolutionEncyclopedia Geochemistry, Marshall and Fairbridge, pp. 156-62.GlobalGenesis, geochemistry
DS2000-0420
2000
Palme, H.Holzheid, A., Sylvester, P., Palme, H.Evidence for a late chondritic veneer in the Earth's mantle from high pressure pressure partitioning of palladium &PtNature, Vol. 406, No.6794, July27, pp. 396-8.MantleChondrites
DS2003-1228
2003
Palme, H.Schmidt, G., Witt Eiscksen, G., Palme, H., Seek, H., Spettel, B., Kratz, K.L.Highly siderophile elements ( PGE Re and Au) in mantle xenoliths from the west EiffelChemical Geology, Vol. 196, No. 1-4, pp. 77-105.GermanyXenoliths
DS200412-1757
2003
Palme, H.Schmidt, G., Witt Eiscksen, G., Palme, H., Seek, H., Spettel, B., Kratz, K.L.Highly siderophile elements ( PGE Re and Au) in mantle xenoliths from the west Eiffel volcanic field, Germany.Chemical Geology, Vol. 196, no. 1-4, pp. 77-105.Europe, GermanyXenoliths
DS200512-0545
2004
Palme, H.Kleine, T., Mezger, K., Palme, H., Munker, C.The W isotope evolution of the bulk silicate Earth: constraints on the timing and mechanisms of core formation and accretion.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 228, 1-2, Nov. 30, pp. 109-123.MantleGeochemistry
DS200912-0820
2009
Palme, H.Witt-Eickschen, G., Palme, H., O'Neill, H.St.C., Allen, C.M.The geochemistry of the volatile trace elements As, Cd, Ga, In and Sn in the Earth's mantle: new evidence from in situ analyses of mantle xenoliths.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 73, 6, pp. 1755-1778.MantleGeochemistry
DS201112-0885
2011
Palme, H.Rubie, D.C., Frost, D.J., Mann, U., Asahara, Y., Nimmo, F., Tsuno, K., Kegler, P., Holzheid, A., Palme, H.Heterogeneous accretion, composition and core-mantle differentiation of the Earth.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 301, 1-2, pp. 31-42.MantleAccretion
DS200912-0305
2009
Palmer, C.Hoal, K.O., Appleby, S.K., Stammer, J.G., Palmer, C.SEM based quantitative mineralogical analysis of peridotite, kimberlite and concentrate.Lithos, In press - available 20pAfrica, South Africa, Lesotho, BotswanaDeposit - Premier/Cullinan, Letseng, Ngamiland
DS1991-1289
1991
Palmer, C.D.Palmer, C.D., Santokh Singh, D.Osborne and Chappel's worldwide experience in alluvial mining during the1980'sAlluvial Mining, Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (IMM) Special Volume, pp. 327-346Sierra LeoneAlluvial mining, Mining applications
DS200912-0065
2009
Palmer, C.E.Bowen, D.C., Ferraris, R.D., Palmer, C.E., Ward, J.D.On the unusual characteristics of the diamonds from Letseng La Terae kimberlites, Lesotho.Lithos, In press available 25p.Africa, LesothoDeposit - Letseng La Terae
DS1991-1290
1991
Palmer, D.Palmer, D.Phase transitions in framework mineralsCarnegie Institute Annual Report of the Director Geophysical Laboratory, No. 2250, pp. 120-125GlobalExperimental petrology, Leucite p. 124
DS1995-1419
1995
Palmer, D.Palmer, D.Meteorite showered with diamondsNew Scientist, Vol. 148, No. 2002, Nov. 4, p. 18.GlobalMeteorites
DS2002-1713
2002
Palmer, D.A.Williams Jones, A.E., Palmer, D.A.The evolution of aqeous carbonic fluids in the Amba Dongar carbonatite, implication for fenitization.Chemical Geology, Vol.185, 3-4, pp.283-301., Vol.185, 3-4, pp.283-301.IndiaGeochemistry, Deposit - Amba Dongar
DS2002-1714
2002
Palmer, D.A.Williams Jones, A.E., Palmer, D.A.The evolution of aqeous carbonic fluids in the Amba Dongar carbonatite, implication for fenitization.Chemical Geology, Vol.185,3-4,pp.283-301., Vol.185,3-4,pp.283-301.IndiaGeochemistry, Deposit - Amba Dongar
DS1995-1420
1995
Palmer, D.A.S.Palmer, D.A.S.Metallogeny of carbonatitesPh.d. Thesis, McGill University of, GlobalMetallogeny, Carbonaites
DS1997-0880
1997
Palmer, D.A.S.Palmer, D.A.S., Williams-Jones, A.E.Preliminary investigation of fluid evolution in the cupriferousPhalaborwa.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstracts, POSTER.South AfricaCarbonatite, Deposit - Phalaborwa, Palabora
DS2000-0741
2000
Palmer, D.A.S.Palmer, D.A.S.The evolution of carbonatite melts and their aequous fluids: evidence from Amba Dongar, Phalaborwa.National Library MF 5972 GSC, ThesisIndia, South AfricaCarbonatite, Geochemistry
DS1989-1167
1989
Palmer, D.C.Palmer, D.C., Salje, E.K.H., Schmahl, W.W.Phase transitions in leucite: X-ray diffraction studiesPhysics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 16, No. 7, pp. 714-719GlobalLeucite, Mineralogy
DS1991-1291
1991
Palmer, D.C.Palmer, D.C., Dove, M.T.Phase transition behaviour in natural and synthetic leucite: a structuralperspectiveEos, Spring Meeting Program And Abstracts, Vol. 72, No. 17, April 23, p. 144GlobalLeucite, Mineralogy -crystallography
DS1988-0224
1988
Palmer, D.FFreeman, M.J., Palmer, D.F, Heimlich, R.A.Magnetic survey of the western serpentinite belt,northern HartfordCounty, MarylandSoutheastern Geology, Vol. 29, No. 2, December pp. 103-128GlobalUltramafic, laterite, Geophysics
DS1988-0717
1988
Palmer, D.F.Ullom, B.P., Palmer, D.F.Crustal structure beneath the Cincinnati Arch in South Central Kentucky from magnetic, gravity and seismic dataGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstract Volume, Vol. 20, No. 5, March p. 392. abstractKentuckyBlank
DS1990-1487
1990
Palmer, D.K.Ullom, B., Palmer, D.K.Crustal structure in east-central KentuckyEos, Vol. 71, No. 43, October 23, p. 1435 AbstractKentuckyGeophysics -magnetics, gravity, Crust
DS1982-0487
1982
Palmer, H.C.Palmer, H.C., Webster.Post Paleozoic Dikes in Southern OntarioUniversity WESTERN ONTARIO, Annual Report Department GEOPHYSICS FOR 1981/, P. 11.Canada, OntarioLamprophyres
DS1986-0631
1986
Palmer, H.C.Palmer, H.C., Halls, H.C.Paleomagnetism of the Powder Mill group, Michigan and Wisconsin: are assessment of the Logan loopJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 91, No. B 11, October 10, pp. 11, 571-11, 580Michigan, WisconsinPaleomagnetism, Geophysics
DS1987-0563
1987
Palmer, H.C.Palmer, H.C.Paleomagnetism and uranium-lead (U-Pb) (U-Pb) geochronology of volcanic rocks fromMichipicotenIsland, Lake Superior, Canada: precise calibration of the Keweenawan polar wander trackPrecambrian Research, Vol. 37, No. 2, September pp. 157-OntarioGeochronology, Tectonics
DS1989-0574
1989
Palmer, H.C.Halls, H.C., Bates, M.P., Palmer, H.C.Magnetic-polarity domains, structural domains,petrography andpaleomagnetism; their bearing on The origin and deformation of the early Prot.MatachewanNew Mexico Bureau of Mines Bulletin., Continental Magmatism Abstract Volume, Held, Bulletin. No. 131, p. 119. AbstractOntarioDyke, Geophysics
DS1989-0576
1989
Palmer, H.C.Halls, H.C., Palmer, H.C.Magnetic polarity domains in the Matachewan dyke swarm and their relationship to the Kapuskasing structuralzoneGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting Program Abstracts, Vol. 14, p. A103. (abstract.)OntarioTectonics, Kapuskasing Lithoprobe
DS1989-1168
1989
Palmer, H.C.Palmer, H.C., Barnett, R.L.Amphibole chemistry of Matachewan and Kapuskasing dikes and its bearingon the timing of uplift of the Kapuskasing structuralzoneGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting Program Abstracts, Vol. 14, p. A103. (abstract.)OntarioTectonics, Kapuskasing Lithoprobe
DS1990-0641
1990
Palmer, H.C.Halls, H.C., Palmer, H.C.The tectonic relationship of two Early Proterozoic dyke swarms to the Kapuskasing Structural Zone: a paleomagnetic and petrographic studyCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, No. 1, January pp. 87-103OntarioTectonics, Kapuskasing Structural Zo
DS1994-0702
1994
Palmer, H.C.Halls, H.C., Palmer, H.C., et al.Constraints on the nature of the Kapuskasing structural zone from the studyof Proterozoic dyke swarms.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 31, No. 7, July pp. 1182-1196.OntarioStructure, Tectonics -Kapuskasing uplift
DS1994-1363
1994
Palmer, H.C.Percival, J.A., Palmer, H.C., Barnett, R.L.Quantitative estimates of emplacement level of post metamorphic mafic dykesand subsequent erosion...Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 31, No. 7, July pp. 1218-1226.OntarioGeodynamics, Tectonics -Kapuskasing uplift
DS1995-0508
1995
Palmer, H.C.Ernst, R.E., Buchan, K.L., Palmer, H.C.The global mafic dyke GIS database: a tool for reconstructing paleo continents -mapping mantle plumesGeological Association of Canada (GAC)/Mineralogical Association of Canada (MAC) Annual Meeting Abstracts, Vol. 20, p. A29 AbstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesMantle plumes, Dyke swarms
DS1995-0509
1995
Palmer, H.C.Ernst, R.E., Buchan, K.L., Palmer, H.C.Giant dyke swarms: characteristics, distribution and geotectonic applications.Baer, Heiman, Physics and Chemistry of Dykes, pp. 3-21.GlobalDike swarms, Tectonics
DS1996-0435
1996
Palmer, H.C.Ernst, R.E, Buchan, K.L., West, T.D., Palmer, H.C.Diabase dolerite dyke swarms of the world... first editionGeological Survey of Canada Open File, No. 3241, 104p. map 1: 35, 000, 000 total 40.00GlobalDike swarms
DS1996-0437
1996
Palmer, H.C.Ernst, R.E., Buchan, K.L., West, T.D., Palmer, H.C.Diabase ( dolerite) dyke swarms of the worldGeological Survey of Canada (GSC) Open File, No. 3241, 104p.GlobalDike swarms
DS1996-0438
1996
Palmer, H.C.Ernst, R.E., Buchanm, K.L., West, . T.D., Palmer, H.C.Diabase dolerite dike swams of the world: first editionGeological Survey of Canada, Open file 3241, $ 40.00 report - map same priceGlobalDyke swarms, Report and map
DS1998-0460
1998
Palmer, H.C.Gala, M.G., Symons, D.T.A., Palmer, H.C.Geotectonics of the Hanson Lake block, Trans-Hudson orogen: preliminary paleomagnetic report.Precambrian Research, Vol. 90, No. 1-2, June 30. pp. 85-?ManitobaTectonics, Orogeny
DS1993-0218
1993
Palmer, J.A.Carr, J.R., Palmer, J.A.Revisiting the accurate calculation of block sample covariances using GaussquadratureMathematical Geology, Vol. 25, No. 5, pp. 507-524GlobalOre reserve estimation, kriging, Geostatistics
DS1995-0482
1995
Palmer, M.R.Edmond. J.M., Palmer, M.R., Staillard, R.F.The fluvial geochemistry and denudation rate of the Guyana shield inVenezuela, Colombia and Brasil.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 59, No. 16, August 1, pp. 3301-3326.Venezuela, Colombia, BrazilGeochemistry, Geomorphology
DS201412-0223
2014
Palmer, M.R.Ersoy, Y.E., Palmer, M.R., Uysal, I., Gundogan, I.Geochemistry and petrology of the Early Miocene lamproites and related volcanic rocks in the Thrace basin, NW Anatolia.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, Vol. 283, pp. 143-158.Europe, TurkeyLamproite
DS201604-0608
2016
Palmer, M.R.Gernon, T.M., Hincks, T.K., Tyrell, T., Rohling, E.J., Palmer, M.R.Snowball Earth ocean chemistry driven by extensive ridge volcanism during Rodinia breakup.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 9, 3, pp. 242-248.Gondwana, RodiniaAlkalic

Abstract: During Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth glaciations, the oceans gained massive amounts of alkalinity, culminating in the deposition of massive cap carbonates on deglaciation. Changes in terrestrial runoff associated with both breakup of the Rodinia supercontinent and deglaciation can explain some, but not all of the requisite changes in ocean chemistry. Submarine volcanism along shallow ridges formed during supercontinent breakup results in the formation of large volumes of glassy hyaloclastite, which readily alters to palagonite. Here we estimate fluxes of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, silica and bicarbonate associated with these shallow-ridge processes, and argue that extensive submarine volcanism during the breakup of Rodinia made an important contribution to changes in ocean chemistry during Snowball Earth glaciations. We use Monte Carlo simulations to show that widespread hyaloclastite alteration under near-global sea-ice cover could lead to Ca2+ and Mg2+ supersaturation over the course of the glaciation that is sufficient to explain the volume of cap carbonates deposited. Furthermore, our conservative estimates of phosphorus release are sufficient to explain the observed P:Fe ratios in sedimentary iron formations from this time. This large phosphorus release may have fuelled primary productivity, which in turn would have contributed to atmospheric O2 rises that followed Snowball Earth episodes.
DS201710-2253
2017
Palmer, M.R.Palmer, M.R.Boron in subduction zones.Elements, Vol. 13, pp. 237-242.Mantlesubduction
DS202004-0538
2020
Palmer, M.R.Taylor, R.N., Favila-Harris, P., Branney, M.J., Farley, E.M.R., Gernon, T.M., Palmer, M.R.Dynamics of chemically pulsing mantle plume.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 537, 116182 14p. PdfMantlehotspot

Abstract: Upwelling plumes from the deep mantle have an impact on the Earth's surface for tens to hundreds of millions of years. During the lifetime of a mantle plume, periodic fluctuations in its composition and temperature have the potential to generate changes in the nature and volume of surface volcanism. We constrain the spatial and temporal scale of compositional changes in a plume using high-resolution Pb isotopes, which identify chemical pulses emerging from the Canary Islands hotspot over the last ~15 million years (Myr). Surface volcanism spanning ~ 400 km along the island chain changes composition systematically and synchronously, representing a replenishment of the plume head by a distinct mantle flavour on timescales of 3-5 Myr. These low-frequency compositional changes are also recorded by individual volcanoes, and comprise a sequence of closely-spaced isotopic trajectories. Each trajectory is maintained for ~1 Myr and is preceded and followed by ~0.3 Myr transitions to magmas with distinct isotope ratios. Relatively sharp transitions between periods of sustained isotopic stability require discrete yet coherent heterogeneities rising at speeds of ~100-200 km Myr-1 and extending for ~150 km vertically in the conduit. The long-term synchronous changes require larger scale isotopic domains extending ~600 km vertically through in the plume stem. These observations demonstrate that plumes can chemically “pulse” over short and long-timescales reflecting the characteristics and recycling history of the deep mantle.
DS1984-0138
1984
Palmer.Barnett, R.L., Arima, M., Blackwell, J.D., Winder, C.G., Palmer.The Picton and Varty Lake Ultramafic Dikes: Jurassic Magmatism in the St. Lawrence Platform Near Belleville, Ontario.Canadian Journal of EARTH. SCI., Vol. 21, No. 12, DECEMBER PP. 1460-1472.Canada, OntarioBlank
DS2002-0561
2002
Palmeri, R.Ghiribelli, B., Frzzotti, M-L., Palmeri, R.Coesite in eclogites of the Lanterman Range (Antartica): evidence from textural and Raman studies.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 14,pp.355-60., Vol. 14,pp.355-60.AntarcticaUHP - coesite, metamorphism
DS2002-0562
2002
Palmeri, R.Ghiribelli, B., Frzzotti, M-L., Palmeri, R.Coesite in eclogites of the Lanterman Range (Antartica): evidence from textural and Raman studies.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 14,pp.355-60., Vol. 14,pp.355-60.AntarcticaUHP - coesite, metamorphism
DS2002-0563
2002
Palmeri, R.Ghiribilli, B., Frezzotti, M.L., Palmeri, R.Coesite in eclogites of the Lanterman Range: evidence from textural and raman studiesEuropean Journal of Mineralogy, Vol.14,2,pp.355-60.AntarcticaEclogites
DS201412-0301
2011
Palmeri, R.Godard, G., Frizzotti, M-L., Palmeri, R., Smith, D.C.Origin of high pressure disordered metastable phases ( Lonsdaleite and incipiently amorphized quartz) in metamorphic rocks: geodynamic shock or crystal-scale overpressure? In: Ultrahigh Pressure Metamorphism: 25 years after discovery of coesite and diamond. Eds. Dobrzhinetskaya, L., Cuthbert, S., Faryad, W., Elsevier Publ. Pp. 125-148.MantleUHP
DS201112-0256
2011
PalmieriDe Oliveira Cordeiro, Brod, Palmieri, Gouveia de Oliveira, Soares Rocha Barbosa, Santos, Gaspar, AssisThe Catalao I niobium deposit, central Brazil: resources, geology and pyrochlore chemistry.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 41, pp. 112-121.South America, BrazilCarbonatite
DS200812-0840
2008
Palmieri, M.Palmieri, M., Pereira, G.S.B., Brod, J.A., Junquiera-Brod, T.C., Petrinovic, I.A., Ferrari, A.J.D.Orbicular magnetite from the Catalao I phoscorite carbonatite complex.9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractSouth America, BrazilCarbonatite
DS201312-0319
2013
Palmieri, M.Gomide, C.S., Brod, J.A., Junqueira-Brod, T.C., Buhn, B.M., Santos, R.V., Barbosa, E.S.R., Cordeiro, P.F.O., Palmieri, M., Grasso, C.B., Torres, M.G.Sufur isotopes from Brazilian alkaline carbonatite complexes.Chemical Geology, Vol. 341, pp. 38-49.South America, BrazilDeposit - Tapira, Salitre, Serra Negra, Catalao, Jacupiringa
DS201112-0068
2011
Pal-Molnar, E.Batki, A., Pal-Molnar, E.Camptonites from the Ditrau alkaline massif, Romania.Peralk-Carb 2011, workshop held Tubingen Germany June 16-18, PosterEurope, RomaniaCamptonite
DS201112-0069
2011
Pal-Molnar, E.Batki, A., Pal-Molnar, E.Camptonites from the Ditrau alkaline complex, Romania.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.7-9.Europe, RomaniaLamprophyre
DS201112-0070
2011
Pal-Molnar, E.Batki, A., Pal-Molnar, E.Camptonites from the Ditrau alkaline complex, Romania.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.7-9.Europe, RomaniaLamprophyre
DS201412-0042
2014
Pal-Molnar, E.Batki, A., Pal-Molnar, E., Dobosi, G., Skelton, A.Petrogenetic significance of ocellar camptonite dykes in the Ditrau alkaline Massif, Romania.Lithos, Vol. 200-201, pp. 181-196.Europe, RomaniaCamptonite
DS201412-0054
2014
Palomeras, I.Bezada, M.J., Humphreys, E.D., Davila, J.M., Carbonell, R., Harnafi, M., Palomeras, I., Levander, A.Piecewise delamination of Moroccan lithosphere from beneath the Atlas Mountains.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 15, 4, pp. 975-985.Africa, MoroccoGeophysics
DS200812-0841
2008
Palot, M.Palot, M., Cartigny, P., Viljoen, K.S.F.Diamond origin and genesis: A C and N stable isotope study of diamonds from a single eclogite xenolith Kaalvaalei South Africa.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A720.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Kaalvallei
DS200912-0561
2009
Palot, M.Palot, M., Cartigny, P., Viljoen, F.Diamond origin and genesis: A C and N stable isotope study on diamonds from a single eclogitic xenolith ( Kaalvaalei, South Africa).Lithos, In press available 45p.Africa, South AfricaDiamond genesis
DS201212-0112
2012
Palot, M.Cartigny, P., Palot, M., Clog, M., Labidi, J., Thomassot, E., Aubaud, C., Busigny, V., Harris, J.W.On overview of the deep carbon cycle and its isotope heterogeneity.Goldschmidt Conference 2012, abstract 1p.MantleCarbon cycle
DS201212-0537
2012
Palot, M.Palot, M., Cartigny, P., Harris, J.W., Kaminsky, F.V., Stachel, T.Evidence for deep mantle convection and primordial heterogeneity from nitrogen and carbon isotopes in diamond.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 357-358, pp. 179-193.South America, Brazil, Africa, GuineaDeposit - Juina, Kankan
DS201212-0538
2012
Palot, M.Palot, M., Pearson, D.G., Stern, R., Stachel, T., Harris, J.W.Multiple growth events, processes and fluid sources involved in the growth of diamonds from Finsch mine, RSA: a micro-analytical study.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractAfrica, South AfricaDeposit - Finsch
DS201312-0676
2013
Palot, M.Palot, M., Pearson, D.G., Stachel, T.Multiple growth episodes or prolonged formation of diamonds? Inferences from infrared absorption data.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 1, Special Issue of the Journal of the Geological Society of India,, Vol. 1, pp. 281-296.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201312-0677
2013
Palot, M.Palot, M., Pearson, D.G., Stern, R.A., Stachel, T., Harris, J.W.Multiple growth events, processes and fluid sources involved in diamond genesis: a micro-analytical study of sulphide bearing diamonds from Finsch mine, RSA.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 106, pp. 51-70.Africa, South AfricaDeposit - Finsch
DS201412-0102
2014
Palot, M.Cartigny, P., Palot, M., Thomassot, E., Harris, J.W.Diamond formation: a stable isotope perspective.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 42, pp. 699-732.MantleDiamond - isotpe systematics
DS201412-0655
2014
Palot, M.Palot, M.Isotopic constraints on the nature and circulation of deep mantle C-H-O-N fluids: carbon and nitrogen systematics within super deep diamonds from Kankan Guinea.Geological Society of America Conference Vancouver Oct. 19-22, 1p. AbstractAfrica, GuineaDiamond growth episodes
DS201412-0656
2014
Palot, M.Palot, M., Pearson, D.G., Stern, R.A., Harris, J.W., Stachel, T.Fluid sources of ultradeep diamonds.2014 Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 61, abstractAfrica, GuineaDeposit - Kankan
DS201412-0657
2014
Palot, M.Palot, M., Pearson, D.G., Stern, R.A., Stachel, T., Harris, J.W.Isotopic constraints on the nature and circulation of deep mantle C-H-O-N fluids: Carbon and nitrogen systematics within ultra-deep diamonds from Kankan ( Guinea).Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 139, pp. 26-46.Africa, GuineaDeposit - Kankan
DS201608-1430
2016
Palot, M.Palot, M., Jacobsen, S.D., Townsend, J.P., Nestols, F., Marquardt, K., Harris, J.W., Stachel, T., McCammon, C.A., Pearson, D.G.Evidence for H2O bearing fluids in the lower mantle from diamond inclusion.Lithos, in press available 27p.South America, BrazilSao Luis

Abstract: In this study, we report the first direct evidence for water-bearing fluids in the uppermost lower mantle from natural ferropericlase crystal contained within a diamond from São Luíz, Brazil. The ferropericlase exhibits exsolution of magnesioferrite, which places the origin of this assemblage in the uppermost part of the lower mantle. The presence of brucite-Mg(OH)2 precipitates in the ferropericlase crystal reflects the later-stage quenching of H2O-bearing fluid likely in the transition zone, which has been trapped during the inclusion process in the lower mantle. Dehydration melting may be one of the key processes involved in transporting water across the boundary between the upper and lower mantle.
DS201807-1495
2018
Pals, A.S.M.Gress, M.U., Pearson, D.G., Chinn, I.L., Koornneef, J.M., Pals, A.S.M., Van der Valk, E.A.S., Davies, G.R.Episodic eclogitic diamond genesis at Jwaneng diamond mine, Botswana.Goldschmidt2018, abstract 1p.Africa, Botswanadeposit - Jwaneng

Abstract: The diamondiferous Jwaneng kimberlite cluster (~240 Ma) is located on the NW rim of the Archaean Kaapvaal Craton in central Botswana. Previous studies report eclogitic diamond formation in the late Archean (2.9 Ga) and in the Middle Proterozoic (1.5 Ga) involving different mantle and sedimentary components [1;2;3]. Here we report newly acquired Sm- Nd ages of individual eclogitic pyrope-almandine and omphacite inclusions along with their major element data and nitrogen data from the diamond hosts to re-examine Jwaneng’s diamond formation ages. The Sm-Nd isotope analyses were performed via TIMS using 1013O resistors [4]. An initial suite of three pyropealmandine and 14 omphacite inclusions yield 143Nd/144Nd from 0.51102±7 to 0.5155±5. 147Sm/144Nd vary from 0.024 to 0.469. Major element data defines two inclusion populations: (1) seven omphacites with high Mg#, high Cr# and one pyropealmandine with low-Ca define an isochron age of 1.93±0.16 Ga with ?Ndi= +3.5; (2) seven omphacites with low Mg#, low Cr# and two pyrope-almandines with low-Ca define an isochron age of 0.82±0.06 Ga with ?Ndi= +3.7. Nitrogen contents of corresponding diamond host growth zones in Group (1) are = 50 at.ppm whereas Group (2) range between 50 to 700 at.ppm with N-aggregation > 70 %B. Additional data used to define “co-genetic” inclusion suites include Sr-isotopes and trace elements of the inclusions and carbon isotopes of the diamond hosts. Re-Os data of coexisting sulphide inclusions from the same silicate-bearing diamonds further validates the ages and indicates more periods of diamond formation at Jwaneng than previously assumed. The integrated data indicate the possibility of an extensive Paleoproterozoic diamond-forming event in southern Africa.
DS1980-0270
1980
Palshetkar, A.P.Palshetkar, A.P.The Weight Loss in Diamond ProcessingTranscript of Paper From Diamond Seminar, Bombay, 5P.IndiaCutting
DS200812-0120
2008
Paludetti, L.Boanadiman, C., Coltari, M., Duggen, S., Paludetti, L., Siena,F.,Thirwall, M.F., Upton, BGJ.Paleozoic subduction related and kimberlite or carbonatite metasomatism in the Scottish lithospheric mantle.Geological Society of London, Special Publications no. 293, pp. 303-334.Europe, ScotlandSubduction
DS201906-1270
2019
Palumbo-Roe, B.Barnett, M.J., Deady, E.A., Gregory, S.P., Palumbo-Roe, B.The role of biobased circular economy approach in sustainable critical metal extraction: the rare earth elements. Bioleaching3rd International Critical Metals Meeting held Edinburgh, Apr. 30-May 2.GlobalREE

Abstract: PDF link to presentation.
DS2000-0101
2000
PalyanovBorzdov, Y.M., Sokol, Palyanov, Khokhryakov, SobolevGrowth of synthetic diamond monocrystals weighing up to six carats and perspectives of their application.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 374, No. 7, Sept-Oct. pp. 1113-5.RussiaDiamond - morphology, Diamond - synthesis, Crystallography
DS2000-0913
2000
PalyanovSokol, A.G., Tomilenko, A.A., Palyanov, Borzdov, et al.Fluid regime of diamond crystallization in carbonate carbon systemsEuropean Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 12, pp. 367-75.GlobalDiamond - morphology, crystal, Petrology - experimental
DS2002-1204
2002
Palyanov, N.Palyanov, N., Sokol, A.G., Borzdov, M., Khokhryakov, A.Fluid bearing alkaline carbonate melts as the medium for the formation of diamonds in Earth's mantle:Lithos, Vol. 60, No. 3-4, Feb. pp. 145-59.MantlePetrology - experimental study
DS201412-0679
2014
Palyanov, Y.Persikov, E., Bukhtiyarov, P., Skol, A., Palyanov, Y.Viscosity of kimberlite and basaltic magmas to 10 Gpa and 2000K.V.S. Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy Siberian Branch Russian Academy of Sciences International Symposium Advances in high pressure research: breaking scales and horizons ( Courtesy of N. Poikilenko), Held Sept. 22-26, 2p. AbstractMantleMagmatism
DS201512-1960
2015
Palyanov, Y.Reutsky, V., Borzdov, Y., Palyanov, Y., Sokol, A., Izokh, O.Carbon isotope fractionation during experimental crystallization of diamond from carbonate fluid at mantle conditions.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 170, pp. 41-MantleHPHT

Abstract: We report first results of a systematic study of carbon isotope fractionation in a carbonate fluid system under mantle PT conditions. The system models a diamond-forming alkaline carbonate fluid using pure sodium oxalate (Na2C2O4) as the starting material, which decomposes to carbonate, CO2 and elementary carbon (graphite and diamond) involving a single source of carbon following the reaction 2Na2C2O4 ? 2Na2CO3 + CO2 + C. Near-liquidus behaviour of carbonate was observed at 1300 °C and 6.3 GPa. The experimentally determined isotope fractionation between the components of the system in the temperature range from 1300 to 1700 °C at 6.3 and 7.5 GPa fit the theoretical expectations well. Carbon isotope fractionation associated with diamond crystallisation from the carbonate fluid at 7.5 GPa decreases with an increase in temperature from 2.7 to 1.6 ‰. This trend corresponds to the function ?Carbonate fluid-Diamond = 7.38 × 106 T-2.
DS201808-1781
2017
Palyanov, Y.Ragozin, A., Zedgenizov, D., Kuper, K., Palyanov, Y.Specific internal structure of diamonds from Zarnitsa kimberlite pipe.Crystals, Vol. 7, 5, pp. 133-Russiadeposit - Zarnitsa

Abstract: The Zarnitsa kimberlite pipe is one of the largest pipes of the Yakutian diamondiferous province. Currently, some limited published data exists on the diamonds from this deposit. Among the diamond population of this pipe there is a specific series of dark gray to black diamonds with transition morphologies between octahedron and rounded rhombic dodecahedron. These diamonds have specific zonal and sectorial mosaic-block internal structures. The inner parts of these crystals have polycrystalline structure with significant misorientations between sub-individuals. The high consistency of the mechanical admixtures (inclusions) in the diamonds cores can cause a high grid stress of the crystal structure and promote the block (polycrystalline) structure of the core components. These diamond crystals have subsequently been formed due to crystallization of bigger sub-individuals on the polycrystalline cores according to the geometric selection law.
DS201909-2019
2019
Palyanov, Y.Bataleva, Y., Palyanov, Y., Borzdov, Y., Bayukov, O.Processes and conditions of the origin of Fe3+- bearing magnesiowustite under lithospheric mantle pressures and temperatures.Minerals, Vol. 9, 8, p. 474-MantleUHP

