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SDLRC - Scientific Articles all years by Author - Se-Sh


The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation
The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation is compiled by Patricia Sheahan who publishes on a monthly basis a list of new scientific articles related to diamonds as well as media coverage and corporate announcementscalled the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service that is distributed as a free pdf to a list of followers. Pat has kindly agreed to allow her work to be made available as an online digital resource at Kaiser Research Online so that a broader community interested in diamonds and related geology can benefit. The references are for personal use information purposes only; when available a link is provided to an online location where the full article can be accessed or purchased directly. Reproduction of this compilation in part or in whole without permission from the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is strictly prohibited. Return to Diamond Resource Center
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Media/Corporate References by Name for all years
A B C D-Diam Diamonds Diamr+ E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Tips for Users
Posted/Published Reference CodesThe SDLRC provides 3 types of references identified in the reference code. DS for scientific article, DM for a media article, and DC for a corporate announcement. Consider DS0512-0001. The DS stands for "diamond scientific". 05 stands for 2005, the year the reference was posted. 12 represents the month the reference was posted. For all years prior to 2015 the default month is 12. -0001 is the reference's identifier and it does not mean anything. The number below the refence code, ie 2015, is the year the article was published. Note that the posted year may sometimes be later than the published year.
Sort OrderReferences are sorted by the "author" name and when the reference was posted to the compilation.
Most RecentIf the reference code is highlighted yellow, the reference was made available through the most recent monthly compilation of new literature. Use this to check out new references. When new references are posted, we make it our priority to track down an online link and obtain an abstract. With regard to older references, tracking down an abstract and an online link is a work in progress.
Link to external location of article: If the title has a link, it means we have found a location online where you can either retrieve the full article free, or purchase access to it. The Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is not a technical article procurement service; if you want a restricted article, you must deal directly with the vendor who controls the copyright to the article.
Searching this page for a specific term or authorIn your Firefox browser click Edit in the menu bar and then Find. In the Find box that shows up at the bottom of the web page enter your search term. Firefox will highlight all occurrences. This is particularly helpful when the author you are seeking was not the lead author by whom the compilation is sorted.
Sending or sharing a referenceThe left column (Posted/Published) has an embedded hyperlink for each reference. In Firefox, if you right click on it, you can obtain the link url for that reference's location within the page, which you can copy and paste into an email or any other document. You can also use the "share this link" option to tweet, facebook etc the link.
Author Index
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years - Se-Sh
Posted/
Published
AuthorTitleSourceRegionKeywords
DS200812-0279
2008
Se Stefano, A.Deijanin, B., Simic, D., Zaitsev, A., Chapman, J., Dobrinets, I., Widemann, A., Del Re, N., Middleton, T., Dijanin, E., Se Stefano, A.Characterization of pink diamonds of different origin: natural ( Argyle, non-Argyle), irradiated and annealed, treated with multi-process, coated and synthetic.Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 17, 7-10, pp. 1169-1178.AustraliaPink diamonds
DS2002-1436
2002
Sea TechnologySea TechnologyUltra high resolution seabed mapping using an AUV Dr. Ian Stephenson, Paul Nicholson, Annitta Attieh and Clayton Summers ( de Beers Marine) present case studySea Technology, Vol. 43,8, pp. 40-46.South AfricaOffshore diamond mining industry, Seabed mapping
DS1984-0643
1984
Seager, W.R.Seager, W.R., Shafiquillah, M., Hawley, J.W., Marvin, R.F.New Potassium-argon Dates from Basalts and the Evolution of the Southern Rio Grande Rift.Geological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 95, No. 1, PP. 87-99.United States, Texas, New MexicoMid Continent
DS1990-0817
1990
Seager, W.R.Keller, G.R., Morgan, P., Seager, W.R.Crustal structure, gravity anomalies and heat flow In the southern Rio Grande rift and their relationship to extensional tectonicsTectonophysics, Vol. 174, No. 1-2, pp. 21-38Colorado PlateauGeophysics -gravity, Tectonics
DS201012-0078
2010
Seagle, C.T.Buffett, B.A., Seagle, C.T.Stratification of the top of the core due to chemical interactions with the mantle.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 115, B4, B04407.MantleGeochemistry
DS1991-1142
1991
SealMeyer, H.O.A., Zhang Andi, Milledge, H.J, Mendelsshon, M.J., SealComprehensive investigations of Chinese diamondsProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 285-286ChinaDiamond inclusions, Shandong, microspectroscopy, Cathodluminesence, Liaoning, analyses
DS2002-1437
2002
Seal, A.E.Seal, A.E., Hauri, E.H.Vapour undersaturation in primitive Mid-Ocean ridge basalt and the volatile content of Earth's upper mantle.Nature, Oct. 3, pp. 451-55.MantleGeochemistry
DS1983-0456
1983
Seal, M.Milledge, H.J., Mendelssohn, M.J., Seal, M., et al.Carbon Isotopic Variation in Spectral Type Ii DiamondsNature., Vol. 303, No. 5920, JUNE 30TH. PP. 791-792.GlobalMorphology, Crystallography
DS1986-0455
1986
Seal, M.Koppitz, J., Schrimer, O.F., Seal, M.Pseudo-Jahn Teller optical absorption of isolated nitrogen in diamondJournal of Phys. C., Solid State Physics, Vol. 19, No. 8, pp. 1123-1133GlobalDiamond morphology
DS1989-1365
1989
Seal, M.Seal, M.Diamonds in scienceInternational Sci, Vol. 14, No. 1, March pp. 64-76GlobalOverview
DS1992-1355
1992
Seal, M.Seal, M.Applications exploiting the extreme properties of diamondsMaterial Science E.B., Vol. 11, (1-4), Jan. 15, pp. 167-171. # HE067GlobalDiamond applications, Diamond properties
DS1992-0155
1992
Seal, M.J.Boyd, S.R., Pillinge, C.ET., Milledge, H.J., Seal, M.J.C-isotopic and N-isotopic composition and the infrared absorption spectraof coated diamonds-evidence regional uniformity of CO2-H2) rich fluids lithospheric mantleEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 108, No. 1-3, January pp. 139-150MantleCoated diamonds, Geochronology
DS201909-2058
2019
Seales, J.Lenardic, A., Weller, M., Hoink, T., Seales, J.Toward a boot strap hypothesis of plate tectonics: feedbacks between plates, the asthenosphere, and the wavelength of mantle convection.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, in press avaialable, 72p. PdfMantleplate tectonics