Abstract: An experimental study, implicated in the revealing of the conditions for the origin for Fe3+-bearing magnesiowüstite in the lithospheric mantle, was performed using Mössbauer spectroscopy of pre-synthesized samples. Experiments were carried out using a multi-anvil high-pressure split-sphere apparatus at 6.3-7.5 GPa, in the range of 1100-1650 °C in carbonate-metal, carbonate-oxide-metal, carbonate-oxide, carbide-oxide and carbonate-metal- sulphur systems. In three experimental series, oxygen fugacity gradient in the samples was created, which enabled the study of the processes of magnesiowüstite formation under oxidizing and reducing conditions (?logfO2 (FMQ) values from -1 to -5). It was established that Fe3+-bearing magnesiowüstite can form both in assemblage with oxidized phases, such as carbonate or with reduced ones—metal, carbides, sulphides, graphite and diamond. According to the Mössbauer spectroscopy, the composition of synthesized magnesiowüstite varied within a range of Fe3+/SFe values from 0 to 0.3, with IV and VI coordination of Fe3+ depending on P, T, fO2, x-parameters. It was established that Fe3+-bearing magnesiowüstite formation processes under upper mantle P,T-conditions include redox reactions, with magnesiowüstite being (1) reductant or (2) product of interaction, (3) crystallization processes of magnesiowüstite from an oxidized melt, where magnesiowüstite acts as a sink for ferric iron and (4) iron disproportionation.
DS1997-0881
1997
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Borzdov, Sokol, Khokhryakov, Gusev ..Dislocation free monocrystals of sythetic diamondDoklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 353, No. 2, Feb-Mar, pp. 243-6.GlobalDiamond - synthetics, crystallography
DS1997-0882
1997
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Khokhryakov, A., Borzdov, Sokol et al.Growth conditions and real structure of synthetic diamond crystalsRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 38, No. 5, pp. 920-45.GlobalDiamond morphology, Synthetics
DS1997-0883
1997
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Sokol, A.G., Borzdov, et al.Synthesis and characterization of diamond single crystals up to 4 caratsDoklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 355A, No. 6, July-Aug. pp. 856-61.RussiaDiamond morphology, Diamond synthesis
DS1998-1108
1998
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Gusev, V.A., Kupriyanov, Borzdov, SokolThe effect of growth rate on formation of nitrogenous defects in diamond7th. Kimberlite Conference abstract, pp. 649-51.RussiaDiamond inclusions, Mineralogy
DS2001-0598
2001
Palyanov, Y.N.Khokhryakov, A.F., Palyanov, Y.N.Dissolution forms of diamond crystals in CaCO3 melt at 7 GPaRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 41, No. 5, pp. 682-87.GlobalDiamond - morphology
DS2001-0599
2001
Palyanov, Y.N.Khokhryakov, A.F., Palyanov, Y.N., Sobolev, N.V.Evolution of crystal morphology of natural diamond in dissolution processes: experimental data.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 381, No. 8, Oct/Nov. pp. 884-88.GlobalDiamond - morphology
DS2001-0600
2001
Palyanov, Y.N.Khokhryakov, A.P., Palyanov, Y.N., Sobolev, N.V.Evolution of crustal morphology of natural diamond in dissolution processes: experimental data.Doklady, Vol. 381, No. 8, pp. 884-88.GlobalDiamond - morphology
DS2001-0880
2001
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Shatsky, V.S., Sokol, A.G., TomilenkoCrystallization of metamorphic diamond: an experimental modelingDoklady, Vol. 381, No. 8, pp. 935-8.GlobalDiamond - morphology, Metamorphism
DS2001-0881
2001
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Sokol, A.G., Khokhryakov, PalyanovaDiamond and graphite crystallization in COH fluid at PT parameters of the natural diamond formation. #2Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 375A, No. 9, Nov.Dec. pp.1395-98.GlobalDiamond - genesis
DS2002-0190
2002
Palyanov, Y.N.Borzdov, Y.M., Palyanov, Y.N., Kupriyanov, I.N.Synthesis and characterisation of diamond from a calcium carbonate graphite system18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.79. (poster)GlobalUHP mineralogy - crystallography
DS2002-0841
2002
Palyanov, Y.N.Khikhryakov, A.F., Palyanov, Y.N., Sobolev, N.V.Crystal morphology as an indicator of redox conditions of natural diamond dissolution at the mantle Pt parameters.Doklady, Vol.385,June-July, pp. 534-7.MantleDiamond - mineralogy
DS2002-1205
2002
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Sokol, A.C., Borzdov, V.M.Diamond formation through carbonate silicate interactionAmerican Mineralogist, Vol.87,7, pp. 1009-13.GlobalDiamond - genesis, morphology
DS2002-1206
2002
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Sokol, A.G., Borzdov, KhokhryakovFluid bearing alkaline carbonate melts as the medium for the formation of diamonds in Earth's mantle:Lithos, Vol.60, pp. 145-59.MantleDiamond - crystallization, melting, UHP, Petrology - experimental
DS2002-1207
2002
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Sokol, A.G., Borzdov, Y.M., Khokhryakov, A.F., Sobolev, N.V.Diamond formation through carbonate silicate interactionAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 87, pp. 1009-13.GlobalDiamond - crystallography, genesis, carbon, magnesite, Petrology - experimental
DS2002-1453
2002
Palyanov, Y.N.Shatsky, A.F., Borzdov, Yu.M., Sokol, A.G., Palyanov, Y.N.Phase formation and diamond crystallization in carbon bearing ultrapotassic carbonate silicate systems.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 43, 10, pp. 889-901.GlobalDiamond - morphology
DS2002-1521
2002
Palyanov, Y.N.Sokol, A.G., Palyanov, Y.N.Crystallization of diamond and graphite in C O H fluid under mantle P T parameters18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.79. (poster)MantleUHP mineralogy - crystallography
DS200412-0998
2004
Palyanov, Y.N.Khokhryakov, A.F., Palyanov, Y.N.Evolution of diamond morphology in the processes of mantle dissolution.Lithos, ABSTRACTS only, Vol. 73, p. S57. abstractRussia, UralsDiamond morphology
DS200512-0817
2005
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Sokol, A.G., Tomilenko, A.A., Sobolev, N.V.Conditions of diamond formation through carbonate silicate interaction.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 17, 2, pp. 207-214.Diamond genesis
DS200612-1271
2005
Palyanov, Y.N.Shatsky, V.S., Palyanov, Y.N., Sokol, A.G., Tomilenko, A.A., Sobolev, N.V.Diamond formation in UHP dolomite marbles and garnet pyroxene rocks of the Kokchetav Massif, northern Kazakstan: natural and experimental evidence.International Geology Review, Vol. 47, 10, pp. 999-1010.RussiaUHP
DS200712-0536
2007
Palyanov, Y.N.Khokhrayakov, A.F., Palyanov, Y.N.The evolution of diamond morphology in the process of dissolution: experimental data.Americam Mineralogist, Vol. 92, 5, pp. 909-917.Russia, YakutiaUdachnaya
DS200712-0537
2007
Palyanov, Y.N.Khokhryakov, A.F., Palyanov, Y.N.The evolution of diamond morphology in the process of dissolution: experimental data.American Mineralogist, Vol. 92, pp. 909-917.RussiaDeposit - Udachnaya diamond morphology
DS200712-0796
2007
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Borzdov, Y.M., Batleva, Y.V., Sokol, A.G., Palyanova, G.A.Reducing role of sulfides and diamond formation in the Earth's mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 260, 1-2, pp. 242-256.MantleDiamond genesis
DS200712-0797
2007
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Borzdov, Yu.M., Bataleva, Yu.V., Sokol, A.G., Palyanova, G.A., Kupriyanov, I.N.Reducing role of sufides and diamond formation in the Earth's mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 260, 1-2, pp. 242-256.MantleDiamond genesis
DS200712-0798
2007
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Borzdov, Yu.M., Bataleva, Yu.V., Sokol, A.G., Palyanova, G.A., Kupriyanov, I.N.Reducing role of sufides and diamond formation in the Earth's mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 260, 1-2, pp. 242-256.MantleDiamond genesis
DS200812-0952
2008
Palyanov, Y.N.Reutsky, V.N., Harte, B., EIMF, Borzdov, Y.M., Palyanov, Y.N.Monitoring diamond crystal growth, a combined experimental and SIMS study.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 365-374.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200912-0374
2009
Palyanov, Y.N.Khokhryakov, A.F., Nechaev, D.V., Sokol, A.G., Palyanov, Y.N.Formation of various types of graphite inclusions in diamond: experimental data.Lithos, In press availableTechnologyDiamond inclusions
DS200912-0562
2009
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Sokol, A.G.The effect of composition of mantle fluids/melts on diamond formation processes.Lithos, in press availableMantleChemistry
DS200912-0711
2009
Palyanov, Y.N.Sokol, A.G., Palyanova, G.A., Palyanov, Y.N., Tomilenko, A.A., Melenevsky, V.N.Fluid regime and diamond formation in the reduced mantle: experimental constraints.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 73, 19, pp. 5820-5834.MantleDiamond genesis, crystallography
DS201012-0357
2010
Palyanov, Y.N.Khokhryakov, A.F., Palyanov, Y.N.Influence of the fluid composition on diamond dissolution forms in carbonate melts.American Mineralogist, Vol. 95, 10, pp.1508-1514.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201012-0561
2010
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Borzdov, Y.M., Khokhryakov, A.F.,Kupriyanov, I.N., Sokol, A.G.Effect of nitrogen impurity on diamond crystal growth processes.Crystal Growth & Design, Vol. 10, 6, pp. 3169-3175.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201012-0562
2009
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Kupriyanov, I.N., Borzdov, Y.M., Sokol, A.G., Khokhryakov, A.F.Diamond crystallization from a sulfur - carbon system at HPHT conditions.Crystal Growth & Design, Vol. 9, 6, pp. 2922-2926.TechnologyDiamond synthesis
DS201212-0507
2012
Palyanov, Y.N.Nadolinny, V.A., Yuryeva,O.P., Rakhmanova, M.I., Shatsky, V.S., Palyanov, Y.N., Kupriyanov, I.N., Zedgenizov, D.A., Ragozin, A.L.Distribution of OK1, N3 and NU1 defects in diamond crystals of different habits.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 24, 4, pp. 645-650.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201212-0685
2013
Palyanov, Y.N.Sokol, A.G., Kupriyanov, I.N., Palyanov, Y.N., Kruk, A.N., Sobolev, N.V.Melting experiments on the Udachnaya kimberlite at 6.3-7.5 Gpa: implications for the role of H2O in magma generation and formation of hydrous olivine.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 101, pp. 133-155.RussiaDeposit - Udachnaya
DS201312-0863
2013
Palyanov, Y.N.Sokol, A.G., Kupriyanov, I.N., Palyanov, Y.N.Partitioning of H2O between olivine and carbonate-silicate melts at 6.30 Gpa and 1400C: implications for kimberlite formation.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 383, pp. 58-67.MantleKimberlite genesis
DS201312-0864
2013
Palyanov, Y.N.Sokol,A.G.,Kupriyanov, I.N., Palyanov, Y.N., Kruk, A.N., Sobolev, N.V.Melting experiments in the Udachnaya kimberlite at 6.3-7.5 Gpa: implications for the role of H2O in magma generation and formation of hydrous olivine.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 101, Jn. 15, pp. 133-155.RussiaDeposit - Udachnaya
DS201412-0658
2014
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Bataleva, Y.V., Sokol, A.G., Borzdov, Y.M., Kupriyanov, I.N., Reutsky, V.N., Sobolev, N.V.Mantle slab interaction and redox mechanism of diamond formation.Proceedings of National Academy of Science USA, Vol. 110, 51, Dec. 17, pp.MantleUHP, deep carbon cycle
DS201412-0659
2013
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Khokhryakov, A.F., Borzdov, Y.M., Kupriyanov, I.N.Diamond growth and morphology under the influence of impurity adsorption.Crystal Growth & Design, Vol. 13, no. 12, pp. 5411-21.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201412-0799
2014
Palyanov, Y.N.Shatskiy, A., Litasov, K., Palyanov, Y.N., Ohtaini, E.Phase relationships on the K2CO3 MgCOs join at 6 Gpa and 900-1400C: implications for incipient melting in carbonated mantle domains.V.S. Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy Siberian Branch Russian Academy of Sciences International Symposium Advances in high pressure research: breaking scales and horizons ( Courtesy of N. Poikilenko), Held Sept. 22-26, 2p. AbstractTechnologyDeposit - Ebelyakh, Udachnaya
DS201508-0361
2015
Palyanov, Y.N.Khokhryakov, A.F., Palyanov, Y.N.Effect of crystal defects on diamond morphology during dissolution in the mantle.American Mineralogist, Vol. 100, pp. 1528-1532.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201509-0417
2015
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Borzdov, Y.M., Kupriyanov, I.N., Bataleva, Y.V., Khohkhryakov, A.F.Diamond crystallization from tin-carbon system at HPHT conditions.Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 58, pp. 40-45.TechnologyDiamond synthetics

Abstract: Diamond crystallization from the tin–carbon system has been studied at 7 GPa and temperatures ranging from 1600 to 1900 °C with reaction times from 1 to 20 h. Both diamond growth on the seed crystals and diamond spontaneous nucleation were established, providing evidence for the catalytic ability of tin. A distinctive feature of the Sn–C system is the existence of a significant induction period preceding diamond spontaneous nucleation. Temperature and kinetics are found to be the main factors governing diamond crystallization process. The minimum parameters of diamond spontaneous nucleation are determined to be 7 GPa, 1700 °C and 20 h. The stable form of diamond growth is octahedron and it does not depend on temperature. Synthesized diamonds contain high concentrations of nitrogen impurities up to about 1600 ppm.
DS201601-0005
2015
Palyanov, Y.N.Bataleva, Y.V., Palyanov, Y.N., Sokol, A.G., Borzdov, Y.M., Bayukov, O.A.Wustite stability in the presence of CO2 -fluid and a carbonate silicate melt: implications for the graphite/diamond formation and generation of Fe-rich mantle metasomatic agents.Lithos, in press available, 40p.MantleMelting
DS201602-0193
2016
Palyanov, Y.N.Bataleva, Y.V., Palyanov, Y.N., Sokol, A.G., Borzdov, Y.M., Bayukov, O.A.Wustite stability in the presence of CO2 fluid and a carbonate silicate melt: implications for the graphite/diamond formation and generation of Fe rich mantle metasomatic agents.Lithos, Vol. 244, pp. 20-29.GlobalFerropericlase inclusions

Abstract: Experimental simulation of the interaction of wüstite with a CO2-rich fluid and a carbonate-silicate melt was performed using a multianvil high-pressure split-sphere apparatus in the FeO-MgO-CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-CO2 system at a pressure of 6.3 GPa and temperatures in the range of 1150 °C–1650 °C and with run time of 20 h. At relatively low temperatures, decarbonation reactions occur in the system to form iron-rich garnet (Alm75Prp17Grs8), magnesiowüstite (Mg# = 0.13), and CO2-rich fluid. Under these conditions, magnesiowüstite was found to be capable of partial reducing CO2 to C0 that leads to the formation of Fe3+-bearing magnesiowüstite, crystallization of magnetite and metastable graphite, and initial growth of diamond seeds. At T = 1450 °C, an iron-rich carbonate-silicate melt (FeO ~ 56 wt.%, SiO2 ~ 12 wt.%) forms in the system. Interaction between (Fe,Mg)O, SiO2, fluid and melt leads to oxidation of magnesiowüstite and crystallization of fayalite-magnetite spinel solid solution (1450 °C) as well as to complete dissolution of magnesiowüstite in the carbonate-silicate melt (1550 °C–1650 °C). In the presence of both carbonate-silicate melt and CO2-rich fluid, dissolution (oxidation) of diamond and metastable graphite was found to occur. The study results demonstrate that under pressures of the lithospheric mantle in the presence of a CO2-rich fluid, wüstite/magnesiowüstite is stable only at relatively low temperatures when it is in the absolute excess relative to CO2-rich fluid. In this case, the redox reactions, which produce metastable graphite and diamond with concomitant partial oxidation of wüstite to magnetite, occur. Wüstite is unstable under high concentrations of a CO2-rich fluid as well as in the presence of a carbonate-silicate melt: it is either completely oxidized or dissolves in the melt or fluid phase, leading to the formation of Fe2 +- and Fe3 +-enriched carbonate-silicate melts, which are potential metasomatic agents in the lithospheric mantle.
DS201604-0630
2016
Palyanov, Y.N.Sokol, A.G., Kruk, A.N., Chebotarev, D.A., Palyanov, Y.N.Carbonatite melt-peridotite interaction at 5.5- 7.0 Gpa: implications for metasomatism in lithospheric mantle. KimberliteLithos, Vol. 248-251, pp. 66-79.MantleMetasomatism

Abstract: Interaction between carbonatite melt and peridotite is studied experimentally by melting samples of interlayered peridotite-carbonatite-peridotite in graphite containers at 1200-1350 °C and 5.5-7.0 GPa in a split-sphere multianvil apparatus. Starting compositions are lherzolite and harzburgite, as well as carbonatite which may form in the upper part of a slab or in a plume-related source. Most experimental runs were of 150 h duration in order for equilibrium to be achieved. The interaction produced carbonatitic melts with low SiO2 (= 7 wt.%) and high alkalis. At 1200 °C, melt-peridotite interaction occurs through Mg-Ca exchange, resulting in elimination of orthopyroxene and crystallization of magnesite and clinopyroxene. At 1350 °C hybridization of the carbonatite and magnesite-bearing peridotite melts occurred with consumption of clinopyroxene and magnesite, and crystallization of orthopyroxene at MgO/CaO = 4.3. The resulting peridotite-saturated melt has Ca# (37-50) depending on primary carbonatite composition. Compositions of silicate phases are similar to those of high-temperature peridotite but are different from megacrysts in kimberlites. CaO and Cr2O3 changes in garnet produced from the melt-harzburgite interaction at 1200 and 1350 °C perfectly match the observed trend in garnet from metasomatized peridotite of the Siberian subcontinental lithospheric mantle. K-rich carbonatite melts equilibrated with peridotite at 5.5-7.0 GPa and 1200-1350 °C correspond to high-Mg inclusions in fibrous diamond. Carbonatite melt is a weak solvent of entrained xenoliths and therefore cannot produce kimberlitic magma if temperatures are ~ 1350 °C on separation from the lithospheric peridotite source and ~ 1000 °C on eruption.
DS201608-1431
2016
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N., Kupriyanov, I.N., Sokol, A.G., Borzdov, Y.M., Khokhryakov, A.F.Effect of CO2 on crystallization and properties of diamond from ultra-alkaline carbonate melt.Lithos, in press available, 12p.TechnologyDiamond formation

Abstract: An experimental study on diamond crystallization in CO2-rich sodium-carbonate melts has been undertaken at a pressure of 6.3 GPa in the temperature range of 1250-1570 °C and at 7.5 GPa in the temperature range of 1300-1700 °C. Sodium oxalate (Na2C2O4) was used as the starting material, which over the course of the experiment decomposed to form sodium carbonate, carbon dioxide and elemental carbon. The effects of pressure, temperature and dissolved CO2 in the ultra-alkaline carbonate melt on diamond crystallization, morphology, internal structure and defect-and-impurity content of diamond crystals are established. Diamond growth is found to proceed with formation of vicinal structures on the {100} and {111} faces, resulting eventually in the formation of rounded polyhedrons, whose shape is determined by the combination tetragon-trioctahedron, trigon-trioctahedron and cube faces. Spectroscopic studies reveal that the crystallized diamonds are characterized by specific infrared absorption and photoluminescence spectra. The defects responsible for the 1065 cm- 1 band dominating in the IR spectra and the 566 nm optical system dominating in the PL spectra are tentatively assigned to oxygen impurities in diamond.
DS201610-1844
2016
Palyanov, Y.N.Bataleva, Y.V., Palyanov, Y.N., Borzdov, Y.M., Kupriyanov, I.N., Sokol, A.G.Synthesis of diamonds with mineral, fluid and melt inclusions.Lithos, in press available 12p.TechnologyDiamond inclusions

Abstract: Experiments on the synthesis of inclusions-bearing diamond were performed in the SiO2-((Mg,Ca)CO3-(Fe,Ni)S system at 6.3 GPa and 1650-1750 °C, using a multi-anvil high pressure apparatus of the "split-sphere" type. Diamond synthesis was realized in the "sandwich-type" experiments, where the carbonate-oxide mixture acted as a source of both CO2-dominated fluid and carbonate-silicate melt, and Fe,Ni-sulfide played a role of reducing agent. As a result of redox reactions in the carbonate-oxide-sulfide system, diamond was formed in association with graphite and Mg,Fe-silicates, coexisting with CO2-rich fluid, carbonate-silicate and sulfide melts. The synthesized diamonds are predominantly colorless or light-yellow monocrystals with octahedral habit (20-200 µm), and polycrystalline aggregates (300-400 µm). Photoluminescence spectroscopy revealed defects related to nickel impurity (S3 optical centers), which are characteristic of many diamonds in nature. The density of diamond crystallization centers over the entire reaction volume was ~3 × 102-103 cm- 3. The overwhelming majority of diamonds synthesized were inclusions-bearing. According to Raman spectroscopy data, diamond trapped a wide variety of inclusions (both mono- and polyphase), including orthopyroxene, olivine, carbonate-silicate melt, sulfide melt, CO2-fluid, graphite, and diamond. The Raman spectral pattern of carbonate-silicate melt inclusions have bands characteristic of magnesite and orthopyroxene (± SiO2). The spectra of sulfide melt displayed marcasite and pyrrhotite peaks. We found that compositions of sulfide, silicate and carbonate phases are in good agreement not only with diamond crystallization media in experiments, but with data on natural diamond inclusions of peridotitic and eclogitic parageneses. The proposed methodological approach of diamond synthesis can be used for experimental simulation of the formation of several types of mineral, fluid and melt inclusions, observed in natural diamonds.
DS201901-0052
2018
Palyanov, Y.N.Palyanov, Y.N.The many facets of diamond crystals.Crystals MDPI, Vol. 8, 2, 9p. Doi.org/10. 3390/cryst8020072Russiasynthetics

Abstract: This special issue is intended to serve as a multidisciplinary forum covering broad aspects of the science, technology, and application of synthetic and natural diamonds. This special issue contains 12 papers, which highlight recent investigations and developments in diamond research related to the diverse problems of natural diamond genesis, diamond synthesis and growth using CVD and HPHT techniques, and the use of diamond in both traditional applications, such as mechanical machining of materials, and the new recently emerged areas, such as quantum technologies. The results presented in the contributions collected in this special issue clearly demonstrate that diamond occupies a very special place in modern science and technology. After decades of research, this structurally very simple material still poses many intriguing scientific questions and technological challenges. It seems undoubted that diamond will remain the center of attraction for many researchers for many years to come.
DS201901-0069
2017
Palyanov, Y.N.Reutsky, V.N., Kowalski, P.M., Palyanov, Y.N., EIMF, Weidenbeck, M.Experimental and theoretical evidence for surface induced carbon and nitrogen fractionation during diamond crystallization at high temperatures and high pressures.Crystals MDPI, Vol. 7, 7, 14p. Doi.org/ 10.3390/cryst7070190Russiadiamond morphology

Abstract: Isotopic and trace element variations within single diamond crystals are widely known from both natural stones and synthetic crystals. A number of processes can produce variations in carbon isotope composition and nitrogen abundance in the course of diamond crystallization. Here, we present evidence of carbon and nitrogen fractionation related to the growing surfaces of a diamond. We document that difference in the carbon isotope composition between cubic and octahedral growth sectors is solvent-dependent and varies from 0.7‰ in a carbonate system to 0.4‰ in a metal-carbon system. Ab initio calculations suggest up to 4‰ instantaneous 13C depletion of cubic faces in comparison to octahedral faces when grown simultaneously. Cubic growth sectors always have lower nitrogen abundance in comparison to octahedral sectors within synthetic diamond crystals in both carbonate and metal-carbon systems. The stability of any particular growth faces of a diamond crystal depends upon the degree of carbon association in the solution. Octahedron is the dominant form in a high-associated solution while the cube is the dominant form in a low-associated solution. Fine-scale data from natural crystals potentially can provide information on the form of carbon, which was present in the growth media.
DS201905-1016
2019
Palyanov, Y.N.Bataleva, Y.V., Palyanov, Y.N., Borzdov, Y.M., Novoselov, I.D., Bayukov, O.A.An effect of reduced S-rich fluids on diamond formation under mantle- slab interaction.Lithos, Vol. 336-337, pp. 27-39.Mantlediamond genesis

Abstract: Experimental study, dedicated to understanding the effect of S-rich reduced fluids on the diamond-forming processes under subduction settings, was performed using a multi-anvil high-pressure split-sphere apparatus in Fe3C-(Mg,Ca)CO3-S and Fe0-(Mg,Ca)CO3-S systems at the pressure of 6.3?GPa, temperatures in the range of 900-1600?°C and run time of 18-60?h. At the temperatures of 900 and 1000?°C in the carbide-carbonate-sulfur system, extraction of carbon from cohenite through the interaction with S-rich reduced fluid, as well as C0-producing redox reactions of carbonate with carbide were realized. As a result, graphite formation in assemblage with magnesiowüstite, cohenite and pyrrhotite (±aragonite) was established. At higher temperatures (=1100?°C) formation of assemblage of Fe3+-magnesiowüstite and graphite was accompanied by generation of fO2-contrasting melts - metal-sulfide with dissolved carbon (Fe-S-C) and sulfide-oxide (Fe-S-O). In the temperature range of 1400-1600?°C spontaneous diamond nucleation was found to occur via redox interactions of carbide or iron with carbonate. It was established, that interactions of Fe-S-C and Fe-S-O melts as well as of Fe-S-C melt and magnesiowüstite, were ?0-forming processes, accompanied by disproportionation of Fe. These resulted in the crystallization of Fe3+-magnesiowüstite+graphite assemblage and growth of diamond. We show that a participation of sulfur in subduction-related elemental carbon-forming processes results in sharp decrease of partial melting temperatures (~300?°C), reducting the reactivity of the Fe-S-C melt relatively to FeC melt with respect to graphite and diamond crystallization and decrease of diamond growth rate.
DS201906-1272
2019
Palyanov, Y.N.Bataleva, Y.V., Palyanov, Y.N., Borzdov, Y.M., Novoselov, I.D., Bayukov, O.A.An effect of reduced S rich fluids on diamond formation under mantle-slab interaction.Lithos, Vol. 336-337, pp. 27-39.Mantlediamond genesis

Abstract: Duplicate
DS201502-0089
2015
Palyanov, Y.U.Palyanov, Y.U., Sokol, A.G., Khokhryakov, A.F., Kruk, A.N.Conditions of diamond crystallization in kimberlite melt: experimental data.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 56, 1-2, pp. 196-210.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201212-0684
2012
Palyanov, Yu.Sokol, A.G., Kupriyanov, I., Palyanov, Yu., Kruk, A.Water activity in kimberlite magmas: constrains from melting experiments at 6.3 Gpa.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractRussiaDeposit - Udachnaya
DS1988-0528
1988
Palyanov, Yu. N.Osorgin, N.Yu., Palyanov, Yu. N., Sobolev, N.V., KhokhryakovaLiquified gas inclusions in diamond crystalsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 293, No. 1-6, September pp. 150-153RussiaDiamond inclusions
DS201606-1101
2016
Palyanov, Yu.A.Kruk, A.N., Sokol, A.G., Chebotarev, D.A., Palyanov, Yu.A., Sobolev, N.V.Composition of a carbonatitic melt in equilibrium with lherzolite at 5.5-6.3 Gpa and 1350C.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 467, 1, pp. 303-307.Carbonatite

Abstract: Generation of ultra-alkaline melts by the interaction of lherzolite with cardonatites of various genesis was simulated at the P-T parameters typical of the base of the subcratonic lithosphere. Experiments with a duration of 150 h were performed at 5.5 and 6.3 GPa and 1350°C. The concentrations of CaO and MgO in melts are buffered by the phases of peridotite, and the concentrations of alkalis and FeO depend on the composition of the starting carbonatite. Melts are characterized by a low (<7 wt %) concentration of SiO2 and Ca# from 0.40 to 0.47. It is demonstrated that only high-Mg groups of carbonatitic inclusions in fibrous diamonds have a composition close to that of carbonatitic melts in equilibrium with lherzolite. Most likely, the formation of kimberlite-like melts relatively enriched in SiO2 requires an additional source of heat from mantle plumes and probably H2O fluid.
DS1981-0119
1981
Palyanov, YU.N.Chepurov, A.I., Palyanov, YU.N., et al.Morphology of Diamond Crystals Sythesized in the Nickel, Manganese, Carbon system Using a Truncated Cube Instrument.Trudy Akad. Nauk Sssr Sib. Otd. Institute Geol. Geofiz., No. 499, PP. 38-40.RussiaCrystallography
DS1983-0502
1983
Palyanov, YU.N.Palyanov, YU.N., Chepurkov, A.I., Khorhryakov, A.F.Formation of Twinning During Growth of Synthtic Diamond.(russian)Zap. Vses Mineral. Obshch., (Russian), Vol. 112, No. 3, pp. 354-358RussiaDiamond Morphology
DS1984-0186
1984
Palyanov, YU.N.Chepurov, A.I., Palyanov, YU.N., et al.Antiskeletal Synthetic Diamond CrystalsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 270, No. 1-6, NOVEMBER PP. 136-138.RussiaDiamond Morphology
DS1985-0512
1985
Palyanov, YU.N.Palyanov, YU.N., Chepurkov, A.I., Khorhryakov, A.F.Growth and morphology of antiskeleton crystals of syntheticdiamonds.(Russian)Mineral. Zhurn., (Russian), Vol. 7, No. 5, pp. 50-61RussiaDiamond Morphology
DS1985-0513
1985
Palyanov, YU.N.Palyanov, YU.N., Khokhryakov, A.F., et al.Genetic Pecularities of Diamond Intergrowth Twins.(russian)Mineral. Zhurn., (Russian), Vol. 7, No. 6, pp. 55-61RussiaDiamond Morphology
DS1987-0106
1987
Palyanov, Yu.N.Chepurov, A.I., Khokhryakov, A.F., Sonin, V.M., Palyanov, Yu.N.Shapes derived by solution of diamond crystals in silicate melts at hightemperaturesDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 285, No. 1-6, August pp. 133-137RussiaBlank
DS1987-0557
1987
Palyanov, Yu.N.Osorgin, N.Yu., Palyanov, Yu.N., Sobolev, N.V., et al.Fluid inclusions in diamond crystals.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol.l 293, No. 5, pp. 1214-1217RussiaDiamond morphology, Diamond inclusions
DS1987-0558
1987
Palyanov, Yu.N.Osorgin, N.Yu., Palyanov, Yu.N., Sobolev, N.V., Khokhryakova, I.P., et al.Inclusions of liquified gases in diamond crystals.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR (Russian), Vol. 293, No. 5, pp. 1214-1217RussiaGeochemistry, diamond
DS1990-0829
1990
Palyanov, Yu.N.Khokhryakov, A.F., Palyanov, Yu.N.Morphology of diamond crystals dissolved in water containing silicatemelts.(Russian)Mineral. Zhurnal, (Russian), Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 14-23RussiaDiamond crystallography, Diamond morphology
DS1992-1159
1992
Palyanov, Yu.N.Palyanov, Yu.N., Malinovskiy, I.Yu., Borzdov, Yu.M., KhokhryakovUse of the split sphere apparatus for growing large diamond crystals without the use of a hydraulic press.Doklady Academy of Sciences USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 315, pp. 233-237.RussiaDiamond synthesis
DS1995-0434
1995
Palyanov, Yu.N.Doroshev, A.M., Palyanov, Yu.N., Turkin, A.I., et al.Experimental investigation of joint crystallization of diamond with minerals of eclogites and peridotites.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 135-7.Russia, YakutiaDiamond morphology, genesis, Deposit -Mir
DS1995-1421
1995
Palyanov, Yu.N.Palyanov, Yu.N., Khokhyakov, A.F., Borzdov, Yu.M., SokolDiamond morphology in growth and dissolution processesProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 415-417.GlobalDiamond morphology, Diamond growth
DS1995-1916
1995
Palyanov, Yu.N.Tomilenko, A.A., Chepurov, A.I., Palyanov, Yu.N., et al.Volatile components in the upper mantleProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 628-630.Russia, YakutiaSpectroscopy, Deposit -Udachnaya, Obnazhenaya, Mir
DS1996-1063
1996
Palyanov, Yu.N.Palyanov, Yu.N., et al.Inclusions in synthetic diamondsDoklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 341A, No. 3, April, pp. 69-72.RussiaDiamonds - synthetic, Diamond inclusions
DS2003-1043
2003
Palyanov, Yu.N.Palyanov, Yu.N., Borzdov, Yu.M., Ovchinnikov, I.Yu., Sobolev, N.V.Experimental study of the interaction between pentlandite melt and carbon at mantle PtDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 392, Sept-Oct. pp. 1026-29.MantleCrystallography
DS200412-1492
2004
Palyanov, Yu.N.Palyanov, Yu.N., Borzdov, Y.M., Kupriyanov, I.N., Sobolev, N.V.Diamond and graphite crystallization from pentlandite melt at HPHT conditions.Lithos, ABSTRACTS only, Vol. 73, p. S82. abstractTechnologyDiamond nucleation
DS200412-1493
2003
Palyanov, Yu.N.Palyanov, Yu.N., Borzdov, Yu.M., Ovchinnikov, I.Yu., Sobolev, N.V.Experimental study of the interaction between pentlandite melt and carbon at mantle Pt parameters: condition of diamond and grapDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 392, Sept-Oct. pp. 1026-29.MantleCrystallography
DS200412-1494
2004
Palyanov, Yu.N.Palyanov, Yu.N.,Sokol, A.G., Tomilenko, A.A., Sobolev, N.V.Conditions of diamond formation under carbonate silicate interaction.Lithos, ABSTRACTS only, Vol. 73, p. S83. abstractTechnologyDiamond nucleation
DS200412-1872
2004
Palyanov, Yu.N.Sokol, A.G., Palyanov, Yu.N.Diamond formation in MgO SiO2 H2O C system at 7.5 GPa and 1600 C.Lithos, ABSTRACTS only, Vol. 73, p. S104. abstractTechnologyDiamond nucleation
DS200412-2027
2004
Palyanov, Yu.N.Urakaev, F.Kh., Palyanov, Yu.N., DShevchenko, V.S., Sobolev, N.V.Abrasive reactive Mechano chemical synthesis of cohenite with the application of diamond.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 394, 2, pp. 214-218.TechnologyPetrology - experimental
DS200512-1021
2004
Palyanov, Yu.N.Sokol, A.G., Palyanov, Yu.N.Diamond crystallization in fluid and carbonate fluid systems under mantle P T conditions: 2. an analytical review of experimental data.Geochemistry International, Vol. 42, 11, pp. 1018-1032.MantleExperimental petrology
DS200612-1022
2006
Palyanov, Yu.N.Palyanov, Yu.N., Borzdov, Yu.M., Khokhryakov, A.F., Kupriyanov, I.N., Sobolev, N.V.Sulfide melts - graphite interaction at HPHT conditions: implications for diamond genesis.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 250, 1-2, Oct. 15, pp. 269-280.MantleUHP, diamond genesis, carbon
DS200612-1156
2006
Palyanov, Yu.N.Reutskiy, V.N., Harte, B., Borzdov, Yu.M., Palyanov, Yu.N.Carbon and nitrogen effects during HTHP diamond crystallization.International Mineralogical Association 19th. General Meeting, held Kobe, Japan July 23-28 2006, Abstract p. 139.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS200712-1011
2008
Palyanov, Yu.N.Sokol, A.G., Palyanov, Yu.N.Diamond formation in the system MgO Si02 H20C at 7.5 GPa and 1,600 C.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 155, 1, pp. 33-43.TechnologyDiamond genesis - petrology
DS200812-0951
2008
Palyanov, Yu.N.Reutsky, V.N., Borzdov, Yu.M., Palyanov, Yu.N.Carbon isotope fractionation associated with HPHT crystallization of diamond.Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 17, 11, November pp. 1986-1989.TechnologyUHP
DS201212-0061
2012
Palyanov, Yu.N.Bataleva, Yu.V., Palyanov, Yu.N., Sokol, A.G., Borzdov, Yu.M., Sobolev, N.V.Conditions of formation of Cr-pyrope and escolaite during mantle metasomatism: experimental modeling.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 442, 1, pp. 76-80.TechnologyMetasomatism
DS201212-0686
2012
Palyanov, Yu.N.Sokol, A.G., Kupriyanov, I.N., Palyanov, Yu.N., Kruk, A.N., Sobolev, N.V.Melting experiments on the Udachnaya kimberlite at 6.3-7.5 Gpa: implications for the role of H2O in magma generation and formation of hydrous olivine.emc2012 @ uni-frankfurt.de, 1p. AbstractRussiaDeposit - Udachnaya
DS201502-0092
2015
Palyanov, Yu.N.Reutsky, V.N., Palyanov, Yu.N., Borzdov, Yu.M., Sokol, A.G.Isotope fractionation of carbon during diamond cystallization in model systems.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 56, 1-2, pp. 239-244.TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201502-0103
2015
Palyanov, Yu.N.Sobolev, N.V., Dobretsov, N.I., Ohtani, E., Taylor, L.A., Schertl, H-P., Palyanov, Yu.N.Problems related to crystallogenesis and the deep carbon cycle.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 56, 1-2, pp. 1-12.MantleCarbon cycle
DS201509-0428
2015
Palyanov, Yu.N.Sokol, A.G., Kruk, A.N., Chebotarev, D.A., Palyanov, Yu.N., Sobolev, N.V.The composition of garnet as an indicator of the conditions of peridotite-carbonatite interaction in the subcratonic lithosphere ( Experimental data).Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 463, 1, pp. 746-750.MantleGarnet, carbonatite

Abstract: The article focuses on the study of composition of garnets of the lherzolitic and harzburgitic parageneses and the conditions of peridotite. As per the study, reconstruction of the conditions of metasomatism of peridotitic sources of kimberlite is possible in the evolution of garnet. It mentions the importance of dry and hydrous carbonatitic melt upon alteration of peridotitic sources of kimberlite as it acted as an another heat source.
DS201510-1806
2015
Palyanov, Yu.N.Sokol, A.G., Khokhryakov, A.F., Palyanov, Yu.N.Composition of primary kimberlite magma: constraints from melting and diamond dissolution experiments.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 170, 19p.RussiaDeposit - Udachnaya

Abstract: Experiments are applied to constrain the composition of primary kimberlitic magmas which were in equilibrium with lithospheric peridotite and could resorb the entrained diamond to form typical dissolution features. The experiments are run on samples of a model carbonatite and a melt of the Udachnaya kimberlite at 6.3 GPa and 1400 °C, and at unbuffered or Re-ReO2-buffered oxygen fugacity (1-2 log units above Ni-O). Near-liquidus dry Fe3+-free carbonatitic melt (derived from carbonated harzburgite) is saturated with the Ol-Grt-Opx-Mgs assemblage and is almost inert to diamond. Carbonatitic melts that bear 4.6-6.8 wt% Fe2O3 or 1.5 wt% H2O are in equilibrium only with Mgs ± Ol near the liquidus. Dissolution of diamond by these melts produces surface textures uncommon (corrosion sculptures) or common (negative-oriented trigons, shield-shaped laminae and elongate hillocks) to kimberlitic diamonds. The near-liquidus melt of the Udachnaya kimberlite (Yakutia) with 10-12 wt% H2O is saturated with the Ol-Grt-px assemblage and may result from melting of carbonated garnet-bearing wehrlite. Hydrous kimberlitic melt likewise resorbs diamonds forming typical negative-oriented trigons, shield-shaped laminae and elongate hillocks on their surfaces. Therefore, the melts that could originate in the thermal conditions of subcratonic lithosphere, entrain diamond and dissolve it to produce dissolution features on crystal surfaces, were compositionally close to kimberlite (16-19 wt% SiO2) and rich in H2O. Dry Fe3+-bearing carbonatites with fO2 controlled by the ferric/ferrous equilibrium slightly above the Ni-NiO buffer cannot be diamond carriers.
DS201612-2327
2016
Palyanov, Yu.N.Ragozin, A.L., Palyanov, Yu.N., Zedgenizov, D.A., Kalinin, A.A., Shatsky, V.S.Homogenization of carbonate bearing Micro inclusions in diamond at P-T parameters of the upper mantle.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 470, 2, pp. 1059-1062.RussiaDeposit - Internationalskaya

Abstract: The staged high-pressure annealing of natural cubic diamonds with numerous melt microinclusions from the Internatsional’naya kimberlite pipe was studied experimentally. The results mainly show that the carbonate phases, the daughter phases in partially crystallized microinclusions in diamonds, may undergo phase transformations under the mantle P-T conditions. Most likely, partial melting and further dissolution of dolomite in the carbonate-silicate melt (homogenization of inclusions) occur in inclusions. The experimental data on the staged high-pressure annealing of diamonds with melt microinclusions allow us to estimate the temperature of their homogenization as 1400-1500°C. Thus, cubic diamonds from the Internatsional’naya pipe could have been formed under quite high temperatures corresponding to the lithosphere/asthenosphere boundary. However, it should be noted that the effect of selective capture of inclusions with partial loss of volatiles in relation to the composition of the crystallization medium is not excluded during the growth. This may increase the temperature of their homogenization significantly between 1400 and 1500°C.
DS201701-0003
2016
Palyanov, Yu.N.Bataleva, Yu.V., Palyanov, Yu.N., Borzdov, Yu.M., Sobolev, N.V.Graphite and diamond formation via the interaction of iron carbide and Fe, Ni sulfide under mantle P-T parameters.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 471, 1, pp. 1144-1148.TechnologyPetrology - experimental

Abstract: Experimental research in the Fe3C-(Fe,Ni)S system was carried out. The objective of the investigation was to model the reactions of carbide-sulfide interaction related to graphite (diamond) formation in reduced lithosphere mantle domains. T = 1200°C is the formation temperature of the Ni-cohenite + graphite assemblage coexisting with two immiscible melts such as sulfide (Fe60-Ni3-S37)L and metal-sulfide (Fe71-Ni7-S21-C1)L containing dissolved carbon. T = 1300°C is the generation temperature of a unified melt such as (Fe80-Ni6-S10-C4)L characterized by graphite crystallization and diamond growth. The extraction of carbide carbon during the interaction with the sulfide melt can be considered as one of the potential mechanisms of graphite and diamond formation in the reduced mantle.
DS201806-1212
2018
Palyanov, Yu.N.Bataleva, Yu.V., Palyanov, Yu.N., Borzdov, Yu.N., Zdrokov, E.V., Novoselov, I.D., Sobolev, N.V.Formation of the Fe, Mg-silicates, FeO, and graphite ( diamond) assemblage as a result of cohenite oxidation under lithospheric mantle conditions.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 479, 1, pp. 335-338.Mantlegraphite

Abstract: Experimental studies in the Fe3C-SiO2-MgO system (P = 6.3 GPa, T = 1100-1500°C, t = 20-40 h) have been carried out. It has been established that carbide-oxide interaction resulted in the formation of Fe-orthopyroxene, graphite, wustite, and cohenite (1100 and 1200°C), as well as a Fe-C-O melt (1300-1500°C). The main processes occurring in the system at 1100 and 1200°C are the oxidation of cohenite, the extraction of carbon from carbide, and the crystallization of metastable graphite, as well as the formation of ferrosilicates. At T = 1300°C, graphite crystallization and diamond growth occur as a result of the redox interaction of a predominantly metallic melt (Fe-C-O) with oxides and silicates. The carbide-oxide interaction studied can be considered as the basis for modeling a number of carbon-producing processes in the lithospheric mantle at fO2 values near the iron-wustite buffer.
DS201812-2778
2018
Palyanov, Yu.N.Bataleva, Yu.V., Palyanov, Yu.N., Borzdov, Yu.M., Novoselov, I.D., Bayukov, O.A., Sobolev, N.V.Conditions of formation of iron-carbon melt inclusions in garnet and orthopyroxene under P-T conditions of lithospheric mantle.Petrology, Vol. 26, 6, pp. 565-574.Mantleredox

Abstract: Of great importance in the problem of redox evolution of mantle rocks is the reconstruction of scenarios of alteration of Fe0- or Fe3C-bearing rocks by oxidizing mantle metasomatic agents and the evaluation of stability of these phases under the influence of fluids and melts of different compositions. Original results of high-temperature high-pressure experiments (P = 6.3 GPa, T = 13001500°?) in the carbideoxidecarbonate systems (Fe3CSiO2(Mg,Ca)CO3 and Fe3CSiO2Al2O3(Mg,Ca)CO3) are reported. Conditions of formation of mantle silicates with metallic or metalcarbon melt inclusions are determined and their stability in the presence of CO2-fluid representing the potential mantle oxidizing metasomatic agent are estimated. It is established that garnet or orthopyroxene and CO2-fluid are formed in the carbideoxidecarbonate system through decarbonation, with subsequent redox interaction between CO2 and iron carbide. This results in the formation of assemblage of Fe-rich silicates and graphite. Garnet and orthopyroxene contain inclusions of a FeC melt, as well as graphite, fayalite, and ferrosilite. It is experimentally demonstrated that the presence of CO2-fluid in interstices does not affect on the preservation of metallic inclusions, as well as graphite inclusions in silicates. Selective capture of FeC melt inclusions by mantle silicates is one of the potential scenarios for the conservation of metallic iron in mantle domains altered by mantle oxidizing metasomatic agents.
DS201812-2834
2018
Palyanov, Yu.N.Kruk, A.N., Sokol, A.G., Palyanov, Yu.N.Phase relations in the harzburgite-hydrous carbonate melt at 5.5-7.5 Gpa and 1200-1350 C. ( primary kimberlite)Petrology, Vol. 26, 6, pp. 575-587.Mantlemetasomatism

Abstract: Phase relations are studied experimentally in the harzburgite-hydrous carbonate melt system, the bulk composition of which represents primary kimberlite. Experiments were carried out at 5.5 and 7.5 GPa, 1200-1350°?, and \({{X}_{{{\text{C}}{{{\text{O}}}_{2}}}}}\) = 0.39-0.57, and lasted 60 hours. It is established that olivine-orthopyroxene-garnet-magnesite-melt assemblage is stable within the entire range of the studied parameters. With increase of temperature and \({{X}_{{{\text{C}}{{{\text{O}}}_{2}}}}}\) in the system, Ca# in the melt and the olivine fraction in the peridotite matrix significantly decrease. The composition of silicate phases in run products is close to those of high-temperature mantle peridotite. Analysis of obtained data suggest that magnesite at the base of subcontinental lithosphere could be derived by metasomatic alteration of peridotite by asthenospheric hydrous carbonate melts. The process is possible in the temperature range typical of heat flux of 40-45 mW/m², which corresponds to the conditions of formation of the deepest peridotite xenoliths. Crystallization of magnesite during interaction with peridotite matrix can be considered as experimentally substantiated mechanism of CO2 accumulation in subcratonic lithosphere.
DS201901-0006
2018
Palyanov, Yu.N.Bataleva, Yu.V., Palyanov, Yu.N., Borzdov, Yu.M., Bayukov, O.A., Sobolev, N.V.Experiment al modeling of Co forming processes involving cohenite and CO2 fluid in a silicate mantle.Doklady earth Sciences, Vol. 483, 1, pp. 1427-1430.Mantlepetrology

Abstract: Experimental studies were performed in the Fe3C-SiO2-(Mg,Ca)CO3 system (6.3 GP?, 1100-1500°C, 20-40 h). It is established that the carbide-oxide-carbonate interaction leads to the formation of ferrosilite, fayalite, graphite, and cohenite (1100 and 1200°?), as well as a Fe-C melt (1300°?). It is determined that the main processes in the system are decarbonation, redox-reactions of cohenite and a CO2-fluid, extraction of carbon from carbide, and crystallization of metastable graphite (± diamond growth), as well as the formation of ferriferous silicates. The interaction studied can be considered as a simplified model of the processes that occur during the subduction of oxidized crustal material to reduced mantle rocks.
DS201901-0007
2018
Palyanov, Yu.N.Bataleva, Yu.V., Palyanov, Yu.N., Borzdov, Yu.M., Novoselov, I.D., Bayukov, O.A., Sobolev, N.V.Conditions of formation of iron-carbon melt inclusions in garnet and orthopyroxene under P-T conditions of lithospheric mantle.Petrology, Vol. 26, 6, pp. 565-574.Mantlemetasomatism

Abstract: Of great importance in the problem of redox evolution of mantle rocks is the reconstruction of scenarios of alteration of Fe°- or Fe3C-bearing rocks by oxidizing mantle metasomatic agents and the evaluation of stability of these phases under the influence of fluids and melts of different compositions. Original results of high-temperature high-pressure experiments (P = 6.3 GPa, T = 1300-1500°?) in the carbide-oxide-carbonate systems (Fe3C-SiO2-(Mg,Ca)CO3 and Fe3C-SiO2-Al2O3-(Mg,Ca)CO3) are reported. Conditions of formation of mantle silicates with metallic or metal-carbon melt inclusions are determined and their stability in the presence of CO2-fluid representing the potential mantle oxidizing metasomatic agent are estimated. It is established that garnet or orthopyroxene and CO2-fluid are formed in the carbide-oxide-carbonate system through decarbonation, with subsequent redox interaction between CO2 and iron carbide. This results in the formation of assemblage of Fe-rich silicates and graphite. Garnet and orthopyroxene contain inclusions of a Fe-C melt, as well as graphite, fayalite, and ferrosilite. It is experimentally demonstrated that the presence of CO2-fluid in interstices does not affect on the preservation of metallic inclusions, as well as graphite inclusions in silicates. Selective capture of Fe-C melt inclusions by mantle silicates is one of the potential scenarios for the conservation of metallic iron in mantle domains altered by mantle oxidizing metasomatic agents.
DS201904-0773
2019
Palyanov, Yu.N.Reutsky, V.N., Palyanov, Yu.N., Wiedenbeck, M.Carbon isotope composition of diamond crystals grown via redox mechanism.Geochemistry International, Vol. 56, 13, pp. 1398-1404.Globaldiamond morphology

Abstract: We report the carbon isotope compositions of a set of diamond crystals recovered from an investigation of the experimental interaction of metal iron with Mg-Ca carbonate at high temperature and high pressure. Despite using single carbon source with d13C equal to +0.2‰ VPDB, the diamond crystals show a range of d13C values from -0.5 to -17.1‰ VPDB. Diamonds grown in the metal-rich part of the system are relatively constant in their carbon isotope compositions (from -0.5 to -6.2‰), whereas those diamonds recovered from the carbonate dominated part of the capsule show a much wider range of d13C (from -0.5 to -17.1‰). The experimentally observed distribution of diamond’ d13C using a single carbon source with carbon isotope ratio of marine carbonate is similar to that found in certain classes of natural diamonds. Our data indicate that the d13C distribution in diamonds that resulted from a redox reaction of marine carbonate with reduced mantle material is hardly distinguishable from the d13C distribution of mantle diamonds.
DS201904-0774
2017
Palyanov, Yu.N.Reutsky, V.N., Palyanov, Yu.N., Wiedenbeck, M.Evidence for large scale fractionation of carbon isotopes and of nitrogen impurity during crystallization of gem quality cubic diamonds from placers of North Yakutia.Geochemistry International, Vol. 55, 11, pp. 988-999.Russia, Yakutiadiamond morphology

Abstract: The spatial distribution of carbon and nitrogen isotopes and of nitrogen concentrations is studied in detail in three gem quality cubic diamonds of variety II according to Orlov’s classification. Combined with the data on composition of fluid inclusions our results point to the crystallization of the diamonds from a presumably oxidized carbonate fluid. It is shown that in the growth direction d13C of the diamond becomes systematically lighter by 2-3‰ (from -13.7 to -15.6‰ for one profile and from -11.7 to -14.1‰ for a second profile). Simultaneously, we observe substantial decrease in the nitrogen concentration (from 400-1000 to 10-30 at ppm) and a previously unrecognized enrichment of nitrogen in light isotope, exceeding 30‰. The systematic and substantial changes of the chemical and isotopic composition can be explained using the Burton-Prim-Slichter model, which relates partition coefficients of an impurity with the crystal growth rate. It is shown that changes in effective partition coefficients due to a gradual decrease in crystal growth rate describes fairly well the observed scale of the chemical and isotopic variations if the diamond-fluid partition coefficient for nitrogen is significantly smaller than unity. This model shows that nitrogen isotopic composition in diamond may result from isotopic fractionation during growth and not reflect isotopic composition of the mantle fluid. Furthermore, it is shown that the infra-red absorption at 1332 ?m-1 is an integral part of the Y-defect spectrum. In the studied natural diamonds the 1290 ?m-1 IR absorption band does not correlate with boron concentration.
DS201904-0775
2017
Palyanov, Yu.N.Reutsky, V.N.,Kowalski, P.M., Palyanov, Yu.N., Wiedenbeck, M.Experimental and theoretical evidence for surface induced carbon and nitrogen fractionation during diamond crystallization at high temperatures and high pressures.MDPI Crystals, 14p. Russiadiamond morphology

Abstract: Isotopic and trace element variations within single diamond crystals are widely known from both natural stones and synthetic crystals. A number of processes can produce variations in carbon isotope composition and nitrogen abundance in the course of diamond crystallization. Here, we present evidence of carbon and nitrogen fractionation related to the growing surfaces of a diamond. We document that difference in the carbon isotope composition between cubic and octahedral growth sectors is solvent-dependent and varies from 0.7h in a carbonate system to 0.4h in a metal-carbon system. Ab initio calculations suggest up to 4h instantaneous 13C depletion of cubic faces in comparison to octahedral faces when grown simultaneously. Cubic growth sectors always have lower nitrogen abundance in comparison to octahedral sectors within synthetic diamond crystals in both carbonate and metal-carbon systems. The stability of any particular growth faces of a diamond crystal depends upon the degree of carbon association in the solution. Octahedron is the dominant form in a high-associated solution while the cube is the dominant form in a low-associated solution. Fine-scale data from natural crystals potentially can provide information on the form of carbon, which was present in the growth media.
DS202002-0211
2020
Palyanov, Yu.N.Nadolly, V.A., Shatsky, V.S., Yuryeva, O.P., Rakhmanova, M.I., Komarovskikh, A.Yu., Kalinin, A.A., Palyanov, Yu.N.Formation features of N3V centers in diamonds from the Kholomolokh placer in the Northeast Siberian craton.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 47, 4, 7p. PdfRussia, Siberiadeposit - Khololmolokh

Abstract: In recent years, despite significant progress in the development of new methods for the synthesis of diamond crystals and in their post-growth treatment, many questions remain unclear about the conditions for the formation and degradation of aggregate impurity nitrogen forms. Meanwhile, they are very important for understanding (evaluating) the origin, age, and post-growth conditions of natural diamonds. In the present work, an attempt was made to analyze the causes of the formation of high concentrations of N3V centers in natural IaB-type diamonds from the Kholomolokh placer (the Northeast Siberian craton). The possibility of decay of B centers during the plastic deformation of diamonds is analyzed and experiments on the high-temperature annealing of diamonds containing B centers are reported. The formation of N3V centers during the destruction of the B centers at high-pressure annealing of crystals has been established by experiment. It is assumed that, in the post-growth period, diamond crystals were exposed to tectono-thermal stages of raising the superplumes of the Earth's crust of the Siberian craton.
DS2001-0881
2001
PalyanovaPalyanov, Y.N., Sokol, A.G., Khokhryakov, PalyanovaDiamond and graphite crystallization in COH fluid at PT parameters of the natural diamond formation. #2Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 375A, No. 9, Nov.Dec. pp.1395-98.GlobalDiamond - genesis
DS200512-1022
2004
Palyanova, G.A.Sokol, A.G., Palynaov, Y.N., Palyanova, G.A., Tomilenko, A.A.Diamond crystallization in fluid and carbonate fluid systems under mantle P-T conditions: 1. fluid composition.Geochemistry International, Vol. 42, 9, pp. 830-838.MantleGeochemistry - diamond crystallography
DS200712-0796
2007
Palyanova, G.A.Palyanov, Y.N., Borzdov, Y.M., Batleva, Y.V., Sokol, A.G., Palyanova, G.A.Reducing role of sulfides and diamond formation in the Earth's mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 260, 1-2, pp. 242-256.MantleDiamond genesis
DS200712-0797
2007
Palyanova, G.A.Palyanov, Y.N., Borzdov, Yu.M., Bataleva, Yu.V., Sokol, A.G., Palyanova, G.A., Kupriyanov, I.N.Reducing role of sufides and diamond formation in the Earth's mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 260, 1-2, pp. 242-256.MantleDiamond genesis
DS200712-0798
2007
Palyanova, G.A.Palyanov, Y.N., Borzdov, Yu.M., Bataleva, Yu.V., Sokol, A.G., Palyanova, G.A., Kupriyanov, I.N.Reducing role of sufides and diamond formation in the Earth's mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 260, 1-2, pp. 242-256.MantleDiamond genesis
DS200912-0711
2009
Palyanova, G.A.Sokol, A.G., Palyanova, G.A., Palyanov, Y.N., Tomilenko, A.A., Melenevsky, V.N.Fluid regime and diamond formation in the reduced mantle: experimental constraints.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 73, 19, pp. 5820-5834.MantleDiamond genesis, crystallography
DS1994-1329
1994
Palynamov, Y.N.Palynamov, Y.N., et al.Inclusions in synthetic diamonds (Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk SSR, (Russian), Vol. 338, No. 1, Sept. pp. 78-80.RussiaDiamond synthesis, diamond inclusions
DS1998-1377
1998
Palynanov, Y.N.Sokol, A.G., Palynanov, Y.N., Borzdov et al.Diamond crystallization in a Na2 CO3 meltDoklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 361a, No. 6, pp. 821-4.MantleDiamond morphology, Petrology
DS200512-1022
2004
Palynaov, Y.N.Sokol, A.G., Palynaov, Y.N., Palyanova, G.A., Tomilenko, A.A.Diamond crystallization in fluid and carbonate fluid systems under mantle P-T conditions: 1. fluid composition.Geochemistry International, Vol. 42, 9, pp. 830-838.MantleGeochemistry - diamond crystallography
DS200612-1023
2005
Palynaov, Y.N.Palynaov, Y.N., Sokol, A.G., Sobolev, N.V.Experimental modeling of mantle diamond forming processes.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 46, 12, pp. 1271-1284.MantleDiamond genesis
DS200712-0799
2007
Palynaov, Y.N.Palynaov, Y.N., Shatsky, V.S., Sobolev, N.V., Sokol, A.G.The role of mantle uptrapotassic fluids in diamond formation.Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences USA, Vol. 104, 22, pp. 9122-9127. IngentaMantleDiamond genesis
DS1998-1109
1998
Palynaov, Yu.N.Palynaov, Yu.N., Sokol, A.G., Borzdov, Y.M., et al.Diamond crystallization in the systems CaCO3-C, MgCO3-C, CaMg (CO3)-CDoklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 363, No. 8, Oct-Nov. pp. 1156-60.GlobalDiamond mineralogy - experimental, Diamond morphology
DS201602-0240
2016
Palynaov, Yu.N.Sokol, A.G., Kruk, A.N., Chebotarev, D.A., Palynaov, Yu.N., Sobolev, N.V.Conditions of carbonation and wehrlitization of lithospheric peridotite upon interaction with carbonatitic melts.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 465, 2, pp. 1262-1267.RussiaDeposit - Udachnaya

Abstract: Study of the mechanism of carbonation and wehrlitization of harzburgite upon metasomatism by carbonatitic melts of various genesis was carried out. Experiments with durations of 60-150 h were performed at 6.3 GPa and 1200°C. The data showed that carbonatite with MgO/CaO > 0.3 percolating into the peridotitic lithosphere may provide crystallization of magnesite in it. The influence of all studied carbonatites results in wehrlitization of peridotite. The compositions of melts formed by interaction with harzburgite (~2 wt % SiO2, Ca# = 36-47) practically do not depend on the composition of the initial carbonatite. Based on the data obtained, we conclude that the formation of magnesite-bearing and magnesite-free metasomatized peridotites may have a significant influence on the CO2 regime in the further generation of kimberlitic magmas of groups I and II.
DS201912-2818
2018
Palynaov, Yu.N.Reutsky, V.N., Palynaov, Yu.N., Wiedenbeck, M.Carbon isotope composition of diamond crystals grown via redox mechanism.Geochemistry International, Vol. 56, 13, pp. 1398-1404.Mantleredox

Abstract: We report the carbon isotope compositions of a set of diamond crystals recovered from an investigation of the experimental interaction of metal iron with Mg-Ca carbonate at high temperature and high pressure. Despite using single carbon source with d13C equal to +0.2‰ VPDB, the diamond crystals show a range of d13C values from -0.5 to -17.1‰ VPDB. Diamonds grown in the metal-rich part of the system are relatively constant in their carbon isotope compositions (from -0.5 to -6.2‰), whereas those diamonds recovered from the carbonate dominated part of the capsule show a much wider range of d13C (from -0.5 to -17.1‰). The experimentally observed distribution of diamond’ d13C using a single carbon source with carbon isotope ratio of marine carbonate is similar to that found in certain classes of natural diamonds. Our data indicate that the d13C distribution in diamonds that resulted from a redox reaction of marine carbonate with reduced mantle material is hardly distinguishable from the d13C distribution of mantle diamonds.
DS2001-1100
2001
Palynov, Y.M.Sokol, A.G., Borzdov, Y.M., Palynov, Y.M.An experimental demonstrator of diamond formation in the dolomite carbon and dolomite fluid carbon systems.Eur. Jour. Min., Vol. 13, No. 5, pp. 893-900.RussiaCarbonatite, Petrology - experimental
DS201705-0876
2017
Palynov, Y.N.Sokol, A.G., Kruk, A.N., Palynov, Y.N., Sobolev, N.V.Stability of phlogopite in ultrapotassic kimberlite-like systems at 5.5-7.5 Gpa.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, in press available 22p.MantleMetasomatism, magmatism, carbonatite

Abstract: Hydrous K-rich kimberlite-like systems are studied experimentally at 5.5-7.5 GPa and 1200-1450 °C in terms of phase relations and conditions for formation and stability of phlogopite. The starting samples are phlogopite-carbonatite-phlogopite sandwiches and harzburgite-carbonatite mixtures consisting of Ol + Grt + Cpx + L (±Opx), according to the previous experimental results obtained at the same P-T parameters but in water-free systems. Carbonatite is represented by a K- and Ca-rich composition that may form at the top of a slab. In the presence of carbonatitic melt, phlogopite can partly melt in a peritectic reaction at 5.5 GPa and 1200-1350 °C, as well as at 6.3-7.0 GPa and 1200 °C: 2Phl + CaCO3 (L)?Cpx + Ol + Grt + K2CO3 (L) + 2H2O (L). Synthesis of phlogopite at 5.5 GPa and 1200-1350 °C, with an initial mixture of H2O-bearing harzburgite and carbonatite, demonstrates experimentally that equilibrium in this reaction can be shifted from right to left. Therefore, phlogopite can equilibrate with ultrapotassic carbonate-silicate melts in a = 150 °C region between 1200 and 1350 °C at 5.5 GPa. On the other hand, it can exist but cannot nucleate spontaneously and crystallize in the presence of such melts in quite a large pressure range in experiments at 6.3-7.0 GPa and 1200 °C. Thus, phlogopite can result from metasomatism of peridotite at the base of continental lithospheric mantle (CLM) by ultrapotassic carbonatite agents at depths shallower than 180-195 km, which creates a mechanism of water retaining in CLM. Kimberlite formation can begin at 5.5 GPa and 1350 °C in a phlogopite-bearing peridotite source generating a hydrous carbonate-silicate melt with 10-15 wt% SiO2, Ca# from 45 to 60, and high K enrichment. Upon further heating to 1450 °C due to the effect of a mantle plume at the CLM base, phlogopite disappears and a kimberlite-like melt forms with SiO2 to 20 wt% and Ca# = 35-40.
DS201112-0767
2011
Pamato, M.G.Pamato, M.G., Boffa Ballaran, T., Frost, D.J., Kurnosov, A., Trots, D.M.The elasticity of hydrous minerals in the lower mantle.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1591.MantleWater recycling
DS201610-1893
2016
Pamato, M.G.Pamato, M.G., Kurnosov, A., Boffa Ballaran, T., Frost, D.J., Ziberna, L., Gianni, M., Speziale, S., Tkachev, S.N., Zhuravlev, K.K., Prakapenka, V.B.Single crystal elasticity of majoritic garnets: stagnant slabs and thermal anomalies at the base of the transition zone.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 451, pp. 114-124.MantleSubduction

Abstract: The elastic properties of two single crystals of majoritic garnet (Mg3.24Al1.53Si3.23O12 and Mg3.01Fe0.17Al1.68Si3.15O12), have been measured using simultaneously single-crystal X-ray diffraction and Brillouin spectroscopy in an externally heated diamond anvil cell with Ne as pressure transmitting medium at conditions up to ~30 GPa and ~600 K. This combination of techniques makes it possible to use the bulk modulus and unit-cell volume at each condition to calculate the absolute pressure, independently of secondary pressure calibrants. Substitution of the majorite component into pyrope garnet lowers both the bulk (KsKs) and shear modulus (G ). The substitution of Fe was found to cause a small but resolvable increase in KsKs that was accompanied by a decrease in ?Ks/?P?Ks/?P, the first pressure derivative of the bulk modulus. Fe substitution had no influence on either the shear modulus or its pressure derivative. The obtained elasticity data were used to derive a thermo-elastic model to describe VsVs and VpVp of complex garnet solid solutions. Using further elasticity data from the literature and thermodynamic models for mantle phase relations, velocities for mafic, harzburgitic and lherzolitic bulk compositions at the base of Earth's transition zone were calculated. The results show that VsVs predicted by seismic reference models are faster than those calculated for all three types of lithologies along a typical mantle adiabat within the bottom 150 km of the transition zone. The anomalously fast seismic shear velocities might be explained if laterally extensive sections of subducted harzburgite-rich slabs pile up at the base of the transition zone and lower average mantle temperatures within this depth range.
DS201705-0864
2017
Pamato, M.G.Novella, D., Dolejs, D., Myhill, R., Pamato, M.G., Manthilake, G., Frost, D.J.Melting phase relations in the systems Mg2SiO4-H2O and MgSiO3-H2O and the formation of hydrous melts.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 204, pp. 68-82.MantleMelting

Abstract: High-pressure and high-temperature melting experiments were conducted in the systems Mg2SiO4-H2O and MgSiO3-H2O at 6 and 13 GPa and between 1150 and 1900 °C in order to investigate the effect of H2O on melting relations of forsterite and enstatite. The liquidus curves in both binary systems were constrained and the experimental results were interpreted using a thermodynamic model based on the homogeneous melt speciation equilibrium, H2O + O2- = 2OH-, where water in the melt is present as both molecular H2O and OH- groups bonded to silicate polyhedra. The liquidus depression as a function of melt H2O concentration is predicted using a cryoscopic equation with the experimental data being reproduced by adjusting the water speciation equilibrium constant. Application of this model reveals that in hydrous MgSiO3 melts at 6 and 13 GPa and in hydrous Mg2SiO4 melts at 6 GPa, water mainly dissociates into OH- groups in the melt structure. A temperature dependent equilibrium constant is necessary to reproduce the data, however, implying that molecular H2O becomes more important in the melt with decreasing temperature. The data for hydrous forsterite melting at 13 GPa are inconclusive due to uncertainties in the anhydrous melting temperature at these conditions. When applied to results on natural peridotite melt systems at similar conditions, the same model infers the presence mainly of molecular H2O, implying a significant difference in physicochemical behaviour between simple and complex hydrous melt systems. As pressures increase along a typical adiabat towards the base of the upper mantle, both simple and complex melting results imply that a hydrous melt fraction would decrease, given a fixed mantle H2O content. Consequently, the effect of pressure on the depression of melting due to H2O could not cause an increase in the proportion, and hence seismic visibility, of melts towards the base of the upper mantle.
DS201804-0723
2018
Pamato, M.G.Nestola, F., Korolev, N., Kopylova, M., Rotiroti, N., Pearson, D.G., Pamato, M.G., Alvaro, M., Peruzzo, L., Gurney, J.J., Moore, A.E., Davidson, J.CaSiO3 perovskite in diamond indicates the recycling of oceanic crust into the lower mantle.Nature, Vol. 555, March 8, pp. 237-241.Mantledeposit - Cullinan