Abstract: The solid Earth system is characterized by plate tectonics, a low viscosity zone beneath plates (the asthenosphere), and long wavelength flow in the convecting mantle. We use suites of numerical experiments to show: 1) How long wavelength flow and the operation of plate tectonics can generate and maintain an asthenosphere, and 2) How an asthenosphere can maintain long wavelength flow and plate tectonics. Plate subduction generates a sub-adiabatic temperature gradient in the mantle which, together with temperature-dependent viscosity, leads to a viscosity increase from the upper to the lower mantle. This allows mantle flow to channelize in a low viscosity region beneath plates (an asthenosphere forms dynamically). Flow channelization, in turn, stabilizes long wavelength convection. The degree of dynamic viscosity variations from the upper to the lower mantle increases with the wavelength of convection and drops toward zero if the system transitions from plate tectonics to a single plate planet. The plate margin strength needed to initiate that transition increases for long wavelength cells (long wavelength flow allows plate tectonics to exist over a wider range of plate margin strength). The coupled feedbacks allow for a linked causality between plates, the asthenosphere, and the wavelength of mantle flow, with none being more fundamental than the others and the existence of each depending on the others. Under this hypothesis, the asthenosphere is defined by an active process, plate tectonics, which maintains it and is maintained by it and plate tectonics is part of an emergent, self-sustaining flow system that bootstraps itself into existence.
DS201910-2279
2019
Seales, J.Lenardic, A., Weller, M.B., Seales, J., Hoink, T.Toward a boot strap hypothesis of plate tectonics: feedbacks between plate tectonics, the asthenosphere, and the wavelength of mantle convection.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, in press available, 57p. PdfMantleplate tectonics

Abstract: The solid Earth system is characterized by plate tectonics, a low viscosity zone beneath plates (the asthenosphere), and long wavelength flow in the convecting mantle. We use suites of numerical experiments to show: 1) How long wavelength flow and the operation of plate tectonics can generate and maintain an asthenosphere, and 2) How an asthenosphere can maintain long wavelength flow and plate tectonics. Plate subduction generates a sub-adiabatic temperature gradient in the mantle which, together with temperature-dependent viscosity, leads to a viscosity increase from the upper to the lower mantle. This allows mantle flow to channelize in a low viscosity region beneath plates (an asthenosphere forms dynamically). Flow channelization, in turn, stabilizes long wavelength convection. The degree of dynamic viscosity variations from the upper to the lower mantle increases with the wavelength of convection and drops toward zero if the system transitions from plate tectonics to a single plate planet. The plate margin strength needed to initiate that transition increases for long wavelength cells (long wavelength flow allows plate tectonics to exist over a wider range of plate margin strength). The coupled feedbacks allow for a linked causality between plates, the asthenosphere, and the wavelength of mantle flow, with none being more fundamental than the others and the existence of each depending on the others. Under this hypothesis, the asthenosphere is defined by an active process, plate tectonics, which maintains it and is maintained by it and plate tectonics is part of an emergent, self-sustaining flow system that bootstraps itself into existence.
DS201911-2540
2019
Seales, J.Lenardic, A., Weller, M.B., Hoink, T., Seales, J. Toward a boot strap hypothesis of plate tectonics: feedbacks between plates, the asthenosphere, and the wavelength of mantle convection.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, in press 10.1016/j.pepi.2019.106299 18p. PdfMantleconvection