Abstract: Laboratory experiments and seismology data have created a clear theoretical picture of the most abundant minerals that comprise the deeper parts of the Earth’s mantle. Discoveries of some of these minerals in ‘super-deep’ diamonds—formed between two hundred and about one thousand kilometres into the lower mantle—have confirmed part of this picture1,2,3,4,5. A notable exception is the high-pressure perovskite-structured polymorph of calcium silicate (CaSiO3). This mineral—expected to be the fourth most abundant in the Earth—has not previously been found in nature. Being the dominant host for calcium and, owing to its accommodating crystal structure, the major sink for heat-producing elements (potassium, uranium and thorium) in the transition zone and lower mantle, it is critical to establish its presence. Here we report the discovery of the perovskite-structured polymorph of CaSiO3 in a diamond from South African Cullinan kimberlite. The mineral is intergrown with about six per cent calcium titanate (CaTiO3). The titanium-rich composition of this inclusion indicates a bulk composition consistent with derivation from basaltic oceanic crust subducted to pressures equivalent to those present at the depths of the uppermost lower mantle. The relatively ‘heavy’ carbon isotopic composition of the surrounding diamond, together with the pristine high-pressure CaSiO3 structure, provides evidence for the recycling of oceanic crust and surficial carbon to lower-mantle depths.https://www.nature.com/articles/nature25972
DS201905-1062
2019
Pamato, M.G.Nestola, F., Jacob, D.E., Pamato, M.G., Pasqualatto, L., Oliveira, B., Greene, S., Perritt, S., Chinn, I., Milani, S., Kueter, N., Sgreva, N., Nimis, P., Secco, L., Harris, J.W.Protogenetic garnet inclusions and the age of diamonds.Geology, doi.10.1130/G45781.1Mantlediamond inclusions

Abstract: Diamonds are the deepest accessible “fragments” of Earth, providing records of deep geological processes. Absolute ages for diamond formation are crucial to place these records in the correct time context. Diamond ages are typically determined by dating inclusions, assuming that they were formed simultaneously with their hosts. One of the most widely used mineral inclusions for dating diamond is garnet, which is amenable to Sm-Nd geochronology and is common in lithospheric diamonds. By investigating worldwide garnet-bearing diamonds, we provide crystallographic evidence that garnet inclusions that were previously considered to be syngenetic may instead be protogenetic, i.e., they were formed before the host diamond, raising doubts about the real significance of many reported diamond “ages.” Diffusion modeling at relevant pressures and temperatures, however, demonstrates that isotopic resetting would generally occur over geologically short time scales. Therefore, despite protogenicity, the majority of garnet-based ages should effectively correspond to the time of diamond formation. On the other hand, our results indicate that use of large garnet inclusions (e.g., >100 µm) and diamond hosts formed at temperatures lower than ~1000 °C is not recommended for diamond age determinations.
DS202012-2218
2020
Pamies, G.Hainschwang, T., Notari, F., Pamies, G.The origin of 1330 nm center diamonds. ( hydrogen)Diamond and Related Materials, in press available, 19p. PdfGlobalspectroscopy

Abstract: This study covers hydrogen-rich fancy color diamonds that exhibit complex spectra from the UV all the way to the mid-IR. The diamonds with such spectra that are included here show a large range of colors from brownish yellow to brown, yellow-green to olive and gray to violet. The color origin of such diamonds has always been stated as “hydrogen-related”, without much evidence pointing towards hydrogen actually causing absorptions in the visible spectral range, but only based on their unusually high IR active hydrogen content determined via their FTIR spectra. The diamonds analyzed during this work always showed a series of absorptions in the near-infrared at 7495, 7850, 8255, and 8615 cm-1. For the first time, this here presented study shows the results of low temperature near-infrared spectroscopy performed for a series of differently colored diamonds that all showed these NIR absorptions. When measured at 77 K, it became clear that these NIR bands are actually part of an electronic optical center with ZPLs at 1329.8 to 1330.2 nm (7520-7518 cm-1)/1331.8 to 1332.2 nm (7508-7506 cm-1) and 1341 to 1341.2 nm (7457-7456 cm-1). In this paper we will refer to this defect as the "1330 nm center" (which corresponds to 7519 cm-1) for the sake of brevity. The detailed analysis of the spectra has demonstrated that the colors of diamonds that exhibit the 1330 nm center spectra are caused partially by this same center, and by complex absorption bands associated to two series of ZPLs represented by a number of sharp bands between 965 and 1001 nm, referred to as the 990 nm series in this study. Of these, the 990 nm series was found only in diamonds with significant IR active hydrogen concentrations, while the 1330 nm center was determined to be independent from the concentration of IR active hydrogen. The 1330 nm center was found in spectra lacking the 990 nm series of ZPLs, but the 990 nm series has never been found in spectra without the 1330 nm center. We are suggesting that the defects involved in these absorptions are all nickel-nitrogen-related, with the 1330 nm center lacking hydrogen while it seems reasonable to assume that the 990 nm series includes hydrogen in its structure.
DS1993-1184
1993
PanPan, GuochengCanonical favourability model for dat a integration and mineral potentialmappingComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 19, No. 8, pp. 1077-1100GlobalProgram -CFM, Mineral potential mapping
DS1995-1423
1995
PanPan, GuocehngRelated information measures for the associations of earth sciencevariablesMathematical Geology, Vol. 27, No. 5, pp. 609-632GlobalGeostatistics
DS201502-0130
2015
Pan, C.Zhu, X-k., Sun, J., Pan, C.Sm-Nd isotopic constraints on rare earth mineralization in the Bayan Obo ore deposit, Inner Mongolia, China.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 64, pp. 543-553.ChinaDeposit - Bayan Obo
DS1989-0712
1989
Pan, G.Jing, Y., Pan, G., Xia, M., Liang, W., Liou, J.G.Occurrences of abundant eclogites in the DabieMountains, Central SOURCE[ EOSEos, Vol. 70, No. 15, April 11, p. 505. (abstract.)ChinaEclogite
DS1990-0765
1990
Pan, G.Jing, Y., Pan, G., Xia, M., Wang, X., Liou, J.G., Maruyama, S.Petrology of coesite bearing eclogites from the Dabie Mountains CentralChinaInternational Mineralogical Association Meeting Held June, 1990 Beijing China, Vol. 2, extended abstract p. 864-865ChinaEclogites, Coesite
DS1990-1537
1990
Pan, G.Wang Xiaomin, Jing, Y., Liou, J.G., Pan, G., Liang, W., Xia, M.Field occurrences and petrology of eclogites from the Dabie Mountains, Anhui, central ChinaLithos, Vol. 25, No. 1-3, November pp. 119-130ChinaEclogites, Dabie Mountains
DS1994-1330
1994
Pan, G.Pan, G.A geostatistical procedure for defining mineralization envelopes and modeling ore reservesAmerican Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME) Preprint, Meeting held Albuquerque Feb. 14-17th, No. 94-35, 5pGlobalGeostatistics, Ore reserves, Kriging
DS1995-1422
1995
Pan, G.Pan, G.Practical issues of geostatistical reserve estimation in the miningindustryThe Canadian Mining and Metallurgical Bulletin (CIM Bulletin), Vol. 88, no 993, Sept. pp. 31-37GlobalGeostatisics, Ore reserves
DS201907-1588
2019
Pan, J.Zhang, D., Liu, Y., Pan, J., Dai, T., Bayless, R.C.Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the Miaoya REE prospect, Qinling orogenic belt, China: insights from Sr-Nd-C-O isotopes and LA-ICP-MS mineral chemistry.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 110, 18p.Chinacarbonatites

Abstract: Most carbonatite-related REE (rare earth element) deposits record two stages of REE enrichment: magmatic and magmatic-hydrothermal. It is generally accepted that the first stage of enrichment, which occurs in magmas associated with carbonatite-syenite complexes, is a prerequisite to the formation of REE deposits. The magmatic-hydrothermal process is also important, as demonstrated by the fact that many fertile carbonatite-syenite complexes do not produce REE deposits. The Miaoya carbonatite-syenite complex is prospective for REE and is ideal for studies of the formation of REE deposits. The Miaoya REE prospect lies in the western member of the Wudan Terrane of the Qinling Belt, China, and is hosted by a carbonatite-syenite complex that was intruded along a fault zone between schist of the lower Silurian Meiziya Group and adjacent Proterozoic quartzite. Mineralization at the Miaoya REE prospect includes carbonatite-, syenite-, and mixed-type, all low grade (about 1%). Results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron probe micro-analyzer (EMPA) analyses reveal that modes of REE minerals are low in all samples (<5%), which is consistent with the fact that less monazite, bastnäsite and other REE minerals have been found in the Miaoya REE prospect. REE mineralization is less likely to occur as an overprint on gangue minerals. Results of Photon Laser Ablation Inductively-Coupled-Plasma Mass-Spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS) analyses reveal that apatite and calcite in carbonatite have the highest REE concentrations which are responsible for the relatively high concentration in carbonatite rather than because of the presence of REE minerals. The consistence of Sr-Nd isotopes ratios between altered host rocks and fresh hosted rocks suggested REE mineralization originates directly from the unmineralized carbonatite-syenite complex rather than other host rocks. Carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of hydrothermal calcite are consistent with low-temperature alteration subsequent to ore. Trace element ratios for the Miaoya carbonatite-syenite complex lie in the barren carbonatite field (REEs vs. CaO/MgO, FeO/MgO, Ba and Sr/Ba) compared with those of other giant or large carbonatite-syenite complex related REE deposits, just below the boundary between fields for fertile and barren carbonatites. This suggests that the carbonatite-syenite complex at the Miaoya prospect did not have the potential to produce large or giant REE deposits. The low REE of the Miaoya prospect compared with other carbonatite-syenite hosted deposits may reflect: 1) as supported by petrography, minimal tectonic deformation in the area resulting in 2) restricted cycling of hydrothermal solutions that led to 3) minimal fluid scavenging from REE-rich apatite and calcite for local REE re-deposition and concentration.
DS1993-1185
1993
Pan, L.S.Pan, L.S., Weiner, A.M.Particle induced and photoinduced conductivity in Type IIA diamondsJournal of Applied Physics, Vol. 74, No. 2, June 15, pp. 1086-1095. #LM782GlobalDiamond morphology, Type IIA.
DS200512-1164
2005
Pan, M.Wang, Q., Ji, S., Salisbury, M.H., Xia, B., Pan, M., Xu, Z.Pressure dependence and anisotropy of P wave velocities in ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks from the Dabie Sulu orogenic belt: implications for seismic propertiesTectonophysics, Vol. 398, 1-2, pp. 67-99.ChinaMantle reflections, subduction slabs
DS200512-1165
2005
Pan, M.Wang, Q., Shaocheng, J., Salisbury, M.H., Xia, B., Pan, M., Xu, Z.Shear wave properties and Poisson's ratios of ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks from the Dabie Sulu orogenic belt, China: implications for crustal composition.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 110, B8, pp. B08411 10.1029/2004 JB003435Asia, ChinaUHP
DS200612-1506
2005
Pan, M.Wang, Q., Ji, S., Salisbury, M.H., Xia, B., Pan, M., Xu, Z.Shear wave properties and Poisson's ratios of ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks from Dabie Sulu orogenic belt.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 110, B8, BO8208.ChinaUHP
DS202011-2032
2020
Pan, R-H.Cai, W-C., Zhang, Z-C., Zhu, J., Santosh, M., Pan, R-H.Genesis of high ni-olivine phenocrysts of the Dali picrites in the central Emeishan large igneous province.Geological Magazine, doi: 10.1017/ S0016756820001053 10p. Chinapicrites

Abstract: The Emeishan large igneous province (ELIP) in SW China is considered to be a typical mantle-plume-derived LIP. The picrites formed at relatively high temperatures in the ELIP, providing one of the important lines of argument for the role of mantle plume. Here we report trace-element data on olivine phenocrysts in the Dali picrites from the ELIP. The olivines are Ni-rich, and characterized by high (>1.4) 100×Mn/Fe value and low (<13) 10 000×Zn/Fe value, indicating a peridotite-dominated source. Since the olivine-melt Ni partition coefficient (KDNiol/melt) will decrease at high temperatures and pressures, the picrites derived from peridotite melting at high pressure, and that crystallized olivines at lower pressure, can generate high concentrations of Ni in olivine phenocrysts, excluding the necessity of a metasomatic pyroxenite contribution. Based on the Al-in-olivine thermometer, olivine crystallization temperature and mantle potential temperature (T P) were calculated at c. 1491°C and c. 1559°C, respectively. Our results are c. 200°C higher than that of the normal asthenospheric mantle, and are consistent with the role of a mantle thermal plume for the ELIP.
DS1992-1667
1992
Pan, V.Williams, D.R., Pan, V.Internally heated mantle convection and the thermal and degassing history of the earthJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 97, No. B6, June 10, pp. 8937-8950GlobalMantle, Degassing
DS201502-0129
2014
Pan, X.Zhu, L-F., Wang, X-f., Pan, X.Moving KML geometry elements within Google Earth.Computers & Geosciences, Vol. 72, pp. 176-183.TechnologyNot specific to diamonds
DS1996-1064
1996
Pan, Y.Pan, Y., Fleet, M.E.Rare earth element mobility during prograde granulite facies metamorphism:significance of fluorineContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 123, pp. 251-262OntarioQuetico Subprovince, Superior, rare earth elements (REE), metamorphism
DS1998-1110
1998
Pan, Y.Pan, Y., Fleet, M.E., Heaman, L.Thermo-tectonic evolution of an Archean accretionary complex: uranium-lead (U-Pb) (U-Pb)geochronological constraintsgranulitesPrecambrian Research, Vol. 92, No. 2, Oct.l, pp. 117-28OntarioGeochronology, Quetico Subprovince
DS200612-1607
2006
Pan, Y.Zheng, J., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., Zhang, M., Pearson, N., Pan, Y.Wide spread Archean basement beneath the Yangtze Craton.Geology, Vol. 34, 6, June pp. 417-420.Asia, ChinaGeochronology
DS200712-1228
2007
Pan, Y.Zhang, R.Y., Li, T., Rumble, D., Yui, T-F., Li, L., Yang, J.S., Pan, Y., Liou, J.G.Multiple metasomatism in Sulu ultrahigh P garnet peridotite constrained by petrological geochemiscal investigations.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 25, 2, pp. 149-164..ChinaUHP
DS201709-2075
2017
Pan, Y.Wu, M., Du, X., Tse, J.S., Pan, Y.Viscosity of carbonate melts at high pressures and temperatures.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Mantlecarbon

Abstract: Knowledge about the viscosity and other transport properties of CaCO3 melts at high pressures and temperatures relevant to the Earth’s mantle is critically important for understanding the deep carbon cycle [1,2]. We have conducted First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Calculations of CaCO3 melts up to 52.5 GPa and 3000 K to provide atomistic insights into the mechanisms of diffusion and viscosity. Our calculated viscosities of CaCO3 melts at low pressures are in good agreement with those from experiments. In particular, viscosity is almost constant at low pressures but increases linearly with pressure above 10 GPa. The ultralow viscosity of CaCO3 melts at low pressures [1] is readily attributed to the uncorrelated diffusion of Ca2+ and CO3 2- ions (Fig. 1). In contrast, the motions of the Ca2+ cations and CO3 2- anions at pressures >10 GPa become increasingly correlated (Fig. 1), leading to higher viscosities. Compared to water, the viscosity of CaCO3 melts is not anomalously low. Rather, the viscosity of water is anomalously high, because water molecules are strongly H-bonded and behave like polymers.
DS200812-1312
2008
Pan, Y.M.Zhang, R.Y., Pan, Y.M., Yang, Y.H., Li, T.F., Liou, J.G., Yang, J.S.Chemical composition and ultrahigh P metamorphism of garnet peridotites from the Sulu UHP terrane, China: investigation of major, trace elements and Hf isotopesChemical Geology, in press available,ChinaUHP
DS200812-1313
2008
Pan, Y.M.Zhang, R.Y., Pan, Y.M., Yang, Y.H., Li, T.F., Liou, J.G., Yang, J.S.Chemical composition and ultrahigh P metamorphism of garnet peridotites from the Sulu UHP terrane, China: investigation of major trace elements and Hf isotopes.Chemical Geology, Vol. 255, 1-2, Sept. 30, pp. 250-264.ChinaUHP
DS200912-0563
2009
Pan, Z.Pan, Z., Sun, H., Zhang, Y., Chen, C.Harder than diamond: superior indentation strength of wurtzite BN and lonsdaleite.Physical Review Letters, Vol. 102, 5, 05503TechnologyLonsdaleite
DS200412-1495
2004
Pan African Mining CorporationPan African Mining CorporationPan African commences diamond exploration program.. establishes sample processing laboratory.Pan African Mining Corporation, Sept. 7, 1p.Africa, MadagascarNews item - press release
DS2001-0882
2001
Pana, D.Pana, D., Waters, J., Grobe, W.GIS compilation of structural elements in northern AlbertaAlberta Geological Survey, www.ags.gov.ab.ca, ESR 01-01, Release 1.0 $ 20.AlbertaTectonics, structure
DS2002-0251
2002
Pana, D.Card, C.D., Pana, D.Basement rocks to the western Athabaska BasinGac/mac Annual Meeting, Saskatoon, Abstract Volume, P.17., p.17.AlbertaTaltson Orogen
DS2002-0252
2002
Pana, D.Card, C.D., Pana, D.Basement rocks to the western Athabaska BasinGac/mac Annual Meeting, Saskatoon, Abstract Volume, P.17., p.17.AlbertaTaltson Orogen
DS2002-1096
2002
Pana, D.Morrow, D., Maclean, B.C., Tzeng, P., Pana, D.Subsurface Paleozoic structure and isopach maps and selected seismic surveys ofGeological Survey of Canada Open File, No. 4366, 1 CD., $26.Northwest Territories, AlbertaGeophysics - seismics
DS200612-1010
2006
Pana, D.Olson, R., Eccles, D.R., Pana, D., Edwards, D., Beaton,A., Maslowski, A.Summary of mineral exploration during 2005, Diamondiferous kimberlites ( 2p.)Alberta Geological Survey, Jan. 20, 2p.Canada, AlbertaNews item - exploration activity
DS200912-0778
2009
Pana, D.Tukroglu, E., Unsworth, M., Pana, D.Deep electrical structure of northern Alberta ( Canada): implications for diamond exploration.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 46, 2, pp. 139-154.Canada, AlbertaGeophysics - magnetotellurics
DS1998-1111
1998
Pana, D.I.Pana, D.I., Dahroughe, J.R.Metallic and industrial mineral assessment report on the diamond exploration on Lesser Slave Lake property.Alberta Geological Survey, MIN 19980008AlbertaExploration - assessment
DS2003-0365
2003
Pana, D.I.Eccles, D.R., Pana, D.I., Paulen, R.C., Olson, R.A., Magee, D.Discovery and geological setting of the northern Alberta kimberlite provinceIn: 8th. International Kimberlite Conference Slave Province And Northern Alberta, pp. 1-10.AlbertaGeology
DS200412-0501
2003
Pana, D.I.Eccles, D.R., Pana, D.I., Paulen, R.C., Olson, R.A., Magee, D.Discovery and geological setting of the northern Alberta kimberlite province.8th. International Kimberlite Conference Slave Province and Northern Alberta Field Trip Guidebook, pp. 1-10.Canada, AlbertaGeology
DS2001-0883
2001
Panagapko, D.A.Panagapko, D.A., Chackowsky, Lenton, Bailes et al.Geoscience dat a compilation for southeastern ManitobaGeological Survey of Canada (GSC) Open File, No. 4159, CD $ 130.00 eachManitoba, southeastCompilation
DS200612-1324
2005
Panayi, D.Smith, A.C., Virgl, J.A., Panayi, D., Armstrong, A.R.Effects of a diamond mine on Tundra breeding birds.Arctic ( Arctic Institute of North America), Vol. 38, 3, pp. 295-304.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesEnvironemental
DS200912-0564
2009
Panayi, D.Panayi, D.Caribou monitoring at the diamond mines and implications for effects mitigation.37th. Annual Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, Abstracts p. 51.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesEnvironment
DS200612-0528
2006
PancakeHanson, R.E., Harmer,Blenkinsop, Bullen, Dalziel, Gose, Hall, Kampunzu, Key, Mukwakwami, Munyaniwa, Pancake, Seidel, WardMesoproterozoic intraplate magmatism in the Kalahari Craton: a review.Journal of African Earth Sciences, In press available,Africa, South AfricaAlkaline rocks, carbonatite, Premier kimberlite cluster
DS2002-0652
2002
Pancake, J.Hanson, R., Pancake, J., Crowley, J., Ramezani, Bowring, Dalziel, GoseCorrelation of 1.1 GA large igneous provinces on the Laurentia and Kalahari Cratons:Geological Society of America Annual Meeting Oct. 27-30, Abstract p. 561.South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, OntarioTectonics, Gondwana
DS200412-0788
2004
Pancake, J.A.Hanson, R.E., Gose, W.A., Crowley, J.L., Ramezani, J., Bowring, S.A., Bullen, D.S., Hall, R.P., Pancake, J.A.Paleoproterozoic intraplate magmatism and basin development on the Kaapvaal Craton: age, paleomagnetism and geochemistry of 1.93South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 107, 1/2, pp. 233-254.Africa, South AfricaCraton, tectonics, magmatism
DS1989-1249
1989
Panchanathan, P.V.Raghavan, V., Panchanathan, P.V.Fortran 77 utilities for lineament dat a analysisCogs Computer Contributions, Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 1-15. Database # 18161GlobalComputer, Program - utilities Fortran 77
DS201412-1007
2014
Panchenko, A.Yelisseyev, A., Khrenov, A., Afanasiev, V., Pustavarov, V., Gromilov, S., Panchenko, A., Poikilenko, N., Litasov, K.Luminesence of impact diamonds from the Popigai astrobleme.V.S. Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy Siberian Branch Russian Academy of Sciences International Symposium Advances in high pressure research: breaking scales and horizons ( Courtesy of N. Poikilenko), Held Sept. 22-26, 2p. AbstractRussia, SiberiaDiamond luminescence
DS201509-0439
2015
Panchenko, A.Yelisseyev, A., Khrenov, A., Afanasiev, V., Pustovarov, V., Gromilov, S., Panchenko, A., Pokhilenko, N., Litasov, K.Luminescence of natural carbon nanomaterial: impact diamonds from the Popigai crater.Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 58, pp. 69-77.RussiaDeposit - Popigai

Abstract: Impact diamonds (IDs) from the Popigai crater are aggregates of nanoparticulate graphite and cubic and hexagonal diamonds. IDs demonstrate broad-band emissions at 3.05, 2.8, 2.3 and 2.0 eV, which are associated with structural defects and are similar to those in detonation ultra-dispersed diamonds and CVD diamond films. A doublet with components at 1.7856 and 1.7892 eV in some ID samples is related to R1,2 lines of Cr3 + ions in corundum inclusions. The presence of N3, H3, NV0 and NV- vibronic systems in some of the ID samples shows that (i) there is nitrogen impurity and (ii) samples underwent high temperature annealing that promoted vacancies and nitrogen diffusion and defect aggregation. The luminescence decay fits with a sum of two exponential components: lifetime of the fast one is in the 5 to 9 ns range. Parameters of the traps responsible for broad thermoluminescence peaks at 148, 180, 276 and 383 K were estimated.
DS201610-1919
2016
Panchenko, A.V.Yelisseyev, A.P., Afansiev, V.P., Panchenko, A.V., Gromilov, S.A., Kaichev, V.V., Sarasev, A.A.Yakutites: are they impact diamonds from the Popigai crater?Lithos, in press available 14p.RussiaImpact diamonds

Abstract: Yakutites are coarse (up to 15 mm or larger) aggregates dispersed for more than 500 km around the Popigai meteorite crater. They share many features of similarity with impact diamonds found inside the crater, in elemental and phase compositions, texture, and optical properties as revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and optical spectroscopy (Raman, absorption, luminescence and microscopic) studies. The N3 vibronic system appearing in the luminescence spectra of Popigai impact diamonds (PIDs) indicates a presence of nitrogen impurity and a high-temperature annealing of diamonds that remained in the crater after solid-phase conversion from graphite. Yakutites lack nitrogen-vacancy centers as signatures of annealing, which may indicate quenching at the time of ejection. Thus, both PIDs and yakutites originated during the Popigai impact event and yakutites were ejected to large distances.
DS200412-0599
2004
Panczer, G.Gaft, M., Resifeld, R., Panczer, G.Luminescence spectroscopy of minerals and materials.Springer, 300p. ISBN 3-540-21918-8 $ 130.00TechnologyBook - luminescence
DS201312-0736
2013
Panda, D.K.Ray, J.S., Pnde, K., Bhutani, R., Shukla, A.D., Rai, V.K., Kumar, A., Awasthi, N., Smitha, R.S., Panda, D.K.Age and geochemistry of the Newania dolomite carbonatites, India: implications for the source of primary carbonatite magma.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 166, 6, pp. 1613-1632.IndiaCarbonatite
DS2000-0802
2000
PandeRay, J.S., Ramesh, R., Pande, Trivedi, Shukla, PatelIsotope and rare earth element chemistry of carbonatite alkaline complexes of Deccan volcanic: implications...Journal of Asian Earth Science, Vol. 18, No.2, Apr. pp.177-94.India, Gujarat, WesternCarbonatite, Magmatism, alteration
DS1999-0585
1999
Pande, K.Ray, J.S., Pande, K.Carbonatite alkaline magmatism associated with continental flood basalts at stratigraphic boundaries:Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 26, No. 13, July 1, pp. 1917-20.IndiaCarbonatite, Magmatism - Mass extinction
DS1999-0586
1999
Pande, K.Ray, J.S., Ramesh, R., Pande, K.Carbon isotopes in Kerguelen plume derived carbonatites: evidence for recycled inorganic carbon.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 170, No. 3, July 15, pp. 205-14.GlobalCarbonatite, Carbon cycle
DS2000-0801
2000
Pande, K.Ray, J.S., Pande, K., Venkatesan, T.R.Emplacement of Amba Dongar carbonatite alkaline complex at Cretaceous Tertiary boundary: evidence 40Ar 39 ArProceedings Indian Academy of Science, Vol. 109, No. 1, March pp. 39-47.IndiaCarbonatite, Geochronology
DS2001-0884
2001
Pande, K.Pande, K., Sheth, H.C., Bhutani, R.40Ar 39Ar age of the St. Mary's Islands volcanics: record of India Madagascar break up of subcontinent.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 193, No. 1-2, Nov. 30, pp. 39-46.India, southernGeodynamics - tectonics
DS2003-1136
2003
Pande, K.Ray, J.S., Pande, K., Pattanavak, S.K.Evolution of the Amba Donar carbonatite complex: constraints from 40 Ar 39 ArInternational Geology Review, Vol. 45, 9, pp. 857-62.IndiaCarbonatite, geochronology
DS2003-1137
2003
Pande, K.Ray, J.S., Pande, K., Pattanayak, S.K.Evolution of the Amba Dongar carbonatite complex: constraints from 40 Ar 39 ArInternational Geology Review, Vol. 45, 9, Sept. pp.875-62.India, Chhota UdaipurCarbonatite
DS200412-1636
2003
Pande, K.Ray, J.S., Pande, K., Pattanayak, S.K.Evolution of the Amba Dongar carbonatite complex: constraints from 40 Ar 39 Ar chronologies of the inner basalt and an alkalineInternational Geology Review, Vol. 45, 9, Sept. pp.875-62.India, Chhota UdaipurCarbonatite
DS200512-0892
2005
Pande, K.Ray, J.S., Pattanayak, S.K., Pande, K.Rapid emplacement of the Kerguelen plume related Syihet Traps, eastern India: evidence from 40 Ar 39 Ar geochronology.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 32, L10303.IndiaGeochronology
DS201812-2832
2018
Pande, L.Krishna, C., Pande, L., Norris, R., Howell, D., Burgess, J.Bunder deposit: The Bunder diamond project, India: discovery of the Saptarshi lamproite pipes.Society of Economic Geology Geoscience and Exploration of the Argyle, Bunder, Diavik, and Murowa Diamond Deposits, Special Publication no. 20, pp. 191-200.Indiadeposit - Bunder
DS200912-0471
2009
Pandev, O.P.Mall, D.M., Pandev, O.P., Chandrakala, K., Reddy, P.R.Imprints of a Proterozoic tectonothermal anomaly below the 1.1 Ga kimberlitic province of southwest Cuddapah basin, Dharwar Craton, southern India.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 172, 1, pp. 422-438.IndiaGeothermometry
DS201412-0660
2013
Pandev, O.P.Pandev, O.P., Srivastava, R.P., Vedanti, N., Dutta, S., Dimri, V.P.Anomalous crustal and lithospheric mantle structure of southern part of the Vindhyan Basin and its geodynamic implications.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 91, pp. 316-328.IndiaGeophysics - seismics
DS201702-0230
2017
Pandey, A.Pandey, A., Pandey, R., Pandit, D., Pankaj, P., Chalapathi Rao, N.V.A note on the origin of clinopyroxene megacrysts from the Udiripikonda lamprophyre, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.Journal of India Geophysical Union, Vol. 21, 2, pp. 124-131.IndiaLamprophyre
DS201710-2254
2017
Pandey, A.Pandey, A., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Chakrabarti, R., Shaoo, S.Petrogenesis of a Mesoproterozoic shoshonitic lamprophyre dyke from the Wajrakarur kimberlite field, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India: geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic evidence for a modified sub-continental lithospheric mantle.Lithos, in press availableIndiadeposit - Wajrakarur

Abstract: Mineralogy and geochemistry of the Udirpikonda lamprophyre, located within the Mesoproterozoic diamondiferous Wajrakarur kimberlite field (WKF), towards the western margin of the Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah basin are presented. The lamprophyre is characterised by a panidiomorphic-porphyritic texture imparted by clinopyroxene, olivine and biotite set in a groundmass of feldspar and spinel. Olivine occurs as the microphenocrysts with a composition range of Fo87-78. Clinopyroxenes display reverse as well as oscillatory optical zoning and are diopsidic in nature with a variation in the composition from core (Wo47 En28 Fs20Ac5) to rim (Wo46En41Fs11Ac3). Biotite (Mg# < 0.6) is the only mica present and spinels are titano-magnetites showing ulvospinel- magnetite solid solution. Plagioclase is the dominant feldspar with a variable compositional range of An41-8Ab82-56Or33-3. Based on the mineralogy, the lamprophyre can be classified to be of calc-alkaline variety but its geochemistry display mixed signals of both alkaline and calc-alkaline lamprophyres. K2O/Na2O ranges from 1.49 to 2.79, making it distinctly potassic and highlights its shoshonitic character. Moderate Mg# (60-65), Ni (110-200 ppm) and Cr (110-260 ppm) contents in the bulk-rock indicate substantial fractional crystallization of olivine and clinopyroxene. Fractionated chondrite normalized REE patterns (average (La/Yb)N = 37.56) indicates involvement of an enriched mantle source from within the garnet stability field whereas slightly negative Ta-Nb-Ti and Hf anomalies displayed on the primitive mantle normalized multi-element spider gram highlight involvement of a subducted component in the mantle source. Given the spatial disposition of the studied lamprophyre, the age of the emplacement is considered to be coeval with WKF kimberlites (~ 1.1 Ga) and the initial 143Nd/144Nd (0.510065-0.510192) and 87Sr/86Sr (0.705333-0.706223) are strikingly similar to those observed for the Smoky Butte lamproites, Montana, USA. Fluid-related subduction enrichment of the mantle source is apparent from the enriched ratios of La/Nb, Ba/Nb and (Hf/Sm)N, (Ta/La)N < 1. Petrogenetic modelling reveals melt generation from 1 to 2% partial melting of an enriched mantle source that subsequently underwent fractional crystallization. Our study provides geochemical and isotopic evidence for a sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) modified by subduction and asthenospheric upwelling in the Eastern Dharwar Craton. The partial melting of a resulting heterogeneous Eastern Dharwar Craton SCLM to generate Udiripikonda lamprophyre and Wajrakarur kimberlites has been attributed to the Mesoproterozoic regional lithospheric extension event.
DS201809-2098
2018
Pandey, A.Talukdar, D., Pandey, A., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Kumar, A., Pandit, D., Belyatsky, B.Petrology and geochemistry of the Mesoproterozoic Vattikod lamproites, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India: evidence for multiple enrichment of sub-continental lithospheric mantle and links with amalgamation and break up of the Columbia supercontinent.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 173, doi.org/10.1007/ s00410-018-1493-y 27p.Indialamproites

Abstract: Numerous lamproite dykes are hosted by the Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India, particularly towards the northwestern margin of the Cuddapah Basin. We present here a comprehensive mineralogical and geochemical (including Sr and Nd isotopic) study on the lamproites from the Vattikod Field, exposed in the vicinity of the well-studied Ramadugu lamproite field. The Vattikod lamproites trend WNW-ESE to NW-SE and reveal effects of low-temperature post-magmatic alteration. The studied lamproites show porphyritic texture with carbonated and serpentinized olivine, diopside, fluorine-rich phlogopite, amphibole, apatite, chromite, allanite, and calcite. The trace-element geochemistry (elevated Sr and HFSE) reveals their mixed affinity to orogenic as well as anorogenic lamproites. Higher fluorine content of the hydrous phases coupled with higher whole-rock K2O highlights the role of metasomatic phlogopite and apatite in the mantle source regions. Trace-element ratios such as Zr/Hf and Ti/Eu reveal carbonate metasomatism of mantle previously enriched by ancient subduction processes. The initial 87Sr/86Sr-isotopic ratios (calculated for an assumed emplacement age of 1350 Ma) vary from 0.7037 to 0.7087 and ?Nd range from -?10.6 to -?9.3, consistent with data on global lamproites and ultrapotassic rocks. We attribute the mixed orogenic-anorogenic character for the lamproites under study to multi-stage metasomatism. We relate the (1) earlier subduction-related enrichment to the Paleoproterozoic amalgamation of the Columbia supercontinent and the (2) second episode of carbonate metasomatism to the Mesoproterozoic rift-related asthenospheric upwelling associated with the Columbia breakup. This study highlights the association of lamproites with supercontinent amalgamation and fragmentation in the Earth history.
DS201810-2363
2018
Pandey, A.Pandey, A., Chalapthi Rao, N.V., Chrabarti, R., Sahoo, S.Post collisional calc-alkaline lamprophyres from the Kadiri greenstone belt: evidence for the Neoarchean convergence related evolution of the eastern Dharwar craton and its schist belts.Lithos, doi.10.1016/j.lithos .2018.09.005Indialamprophyres

Abstract: Lamprophyres from the greenstone belts play a crucial role in deciphering tectonic and geodynamic processes operating during the Archean. This study presents a comprehensive mineralogical and geochemical study of three lamprophyre dykes with calc-alkaline to shoshonitic affinities from the Neoarchean Kadiri schist belt, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India. These rocks display porphyritic-panidiomorphic texture, typical of the lamprophyres with amphibole (magnesio-hornblende) as phenocrysts, biotite as microphenocrysts and feldspar, epidote, titanite and apatite confined to the groundmass. Alteration of biotite to chlorite is observed along with mild deformation in the amphibole phenocrysts. Based on mineralogy and major oxide geochemistry, these rocks are classified as the calc-alkaline lamprophyres. Higher Ba/Nb and low Nb/La points to their derivation from an enriched lithospheric mantle source and higher Th/Yb ratio along with negative TNT (Ti-Nb-Ta) and Zr-Hf anomalies on the primitive mantle (PM) normalized multi-element diagram indicates dehydrated fluids from the foundering slab could be the possible metasomatic agent. Fractionated HREE ratios (GdN/YbN >1.9) and higher SmN/YbN suggests that the source region lies in the garnet stability field. Higher than PM Rb/Sr along with positive correlation between K/La and Rb/La reveals presence of metasomatic phlogopite in the source region. Strong negative initial eNd along with radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr ratios further support an enriched mantle reservoir involved in their genesis. Non-modal batch melting (1-5%) of a mixed source (phlogopite-garnet peridotite) assuming 5% mixing of subducted sediment with ambient mantle wedge (depleted mantle) satisfies the multi-element concentration pattern shown by the Kadiri lamprophyres. The source enrichment can be linked to the accretion-related growth of Dharwar craton and its schist belts during Neoarchean. Our study shows that a majority of lamprophyres associated with the Archean greenstone belts display a shoshonitic character; this highlights the role of subduction-related processes in the growth and evolution of the greenstone belts .
DS201903-0536
2019
Pandey, A.Pandey, A., Chalapathi Rao, N.V.Coupled assimilation and fractional crystallization (AFC) and mantle plume source(s) contribution in the generation of Paleoproterozoic mafic dykes of the eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 93, 2, pp. 157-162.Indiacraton

Abstract: The eastern Dharwar craton (EDC) of the southern Indian Shield hosts five geochronologically distinct Paleoproterozoic mafic dyke swarms emplaced at 2.37, 2.21, 2.18, 2.08 and 1.89 Ga. Trace element geochemical data available for these dykes display the ‘arc signals’ viz., negative Nb-Ta anomalies and elevated Zr/Nb, Th/Yb and Th/Ta values, which are conventionally interpreted to represent involvement of subduction in their genesis. It is shown that these ‘arc signals’ resulted from coupled assimilation and fractional crystallization (AFC) processes that modified these mantle-derived melts. Since, mafic dykes under study are highly evolved, an attempt has been made to estimate (using PRIMELTS2.xls software) the composition of the primary magma from the most primitive sample available from the 2.21 and 2.37 Ga swarms. The mantle potential temperature derived from the estimated primary magma compositions revealed anomalously hot mantle source regions compared to the known ambient upper mantle temperatures during Paleoproterozoic, thus implying the possible involvement of thermal plumes in their genesis.
DS201904-0769
2019
Pandey, A.Raghuvanshi, S., Pandey, A., Pankaj, P., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Chakrabarti, R., Pandit, D., Pandey, R.Lithosphere - asthenosphere interaction and carbonatite metasomatism in the genesis of Mesoproterozoic shoshonitic lamprophryres at Krakkodu, Wajrakarur kimberlite field, eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India.Geological Journal, doi: 10.1002/gj.3468 18p.Indiadeposit - Wajrakarur

Abstract: The spatial and temporal association between lamprophyres and kimberlites provides unique opportunities to explore their genetic relationships. This paper explores such a relationship by detailing mineralogical and geochemical aspects of Korakkodu lamprophyre dykes located within the well-known Mesoproterozoic diamondiferous Wajrakarur Kimberlite field (WKF), towards the south-western margin of Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah Basin, Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India. Mineralogy reveals that these dykes belong to calc-alkaline variety of lamprophyres, but their geochemistry display mixed signals of both alkaline and calc-alkaline lamprophyres. These lamprophyres are highly potassic, and their high Al2O3 and low-TiO2 content implies a shoshonitic character. Low Mg#, Ni, and Cr concentration highlight their evolved nature. High (La/Yb)N and (Gd/Yb)N content is consistent with their derivation from low degrees of partial melting, whereas highly fractionated nature suggests the presence of garnet in their source. Absence of prominent Nb-Ta anomaly implies to the dilution of lithospheric mantle source by melts rich in HFSEs and low La/Nb ratio compared to those of the calc-alkaline island arc volcanics and suggests an asthenospheric overprint on lithospheric mantle source. Carbonatite metasomatism in the source region of these lamprophyres is apparent from conspicuously high-Zr/Hf ratio, and the HFSE budget of these lamprophyres are principally controlled by the presence of phlogopite veins in their lithospheric source. An extremely heterogeneous and layered lithospheric mantle beneath Eastern Dharwar Craton has been inferred from the divergent genetic history of Mesoproterozoic lamprophyres and kimberlites in the Wajrakarur field.
DS201909-2070
2019
Pandey, A.Pandey, R., Pandey, A., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Belyatsky, B., Choudhary, A.K., Lehmann, B., Pandit, D., Dhote, P.Petrogenesis of end-Cretaceous/Early Eocene lamprophyres from the Deccan Large igneous province: constraints on plume-lithosphere interaction and the post-Deccan lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary ( LAB) beneath NW India.Lithos, Vol. 346-347, 19p. PdfIndiaplumes

Abstract: We present petrology, geochemistry and radiogenic isotope (Sr and Nd) data of thirteen post-Deccan lamprophyre dykes in the Narmada rift zone from the Chhotaudepur alkaline province of the Deccan Large Igneous Province (DLIP). Mineralogically, these dykes show affinity towards alkaline (sannaite and camptonite) as well as ultramafic (damtjernite) varieties of lamprophyres. Their major oxides and certain trace element ratios increase with increasing silica content highlighting the strong influence of fractionation processes. Their Nb/U and Ce/Pb ratios are similar to the mantle array defined by MORBs and OIBs and suggests an uncontaminated nature. Major oxide (K2O, Na2O, SiO2 and TiO2) contents show geochemical similarity towards shoshonitic volcanic series, whereas elevated Zr/Hf and Nb/La coupled with suppressed Rb/Nb and Zr/b display their affinity towards HIMU-type intraplate basalts. Their radiogenic initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.706034-0.710582) and sub-chondritic initial ?Nd (-8.6 to 2.1) are akin to those of the (i) ca. 65?Ma Ambadongar carbonatite, NW India, and (ii) ca. 65?Ma orangeites from Bastar Craton, central India, highlighting an enriched lithospheric mantle source. REE inversion modeling suggests ~3% enrichment of an undepleted mantle followed by small degrees of melting of this enriched mantle source are sufficient- as in the case of ocean island basalts (OIB)- to reproduce their observed REE concentrations. Their TDM Nd model ages (564-961?Ma) are consistent with widespread convergent margin-related magmatism during the amalgamation of the Rodinia supercontinent. We propose that enriched lithospheric mantle developed during the Neoproterozoic was metasomatized by small-volume CO2-rich melts imparting a HIMU-type geochemical character during Late Cretaceous, when the mantle plume (viz., Réunion) responsible for the flood basalt eruption, impinged at the base of the NW Indian lithosphere. From the presence of F-rich apatite and high K/Rb in mica, we infer the (i) presence of F-phlogopite in their source regions, and (ii) that the depth of post-Deccan lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) beneath NW India was at least ~100?km at ca. 65?Ma.
DS201910-2293
2019
Pandey, A.Raghuvanshi, S., Pandey, A., Pankaj, P., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Chakrabati, R., Pandit, D., Pandey, R.Lithosphere-asthenosphere interaction and carbonatite metasomatism in the genesis of Mesoproterozoic shoshonitic lamprophyres at Korakkodu, Wajrakarur kimberlite field, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.Geological Journal, Vol. 54, 5, pp. 3060-3077.Indiadeposit - Wajrakarur

Abstract: The spatial and temporal association between lamprophyres and kimberlites provides unique opportunities to explore their genetic relationships. This paper explores such a relationship by detailing mineralogical and geochemical aspects of Korakkodu lamprophyre dykes located within the well-known Mesoproterozoic diamondiferous Wajrakarur Kimberlite field (WKF), towards the south-western margin of Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah Basin, Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India. Mineralogy reveals that these dykes belong to calc-alkaline variety of lamprophyres, but their geochemistry display mixed signals of both alkaline and calc-alkaline lamprophyres. These lamprophyres are highly potassic, and their high Al2O3 and low-TiO2 content implies a shoshonitic character. Low Mg#, Ni, and Cr concentration highlight their evolved nature. High (La/Yb)N and (Gd/Yb)N content is consistent with their derivation from low degrees of partial melting, whereas highly fractionated nature suggests the presence of garnet in their source. Absence of prominent Nb-Ta anomaly implies to the dilution of lithospheric mantle source by melts rich in HFSEs and low La/Nb ratio compared to those of the calc-alkaline island arc volcanics and suggests an asthenospheric overprint on lithospheric mantle source. Carbonatite metasomatism in the source region of these lamprophyres is apparent from conspicuously high-Zr/Hf ratio, and the HFSE budget of these lamprophyres are principally controlled by the presence of phlogopite veins in their lithospheric source. An extremely heterogeneous and layered lithospheric mantle beneath Eastern Dharwar Craton has been inferred from the divergent genetic history of Mesoproterozoic lamprophyres and kimberlites in the Wajrakarur field.
DS202005-0755
2017
Pandey, A.Pandey, A., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Pandit, D., Pankaj, P., Pandey, R., Sahoo, S.Subduction - tectonics in the evolution of the eastern Dharwar craton, southern India: insights from the post-collisional calc-alkaline lamprophyres at the western margin of the Cuddapah Basin.Precambrian Research, in press available, 17p. PdfIndiacraton

Abstract: The geodynamic evolution of the eastern Dharwar craton, southern India, is widely debated with a number of contrasting models ranging from uniformitarian plate convergence to the mantle plume and their combination. We report here the petrology and geochemistry of two undeformed and unmetamorphosed lamprophyre dykes from the Mudigubba area located immediately towards the western margin of the Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah basin from this craton. The Mudigubba lamprophyres are free from crustal xenoliths, and have a typical porphyritic-panidiomorphic texture predominated by phenocrysts of amphibole. Clinopyroxene occurs as microphenocrysts with feldspar essentially confined to the groundmass. F-rich apatite and sphene are the other accessories. Mineral chemistry reveals that the amphiboles are of calcic variety (dominantly magnesio-hornblende), the clinopyroxene to be a diopside (Wo45.01-50.40 En36.74-44.58 Fs6.79-12.73 Ac0.42-2.24) and the albitic (Or1.12 Ab91.17 An7.70) nature of the feldspar. The lower abundance of TiO2 in both the amphibole and clinopyroxene, suggest a calc-alkaline nature of the magma. High Mg# (76.8-79.3), Ni (140-240 ppm) and Cr (380-830 ppm) contents along with (i) depletion in U, and Th, (ii) variable Ba/La and (iii) low Nb/La as well as Th/La strikes out possibility of crustal contamination and supports the primary nature of the lamprophyre magma. The presence of significant Nb-Ta, Zr-Hf and Ti negative anomalies in the primitive mantle normalized multi-element plots and their striking similarity with the global calc-alkaline lamprophyres imply the involvement of subduction-related mantle source modification. Various geochemical ratios (e.g., Hf/Sm, Ta/La, Th/Yb, Nb/Yb, La/Nb, Ba/Nb) demonstrate the source enrichment was caused by a fluid-related, rather than silicate-melt related, subduction metasomatism. Binary-mixing calculations assuming average upper crust and N-MORB as the two end members reveals ~10-30% influx of subducted component in the generation of the Mudigubba lamprophyres. A re-examination of the limited geochemical data available for the co-spatial Paleoproterozoic (2200-1600 Ma) alkaline plutons suggests this Neoarchaean subduction-event in this domain could in fact be a regional feature - all along the western margin of the Cuddapah basin and represents a hitherto unrecognised suture zone in the eastern Dharwar craton with the Paleoproterozoic (?) emplacement of Mudigubba lamprophyres post-dating this collisional event. Our findings provide significant geochemical support to the models invoking convergence towards the evolution of the Eastern Dharwar craton and impose important constraints on the geodynamics of the southern peninsular India.
DS202007-1169
2020
Pandey, A.Pandey, A., Chalapathi Rao, N.V.Supercontinent transition as a trigger for ~1.1 Gyr diamondiferous kimberlites and related magmatism in India. ( Dharwar and Bastar cratons)Lithos, Vol. 370-371, 105620, 11p. PdfIndialamproites

Abstract: Kimberlites are volatile-rich deep mantle-derived rocks that often contain diamonds. Numerous Grenvillian (ca. 1.1 Gyr) diamondiferous kimberlites, ultramafic lamprophyres, and lamproites are exposed in the Eastern Dharwar Craton and the Bastar Craton, India, and are aligned almost parallel to the Eastern Ghats (granulite) Mobile Belt (EGMB). The trigger for these kimberlite and related magmatic events still remains an open question. We review the available geochronological and radiogenic isotopic data for the ~1.1 Gyr kimberlites, lamproites, and ultramafic lamprophyres from the Eastern Dharwar Craton and the Bastar Craton of the Indian shield. We show that kimberlites and associated magmas were emplaced for a longer duration (ca. 130 Myr) in the Indian shield during the Mesoproterozoic and sampled distinct mantle source regions. The kimberlites and ultramafic lamprophyre are characterized by slightly depleted to chondritic Nd isotopic ratios revealing their origin at deeper sub-lithospheric regions, whereas the lamproites essentially show an enriched Nd isotopic signature suggesting their derivation from enriched sub-continental lithospheric mantle. We argue that the absence of linear age progression, prolonged magmatic activity compared to the time span of coeval large igneous provinces (the Umkondo, the Keweenawan, and the Warakurna) and a cooler ambient mantle as revealed from the entrained xenoliths, constitute important limitations for a plume model earlier proposed for the genesis of these kimberlites and related magmas. These observations together with a geographical and temporal (Grenvillian) link to the EGMB points towards edge-driven convection as a trigger for kimberlite magmatism- similar to the model proposed for the Mid-Cretaceous kimberlite corridor in North America. However, this model can't explain the coeval formation of sub-continental lithospheric mantle-derived lamproites. As the timing of kimberlite and related magmatism coincides with that of the Grenvillian orogeny and succeeded a magmatic lull of ~360 Myr in the Dharwar Craton during the Mesoproterozoic, we instead, propose that small scale partial melting of heterogeneous mantle caused by plate reorganization during Columbia to Rodinia supercontinent extroversion served as a trigger for this ca. 1.1 Gyr magmatism in the southeastern Indian shield.
DS202008-1377
2020
Pandey, A.Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Giri, R.K., Pandey, A.Kimberlites, lamproites and lamprophyres from the Indian shield: highlights of researches during 2016-2019.Proceedings Natural Science Academy, Vol. 86, 1, pp. 301-311.Indiakimberlite, lamproites

Abstract: Highlights of researches on kimberlites, lamproites and lamprophyres (and their entrained xenoliths) during 2016-2019 from the Indian context are presented. A few previously unknown occurrences have been brought to light, and a wealth of petrological, geochemical and isotopic data on these rocks became available. All these studies provided new insights into the nomenclatural as well as geodynamic aspects such as subduction-tectonics, mantle metasomatism, lithospheric thickness, supercontinent amalgamation, and break-up and nature of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle from the Indian shield.
DS202008-1430
2020
Pandey, A.Pandey, A., Chalapathi Rao, N.V.Geochemical insights into the distinct mantle sources of coeval shoshonitic lamprophyres and kimberlites from the Wajrakarur kimberlite field, Dharwar craton.Goldschmidt 2020, 1p. AbstractIndiadeposit - Wajakarur

Abstract: The Eastern Dharwar Craton (EDC) of the southern Indian shield host numerous Mesoproterozoic (~1100 Ma) kimberlite fields. Shoshonitic lamprophyre dykes synchronous to these kimberlites are exposed in the diamondiferous Wajrakarur kimberlite field (WKF). These lamprophyre dykes are characterized by the presence of olivine, biotite and zoned clinopyroxene phenocrysts set in a groundmass of feldspar, spinel and apatite. High K2O/Na2O (1.5-3.4) along with elevated Th content (2.2-8.6) in these dykes reveal their shoshonitic affinity. High Th/Yb (1.5-4.1), Nb/Yb (23.8-59.0) and superchondritic Zr/Hf ratios (40-50.4) similar to the oceanic island basalts rules out crustal assimilation and highlights the role of an enriched mantle source in their genesis. Age corrected bulk-rock ?Nd of the shoshonitic lamprophyres vary between -13.73 and -22.90, whereas the initial 87Sr/86Sr ranges between and 0.70533-0.71218 suggesting their derivation from an enriched lithospheric mantle. However, the coeval kimberlites of the WKF have distinct Sr-Nd isotopic composition with bulk-rock ?Nd and initial 87Sr/86Sr varying from 0.44 to 2.75 and 0.70209 to 0.70744, respectively, similar to that of the groundmass perovskite ?Nd (2.08-2.92) and initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.70234- 0.70255). Since, these kimberlites tap an isotopically depleted mantle source, unlike the shoshonitic lamprophyres, the geochemistry of these rocks points to a vertically heterogeneous lithospheric mantle beneath the EDC. We suggest that the Wajrakarur kimberlites generated from a deeper depleted mantle (>150 km) compared to the shallower enriched lithospheric mantle source for the shoshonitic lamprophyres. Neoarchean (2.6-2.8 Ga) Nd depleted mantle model ages for these lamprophyres suggest that the subcontinental lithospheric mantle was enriched during Neoarchean accretion-related evolution of the Dharwar Craton.
DS202009-1618
2020
Pandey, A.Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Giri, R.K., Sharma, A., Pandey, A.Lamprophyres from the Indian shield: a review of their occurrence, petrology, tectonomagmatic significance and relationship with the kimberlites and related rocks.Episodes, Vol. 43, 1, pp. 231-248.Indialamprophyres

Abstract: Lamprophyres are some of the oldest recognized alkaline rocks and have been studied for almost the last 150 years. Known for hosting economic minerals such as gold, diamond and base metals, they are also significant in our understanding of the deep-mantle processes (viz., mantle metasomatism and mantleplume-lithosphere interactions) as well as large-scale geodynamic processes (viz., subduction-tectonics, supercontinent amalgamation and break-up). The Indian shield is a collage of distinct cratonic blocks margined by the mobile belts and manifested by large igneous provinces (LIPs) such as the Deccan. A plethora of lamprophyres, varying in age from the Archaean to the Eocene, with diverse mineralogical and geochemical compositions, are recorded from the Indian shield and played a key role in clarifying the tectonic processes, especially during the Paleo- and Mesoproterozoic and the Late Cretaceous. A comprehensive review of the occurrence, petrology, geochemistry and origin of the Indian lamprophyres is provided here highlighting their tectonomagmatic significance. The relationship of the lamprophyres to the Kimberlite clan rocks (KCRs), focusing on the Indian examples, is also critically examined.
DS202011-2057
2020
Pandey, A.Pandey, A., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Chakrabarti, R.Mesoproterozoic 40 Ar/39 Ar age and Sr-Nd isotopic geochemistry of calc- alkaline lamprophyre from the Mudigubba area, eastern Dharwar craton, India.Current Science, Oct. 8p. PdfIndialamprophyre

Abstract: We report a 40Ar/39Ar Mesoproterozoic radiometric age for a calc-alkaline lamprophyre dyke from the Mudigubba area towards the western margin of the Cuddapah Basin, Eastern Dharwar Craton (EDC), Southern India. Amphibole phenocryst separates from this lamprophyre yielded a plateau age of 1169 ± 8 Ma (2s ), which is almost 50 million years older than the majority of radiometric dates available for the Wajrakarur field kimberlites which are proximal to this dyke. Bulk-rock Sr-Nd isotopic analyses of the Mudigubba lamprophyre dykes (eNd(t) between -13.3 and -12.4) reveal their derivation from an old, enriched, continental lithospheric mantle unlike the kimberlites (bulk-rock and perovskite in situ eNd(t) between -0.77 and +7.93), which originated either from a chondritic or depleted mantle source. This study provides further evidence for emplacement of compositionally distinct, mantle-derived Mesoproterozoic alkaline magmas in the EDC and highlights the extremely heterogeneous character of the lithospheric mantle beneath this craton.
DS200812-0842
2008
Pandey, K.Pandey, K., Dwivedi, M.M.Natural and fancy diamonds: synthesis and characterization techniques.Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences India , Vol. 78, 3, pp. 231-236. Ingenta art1083898765IndiaTechnology
DS2001-0885
2001
Pandey, O.P.Pandey, O.P., Agrawal, P.K.Nature of lithospheric deformation beneath the western continental margin of India.Journal of Geological Society India, Vol. 57, No. 6, pp. 497-506.IndiaTectonics
DS200412-0005
2004
Pandey, O.P.Agrawal, P.K., Pandey, O.P.Unusual lithospheric structure and evolutionary pattern of the cratonic segments of the South Indian Shield.Earth Planets and Space, Vol. 56, 2, pp. 139-150. Ingenta 1043471076IndiaTectonics, eastern Dharwar Craton, geothermometry
DS200512-0144
2005
Pandey, O.P.Catherine, J.K., Pandey, O.P.Differential uplift between Hyderabad and Bangalore geotectonic blocks of eastern Dharwar Craton, south India.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 65, 4, pp. 493-496.IndiaTectonics
DS200812-0707
2008
Pandey, O.P.Mall, D.M., Pandey, O.P., Chandrakala, K., Reddy, P.R.Imprints of a Proterozoic tectonothermal anomaly below the 1.1 Ga kimberltic province of southwest Cuddapah basin, Dharwar craton ( Southern India).Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 172, 1, pp. 422-438.IndiaGeothermometry
DS201112-0168
2010
Pandey, O.P.Chandrakala, K., Pandey, O.P., Mall, D.M., Sarkar, D.Seismic signatures of a Proterozoic thermal plume below southwestern part of the Cuddapah Basin, Dharwar craton.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 76, 6, pp.565-572.IndiaGeophysics - seismics
DS201112-0169
2010
Pandey, O.P.Chandrakala, K., Pandey, O.P., Mall, D.M., Sarkar, D.Seismic signatures of a Proterozoic thermal plume below southwestern part of the Cuddapah basin, Dharwar craton.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 76, pp. 565-572.India, Andhra PradeshGeophysics - seismics kimberlite magmatism
DS201312-0678
2013
Pandey, O.P.Pandey, O.P., Vedanti, N., Srivastava, R.P., Uma, V.Was Archean Dharwar craton ever stable? A seismic perspective.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 81, 6, pp. 774-780.IndiaGeophysics - seismics
DS201609-1736
2016
Pandey, O.P.Pandey, O.P.Deep scientific drilling results from Koyna and Killari earthquake regions reveal why Indian shield lithosphere is unusual, thin and warm.Geoscience Frontiers, Vol. 7, pp. 851-858.IndiaGeodynamics

Abstract: The nature of crustal and lithospheric mantle evolution of the Archean shields as well as their subsequent deformation due to recent plate motions and sustained intraplate geodynamic activity, has been a subject of considerable interest. In view of this, about three decades ago, a new idea was put forward suggesting that out of all shield terrains, the Indian shield has an extremely thin lithosphere (~100 km, compared to 250-350 km, elsewhere), apart from being warm, non-rigid, sheared and deformed. As expected, it met with scepticism by heat flow and the emerging seismic tomographic study groups, who on the contrary suggested that the Indian shield has a cool crust, besides a coherent and thick lithosphere (as much as 300-400 km) like any other shield. However, recently obtained integrated geological and geophysical findings from deep scientific drillings in 1993 Killari (Mw: 6.3) and 1967 Koyna (Mw: 6.3) earthquake zones, as well as newly acquired geophysical data over other parts of Indian shield terrain, have provided a totally new insight to this debate. Beneath Killari, the basement was found consisting of high density, high velocity mid crustal amphibolite to granulite facies rocks due to exhumation of the deeper crustal layers and sustained granitic upper crustal erosion. Similar type of basement appears to be present in Koyna region too, which is characterized by considerably high upper crustal temperatures. Since, such type of crust is depleted in radiogenic elements, it resulted into lowering of heat flow at the surface, increase in heat flow contribution from the mantle, and upwarping of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. Consequently, the Indian shield lithosphere has become unusually thin and warm. This study highlights the need of an integrated geological, geochemical and geophysical approach in order to accurately determine deep crust-mantle thermal regime in continental areas.
DS201801-0044
2017
Pandey, O.P.Pandey, O.P., Chandrakala, K., Vasanthi, A., Satish Kumar, K.Seismically imaged shallow and deep crustal structure and potential field anomalies across the Eastern Dharwar Craton, south Indian shield: possible geodynamical implications.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, in press available, 11p.Indiageophysics - seismics

Abstract: The time-bound crustal evolution and subsequent deformation of the Cuddapah basin, Nellore Schist Belt and Eastern Ghats terrain of Eastern Dharwar Craton, which have undergone sustained geodynamic upheavals since almost 2.0 billion years, remain enigmatic. An attempt is made here to integrate newly available potential field data and other geophysical anomalies with deep seismic structure, to examine the generative mechanism of major crustal features, associated with this sector. Our study indicates that the initial extent of the Cuddapah basin sedimentation may have been much larger, extending by almost 50-60?km west of Tadipatri during Paleoproterozoic period, which subsequently shrank due to massive erosion following thermal uplift, caused by SW Cuddapah mantle plume. Below this region, crust is still quite warm with Moho temperatures exceeding 500?°C. Similarly, Nallamalai Fold Belt rocks, bounded by two major faults and extremely low gravity, may have occupied a large terrain in western Cuddapah basin also, before their abrasion. No geophysical signatures of thrusting are presently seen below this region, and thus it could not be an alien terrain either. In contrast, Nellore Schist Belt is associated with strikingly high positive gravity, possibly caused by a conspicuous horst structure and up dipping mafic crustal layers underneath, that resulted due to India-east Antarctica collision after the cessation of prolonged subduction (1.6-0.95?Ga). Further, the crustal seismic and gravity signatures would confirm presence of a totally distinct geological terrain east of the Cuddapah basin, but the trace of Eastern Ghats Belt is all together missing. Instead, all the geophysical signatures, point out to presence of a Proterozoic sedimentary terrain, east of Nellore Schist Belt. It is likely that the extent of Prorerozoic sedimentation was much larger than thought today. In addition, presence of a seismically detected Gondwana basin over Nellore Schist Belt, apart from some recently discovered similar subsurface Gondwana occurrences in intracratonic parts, would indicate that Dharwar Craton was rifting even during Gondwana period, thereby challenging the long held view of cratonic stability.
DS201805-0969
2018
Pandey, O.P.Pandey, O.P., Chandrakala, K., Vasanti, A., Kumar, K.S.Seismically imaged shallow and deep crustal structure and potential field anomalies across the Eastern Dharwar Craton, South Indian shield: possible geodynamical implications.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 157, pp. 302-316.Indiageophysics - seismics

Abstract: The time-bound crustal evolution and subsequent deformation of the Cuddapah basin, Nellore Schist Belt and Eastern Ghats terrain of Eastern Dharwar Craton, which have undergone sustained geodynamic upheavals since almost 2.0 billion years, remain enigmatic. An attempt is made here to integrate newly available potential field data and other geophysical anomalies with deep seismic structure, to examine the generative mechanism of major crustal features, associated with this sector. Our study indicates that the initial extent of the Cuddapah basin sedimentation may have been much larger, extending by almost 50-60?km west of Tadipatri during Paleoproterozoic period, which subsequently shrank due to massive erosion following thermal uplift, caused by SW Cuddapah mantle plume. Below this region, crust is still quite warm with Moho temperatures exceeding 500?°C. Similarly, Nallamalai Fold Belt rocks, bounded by two major faults and extremely low gravity, may have occupied a large terrain in western Cuddapah basin also, before their abrasion. No geophysical signatures of thrusting are presently seen below this region, and thus it could not be an alien terrain either. In contrast, Nellore Schist Belt is associated with strikingly high positive gravity, possibly caused by a conspicuous horst structure and up dipping mafic crustal layers underneath, that resulted due to India-east Antarctica collision after the cessation of prolonged subduction (1.6-0.95?Ga). Further, the crustal seismic and gravity signatures would confirm presence of a totally distinct geological terrain east of the Cuddapah basin, but the trace of Eastern Ghats Belt is all together missing. Instead, all the geophysical signatures, point out to presence of a Proterozoic sedimentary terrain, east of Nellore Schist Belt. It is likely that the extent of Prorerozoic sedimentation was much larger than thought today. In addition, presence of a seismically detected Gondwana basin over Nellore Schist Belt, apart from some recently discovered similar subsurface Gondwana occurrences in intracratonic parts, would indicate that Dharwar Craton was rifting even during Gondwana period, thereby challenging the long held view of cratonic stability.
DS201702-0230
2017
Pandey, R.Pandey, A., Pandey, R., Pandit, D., Pankaj, P., Chalapathi Rao, N.V.A note on the origin of clinopyroxene megacrysts from the Udiripikonda lamprophyre, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.Journal of India Geophysical Union, Vol. 21, 2, pp. 124-131.IndiaLamprophyre
DS201806-1238
2018
Pandey, R.Pandey, R., Sahoo, S., Pandit, D., Chalapathi Rao, N.V.Recurrent lamprophyre magmatism in the Narmada rift zone: petrographic and mineral chemistry evidence from xenoliths in the Eocene Dongargaon lamprophyre, NW Deccan Large Igneous Province India.Journal of the Indian Institute of Science, 15p. available in pressIndiamagmatism

Abstract: We report rare occurrence of lamprophyre xenoliths within a host lamprophyre from the Dongargaon area, Deccan Large Igneous Province, NW India. The lamprophyre xenoliths are distinct in texture (grain size) as well in mineralogy from those of their host rock. The clinopyroxene (diopside) in the xenoliths is depleted in Ca and Mg but substantially enriched in Fe compared to those in the host lamprophyre. Mica in the xenoliths is a phlogopite whereas that present in the host rock is compositionally a biotite; spinels in the host lamprophyre are relatively enriched in TiO2. As the host lamprophyre dyke has been dated to be of Eocene (ca. 55 Ma) age, the entrained lamprophyre xenoliths are inferred to represent an earlier pulse of lamprophyre emplacement. The recurrent lamprophyre emplacement in this domain is consistent with the recently brought out polychronous nature of Late Cretaceous alkaline magmatism at the Mundwara and Sarnu Dandali complexes in the NW India and is related to the extensional events linked with the reactivation of the Narmada rift zone.
DS201904-0769
2019
Pandey, R.Raghuvanshi, S., Pandey, A., Pankaj, P., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Chakrabarti, R., Pandit, D., Pandey, R.Lithosphere - asthenosphere interaction and carbonatite metasomatism in the genesis of Mesoproterozoic shoshonitic lamprophryres at Krakkodu, Wajrakarur kimberlite field, eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India.Geological Journal, doi: 10.1002/gj.3468 18p.Indiadeposit - Wajrakarur

Abstract: The spatial and temporal association between lamprophyres and kimberlites provides unique opportunities to explore their genetic relationships. This paper explores such a relationship by detailing mineralogical and geochemical aspects of Korakkodu lamprophyre dykes located within the well-known Mesoproterozoic diamondiferous Wajrakarur Kimberlite field (WKF), towards the south-western margin of Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah Basin, Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India. Mineralogy reveals that these dykes belong to calc-alkaline variety of lamprophyres, but their geochemistry display mixed signals of both alkaline and calc-alkaline lamprophyres. These lamprophyres are highly potassic, and their high Al2O3 and low-TiO2 content implies a shoshonitic character. Low Mg#, Ni, and Cr concentration highlight their evolved nature. High (La/Yb)N and (Gd/Yb)N content is consistent with their derivation from low degrees of partial melting, whereas highly fractionated nature suggests the presence of garnet in their source. Absence of prominent Nb-Ta anomaly implies to the dilution of lithospheric mantle source by melts rich in HFSEs and low La/Nb ratio compared to those of the calc-alkaline island arc volcanics and suggests an asthenospheric overprint on lithospheric mantle source. Carbonatite metasomatism in the source region of these lamprophyres is apparent from conspicuously high-Zr/Hf ratio, and the HFSE budget of these lamprophyres are principally controlled by the presence of phlogopite veins in their lithospheric source. An extremely heterogeneous and layered lithospheric mantle beneath Eastern Dharwar Craton has been inferred from the divergent genetic history of Mesoproterozoic lamprophyres and kimberlites in the Wajrakarur field.
DS201909-2070
2019
Pandey, R.Pandey, R., Pandey, A., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Belyatsky, B., Choudhary, A.K., Lehmann, B., Pandit, D., Dhote, P.Petrogenesis of end-Cretaceous/Early Eocene lamprophyres from the Deccan Large igneous province: constraints on plume-lithosphere interaction and the post-Deccan lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary ( LAB) beneath NW India.Lithos, Vol. 346-347, 19p. PdfIndiaplumes

Abstract: We present petrology, geochemistry and radiogenic isotope (Sr and Nd) data of thirteen post-Deccan lamprophyre dykes in the Narmada rift zone from the Chhotaudepur alkaline province of the Deccan Large Igneous Province (DLIP). Mineralogically, these dykes show affinity towards alkaline (sannaite and camptonite) as well as ultramafic (damtjernite) varieties of lamprophyres. Their major oxides and certain trace element ratios increase with increasing silica content highlighting the strong influence of fractionation processes. Their Nb/U and Ce/Pb ratios are similar to the mantle array defined by MORBs and OIBs and suggests an uncontaminated nature. Major oxide (K2O, Na2O, SiO2 and TiO2) contents show geochemical similarity towards shoshonitic volcanic series, whereas elevated Zr/Hf and Nb/La coupled with suppressed Rb/Nb and Zr/b display their affinity towards HIMU-type intraplate basalts. Their radiogenic initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.706034-0.710582) and sub-chondritic initial ?Nd (-8.6 to 2.1) are akin to those of the (i) ca. 65?Ma Ambadongar carbonatite, NW India, and (ii) ca. 65?Ma orangeites from Bastar Craton, central India, highlighting an enriched lithospheric mantle source. REE inversion modeling suggests ~3% enrichment of an undepleted mantle followed by small degrees of melting of this enriched mantle source are sufficient- as in the case of ocean island basalts (OIB)- to reproduce their observed REE concentrations. Their TDM Nd model ages (564-961?Ma) are consistent with widespread convergent margin-related magmatism during the amalgamation of the Rodinia supercontinent. We propose that enriched lithospheric mantle developed during the Neoproterozoic was metasomatized by small-volume CO2-rich melts imparting a HIMU-type geochemical character during Late Cretaceous, when the mantle plume (viz., Réunion) responsible for the flood basalt eruption, impinged at the base of the NW Indian lithosphere. From the presence of F-rich apatite and high K/Rb in mica, we infer the (i) presence of F-phlogopite in their source regions, and (ii) that the depth of post-Deccan lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) beneath NW India was at least ~100?km at ca. 65?Ma.
DS201910-2293
2019
Pandey, R.Raghuvanshi, S., Pandey, A., Pankaj, P., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Chakrabati, R., Pandit, D., Pandey, R.Lithosphere-asthenosphere interaction and carbonatite metasomatism in the genesis of Mesoproterozoic shoshonitic lamprophyres at Korakkodu, Wajrakarur kimberlite field, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.Geological Journal, Vol. 54, 5, pp. 3060-3077.Indiadeposit - Wajrakarur

Abstract: The spatial and temporal association between lamprophyres and kimberlites provides unique opportunities to explore their genetic relationships. This paper explores such a relationship by detailing mineralogical and geochemical aspects of Korakkodu lamprophyre dykes located within the well-known Mesoproterozoic diamondiferous Wajrakarur Kimberlite field (WKF), towards the south-western margin of Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah Basin, Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India. Mineralogy reveals that these dykes belong to calc-alkaline variety of lamprophyres, but their geochemistry display mixed signals of both alkaline and calc-alkaline lamprophyres. These lamprophyres are highly potassic, and their high Al2O3 and low-TiO2 content implies a shoshonitic character. Low Mg#, Ni, and Cr concentration highlight their evolved nature. High (La/Yb)N and (Gd/Yb)N content is consistent with their derivation from low degrees of partial melting, whereas highly fractionated nature suggests the presence of garnet in their source. Absence of prominent Nb-Ta anomaly implies to the dilution of lithospheric mantle source by melts rich in HFSEs and low La/Nb ratio compared to those of the calc-alkaline island arc volcanics and suggests an asthenospheric overprint on lithospheric mantle source. Carbonatite metasomatism in the source region of these lamprophyres is apparent from conspicuously high-Zr/Hf ratio, and the HFSE budget of these lamprophyres are principally controlled by the presence of phlogopite veins in their lithospheric source. An extremely heterogeneous and layered lithospheric mantle beneath Eastern Dharwar Craton has been inferred from the divergent genetic history of Mesoproterozoic lamprophyres and kimberlites in the Wajrakarur field.
DS202005-0755
2017
Pandey, R.Pandey, A., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Pandit, D., Pankaj, P., Pandey, R., Sahoo, S.Subduction - tectonics in the evolution of the eastern Dharwar craton, southern India: insights from the post-collisional calc-alkaline lamprophyres at the western margin of the Cuddapah Basin.Precambrian Research, in press available, 17p. PdfIndiacraton

Abstract: The geodynamic evolution of the eastern Dharwar craton, southern India, is widely debated with a number of contrasting models ranging from uniformitarian plate convergence to the mantle plume and their combination. We report here the petrology and geochemistry of two undeformed and unmetamorphosed lamprophyre dykes from the Mudigubba area located immediately towards the western margin of the Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah basin from this craton. The Mudigubba lamprophyres are free from crustal xenoliths, and have a typical porphyritic-panidiomorphic texture predominated by phenocrysts of amphibole. Clinopyroxene occurs as microphenocrysts with feldspar essentially confined to the groundmass. F-rich apatite and sphene are the other accessories. Mineral chemistry reveals that the amphiboles are of calcic variety (dominantly magnesio-hornblende), the clinopyroxene to be a diopside (Wo45.01-50.40 En36.74-44.58 Fs6.79-12.73 Ac0.42-2.24) and the albitic (Or1.12 Ab91.17 An7.70) nature of the feldspar. The lower abundance of TiO2 in both the amphibole and clinopyroxene, suggest a calc-alkaline nature of the magma. High Mg# (76.8-79.3), Ni (140-240 ppm) and Cr (380-830 ppm) contents along with (i) depletion in U, and Th, (ii) variable Ba/La and (iii) low Nb/La as well as Th/La strikes out possibility of crustal contamination and supports the primary nature of the lamprophyre magma. The presence of significant Nb-Ta, Zr-Hf and Ti negative anomalies in the primitive mantle normalized multi-element plots and their striking similarity with the global calc-alkaline lamprophyres imply the involvement of subduction-related mantle source modification. Various geochemical ratios (e.g., Hf/Sm, Ta/La, Th/Yb, Nb/Yb, La/Nb, Ba/Nb) demonstrate the source enrichment was caused by a fluid-related, rather than silicate-melt related, subduction metasomatism. Binary-mixing calculations assuming average upper crust and N-MORB as the two end members reveals ~10-30% influx of subducted component in the generation of the Mudigubba lamprophyres. A re-examination of the limited geochemical data available for the co-spatial Paleoproterozoic (2200-1600 Ma) alkaline plutons suggests this Neoarchaean subduction-event in this domain could in fact be a regional feature - all along the western margin of the Cuddapah basin and represents a hitherto unrecognised suture zone in the eastern Dharwar craton with the Paleoproterozoic (?) emplacement of Mudigubba lamprophyres post-dating this collisional event. Our findings provide significant geochemical support to the models invoking convergence towards the evolution of the Eastern Dharwar craton and impose important constraints on the geodynamics of the southern peninsular India.
DS201312-0522
2012
Pandey, S.P.Kumar, S.A., Pandey, S.P., Kumar, S.D.Determination of rare earth elements in Indian kimberlite using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer ( ICP-MS).Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry, Vol. 294, 3, pp. 419-424.IndiaMineral chemistry - REE
DS2001-1165
2001
PanditTorsvik, T.H., Carter, L.M., Ashwal, Blushan, PanditRodinia refined or obscured; paleomagnetism of the Malani igneous suitePrecambrian Research, Vol. 108, No. 3, June 1, pp. 319-33.IndiaGeophysics - paleomagnetics
DS1998-1112
1998
Pandit, B.Pandit, B., Hajnal, Z.Migration velocities for Trans Hudson Orogen(lithoprobe)transect reflection data.Geological Association of Canada (GAC)/Mineralogical Association of Canada (MAC) Abstract Volume, p. A140. abstract.Saskatchewan, ManitobaGeophysics - seismics, Trans Hudson Orogen
DS1990-0635
1990
Pandit, B.I.Hajnal, Z., Pandit, B.I., Scott, D., Reilkoff, B.Importance of selecting the most effective processing sequences and relevance of colour displays, analysing the Kapuskasing crustal refelctiondataTerra, Abstracts of Deep Seismic reflection profiling of the Continental, Vol. 2, December abstracts p. 180OntarioTectonics, Kapuskasing Zone
DS1992-0479
1992
Pandit, B.I.Fowler, C.M.R., Stead, D., Pandit, B.I., Nisbet, E.G.Physical properties of rocks from the Trans-Hudson OrogenEos Transactions, Vol. 73, No. 14, April 7, supplement abstracts p. 322SaskatchewanLithoprobe, Geophysics -magnetics
DS1998-1113
1998
Pandit, B.I.Pandit, B.I., Hajnal, Z.Sole thrust of the Trans Hudson OrogenGeological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting, abstract. only, p.A110.SaskatchewanTectonics, Trans Hudson Orogen
DS1998-1114
1998
Pandit, B.I.Pandit, B.I., Hajnal, Z., Ashton, K.E.New seismic images of the crust in the central Trans Hudson Orogen ofSaskatchewan.Tectonophysics, Vol. 290, No. 3-4, May 30, pp. 211-20.SaskatchewanGeophysics - seismics, Orogeny
DS1998-1115
1998
Pandit, B.I.Pandit, B.I., Hajnal, Z., Ashton, K.E.New seismic images of the crust in the central Trans - Hudson Orogen ofSaskatchewanTectonophysics, Vol. 290, No. 3-4, May 30, pp. 211-220SaskatchewanGeophysics - seismics, Orogeny
DS201702-0230
2017
Pandit, D.Pandey, A., Pandey, R., Pandit, D., Pankaj, P., Chalapathi Rao, N.V.A note on the origin of clinopyroxene megacrysts from the Udiripikonda lamprophyre, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.Journal of India Geophysical Union, Vol. 21, 2, pp. 124-131.IndiaLamprophyre
DS201709-1973
2017
Pandit, D.Choudhary, B.R., Xu, Y.G., Ernst, R.E., Pandit, D.Ti- rich garnet core in spinel in a kimberlite: evidence for metasomatic origin.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Indiadeposit, P-5 Wajrakarur

Abstract: EPMA data are obtained from the P-5 kimberlite from the Wajrakarur field in the Eastern Dharwar craton of southern India (EDC). The studied sample consists of xenocrysts and xenoliths set in a variable grain size groundmass of olivine (with two textures: rounded-anhedral and subhedraleuhedral), phlogopite, perovskite, spinel, pyroxene, spinel and spinel containing Ti-garnet core. Ti-rich garnet associated with spinel is a rare occurrence in kimberlites. Two types of spinel have been identified (a) fine grained (<80 µm) and compositionally non titaniferous, and (b) large macrocrysts (>100 µm) having replacement cores having distinctly Ti-rich (TiO2 up to 28.51 wt %) compositions. Spinel is an abundant phase varying from <20 to >300 µm in size, mostly subhedral to euhedral in shape. Pipe-5 has atolland necklace-textured spinels in addition to the euhedral groundmass spinels. Apart from individual grains in ground mass spinel there are also spinel intergrowths with perovskite (no apparent reaction texture observed), and sieve-like intergrowths. The composition of groundmass spinel is extensively used as petrogenetic indicator mineral (Roeder and Schulze 2008). Ti-garnets contain significant Ti (21.25-28.51wt.% TiO2), Ca (15.45-27.69 wt.% CaO), Fe (2.62-24.46 wt.% FeO) and low Cr (0.08-1.52 wt.% Cr2O3) and low Al (1.40-3.87 wt.% Al2O3). Ti- garnets and their paragenetic relationships to spinel are considered here as vital petrogenetic indicators of metasomatic fluids (Dongre et al., 2016; Cheng et al., 2014), and textural association with spinel shows that Ti-garnet formed when early crystallizing spinel interacted with residual melt during magma crystallization.
DS201805-0976
2018
Pandit, D.Sharma, A., Kunar, D., Sahoo, S., Pandit, D., Chalapathi Rao, N.V.Chrome diopside megacryst bearing lamprophyre from the Late Cretaceous Mundwara alkaline complex, NW India: petrological and geodynamic implications.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 91, pp. 395-399.IndiaAlkaline - Mundwara

Abstract: The occurrence of a rare mantle-derived chrome-diopside megacryst (~8 mm), containing inclusions of olivine, in a lamprophyre dyke from the late Cretaceous polychronous (~100 - 68 Ma) Mundwara alkaline complex of NW India is reported. The olivine inclusions are forsteritic (Fo: 85.23) in composition, and their NiO (0.09 wt%) and CaO (0.13 wt%) contents imply derivation from a peridotitic mantle source. The composition of the chrome diopside (Cr2O3: 0.93 wt ) (Wo45.27 En48.47 Fs5.07 and Ac1.18) megacryst is comparable to that occurring in the garnet peridotite xenoliths found in diamondiferous kimberlites from Archaean cratons. Single pyroxene thermobarometry revealed that this chrome diopside megacryst was derived from a depth range of ~100 km, which is relatively much deeper than that of the chrome-diopside megacrysts (~40-50 km) reported in spinellherzolite xenoliths from the alkali basalts of Deccan age (ca. 66- 67 Ma) from the Kutch, NW India. This study highlights that pre- Deccan lithosphere, below the Mundwara alkaline complex, was at least ~100 km thick and, likely, similar in composition to that of the cratonic lithosphere.
DS201806-1238
2018
Pandit, D.Pandey, R., Sahoo, S., Pandit, D., Chalapathi Rao, N.V.Recurrent lamprophyre magmatism in the Narmada rift zone: petrographic and mineral chemistry evidence from xenoliths in the Eocene Dongargaon lamprophyre, NW Deccan Large Igneous Province India.Journal of the Indian Institute of Science, 15p. available in pressIndiamagmatism

Abstract: We report rare occurrence of lamprophyre xenoliths within a host lamprophyre from the Dongargaon area, Deccan Large Igneous Province, NW India. The lamprophyre xenoliths are distinct in texture (grain size) as well in mineralogy from those of their host rock. The clinopyroxene (diopside) in the xenoliths is depleted in Ca and Mg but substantially enriched in Fe compared to those in the host lamprophyre. Mica in the xenoliths is a phlogopite whereas that present in the host rock is compositionally a biotite; spinels in the host lamprophyre are relatively enriched in TiO2. As the host lamprophyre dyke has been dated to be of Eocene (ca. 55 Ma) age, the entrained lamprophyre xenoliths are inferred to represent an earlier pulse of lamprophyre emplacement. The recurrent lamprophyre emplacement in this domain is consistent with the recently brought out polychronous nature of Late Cretaceous alkaline magmatism at the Mundwara and Sarnu Dandali complexes in the NW India and is related to the extensional events linked with the reactivation of the Narmada rift zone.
DS201809-2098
2018
Pandit, D.Talukdar, D., Pandey, A., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Kumar, A., Pandit, D., Belyatsky, B.Petrology and geochemistry of the Mesoproterozoic Vattikod lamproites, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India: evidence for multiple enrichment of sub-continental lithospheric mantle and links with amalgamation and break up of the Columbia supercontinent.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 173, doi.org/10.1007/ s00410-018-1493-y 27p.Indialamproites

Abstract: Numerous lamproite dykes are hosted by the Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India, particularly towards the northwestern margin of the Cuddapah Basin. We present here a comprehensive mineralogical and geochemical (including Sr and Nd isotopic) study on the lamproites from the Vattikod Field, exposed in the vicinity of the well-studied Ramadugu lamproite field. The Vattikod lamproites trend WNW-ESE to NW-SE and reveal effects of low-temperature post-magmatic alteration. The studied lamproites show porphyritic texture with carbonated and serpentinized olivine, diopside, fluorine-rich phlogopite, amphibole, apatite, chromite, allanite, and calcite. The trace-element geochemistry (elevated Sr and HFSE) reveals their mixed affinity to orogenic as well as anorogenic lamproites. Higher fluorine content of the hydrous phases coupled with higher whole-rock K2O highlights the role of metasomatic phlogopite and apatite in the mantle source regions. Trace-element ratios such as Zr/Hf and Ti/Eu reveal carbonate metasomatism of mantle previously enriched by ancient subduction processes. The initial 87Sr/86Sr-isotopic ratios (calculated for an assumed emplacement age of 1350 Ma) vary from 0.7037 to 0.7087 and ?Nd range from -?10.6 to -?9.3, consistent with data on global lamproites and ultrapotassic rocks. We attribute the mixed orogenic-anorogenic character for the lamproites under study to multi-stage metasomatism. We relate the (1) earlier subduction-related enrichment to the Paleoproterozoic amalgamation of the Columbia supercontinent and the (2) second episode of carbonate metasomatism to the Mesoproterozoic rift-related asthenospheric upwelling associated with the Columbia breakup. This study highlights the association of lamproites with supercontinent amalgamation and fragmentation in the Earth history.
DS201904-0769
2019
Pandit, D.Raghuvanshi, S., Pandey, A., Pankaj, P., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Chakrabarti, R., Pandit, D., Pandey, R.Lithosphere - asthenosphere interaction and carbonatite metasomatism in the genesis of Mesoproterozoic shoshonitic lamprophryres at Krakkodu, Wajrakarur kimberlite field, eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India.Geological Journal, doi: 10.1002/gj.3468 18p.Indiadeposit - Wajrakarur

Abstract: The spatial and temporal association between lamprophyres and kimberlites provides unique opportunities to explore their genetic relationships. This paper explores such a relationship by detailing mineralogical and geochemical aspects of Korakkodu lamprophyre dykes located within the well-known Mesoproterozoic diamondiferous Wajrakarur Kimberlite field (WKF), towards the south-western margin of Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah Basin, Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India. Mineralogy reveals that these dykes belong to calc-alkaline variety of lamprophyres, but their geochemistry display mixed signals of both alkaline and calc-alkaline lamprophyres. These lamprophyres are highly potassic, and their high Al2O3 and low-TiO2 content implies a shoshonitic character. Low Mg#, Ni, and Cr concentration highlight their evolved nature. High (La/Yb)N and (Gd/Yb)N content is consistent with their derivation from low degrees of partial melting, whereas highly fractionated nature suggests the presence of garnet in their source. Absence of prominent Nb-Ta anomaly implies to the dilution of lithospheric mantle source by melts rich in HFSEs and low La/Nb ratio compared to those of the calc-alkaline island arc volcanics and suggests an asthenospheric overprint on lithospheric mantle source. Carbonatite metasomatism in the source region of these lamprophyres is apparent from conspicuously high-Zr/Hf ratio, and the HFSE budget of these lamprophyres are principally controlled by the presence of phlogopite veins in their lithospheric source. An extremely heterogeneous and layered lithospheric mantle beneath Eastern Dharwar Craton has been inferred from the divergent genetic history of Mesoproterozoic lamprophyres and kimberlites in the Wajrakarur field.
DS201909-2070
2019
Pandit, D.Pandey, R., Pandey, A., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Belyatsky, B., Choudhary, A.K., Lehmann, B., Pandit, D., Dhote, P.Petrogenesis of end-Cretaceous/Early Eocene lamprophyres from the Deccan Large igneous province: constraints on plume-lithosphere interaction and the post-Deccan lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary ( LAB) beneath NW India.Lithos, Vol. 346-347, 19p. PdfIndiaplumes

Abstract: We present petrology, geochemistry and radiogenic isotope (Sr and Nd) data of thirteen post-Deccan lamprophyre dykes in the Narmada rift zone from the Chhotaudepur alkaline province of the Deccan Large Igneous Province (DLIP). Mineralogically, these dykes show affinity towards alkaline (sannaite and camptonite) as well as ultramafic (damtjernite) varieties of lamprophyres. Their major oxides and certain trace element ratios increase with increasing silica content highlighting the strong influence of fractionation processes. Their Nb/U and Ce/Pb ratios are similar to the mantle array defined by MORBs and OIBs and suggests an uncontaminated nature. Major oxide (K2O, Na2O, SiO2 and TiO2) contents show geochemical similarity towards shoshonitic volcanic series, whereas elevated Zr/Hf and Nb/La coupled with suppressed Rb/Nb and Zr/b display their affinity towards HIMU-type intraplate basalts. Their radiogenic initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.706034-0.710582) and sub-chondritic initial ?Nd (-8.6 to 2.1) are akin to those of the (i) ca. 65?Ma Ambadongar carbonatite, NW India, and (ii) ca. 65?Ma orangeites from Bastar Craton, central India, highlighting an enriched lithospheric mantle source. REE inversion modeling suggests ~3% enrichment of an undepleted mantle followed by small degrees of melting of this enriched mantle source are sufficient- as in the case of ocean island basalts (OIB)- to reproduce their observed REE concentrations. Their TDM Nd model ages (564-961?Ma) are consistent with widespread convergent margin-related magmatism during the amalgamation of the Rodinia supercontinent. We propose that enriched lithospheric mantle developed during the Neoproterozoic was metasomatized by small-volume CO2-rich melts imparting a HIMU-type geochemical character during Late Cretaceous, when the mantle plume (viz., Réunion) responsible for the flood basalt eruption, impinged at the base of the NW Indian lithosphere. From the presence of F-rich apatite and high K/Rb in mica, we infer the (i) presence of F-phlogopite in their source regions, and (ii) that the depth of post-Deccan lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) beneath NW India was at least ~100?km at ca. 65?Ma.
DS201910-2293
2019
Pandit, D.Raghuvanshi, S., Pandey, A., Pankaj, P., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Chakrabati, R., Pandit, D., Pandey, R.Lithosphere-asthenosphere interaction and carbonatite metasomatism in the genesis of Mesoproterozoic shoshonitic lamprophyres at Korakkodu, Wajrakarur kimberlite field, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.Geological Journal, Vol. 54, 5, pp. 3060-3077.Indiadeposit - Wajrakarur

Abstract: The spatial and temporal association between lamprophyres and kimberlites provides unique opportunities to explore their genetic relationships. This paper explores such a relationship by detailing mineralogical and geochemical aspects of Korakkodu lamprophyre dykes located within the well-known Mesoproterozoic diamondiferous Wajrakarur Kimberlite field (WKF), towards the south-western margin of Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah Basin, Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India. Mineralogy reveals that these dykes belong to calc-alkaline variety of lamprophyres, but their geochemistry display mixed signals of both alkaline and calc-alkaline lamprophyres. These lamprophyres are highly potassic, and their high Al2O3 and low-TiO2 content implies a shoshonitic character. Low Mg#, Ni, and Cr concentration highlight their evolved nature. High (La/Yb)N and (Gd/Yb)N content is consistent with their derivation from low degrees of partial melting, whereas highly fractionated nature suggests the presence of garnet in their source. Absence of prominent Nb-Ta anomaly implies to the dilution of lithospheric mantle source by melts rich in HFSEs and low La/Nb ratio compared to those of the calc-alkaline island arc volcanics and suggests an asthenospheric overprint on lithospheric mantle source. Carbonatite metasomatism in the source region of these lamprophyres is apparent from conspicuously high-Zr/Hf ratio, and the HFSE budget of these lamprophyres are principally controlled by the presence of phlogopite veins in their lithospheric source. An extremely heterogeneous and layered lithospheric mantle beneath Eastern Dharwar Craton has been inferred from the divergent genetic history of Mesoproterozoic lamprophyres and kimberlites in the Wajrakarur field.
DS201912-2797
2019
Pandit, D.Kumar, R.K., Praveer, P., Rao, N.V.Chalapthi, Chakrabarti, R., Pandit, D.Petrogenesis of an alkaline lamprophyre ( camptonite) with ocean island basalt ( OIB)-affinity at the NW margin of the Cuddapah Basin, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.Neues Jahbuch fur Mineralogy, Vol. 196, p2, pp. 149-177.Indiacamptonite

Abstract: We report petrology and geochemistry (including Sr and Nd isotopes) of a fresh lamprophyre at Ankiraopalli area at the north-western margin of Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah basin, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India. Ankiraopalli samples possess a typical lamprophyre porphyritic-panidiomorphic texture with phenocrysts of kaersutite and diopside set in a plagioclase dominant groundmass. Combined mineralogy and geochemistry classify it as alkaline lampro- phyre in general and camptonite in particular. Contrary to the calc-alkaline and/or shoshonitic orogenic nature portrayed by lamprophyres occurring towards the western margin of the Cuddapah basin, the Ankiraopalli samples display trace element composition revealing striking similarity with those of ocean island basalts, Italian alkaline lamprophyres and highlights an anorogenic character. However, the87 Sr/86 Srinitial (0.710316 to 0.720016) and eNdinitial (- 9.54 to - 9.61) of the Ankiraopalli lamprophyre show derivation from an 'enriched' mantle source showing long term enrichment of incompatible trace elements and contrast from those of (i) OIB, and (ii) nearby Mahbubnagar alkaline mafic dykes of OIB affinity. Combining results of this study and recent advances made, multiple mantle domains are identified in the Eastern Dharwar craton which generated distinct Mesoproterozoic lamprophyre varieties. These include (i) Domain I, involving sub-continental lithospheric mantle source essentially metasomatized by subduction-derived melts/fluids (represented by orogenic calcalkaline and/or shoshonitic lamprophyres at the Mudigubba, the Udiripikonda and the Kadiri); (ii) Domain II, comprising a mixed sub-continental lithospheric and asthenospheric source (represented by orogenic-anorogenic, alkaline to calc-alkaline transitional lamprophyres at the Korakkodu), and (iii) Domain III, representing a sub-continental lithospheric source with a dominant overprint of an asthenospheric (plume) component (represented by essentially alkaline lamprophyres at the Ankiraopalli). Our study highlights the varied mantle source heterogeneities and complexity of geodynamic processes involved in the Neoarchean-Paleo/Mesoproterozoic evolution of the Eastern Dharwar craton.
DS202005-0755
2017
Pandit, D.Pandey, A., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Pandit, D., Pankaj, P., Pandey, R., Sahoo, S.Subduction - tectonics in the evolution of the eastern Dharwar craton, southern India: insights from the post-collisional calc-alkaline lamprophyres at the western margin of the Cuddapah Basin.Precambrian Research, in press available, 17p. PdfIndiacraton

Abstract: The geodynamic evolution of the eastern Dharwar craton, southern India, is widely debated with a number of contrasting models ranging from uniformitarian plate convergence to the mantle plume and their combination. We report here the petrology and geochemistry of two undeformed and unmetamorphosed lamprophyre dykes from the Mudigubba area located immediately towards the western margin of the Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah basin from this craton. The Mudigubba lamprophyres are free from crustal xenoliths, and have a typical porphyritic-panidiomorphic texture predominated by phenocrysts of amphibole. Clinopyroxene occurs as microphenocrysts with feldspar essentially confined to the groundmass. F-rich apatite and sphene are the other accessories. Mineral chemistry reveals that the amphiboles are of calcic variety (dominantly magnesio-hornblende), the clinopyroxene to be a diopside (Wo45.01-50.40 En36.74-44.58 Fs6.79-12.73 Ac0.42-2.24) and the albitic (Or1.12 Ab91.17 An7.70) nature of the feldspar. The lower abundance of TiO2 in both the amphibole and clinopyroxene, suggest a calc-alkaline nature of the magma. High Mg# (76.8-79.3), Ni (140-240 ppm) and Cr (380-830 ppm) contents along with (i) depletion in U, and Th, (ii) variable Ba/La and (iii) low Nb/La as well as Th/La strikes out possibility of crustal contamination and supports the primary nature of the lamprophyre magma. The presence of significant Nb-Ta, Zr-Hf and Ti negative anomalies in the primitive mantle normalized multi-element plots and their striking similarity with the global calc-alkaline lamprophyres imply the involvement of subduction-related mantle source modification. Various geochemical ratios (e.g., Hf/Sm, Ta/La, Th/Yb, Nb/Yb, La/Nb, Ba/Nb) demonstrate the source enrichment was caused by a fluid-related, rather than silicate-melt related, subduction metasomatism. Binary-mixing calculations assuming average upper crust and N-MORB as the two end members reveals ~10-30% influx of subducted component in the generation of the Mudigubba lamprophyres. A re-examination of the limited geochemical data available for the co-spatial Paleoproterozoic (2200-1600 Ma) alkaline plutons suggests this Neoarchaean subduction-event in this domain could in fact be a regional feature - all along the western margin of the Cuddapah basin and represents a hitherto unrecognised suture zone in the eastern Dharwar craton with the Paleoproterozoic (?) emplacement of Mudigubba lamprophyres post-dating this collisional event. Our findings provide significant geochemical support to the models invoking convergence towards the evolution of the Eastern Dharwar craton and impose important constraints on the geodynamics of the southern peninsular India.
DS202008-1442
2018
Pandit, D.Sharma, A., Kumar, A., Pankaj, P., Pandit, D., Chakrabarti, R., Chalapathi Rao, N.V.Petrology and Sr-Nd isotpe systematics of the Ahobil kimberlite pipe ( Pipe -16) from the Wajrakarur field, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.Geoscience Frontiers, 20p. PdfIndiadeposit - Ahobil Pipe 16
DS201907-1566
2016
Pandit, K.Pandit, K., Sial, S., Piementle, F.Geochemistry and C-O and Nd-Sr isotope characteristics of thre 2.4 Ga Higenakkal carbonatites from the South Indian granulite terrane: evidence for an end- Archean depleted component and mantle heterogenity. Note date 2016International Geology Review, Vol. 58, 12, pp. 1461-1480.Indiacarbonatites

Abstract: The South Indian Granulite Terrane (SGT) is a collage of Archaean to Neoproterozoic age granulite facies blocks that are sutured by an anastomosing network of large-scale shear systems. Besides several Neoproterozoic carbonatite complexes emplaced within the Archaean granulites, there are also smaller Paleoproterozoic (2.4 Ga, Hogenakkal) carbonatite intrusions within two NE-trending pyroxenite dikes. The Hogenakkal carbonatites, further discriminated into sövite and silicate sövite, have high Sr and Ba contents and extreme light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment with steep slopes typical of carbonatites. The C- and O-isotopic ratios [d13CVPDB = -6.7 to -5.8‰ and d18OVSMOW = 7.5-8.7‰ except a single 18O-enriched sample (d18O = 20.0‰)] represent unmodified mantle compositions. The eNd values indicate two groupings for the Hogenakkal carbonatites; most samples show positive eNd values, close to CHUR (eNd = -0.35 to 2.94) and named high-eNd group while the low-eNd group samples show negative values (-5.69 to -8.86), corresponding to depleted and enriched source components, respectively. The 87Sr/86Sri ratios of the two groups also can be distinguished: the high-eNd ones have low 87Sr/86Sri ratios (0.70161-0.70244) while the low-eNd group shows higher ratios (0.70247-0.70319). We consider the Nd-Sr ratios as primary and infer derivation from a heterogeneous mantle source. The emplacement of the Hogenakkal carbonatites may be related to Paleoproterozoic plume induced large-scale rifting and fracturing related to initiation of break-up of the Neoarchean supercontinent Kenorland.
DS2000-0742
2000
Pandit, M.K.Pandit, M.K., Sial, A.N., Saxena, A.D., Ferreira, V.P.Non magmatic features in carbonatitic rocks: a re-examination of Proterozoic carbonatites ..RajasthanInternational Geology Review, Vol. 42, No. 11, Nov. pp. 1046-53.India, southeastCarbonatite, Indian Craton, Deposit - Newania
DS2000-0743
2000
Pandit, M.K.Pandit, M.K., Sial, Golani, FerreiraTerrigenous and mantle contributions in Newania carbonatite body, stable isotopic constraints...Igc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.India, WestCarbonatite - petrogenesis, Deposit - Newania
DS2000-0792
2000
Pandit, M.K.Ramasamy, R., Gwalani, L.G., Pandit, M.K.Geology of Indian carbonatites and evolution of alkali carbonatite magmaIgc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.IndiaTectonics - rifting, Carbonatite
DS2001-0886
2001
Pandit, M.K.Pandit, M.K., Golani, P.R.Reappraisal of the petrologic status of Newania carbonatite of Rajasthan, western India.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 19, No. 3, Apr. pp.305-310.IndiaCarbonatite - petrology, Deposit - Newania
DS2002-1208
2002
Pandit, M.K.Pandit, M.K., et al.Depleted and enriched mantle sources for paleo and neoproterozoic carbonatites of southern India: Sr Nd Co isotopic and geochemical constraints.Chemical Geology, Vol. 189, 3-4. Sept. 30, pp. 69-89.IndiaCarbonatite, Geochronology
DS2002-1209
2002
Pandit, M.K.Pandit, M.K., Sial, A.N., Sukumaran, G.B., Pimentel, M.M., Ramasamy, A.K.Depleted and enriched mantle sources for Paleo- and Neoproterozoic carbonatites ofChemical Geology, Vol. 189,1-2,pp. 69-89.India, Tamil NaduCarbonatite - geochronology, Deposit - Samalpatti, Sevattur, Mulakkasu
DS2003-1044
2003
Pandit, M.K.Pandit, M.K., Carter, L.M., Ashwal, L.D., Tucker, R.D., Torsvik, Th.Age, petrogenesis and significance of 1 Ga granitoids and related rocks from theJournal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 22, 4, pp. 363-381.IndiaCraton - not specific to diamonds
DS200412-1496
2003
Pandit, M.K.Pandit, M.K., Carter, L.M., Ashwal, L.D., Tucker, R.D., Torsvik, Th.Age, petrogenesis and significance of 1 Ga granitoids and related rocks from the Sendra area Aravalli Craton, northwest India.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 22, 4, pp. 363-381.IndiaCraton, not specific to diamonds
DS200612-0497
2006
Pandit, M.K.Gregory, L.C., Meert, J.G., Pradhan, V., Pandit, M.K., Tamrat, E., Malone, S.J.A paleomagnetic and geochronologic study of the Majhgawan kimberlite. India: implications for the age of the Upper Vindhyan Supergroup.Precambrian Research, Vol. 149, 1-2, pp. 65-75.IndiaDeposit - Majhgawan, geophysics, geochronology
DS201012-0490
2010
Pandit, M.K.Meert, J.G., Pandit, M.K., Pradhan, V.R., Banks, J., Sirianni, R., Stroud, M., Newstead, B., Gifford, J.Precambrian crustal evolution of Peninsular India: a 3.0 billion year odyssey.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 39, 6, pp. 483-515.IndiaGeodynamics, tectonics
DS201012-0596
2010
Pandit, M.K.Pradhan, V.R., Meert, J.G., Pandit, M.K., Kamenov, G., Gregory, L.C., Malone, S.J.India's changing place in global Proterozoic reconstructions: a review of geochronologic constraints and paleomagnetic poles from the Dharwar Bundelk hand and MarwarJournal of Geodynamics, Vol. 50, 3-4, pp. 224-242.IndiaCraton, crustal evolution
DS201012-0805
2010
Pandit, M.K.Turner, C.C., Meert, J.G., Kamenov, G.D., Pandit, M.K.A detrital zircon transect across the Son Valley sector of the Vindhyan Basin, India: further constraints on basin evolution.Geological Society of America Abstracts, 1/2p.IndiaKimberlite
DS201112-0662
2011
Pandit, M.K.Meert, J.G., Pandit, M.K.,Pradham, V.R., Kamenov, G.Preliminary report on the paleomagnetism of 1.88 Ga dykes from the Bastar and Dharwar cratons, Peninsular India.Gondwana Research, Vol. 20, 2-3, pp. 335-343.IndiaDyke system
DS201212-0572
2012
Pandit, M.K.Pradham, V.R., Meert, J.G., Pandit, M.K., Kamenov, G., Mondal, E.F.A.Paleomagnetic and geochronological studies of the mafic dyke swarms of Bundelk hand craton, central India: implications for the tectonic evolution and paleogeographic reconstructions.Precambrian Research, in press available, 80p.IndiaDeposit - Bunder
DS201612-2325
2016
Pandit, M.K.Pandit, M.K., Kumar, N., Sial, A.N., Sukumaran, G.B., Piementle, M., Ferreira, V.P.Geochemistry and C-O and Nd-Sr isotope characteristics of the 2.4 Ga Hogenakkal carbonatites and the South Indian granulite terrain: evidence for an end Archean depleted component and mantle heterogeneity.International Geology Review, Vol. 58, 12, pp. 1461-1480.IndiaCarbonatite

Abstract: The South Indian Granulite Terrane (SGT) is a collage of Archaean to Neoproterozoic age granulite facies blocks that are sutured by an anastomosing network of large-scale shear systems. Besides several Neoproterozoic carbonatite complexes emplaced within the Archaean granulites, there are also smaller Paleoproterozoic (2.4 Ga, Hogenakkal) carbonatite intrusions within two NE-trending pyroxenite dikes. The Hogenakkal carbonatites, further discriminated into sövite and silicate sövite, have high Sr and Ba contents and extreme light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment with steep slopes typical of carbonatites. The C- and O-isotopic ratios [d13CVPDB = -6.7 to -5.8‰ and d18OVSMOW = 7.5-8.7‰ except a single 18O-enriched sample (d18O = 20.0‰)] represent unmodified mantle compositions. The eNd values indicate two groupings for the Hogenakkal carbonatites; most samples show positive eNd values, close to CHUR (eNd = -0.35 to 2.94) and named high-eNd group while the low-eNd group samples show negative values (-5.69 to -8.86), corresponding to depleted and enriched source components, respectively. The 87Sr/86Sri ratios of the two groups also can be distinguished: the high-eNd ones have low 87Sr/86Sri ratios (0.70161-0.70244) while the low-eNd group shows higher ratios (0.70247-0.70319). We consider the Nd-Sr ratios as primary and infer derivation from a heterogeneous mantle source. The emplacement of the Hogenakkal carbonatites may be related to Paleoproterozoic plume induced large-scale rifting and fracturing related to initiation of break-up of the Neoarchean supercontinent Kenorland.
DS201710-2247
2017
Pandit, M.K.Meert, J.G., Pandit, M.K., Pivarunas, A., Katusin, K., Sinha, A.K.India and Antarctica in the Precambrian: a brief analysis.Geological Society of London Special Publication, Vol. 457, pp. 339-351.IndiaTectonics

Abstract: In this short paper, we outline the potential links between India and the East Antarctica region from Enderby Land to Princess Elizabeth Land using the Mesozoic East Gondwana configuration as a starting point. Palaeomagnetic data indicate that East Gondwana did not exist prior to the Ediacaran-Cambrian. Early Neoproterozoic (1050-950 Ma) deformation in East Antarctica and along the Eastern Ghats Province in India marks the initial contact between the two regions. Volcanism in the Kerguelen hotspot led to final break-up of India and East Antarctica in the Cretaceous. Although connections between the Archaean and Proterozoic provinces of India and East Antarctica have been proposed, the current record of large igneous provinces (or dyke swarms), palaeomagnetic data and geochronology do not show a consistently good match between the two regions.
DS201801-0045
2017
Pandit, M.K.Pandit, M.K.Paleoproterozoic carbonatites Newania and Hogenkkal: geochemical and isotoopic characteristics.Carbonatite-alkaline rocks and associated mineral deposits , Dec. 8-11, abstract p. 24.Indiadeposit - Newania. Hogenkkal

Abstract: Several carbonatite occurrences ranging in age from Proterozoic to Phanerozoic are known and reported from India. Only two amongst them, the Hogenakkal and Newania carbonatites are Paleoproterozoic in age. The Newania carbonatite body, emplaced within Mesoarchean Untala Granite, comprises predominantly dolomiticcarbonatite and minor ankeritic and sövitic phases, in the chronological order. Only the dolomitic-carbonatites have mantle like C- and O-isotopic characteristics and some authors argue that the ankeritic phase is its alteration product while sövite represents late stage calcite veins. The Pb - Pb geochronology yields high ratios and 2.23 Ga age for the dolomitic carbonatite and extremely high Pb/Pb ratios resulting in an unrealistic 1550 Ma age for the ankeritic phase. Melt residence in an intermediate upper mantle/lower crust reservoir, prior to emplacement, has been postulated for the high Pb/Pb ratios observed in dolomitic carbonatites. The 2.4 Ga Hogenakkal carbonatites occur in the northern part of the Southern Granulite Terrane as small isolated bodies hosted within two sub-parallel pyroxenite dykes within a milieu of Archean charnockites. These are fine to mediumgrained and named as sövite, silicate sövite and melanocratic silicate sövite, based upon calcite or calcite + pyroxene as dominant mineralogy. The C- and O-isotopic ratios for all the varieties are remarkably consistent and represent unmodified mantle values (-5.8 to - 6.7‰ V-PDB and 7.2 to 8.7‰ V-SMOW, respectively). However, diversity in Sr- and Nd-isotopic characteristics suggest both enriched and depleted source characteristics and call for a heterogeneous mantle beneath the SGT. Both the groups do indicate presence of an enriched mantle component during late Archean
DS201702-0238
2017
Pando, K.Righter, K., Nickodem, K., Pando, K., Danielson, L., Boujibar, A., Righter, M., Lapen, T.J.Distribution of Sb, As, Ge and in between metal and silicate during acccretion and core formation in the Earth.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 198, pp. 1-16.MantleCore chemistry

Abstract: A large number of siderophile (iron-loving) elements are also volatile, thus offering constraints on the origin of volatile elements in differentiated bodies such as Earth, Moon, Mars and Vesta. Metal-silicate partitioning data for many of these elements is lacking, making their overall mantle concentrations in these bodies difficult to model and origin difficult to distinguish between core formation and volatile depletion. To address this gap in understanding, we have undertaken systematic studies of four volatile siderophile elements - Sb, As, Ge and In - at variable temperature and variable Si content of metal. Several series were carried out at 1 GPa, and between 1500 and 1900 °C, for both C saturated and C-free conditions. The results show that temperature causes a decrease in the metal/silicate partition coefficient for all four elements. In addition, activity coefficients for each element have been determined and show a very strong dependence on Si content of Fe alloy. Si dissolved in metal significantly decreases the metal/silicate partition coefficients, at both 1600 and 1800 °C. The combination of temperature and Si content of the metal causes reduction of the metal-silicate partition coefficient to values that are close to those required for an origin of mantle As, Sb, Ge, and In concentrations by metal-silicate equilibrium processes. Combining these new results with previous studies on As, Sb, Ge, and In, allowed derivation of predictive expressions for metal/silicate partition coefficients for these elements which can then be applied to Earth. The expressions are applied to two scenarios for continuous accretion of Earth; specifically for constant and increasing fO2 during accretion. The results indicate that mantle concentrations of As, Sb, Ge, and In can be explained by metal-silicate equilibrium during an accretion scenario. The modeling is not especially sensitive to either scenario, although all element concentrations are explained better by a model with variable fO2. The specific effect of Si is important and calculations that include only S and C (and no Si) cannot reproduce the mantle As, Sb, Ge, and In concentrations. The final core composition in the variable fO2 model is 10.2% Si, 2% S, and 1.1% C (or XSi = 0.18, XS = 0.03, and XC = 0.04. These results suggest that core formation (involving a Si, S, and C-bearing metallic liquid) and accretion were the most important processes establishing many of Earth’s mantle volatile elements (indigenous), while post-core formation addition or re-equilibration (exogenous) was of secondary or minor importance.
DS2002-1210
2002
Pandrey, O.P.Pandrey, O.P., Agrawal, P.K., Chetty, T.R.K.Unusual lithospheric structure beneath the Hyderabad granitic region, eastern Dharwar craton, south India.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 130, 1-2, pp.59-69.India, southHeat flow, Cratonic mantle lithosphere
DS1930-0219
1936
Paneeth, F.A.Holmes, A., Paneeth, F.A.Helium Ratios of Rocks and Minerals from the Diamond Pipes Of South Africa.Royal Society. (London) Proceedings, Vol. 154A, No. 882, PP. 385-413.South AfricaPetrography
DS200412-1103
2004
Panero, W.R.Lee, K.K., O'Neill, B., Panero, W.R., Shim, S.H., Benedetti, L.R., Jeanloz, R.Equations of state of the high pressure phases of a natural peridotite and implications for the Earth's lower mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 223, 3-4, pp. 381-393.MantlePeridotite, magnesiowustite
DS201504-0212
2015
Panero, W.R.Panero, W.R., Pigott, J.S., Reaman, D.M., Kabbes, J.E., Liu, Z.Dry ( Mg,Fe) SiO3 perovskite in the Earth's lower mantle.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 120, 2, pp. 894-908.MantlePerovskite
DS200512-0724
2004
Panet, I.Mikhailov, V., Tikhotsky, S., Diamant, M., Panet, I., Ballu, V.Can tectonic processes be recovered from new gravity satellite data?Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 228, 3-4, pp. 281-297.MantleGeophysics - gravity
DS201412-0661
2014
Panet, I.Panet, I., Pajot-Metivier, G., Greff-Lefftz, M., Metivier, L., Diament, M.Mapping the mass distribution of Earth's mantle using satellite-derived gravity gradients.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 7, 2, Feb. pp. 131-135.MantleGeophysics - tomography
DS201606-1116
2016
Panet, I.Shephard, G.E., Tronnes, R.G., Spakman, W., Panet, I., Gaina, C.Evidence of slab material under Greenland and links to Cretaceous high Arctic magmatism.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 43, 8, pp. 3717-3726.Europe, GreenlandMagmatism

Abstract: Understanding the evolution of extinct ocean basins through time and space demands the integration of surface kinematics and mantle dynamics. We explore the existence, origin, and implications of a proposed oceanic slab burial ground under Greenland through a comparison of seismic tomography, slab sinking rates, regional plate reconstructions, and satellite-derived gravity gradients. Our preferred interpretation stipulates that anomalous, fast seismic velocities at 1000-1600?km depth imaged in independent global tomographic models, coupled with gravity gradient perturbations, represent paleo-Arctic oceanic slabs that subducted in the Mesozoic. We suggest a novel connection between slab-related arc mantle and geochemical signatures in some of the tholeiitic and mildly alkaline magmas of the Cretaceous High Arctic Large Igneous Province in the Sverdrup Basin. However, continental crustal contributions are noted in these evolved basaltic rocks. The integration of independent, yet complementary, data sets provides insight into present-day mantle structure, magmatic events, and relict oceans.
DS201607-1315
2016
Panet, I.Shephard, G.E., Tronnes, R.G., Sparkman< W., Panet, I., Gaina, C.Evidence for slab material under Greenland and links to Cretaceous High Arctic magmatism.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 43, 8, pp. 3717-3726.Europe, GreenlandMagmatism

Abstract: Understanding the evolution of extinct ocean basins through time and space demands the integration of surface kinematics and mantle dynamics. We explore the existence, origin, and implications of a proposed oceanic slab burial ground under Greenland through a comparison of seismic tomography, slab sinking rates, regional plate reconstructions, and satellite-derived gravity gradients. Our preferred interpretation stipulates that anomalous, fast seismic velocities at 1000 -1600?km depth imaged in independent global tomographic models, coupled with gravity gradient perturbations, represent paleo-Arctic oceanic slabs that subducted in the Mesozoic. We suggest a novel connection between slab-related arc mantle and geochemical signatures in some of the tholeiitic and mildly alkaline magmas of the Cretaceous High Arctic Large Igneous Province in the Sverdrup Basin. However, continental crustal contributions are noted in these evolved basaltic rocks. The integration of independent, yet complementary, data sets provides insight into present-day mantle structure, magmatic events, and relict oceans.
DS201612-2337
2016
Panet, I.Shephard, G.E., Tronnes, R.G., Spakman, W., Panet, I., Gaina, C.Evidence for slab material under Greenland and links to Cretaceous high arctic magmatism.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 7, 10.1002/ 2016GL068424Europe, GreenlandMagmatism

Abstract: Understanding the evolution of extinct ocean basins through time and space demands the integration of surface kinematics and mantle dynamics. We explore the existence, origin, and implications of a proposed oceanic slab burial ground under Greenland through a comparison of seismic tomography, slab sinking rates, regional plate reconstructions, and satellite-derived gravity gradients. Our preferred interpretation stipulates that anomalous, fast seismic velocities at 1000-1600?km depth imaged in independent global tomographic models, coupled with gravity gradient perturbations, represent paleo-Arctic oceanic slabs that subducted in the Mesozoic. We suggest a novel connection between slab-related arc mantle and geochemical signatures in some of the tholeiitic and mildly alkaline magmas of the Cretaceous High Arctic Large Igneous Province in the Sverdrup Basin. However, continental crustal contributions are noted in these evolved basaltic rocks. The integration of independent, yet complementary, data sets provides insight into present-day mantle structure, magmatic events, and relict oceans.
DS1998-1531
1998
Paney. KrishnamurthyVeena, K., Paney. Krishnamurthy, Guptalead, Strontium, and neodymium isotopic systematics of the carbonatites of Sung Valley, Meghalaya, implications for plume...Journal of Petrology, Vol. 39, No. 11-12, Nov-Dec. pp. 1875-84.India, northeastCarbonatite - geochronology, Mantle - plume sources, characteristics
DS1996-0884
1996
PaneyakhMarakushev, A.A., Pertsev, N.N., Zotov, I.A., PaneyakhSome petrological aspects of genesis of diamondInternational Geological Congress 30th Session Beijing, Abstracts, Vol. 2, p. 400.RussiaPetrology, Diamond genesis
DS1995-1162
1995
Paneyakh, N.Marakushev, A.A., Pertsev, N.N., Zotov, I.A., Paneyakh, N.Some petrological aspects of diamond genesisGeology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 37, No. 2, March-April pp. 88-102.RussiaDiamond genesis, lamproite, Petrology
DS1992-1160
1992
Paneyakh, N.A.Paneyakh, N.A.Correlation of chrome spinel composition from hyper basic nodules and volcanic rocksProceedings of the 29th International Geological Congress. Held Japan August 1992, Vol. 2, abstract p. 576RussiaHyperbasite
DS1995-1163
1995
Paneyakh, N.A.Marakushev, A.A., Pertsev, N.N., Zotov, I.A., Paneyakh, N.A.Petrology of Diamondiferous magmatismProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 350-351.MantleMagmatism, Metamorphic complexes
DS1997-0884
1997
Paneyakh, N.A.Paneyakh, N.A.Mineralogical criteria of the genesis of alkaline basalts, lamproites andkimberlites.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 357, No. 8, Oct. Nov. pp. 1194-98.RussiaMineralogy, Kimberlites, lamproites
DS1998-0939
1998
Paneyakh, N.A.Marakushev, A.A., Paneyakh, N.A., Rusinov, PertsovPetrological model of giant ore depositsGeology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 40, No. 3, May-June pp. 211-227RussiaMetallogeny, Petrology
DS2000-0744
2000
Paneyakh, N.A.Paneyakh, N.A.Diamondiferous potential of kimberlites and lamproites evidenced by their spinellids.Igc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.RussiaChromespinel, Diamond - genesis
DS201809-2096
2018
Pang, K.N.Sun, Y., Teng, F.Z., Kuehner, S., Pang, K.N.Origins of Leucite Hills lamproites constrained by magnesium isotopes.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractUnited States, Wyominglamproites

Abstract: Lamproites are commonly found in post-collisional or intracontinental environments and characterized by unique elemental and radiogenic isotopic signatures that signify derivation from the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. An improved understanding on their genesis is important regarding the dynamics of the Earth’s mantle lithosphere, and requires knowledge in identifying source components and magmatic processes. In order to better constrain the mechanism producing the geochemical diversity of lamproites, we measure the elemental and Mg isotopic compositions of a suite of lamproites from the well-known locality Leucite Hills, Wyoming, U.S.A. The two types of lamproites therein, madupitic and phlogopite lamproites, display distinct characteristics in many element and Mg isotope diagrams. These variations cannot be ascribed to crustal contamination, fractional crystallization or source heterogeneity. Instead, the strong correlations between melting-sensitive elemental ratios (e.g., Sm/Yb and La/Yb) and indices of carbonatitic metasomatism (e.g., CaO/Al2O3, Hf/Hf*, and Ti/Ti*) with d26Mg indicate that variable degrees of partial melting of a common carbonated mantle source have generated the observed geochemical distinctions of the Leucite Hills lamproites. Our study reveals that geochemical variations in a given lamproite suite might have been controlled mainly by the degree of mantle melting.
DS201112-1090
2011
Pang, K-N.Viet Anh, T., Pang, K-N., Chung, S-L., Lin, H-M., Trong Hoa, T.The Song Da magmatic suite revisited: a petrologic, geochemical and Sr Nd isotopic study on picrites, flood basalts and silicic volcanic rocks.Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, Vol. 42, 6, pp. 1341-1355.ChinaPlume lithosphere interaction, ELIP
DS1985-0106
1985
PangeaPangeaLe Diamant.(in French)Pangea, No. 5, December p. 22Central African RepublicDiamond Production
DS1985-0514
1985
PangeaPangeaReview of prospecting in areas of glacial terrain held MorrocoApril15-17, 1985. N.P. Lock discusses Jwaneng in BotswanaPangea, No. 5, December pp. 62-63PangeaNews Item
DS200812-0843
2008
Pangea DiamondFields plc.Pangea DiamondFields plc.Exploration update.Pangea DiamondFields plc., May 12, 4p.Africa, Democratic Republic of Congo, Central African Republic, Angola, South AfricaNews item - Pangea DiamondFields
DS201803-0487
2018
Panikorovskii, T.L.Yakovenchuk, V.N., Yu, G., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Panikorovskii, T.L., Britvin, S.N., Krivivichev, S.V., Shilovskikh, V.V., Bocharov, V.N.Kampelite, Ba3Mg1.5,Sc4(PO4)6(OH)3.4H2O, a new very complex Ba-Sc phosphate mineral from the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite complex ( Kola Peninsula) Russia.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 112, pp. 111-121.Russia, Kola Peninsulacarbonatite - Kovdor
DS201905-1046
2019
Panikorovskii, T.L.Ivanyuk, G.Y., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Panikorovskii, T.L., Konoplyova, N., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Bazai, A.V., Bocharov, V.N., Krivovichev, S.V.Hydroxynatropyrochlore, ( Na, Ca, Ce)2 Nb2O6(OH), a new member of the pyrochlore group from the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite pipe, Kola Peninsula, Russia.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 83, pp. 107-113.Russia, Kola Peninsulacarbonatite

Abstract: Hydroxynatropyrochlore, (Na,?a,Ce)2Nb2O6(OH), is a new Na-Nb-OH-dominant member of the pyrochlore supergroup from the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite pipe (Kola Peninsula, Russia). It is cubic, Fd-3m, a = 10.3211(3) Å, V = 1099.46 (8) Å3, Z = 8 (from powder diffraction data) or a = 10.3276(5) Å, V = 1101.5(2) Å3, Z = 8 (from single-crystal diffraction data). Hydroxynatropyrochlore is a characteristic accessory mineral of low-carbonate phoscorite of the contact zone of the phoscorite-carbonatite pipe with host foidolite as well as of carbonate-rich phoscorite and carbonatite of the pipe axial zone. It usually forms zonal cubic or cubooctahedral crystals (up to 0.5 mm in diameter) with irregularly shaped relics of amorphous U-Ta-rich hydroxykenopyrochlore inside. Characteristic associated minerals include rockforming calcite, dolomite, forsterite, hydroxylapatite, magnetite,and phlogopite, accessory baddeleyite, baryte, barytocalcite, chalcopyrite, chamosite-clinochlore, galena, gladiusite, juonniite, ilmenite, magnesite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, quintinite, spinel, strontianite, valleriite, and zirconolite. Hydroxynatropyrochlore is pale-brown, with an adamantine to greasy lustre and a white streak. The cleavage is average on {111}, the fracture is conchoidal. Mohs hardness is about 5. In transmitted light, the mineral is light brown, isotropic, n = 2.10(5) (??= 589 nm). The calculated and measured densities are 4.77 and 4.60(5) g•cm-3, respectively. The mean chemical composition determined by electron microprobe is: F 0.05, Na2O 7.97, CaO 10.38, TiO2 4.71, FeO 0.42, Nb2O5 56.44, Ce2O3 3.56, Ta2O5 4.73, ThO2 5.73, UO2 3.66, total 97.65 wt. %. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of Nb+Ta+Ti = 2 apfu is (Na1.02Ca0.73Ce0.09Th0.09 U0.05Fe2+0.02)?2.00 (Nb1.68Ti0.23Ta0.09)?2.00O6.03(OH1.04F0.01)?1.05. The simplified formula is (Na, Ca,Ce)2Nb2O6(OH). The mineral slowly dissolves in hot HCl. The strongest X-ray powderdiffraction lines [listed as (d in Å)(I)(hkl)] are as follows: 5.96(47)(111), 3.110(30)(311), 2.580(100)(222), 2.368(19)(400), 1.9875(6)(333), 1.8257(25)(440) and 1.5561(14)(622). The crystal structure of hydroxynatropyrochlore was refined to R1 = 0.026 on the basis of 1819 unique observed reflections. The mineral belongs to the pyrochlore structure type A2B2O6Y1 with octahedral framework of corner-sharing BO6 octahedra with A cations and OH groups in the interstices. The Raman spectrum of hydroxynatropyrochlore contains characteristic bands of the lattice, BO6, B-O and O-H vibrations and no characteristic bands of the H2O vibrations. Within the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite pipe, hydroxynatropyrochlore is the latest hydrothermal mineral of the pyrochlore supergroup, which forms external rims around grains of earlier U-rich hydroxykenopyrochlore and separated crystals in voids of dolomite carbonatite veins. The mineral is named in accordance with the pyrochlore supergroup nomenclature.
DS201912-2795
2019
Panikorovskii, T.L.Krivovichev, S.V., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Panikorovskii, T.L., Savchenko, E.E., Pakhailova, Yu, A., Selivanova, E.A., Kadyrova, G.I., Ivanyuk, G.Yu.,Krivovchev, S.V.Nikmelnikovite: Ca 12 Fe 2+ Fe 3+3 Al3(SiO4) 6(OH)20: a new mineral from the Kovdor Massif ( Kola Peninsula, Russia)Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 488, 2, pp. 1200-1202.Russia, Kola Peninsuladeposit - Kovdor
DS200412-0582
2003
Panikov, N.S.Friborg, T., Spegaard, H., Christensen, TR., Lloyd, C.R., Panikov, N.S.Siberian wetlands: where a sink is a source.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 21, Nov. 1, 10.1029/2003 GLO17797RussiaGeophysics
DS1995-0205
1995
Panin, A.V.Bredikhin, A.V., Panin, A.V.Experience in the development and use of a geology geomorphology block in a geographic information systemMapping Sciences and Remote Sensing, Vol. 32, No. 1, Jan-Mar pp. 50-58RussiaRemote Sensing, GIS
DS201502-0128
2015
Panin, A.V.Zedgenizov, D.A., Shatsky, V.S., Panin, A.V., Evtushenko, O.V., Ragozin, A.L., Kagi, H.Evidence for phase transitions in mineral inclusions in superdeep diamonds of the Sao Luiz deposit, Brazil.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 56, 1, pp. 296-305.South America, BrazilDeposit - Sao Luiz
DS1970-0972
1974
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Podgornykh, N.M.Temperature of Formation of Melilite Rocks of the Turiy Peninsula.Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 217, No. 1-6, PP. 141-144.RussiaGenesis
DS1975-0155
1975
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Podgornykh, N.M.Inclusions of Melt in Minerals from Carbonatite of the Beloziminskiy Pluton.Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 223, No. 1-6, PP. 165-167.RussiaKimberlite
DS1975-0871
1978
Panina, L.I.Sobolev, V.S., Panina, L.I., Podgornikh, N.M.Crystallization Temperatures of Several Carbonatite Minerals from Siberia.I Symposio International De Carbonatitos, PP. 215-219.RussiaPetrology, Mineral Chemistry
DS1985-0515
1985
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I.Physicochemical Conditions of Rock Formation in Intrusives Of Alkaline-ultrabasic Rock Series.Geology And Geophysics, No. 1, JANUARY PP.RussiaPetrology
DS1989-1169
1989
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Motorina, I.V., Sharygin, V.V., Vladykin, N.V.Biotitic pyroxenites and melilite-monticellite-olivine rocks of the Malo-Murun alkaline massif of YakutiaSoviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 30, No. 12, pp. 40-48RussiaMelilite, Alkaline rocks
DS1991-1292
1991
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Sharygin, V.V., Proshenkin, I.E.Apatite contents of potassium alkaline massifsSoviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 32, No. 1, pp. 107-114RussiaAlkaline rocks, Apatite
DS1992-1161
1992
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Mikhaleva, L.A., Smironov, S.Z., Motorina, I.V.Genesis of mottled camptonites from the south of Tuva (based on the studying of melt inclusions).Soviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 33, No. 1, pp. 81-86.RussiaCamptonite, Dikes
DS1992-1376
1992
Panina, L.I.Sharygin, V.V., Proshenkin, I.E., Panina, L.I., Bazarova, T.Yu.Modal leucite in melanocratic rocks of synnritiferous massifs as An indicator of their genesis.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 33, No. 5, pp. 56-61.GlobalMineralogy, Leucite
DS1993-1186
1993
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I.Aldan lamproite rocks and genetic criteria of lamproite meltsRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 34, No. 6, pp. 70-77.Russia, YakutiaLamproite, Mineral chemistry
DS1993-1441
1993
Panina, L.I.Sharygin, V.V., Panina, L.I.Melanocratic rocks of the Kalyumny area... Synnyr alkaline basinRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 34, No. 8, pp. 92-99.RussiaAlkaline rocks, Shonkenites
DS1995-1424
1995
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I.Genetic criteria of distinguishing lamproitesProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 418-420.RussiaPetrology -experimental, Lamproites
DS1995-1425
1995
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I.Physico chemical conditions of crystallization of low titanium lamproites of Aldan (Siberia).Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 421-423.Russia, Aldan shieldGeothermometry, Lamproites
DS1995-1426
1995
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Konev, A.A.Genetic features of the Molbo River lamproites, West AldanGeochemistry International, Vol. 32, No. 11, Nov. 1, pp. 49-59.Russia, Aldan shieldLamproites, Deposit -Molbo River
DS1996-1065
1996
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Usoltseva, L.M., Vladykin, N.V.Lamproite rocks of the Yakokut Massif and Upper Yakokut depression (Central Alden).Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 37, No. 6, pp. 13-23.Russia, Aldan shieldLamproite, Yakokut
DS1998-1327
1998
Panina, L.I.Sharygin, V.V., Panina, L.I., Vladykin, N.V.Silicate melt inclusions in minerals of lamproites from Smoky ButteRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 39, No. 1, pp. 38-54.MontanaLamproites - mineralogy, Deposit - Smoky Butte
DS2000-0745
2000
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Sharygin, V.V., Keller, J.Olivine nephelinite, tephrite, essexite, phonolite and tinguaite from Kaiserstuhl: melt inclusions in pyroxeneGeochemistry International, Vol. 38, No. 4, pp. 343-52.GermanyAlkaline rocks, Geochemistry
DS2001-0887
2001
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Usoltseva, L.M.The role of liquid immiscibility in the origin of calcite carbonatites from Malyi Murun massif (Aldan)Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 41, No. 5, pp. 633-48.Russia, Aldan shieldCarbonatite, Deposit - Malyi Murun
DS2003-1045
2003
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Stoppa, F., Usoltseva, L.M.Genesis of melilitite rocks of Pian di Celle volcano, Umbrian kamafugite province, Italy:Petrology, Vol. 11, 4, pp. 365-82.ItalyMelilitites
DS200412-1497
2003
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Stoppa, F., Usoltseva, L.M.Genesis of melilitite rocks of Pian di Celle volcano, Umbrian kamafugite province, Italy: evidence from melt inclusions in minerPetrology, Vol. 11, 4, pp. 365-82.Europe, ItalyMelilitite
DS200512-0746
2001
Panina, L.I.Morikiyo, T., Miyazaki, T., Kagami, H., Vladykin, N.V., Chernysheva, E.A., Panina, L.I., Podgornych, N.M.Sr Nd C and O isotope characteristics of Siberian carbonatites.Alkaline Magmatism and the problems of mantle sources, pp. 69-84.Russia, SiberiaGeochronology
DS200512-0818
2004
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Usoltseva, L.M.Liquid carbonate carbonate salt immiscibility and origin of calciocarbonatites.Deep seated magmatism, its sources and their relation to plume processes., pp. 209-235.Carbonatite, mineralogy
DS200612-1024
2005
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I.Multiphase carbonate salt immiscibility in carbonatite melts: dat a on melt inclusions from the Krestovskiy massif mineral ( Polar Siberia).Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 150, 1, pp. 19-36.Russia, SiberiaCarbonatite
DS200812-0844
2008
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I.Origin and evolution of carbonatite magmas.9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractTechnologyMelt inclusions
DS200812-0845
2008
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Motorina, I.V.Liquid immiscibility in deep seated magmas and the generation of carbonatite melts.Geochemistry International, Vol. 46, 5, May pp. 448-464.MantleCarbonatite
DS200812-0846
2008
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Usoltseva, L.M.Alkaline ultrabasic mantle derived magmas, their sources, and crystallization features: dat a of melt inclusion studies.Lithos, Vol. 103, 3-4, pp. 431-444.MantleAlkaline rocks, magmatism
DS201312-0679
2013
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Nikolaeva, A.T., Stoppa, F.Genesis of melilitolite from Colle Fabbri: inferences from melt inclusions.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 107, 6, pp. 897-914.Europe, ItalyMelilite, kamafugite
DS201312-0681
2013
Panina, L.I.Panina,L.I.,Motorina, I.V.Meimechmites, porhyritic alkaline picrites, and melanephelinites of Siberia: conditions of crystallization, parental magmas, and sources.Geochemistry International, Vol. 51, 2, pp. 109-128.RussiaAlkalic
DS201612-2326
2016
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Rokosova, E.Yu., Isakova, A.T., Tolstov, A.V.Lamprophyres of the Tomto Massif: a result of mixing between potassic and sodic alkaline mafic magmas.Petrology, Vol. 24, 6, pp. 608-625.RussiaAlkalic
DS201712-2715
2017
Panina, L.I.Panina, L.I., Rokosova, E.Yu., Isakova, A.T., Tolstov, A.V.Mineral composition of alkaline lamprophyres of the Tomto massif as reflection of their genesis.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 58, pp. 887-902.Russiamonchiquites
DS2003-0394
2003
Panis, D.Faure, M., Lin, W., Monie, P., Le Breton, N., Pouissineau, S., Panis, D., Deloule, E.Exhumation tectonics of the ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks in the Qinling orogenTectonics, Vol. 22, 3, 10.1029/2002TC001450ChinaTectonics - subduction
DS2003-0395
2003
Panis, D.Faure, M., Lin, W., Monie, P., Le Breton, N., Pouissineau, S., Panis, D., Deloule, E.Exhumation tectonics of the ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks in the Qinling orogenTectonics, Vol. 22, 3, 10.1029/2002TC001450China, ShandongUHP
DS200412-0537
2003
Panis, D.Faure, M., Lin, W., Monie, P., Le Breton, N., Pouissineau, S., Panis, D., Deloule, E.Exhumation tectonics of the ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks in the Qinling orogen in east China: new petrological structuraTectonics, Vol. 22, 3, 10.1029/2002TC001450China, ShandongUHP
DS2001-0756
2001
Panish, P.T.McEnroe, S.A., Robinson, P., Panish, P.T.Aeromagnetic anomalies, magnetic petrology, and rock magnetism of hemo-ilmenite magnetite rich cumulates...Amer. Min., Vol. 86, pp. 1447-68.NorwayGeophysics - magnetics - not specific to diamonds, Sokndal region
DS201603-0393
2016
Pankaj, P.Kumar, A., Pankaj, P., Koteswara Rao, K.A new find of lamproite dyke near Chintalapalle area, NW margin of the Cuddapah basin, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.Journal of The Geological Society of India, Vol. 87, 2, pp. 127-131.IndiaLamproite

Abstract: A singular outcrop of a lamproite dyke is located ~1.5 km south-west of Chintalapalle village at the NW margin of the Cuddapah basin, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.. The dyke trends E-W and is emplaced within the granitic rocks belonging to the peninsular gneissic complex. The lamproite dyke has a porphyritic to weakly porphyritic texture comprising microphenocrysts of sanidine, and potassic richterite set in a groundmass rich in carbonate, and chlorite with rutile and titanate as accessory phases. This new occurrence of lamproite is located mid-way between the well-known Narayanpet kimberlite field towards the west and the Ramadugu and Vattikod lamproite fields in east. The Chintalapalle lamproite dyke, together with those from Vattikod, Ramadugu, Krishna and Cuddapah basin lamproite fields, constitute a wide spectrum of ultrapotassic magmatism emplaced in and around the Palaeo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah basin in southern India.
DS201607-1369
2016
Pankaj, P.Pankaj, P.Petrology and geochemistry of Chintalapalle lamproite, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.IGC 35th., Session A Dynamic Earth 1p. AbstractIndiaLamproite
DS201702-0230
2017
Pankaj, P.Pandey, A., Pandey, R., Pandit, D., Pankaj, P., Chalapathi Rao, N.V.A note on the origin of clinopyroxene megacrysts from the Udiripikonda lamprophyre, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.Journal of India Geophysical Union, Vol. 21, 2, pp. 124-131.IndiaLamprophyre
DS201904-0769
2019
Pankaj, P.Raghuvanshi, S., Pandey, A., Pankaj, P., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Chakrabarti, R., Pandit, D., Pandey, R.Lithosphere - asthenosphere interaction and carbonatite metasomatism in the genesis of Mesoproterozoic shoshonitic lamprophryres at Krakkodu, Wajrakarur kimberlite field, eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India.Geological Journal, doi: 10.1002/gj.3468 18p.Indiadeposit - Wajrakarur

Abstract: The spatial and temporal association between lamprophyres and kimberlites provides unique opportunities to explore their genetic relationships. This paper explores such a relationship by detailing mineralogical and geochemical aspects of Korakkodu lamprophyre dykes located within the well-known Mesoproterozoic diamondiferous Wajrakarur Kimberlite field (WKF), towards the south-western margin of Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah Basin, Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India. Mineralogy reveals that these dykes belong to calc-alkaline variety of lamprophyres, but their geochemistry display mixed signals of both alkaline and calc-alkaline lamprophyres. These lamprophyres are highly potassic, and their high Al2O3 and low-TiO2 content implies a shoshonitic character. Low Mg#, Ni, and Cr concentration highlight their evolved nature. High (La/Yb)N and (Gd/Yb)N content is consistent with their derivation from low degrees of partial melting, whereas highly fractionated nature suggests the presence of garnet in their source. Absence of prominent Nb-Ta anomaly implies to the dilution of lithospheric mantle source by melts rich in HFSEs and low La/Nb ratio compared to those of the calc-alkaline island arc volcanics and suggests an asthenospheric overprint on lithospheric mantle source. Carbonatite metasomatism in the source region of these lamprophyres is apparent from conspicuously high-Zr/Hf ratio, and the HFSE budget of these lamprophyres are principally controlled by the presence of phlogopite veins in their lithospheric source. An extremely heterogeneous and layered lithospheric mantle beneath Eastern Dharwar Craton has been inferred from the divergent genetic history of Mesoproterozoic lamprophyres and kimberlites in the Wajrakarur field.
DS201910-2293
2019
Pankaj, P.Raghuvanshi, S., Pandey, A., Pankaj, P., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Chakrabati, R., Pandit, D., Pandey, R.Lithosphere-asthenosphere interaction and carbonatite metasomatism in the genesis of Mesoproterozoic shoshonitic lamprophyres at Korakkodu, Wajrakarur kimberlite field, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.Geological Journal, Vol. 54, 5, pp. 3060-3077.Indiadeposit - Wajrakarur

Abstract: The spatial and temporal association between lamprophyres and kimberlites provides unique opportunities to explore their genetic relationships. This paper explores such a relationship by detailing mineralogical and geochemical aspects of Korakkodu lamprophyre dykes located within the well-known Mesoproterozoic diamondiferous Wajrakarur Kimberlite field (WKF), towards the south-western margin of Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah Basin, Eastern Dharwar Craton, southern India. Mineralogy reveals that these dykes belong to calc-alkaline variety of lamprophyres, but their geochemistry display mixed signals of both alkaline and calc-alkaline lamprophyres. These lamprophyres are highly potassic, and their high Al2O3 and low-TiO2 content implies a shoshonitic character. Low Mg#, Ni, and Cr concentration highlight their evolved nature. High (La/Yb)N and (Gd/Yb)N content is consistent with their derivation from low degrees of partial melting, whereas highly fractionated nature suggests the presence of garnet in their source. Absence of prominent Nb-Ta anomaly implies to the dilution of lithospheric mantle source by melts rich in HFSEs and low La/Nb ratio compared to those of the calc-alkaline island arc volcanics and suggests an asthenospheric overprint on lithospheric mantle source. Carbonatite metasomatism in the source region of these lamprophyres is apparent from conspicuously high-Zr/Hf ratio, and the HFSE budget of these lamprophyres are principally controlled by the presence of phlogopite veins in their lithospheric source. An extremely heterogeneous and layered lithospheric mantle beneath Eastern Dharwar Craton has been inferred from the divergent genetic history of Mesoproterozoic lamprophyres and kimberlites in the Wajrakarur field.
DS202005-0755
2017
Pankaj, P.Pandey, A., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Pandit, D., Pankaj, P., Pandey, R., Sahoo, S.Subduction - tectonics in the evolution of the eastern Dharwar craton, southern India: insights from the post-collisional calc-alkaline lamprophyres at the western margin of the Cuddapah Basin.Precambrian Research, in press available, 17p. PdfIndiacraton

Abstract: The geodynamic evolution of the eastern Dharwar craton, southern India, is widely debated with a number of contrasting models ranging from uniformitarian plate convergence to the mantle plume and their combination. We report here the petrology and geochemistry of two undeformed and unmetamorphosed lamprophyre dykes from the Mudigubba area located immediately towards the western margin of the Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Cuddapah basin from this craton. The Mudigubba lamprophyres are free from crustal xenoliths, and have a typical porphyritic-panidiomorphic texture predominated by phenocrysts of amphibole. Clinopyroxene occurs as microphenocrysts with feldspar essentially confined to the groundmass. F-rich apatite and sphene are the other accessories. Mineral chemistry reveals that the amphiboles are of calcic variety (dominantly magnesio-hornblende), the clinopyroxene to be a diopside (Wo45.01-50.40 En36.74-44.58 Fs6.79-12.73 Ac0.42-2.24) and the albitic (Or1.12 Ab91.17 An7.70) nature of the feldspar. The lower abundance of TiO2 in both the amphibole and clinopyroxene, suggest a calc-alkaline nature of the magma. High Mg# (76.8-79.3), Ni (140-240 ppm) and Cr (380-830 ppm) contents along with (i) depletion in U, and Th, (ii) variable Ba/La and (iii) low Nb/La as well as Th/La strikes out possibility of crustal contamination and supports the primary nature of the lamprophyre magma. The presence of significant Nb-Ta, Zr-Hf and Ti negative anomalies in the primitive mantle normalized multi-element plots and their striking similarity with the global calc-alkaline lamprophyres imply the involvement of subduction-related mantle source modification. Various geochemical ratios (e.g., Hf/Sm, Ta/La, Th/Yb, Nb/Yb, La/Nb, Ba/Nb) demonstrate the source enrichment was caused by a fluid-related, rather than silicate-melt related, subduction metasomatism. Binary-mixing calculations assuming average upper crust and N-MORB as the two end members reveals ~10-30% influx of subducted component in the generation of the Mudigubba lamprophyres. A re-examination of the limited geochemical data available for the co-spatial Paleoproterozoic (2200-1600 Ma) alkaline plutons suggests this Neoarchaean subduction-event in this domain could in fact be a regional feature - all along the western margin of the Cuddapah basin and represents a hitherto unrecognised suture zone in the eastern Dharwar craton with the Paleoproterozoic (?) emplacement of Mudigubba lamprophyres post-dating this collisional event. Our findings provide significant geochemical support to the models invoking convergence towards the evolution of the Eastern Dharwar craton and impose important constraints on the geodynamics of the southern peninsular India.
DS202008-1431
2020
Pankaj, P.Pankaj, P., Giri, R.K., Chalapathi Rao, N.V., Charabarti, R., Raghuvanshi, S.Mineralogy and petrology of shoshonitic lamprophyre dykes from the Sivarampeta area, diamondiferous Wajrakarur kimberlite field, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.Journal of Mineralogical and petrological Sciences, Vol. 115, 2, pp. 202-215. pdfIndiadeposit - Wajrakarur

Abstract: Petrology and geochemistry (including Sr and Nd isotopes) of two lamprophyre dykes, intruding the Archaean granitic gneisses at Sivarampeta in the diamondiferous Wajrakarur kimberlite field (WKF), eastern Dharwar craton, southern India, are presented. The Sivarampeta lamprophyres display porphyritic-panidiomorphic texture comprising macrocrysts/phenocrysts of olivine, clinopyroxene (augite), and mica set in a groundmass dominated by feldspar and comprising minor amounts of ilmenite, chlorite, carbonates, epidote, and sulphides. Amphibole (actinolite-tremolite) is essentially secondary in nature and derived from the alteration of clinopyroxene. Mica is compositionally biotite and occurs as a scattered phase throughout. Mineralogy suggests that these lamprophyres belong to calc-alkaline variety whereas their bulk-rock geochemistry portrays mixed signals of both alkaline as well as calc-alkaline (shoshonitic) variety of lamprophyres and suggest their derivation from the recently identified Domain II (orogenic-anorogenic transitional type mantle source) from eastern Dharwar craton. Trace element ratios imply melt-derivation from an essentially the garnet bearing-enriched lithospheric mantle source region; this is further supported by their 87Sr/86Srinitial (0.708213 and 0.708507) and ‘enriched’ eNdinitial (-19.1 and -24.2) values. The calculated TDM ages (2.7-2.9 Ga) implies that such enrichment occurred prior to or during Neoarchean, contrary to that of the co-spatial and co-eval kimberlites which originated from an isotopically depleted mantle source which was metasomatized during Mesoproterozoic. The close association of calc-alkaline shoshonitic lamprophyres, sampling distinct mantle sources, viz., Domain I (e.g., Udiripikonda) and Domain II (Sivarampeta), and kimberlites in the WKF provide further evidence for highly heterogeneous nature of the sub-continental lithospheric mantle beneath the eastern Dharwar craton.
DS202008-1442
2018
Pankaj, P.Sharma, A., Kumar, A., Pankaj, P., Pandit, D., Chakrabarti, R., Chalapathi Rao, N.V.Petrology and Sr-Nd isotpe systematics of the Ahobil kimberlite pipe ( Pipe -16) from the Wajrakarur field, eastern Dharwar craton, southern India.Geoscience Frontiers, 20p. PdfIndiadeposit - Ahobil Pipe 16
DS1994-1899
1994
PankhurstWever, H.E., Millar, PankhurstGeochronology and radiogenic isotope geology of Mesozoic rocks from eastern Palmer Land, AntarcticaJournal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 69-83.GlobalGeochronology, Gondwana
DS1998-1238
1998
PankhurstRiley, T.R., Pankhurst, Leat, Storey, FanningTime relationships of pre-breakup Gondwana magmatismJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, 1A, p. 160. AbstractGondwanaMagmatism
DS1992-1485
1992
Pankhurst, R.J.Storey, B.C., Alabaster, T., Hole, M.J., Pankhurst, R.J., Wever, H.E.Role of subduction-plate boundary forces during the initial stages of Gondwana break-up: evidence from the Proto-Pacific margin of Antarctica.Geological Society Special Publication, Magmatism and the Causes of Continental, No. 68, pp. 149-163.AntarcticaTectonics, Subduction
DS1992-1486
1992
Pankhurst, R.J.Storey, B.C., Alabaster, T., Pankhurst, R.J.Magmatism and the causes of continental break-upGeological Society of London Special Publication, No. 68, 400pGondwanaBook -table of contents, Magma generation
DS1994-1893
1994
Pankhurst, R.J.Weaver, S.D., Storey, B.C., Pankhurst, R.J., Mukasas, S.B.Antarctica - New Zealand rifting and Marie Byrd Land lithospheric magmatism linked to ridge subductionGeology, Vol. 22, No. 9, September pp. 811-814.Antarctica, New ZealandTectonics, Subduction, mantle plume activity
DS1998-1116
1998
Pankhurst, R.J.Pankhurst, R.J., et al.Early Paleozoic evolution of the Gondwana margin of South AmericaJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 27, 1A, p. 145. AbstractSouth America, BrazilTectonics
DS1998-1117
1998
Pankhurst, R.J.Pankhurst, R.J., Rapela, C.W.The proto-Andean margin of GondwanaGeological Society of London Spec. Pub, No. 142, 336p. $ 125.00ArgentinaBook - ad, Basins - subduction
DS1998-1118
1998
Pankhurst, R.J.Pankhurst, R.J., Rapela, C.W.The Proto Andean margin of Gondwana: an introductionPankhurst Geological Society of London, Special Paper No. 142, pp. 1-9.ArgentinaOrogeny - Sierras Pampeanas, Gondwana - not specific to diamonds
DS1998-1210
1998
Pankhurst, R.J.Rapela, C.W., Pankhurst, R.J., et al.Early evolution of the Proto-Andean margin of South AmericaGeology, Vol. 26, No. 8, Aug. pp. 707-710Argentina, South America, AndesTectonics, magmatism, Gondwana, Pampean Orogeny
DS200612-1025
2006
Pankhurst, R.J.Pankhurst, R.J., Rapela, C.W., Fanning, C.M., Marquez, M.Gondwanide continental collision and origin of Patagonia.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 76, 3-4, June pp. 235-257.South AmericaTectonics
DS200712-0872
2007
Pankhurst, R.J.Rapela, C.W., Pankhurst, R.J., Casquet, C., Fanning, C.M., Baldor Casado, E.G., Galindo, C., DahlquistThe Rio de la Plat a craton and the assembly of SW Gondwana.Earth Science Reviews, In press availableSouth America, BrazilTectonics
DS200712-0873
2007
Pankhurts, R.J.Rapela, C.W., Pankhurts, R.J., Casquet, C., Fanning, C.M., Baldo, E.G., Gonzalez-Casado, J.M., Galindo, C., Dahlquist, J.The Rio de la Plate craton and the assembly of SW Gondwana.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 83, 1-2, pp. 49-82.South America, BrazilCraton, tectonics
DS1997-0885
1997
Panko, A.Panko, A.Difficult but do-able: mining project financing in Africa. Presentation by Dresdner Kleinwort Benson.Miga Conference Held Denver June 3-5, 28p.AfricaMining, Economics - finance, not specific to diamonds
DS1999-0120
1999
PankovChakhmouradian, A.R., Mitchell, R.H., Pankov, ChulkanovLoparite and metaloparite from the Burpala alkaline complex, Baikal alkaline province, Russia.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 63, No. 4, Aug. pp. 519-34.RussiaAlkaline rocks - mineralogy
DS1989-0074
1989
Pankov, V. Yu.Barashkov, Yu.P., Marshintsev, V.K., Pankov, V. Yu.Solid inclusions in pyrope-almandine garnets from kimberlite veins associated with the Udachnaya pipe.(Russian)Mineral. Zhurn., (Russian), Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 19-30RussiaGarnet inclusions
DS1985-0504
1985
Pankov, V.I.Oleinikov, B.V., Pankov, V.I., Plaksenko, A.N., Okrugin, A.V.Inclusions in Moissanite from Platform Basic RocksDoklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 283, No. 5, PP. 1269-1273.RussiaBlank
DS1989-1170
1989
Pankov, V.I.Pankov, V.I., Spetsius, Z.V.Inclusions of iron silicates and native silicon in moissanite from the Sytykanskaia kimberlite pipe.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 305, No. 3, pp. 704-707RussiaDiamond inclusions, Moissanite
DS1987-0544
1987
Pankov, V.Yu.Oleynikov, B.V., Pankov, V.Yu., et al.Inclusions in moissanite from mafic rocks of cratonsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol.283, No. 1-6, pp. 155-159.RussiaMineralogy, Craton
DS1989-0073
1989
Pankov, V.Yu.Barahkov, Yu.P., Marshintsev, V.K., Pankov, V.Yu.Solid inclusions in pyrope-almandine garnets from the kimberlite veins associated with the pipeUdachnaya, Yakutia.(Russian)Mineral. Zhurnal. UKR, (Russian), Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 19-30RussiaGarnets -analyses-inclusions, Deposit -Udachnaya
DS1990-1155
1990
Pankov, V.Yu.Pankov, V.Yu., Spetius, Z.V.Iron silicide and native silicon inclusions in moissanite from the Sytykan kimberlite pipeDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 305, No. 2, Sept. pp. 152-155RussiaKimberlite, Moissanite
DS2002-1211
2002
Pankow, K.L.Pankow, K.L., Williams, Q., Lay, T.Using shear wave amplitude patterns to detect metastable olivine in subducted slabsJournal of Geophysical Research, June 7, 10.1029/2001JB000608MantleGeophysics - seismics, Subduction
DS1960-0181
1961
Pankraton, A.A.Pankraton, A.A.The Features of Inclusions of Ultrabasic Rock Compared With those of Kimberlites.Mater. Geol. Yakut. Akad. Nauk Sssr., No. 7RussiaBlank
DS1960-0080
1960
Pankratov, A.A.Pankratov, A.A.Garnets from the Yakutian Kimberlite PipesIzv. Vost-sib. Fil. Akad. Nauk Sssr., No. 2, PP. 52-60.RussiaBlank
DS1960-0156
1961
Pankratov, A.A.Ilupin, I.P., Kozlov, I.T., Pankratov, A.A.The Problem of the Origin of Trace Minerals in Diamond in The Kimberlites of Yakutia.Zap. Vses. Miner. Obshch., PT. 90, No. 4, PP. 488-492.RussiaBlank
DS1970-0100
1970
Pankratov, A.A.Ilupin, I.P., Pankratov, A.A., Chernyy, YE.D.K.Limits of the Term KimberliteIn: Geology, Petrography And Mineralogy of Magmatic Formatio, RussiaBlank
DS1970-0171
1970
Pankratov, A.A.Pankratov, A.A.New Type of Breccia Pipes in the Northeast Siberian PlatformAkad. Nauk Sssr Sib. Otd. Yakut. Fil. Institute Geol., RussiaBlank
DS1970-0176
1970
Pankratov, A.A.Ponamarenko, A.I., Pankratov, A.A., Poberezhskiy, V.A.Occurrence of Kimberlite Magmatism on the Southern Slope Of the Anabar Anticlise (uplift).In: Geology, Petrography And Mineralogy of Magmatic Formatio, PP. 33-47.RussiaBlank
DS1998-1568
1998
Pankurst, R.J.Wareham, C.D., Pankurst, R.J., Thomas, Storey et al.lead, neodymium, Strontium isotope mapping of Grenville age crustal Provinces in Rodinia.Journal of Geology, Vol. 106, No.6, Nov. pp. 647-60.Southern Africa, Antarctica, Gondwana, RodiniaGeochronology, Supercontinent
DS2003-0519
2003
Panning, M.Gung, Y., Panning, M., Robanowicz, B.Global anisotropy and the thickness of continentsNature, No. 6933, April 17, p. 707-710.MantleGeophysics
DS2003-0520
2003
Panning, M.Gung, Y., Panning, M., Romanowicz, B.Global anisotropy and the thickness of continentsNature, Vol. 422, April 17. pp. 707-711.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-0743
2003
Panning, M.Gung, Y., Panning, M., Romanowicz, B.Global anisotropy and the thickness of continents.Nature, Vol. 422, April 17. pp. 707-711.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200412-1498
2004
Panning, M.Panning, M., Romanowicz, B.Inferences on flow at the base of Earth's mantle based on seismic antropy.Science, No. 5656 Jan. 16, pp. 352-2.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200612-1026
2006
Panning, M.Panning, M., Romanowicz, B.A three dimensional radially anistropic model of shear velocity in the whole mantle.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 167, 1, Oct., pp. 361-379.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS201509-0399
2015
Panning, M.P.Hongsresawat, S., Panning, M.P., Russo, R.M., Foster, D.A., Monteiller, V., Chevrot, S.USArray shear wave splitting shows seismic anisotropy from both lithosphere and asthenosphere.Geology, Vol. 43, 8, pp. 667-670.United StatesSeismic -anisotropy

Abstract: North America provides an important test for assessing the coupling of large continents with heterogeneous Archean- to Cenozoic-aged lithospheric provinces to the mantle flow. We use the unprecedented spatial coverage of the USArray seismic network to obtain an extensive and consistent data set of shear wave splitting intensity measurements at 1436 stations. Overall, the measurements are consistent with simple shear deformation in the asthenosphere due to viscous coupling to the overriding lithosphere. The fast directions agree with the absolute plate motion direction with a mean difference of 2° with 27° standard deviation. There are, however, deviations from this simple pattern, including a band along the Rocky Mountain front, indicative of flow complication due to gradients in lithospheric thickness, and variations in amplitude through the central United States, which can be explained through varying contributions of lithospheric anisotropy. Thus, seismic anisotropy may be sourced in both the asthenosphere and lithosphere, and variations in splitting intensity are due to lithospheric anisotropy developed during deformation over long time scales.
DS1994-1331
1994
Panorama Resources NLPanorama Resources NLProspectus Panorama 1994Panorama Resources N.L., 80p.AustraliaNews item -prospectus, Projects -Mr. Remarkable, Maude Creek, Mt. Carmel
DS2000-1040
2000
PanovYatsenko, G.M., Panov, Belousoba, Lesnov, GriffinThe rare earth elements (REE) distribution in zircon from minettes of the Kirovograd Ukraine.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 370, No. 1, Jan-Feb pp.196-200.Russia, UkraineGeochronology, Minettes
DS1987-0564
1987
Panov, B.S.Panov, B.S.Some genetic characteristics of the Siberian and Chinese platformkimberlites.(Russian)Mineral. Sbornik (L'Vov), (Russian), Vol. 41, No. 2, pp. 35-48Russia, ChinaPetrology, Tectonics
DS1997-0257
1997
Panov, B.S.De Boorder, H., Van Beek, A.J.J., Panov, B.S.Crustal architecture of the Donets Basin: tectonic implications for diamond and mercury-antimony mineralsTectonophysics, Vol. 268, No. 1/4, Dec. 31, pp. 293-UKraineTectonics, Structure, Diamond mineralization, genesis
DS2002-0012
2002
Panova, E.Ahmedov, A., Panova, E., Krupenik, V., Svehnikova, K.Diamond from Early Proterozoic and Devonian rocks of the joint zone of the Baltic Shield and Russian platform.18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.272.Russia, Baltic ShieldLithogenesis - sedimentary basins
DS1995-1427
1995
Panova, Ye.G.Panova, Ye.G.Mineralogical and geochemical features of fluorite as indicators of raremetal mineralizationGeochemistry International, Vol. 32, No. 12, Dec. 1, pp. 34-47RussiaGeochemistry, Rare earths
DS1989-1171
1989
Pant, D.R.Pant, D.R., Greenhalgh, S.A.Multicomponent seismic reflection profiling over an ore-body structure- a scale model investigationGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 16, No. 10, October pp. 1089-1092GlobalGeophysics, Seismics -orebody
DS200612-0388
2006
Pant, N.C.Fareeduddin, Pant, N.C., Neogi, S.Petrology of the Kodomali diatreme, Mainput area, Chhattisgarh, central India: implications for a Paleozoic orangeite field.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 68, 1, pp. 19-34.IndiaDeposit - Kodomali
DS200612-1052
2005
Pant, N.C.Paul, D.K., Nayak, S.S., Pant, N.C.Indian kimberlites and related rocks: petrology and geochemistry.Geological Society of India, Bangalore November Meeting Group Discussion on Kimberlites and Related Rocks India, Abstract p. 7.IndiaBrief overview
DS200612-1053
2006
Pant, N.C.Paul, D.K., Nayak, S.S., Pant, N.C.Indian kimberlites and related rock: petrology and geochemistry. Majhgawan, Wajrakarur, Kota Konda, Mudalbid, Ramanapeta, Chelima.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 67, pp. 328-355.IndiaReview - maps, petrography, geochronology
DS201012-0650
2010
Pant, N.C.Saha, L., Pant, N.C., Pati, J.K., Upadhyay, D., Berndt, J., Bhattacharya, A., Satynarayanan, M.Neoarchean high pressure margarite phengite muscovite chlorite corona mantle corundum in quartz free high Mg, Al phlogopite chlorite schists from the BundelkhandContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, in press available, 20p.IndiaCraton, U H metamorphism
DS201212-0090
2012
Pant, N.C.Browmik, S.K., Wilde, S.A., Bhandari, A., Pal, T., Pant, N.C.Growth of the greater Indian landmass and its assembly in Rodinia:geochronological evidence from the Central Indian Tectonic Zone.Gondwana Research, Vol. 22, 1, pp. 54-72.IndiaGeochronology, tectonics, cratons
DS201710-2255
2017
Pant, N.C.Pant, N.C., Dasgupta, S.An introduction to the crustal evolution of India and Antarctica: the supercontinent connectionGeological Society of London Special Publication, Vol. 457, pp. 1-6.Indiatectonics
DS202005-0730
2020
Pant, N.C.Fareeduddin., Pant, N.C., Gupta, S., Chakraborty, P., Sensarma, S., Jain, A.K., Prasad, G.V.R., Srivastava, P., Rjan, S., Tiwari, V.M.The geodynamic evolution of the Indian subcontinent - an introduction.Episodes ( IUGS), Vol. 43, 1, pp. 1-18.Indiacarbonatite
DS202009-1627
2020
Pant, N.C.Fareeduddin, Pant, N.C., Gupta, S., Chakraborty, P., Sensarma, S., Jain, A.K., Prasad, G.V.R., Srivastava, P., Rajan, S., Tiwari, V.M.The geodynamic evolution of the Indian subcontinent - an introduction.Episodes, Vol. 43, 1, pp. 8p.Indiacarbonatites
DS1997-0596
1997
Pant, P.C.Khandelwal, M.K., Maithani, P.B., Pant, P.C., et al.Geological and geochemical studies on carbonatites and rocks of carbonatitic affinity from areas north...Journal of Geological Society India, Vol. 50, Sept., pp. 307-313.India, Madhya Pradesh, GujaratNarmada lineament, Carbonatite
DS1975-1172
1979
Pantaleo, N.S.Pantaleo, N.S., Newton, G.S., Gogineni, S.V., Melton, C.E.Mineral Inclusions in Four Arkansaw Diamonds: Their Nature And Significance.American Mineralogist., Vol. 64, No. 9-10, PP. 1059-1062.United States, Gulf Coast, Arkansas, PennsylvaniaMineralogy, Mineral Chemistry
DS1992-0398
1992
Pantano, C.G.Dubray, J.J., Pantano, C.G., Yarborogh, W.A.Graphite as a substrate for diamond growthJournal of Applied Physics, Vol. 72, No. 7, October 1, pp. 3136-3142. # JT007GlobalDiamond genesis, Graphite
DS1990-0977
1990
Pantayiotou, A.Malpas, J., Moores, E.M., Pantayiotou, A., Xenophontos, C.Ophiolites- oceanic crustal analoguesCyprus Geological Survey, 733p. $ 65.00Japan, Indonesia, California, Oregon, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, ScotlandOphiolites, Book -ad
DS200512-0819
2005
Pantea, C.Pantea, C., Voronin, G.A., Waldek Zerda, T., Zhang, J., Wang, Y., Uchida, T., Zhao, Y.Kinetics of SIC formation during high P T reaction between diamond and silicon.Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 14, 10, pp. 1611-1615.TechnologySIC
DS201909-2072
2019
Panteeva, S.Pashkova, G.V., Panteeva, S., Ukhova, N.N., Chubarov, V.M., Finkelshtein, A.L., Ivanov, A.V., Asavin, A.M.Major and trace elements in meimechites - rarely occurring volcanic rocks: developing optimal analytical strategy.Geochemistry: Exploration, Environment, Analysis, Vol. 19, pp, 233-243.Russia, Canada, Chinameimechites

Abstract: The determination of the chemical composition of meimechites which are unique and