Abstract: The solid Earth system is characterized by plate tectonics, a low viscosity zone beneath plates (the asthenosphere), and long wavelength flow in the convecting mantle. We use suites of numerical experiments to show: 1) How long wavelength flow and the operation of plate tectonics can generate and maintain an asthenosphere, and 2) How an asthenosphere can maintain long wavelength flow and plate tectonics. Plate subduction generates a sub-adiabatic temperature gradient in the mantle which, together with temperature-dependent viscosity, leads to a viscosity increase from the upper to the lower mantle. This allows mantle flow to channelize in a low viscosity region beneath plates (an asthenosphere forms dynamically). Flow channelization, in turn, stabilizes long wavelength convection. The degree of dynamic viscosity variations from the upper to the lower mantle increases with the wavelength of convection and drops toward zero if the system transitions from plate tectonics to a single plate planet. The plate margin strength needed to initiate that transition increases for long wavelength cells (long wavelength flow allows plate tectonics to exist over a wider range of plate margin strength). The coupled feedbacks allow for a linked causality between plates, the asthenosphere, and the wavelength of mantle flow, with none being more fundamental than the others and the existence of each depending on the others. Under this hypothesis, the asthenosphere is defined by an active process, plate tectonics, which maintains it and is maintained by it and plate tectonics is part of an emergent, self-sustaining flow system that bootstraps itself into existence.
DS202002-0180
2020
Seales, J.Eguchi, J., Seales, J., Dagupta, R.Great oxidation and Lomagundi events linked by deep cycling and enhanced degassing of carbon.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 13, pp. 71-76. Mantlecarbon

Abstract: For approximately the first 2?billion years of the Earth’s history, atmospheric oxygen levels were extremely low. It was not until at least half a billion years after the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, perhaps as early as 3?billion years ago, that oxygen rose to appreciable levels during the Great Oxidation Event. Shortly after, marine carbonates underwent a large positive spike in carbon isotope ratios known as the Lomagundi event. The mechanisms responsible for the Great Oxidation and Lomagundi events remain debated. Using a carbon-oxygen box model that tracks the Earth’s surface and interior carbon fluxes and reservoirs, while also tracking carbon isotopes and atmospheric oxygen levels, we demonstrate that about 2.5?billion years ago a tectonic transition that resulted in increased volcanic CO2 emissions could have led to increased deposition of both carbonates and organic carbon (organic?C)?via enhanced weathering and nutrient delivery to oceans. Increased burial of carbonates and organic?C would have allowed the accumulation of atmospheric oxygen while also increasing the delivery of carbon to subduction zones. Coupled with preferential release of carbonates at arc volcanoes and deep recycling of organic?C to ocean island volcanoes, we find that such a tectonic transition can simultaneously explain the Great Oxidation and Lomagundi events without any change in the fraction of carbon buried as organic?C relative to carbonate, which is often invoked to explain carbon isotope excursions.
DS202005-0759
2020
Seales, J.Seales, J., Lenardic, A.Deep water cycling and multi-stage cooling of the Earth.Researchgate preprint, 32p. PdfMantlegeothermometry

Abstract: Paleo-temperature data indicates that the Earth's mantle did not cool at a constant rate over geologic time. Post magma ocean cooling was slow with an onset of more rapid mantle cooling between 2.5 and 3.0 Gyr. We explore the hypothesis that this multi-stage cooling is a result of deep water cycling coupled to thermal mantle convection. As warm mantle ascends, producing melt, the mantle is dehydrated. This tends to stiffens the mantle, which slows convective vigor causing mantle heating. At the same time, an increase in temperature tends to lower mantle viscosity which acts to increase convective vigor. If these two tendencies are in balance, then mantle cooling can be weak. If the balance is broken, by a switch to a net rehydration of the mantle, then the mantle can cool more rapidly. We use coupled water cycling and mantle convection models to test the viability of this hypothesis. We test models with different parameterizations to allow for variable degrees of plate margin strength. We also perform a layered uncertainty analysis on all the models to account for input, parameter, and structural model uncertainties. Within model and data uncertainty, the hypothesis that deep water cycling, together with a combination of plate strength and mantle viscosity resisting mantle overturn, can account for paleo data constraints on mantle cooling.
DS202008-1440
2020
Seales, J.Seales, J., Lenardic, A.Deep water cycling and the multi-stage cooling of the Earth.Preprint, doi:101340/RG2.2.25986.63683 32p. PdfMantlethermal convection

Abstract: Paleo-temperature data indicates that the Earth's mantle did not cool at a constant rate over geologic time. Post magma ocean cooling was slow with an onset of more rapid mantle cooling between 2.5 and 3.0 Gyr. We explore the hypothesis that this multi-stage cooling is a result of deep water cycling coupled to thermal mantle convection. As warm mantle ascends, producing melt, the mantle is dehydrated. This tends to stiffens the mantle, which slows convective vigor causing mantle heating. At the same time, an increase in temperature tends to lower mantle viscosity which acts to increase convective vigor. If these two tendencies are in balance, then mantle cooling can be weak. If the balance is broken, by a switch to a net rehydration of the mantle, then the mantle can cool more rapidly. We use coupled water cycling and mantle convection models to test the viability of this hypothesis. We test models with different parameterizations to allow for variable degrees of plate margin strength. We also perform a layered uncertainty analysis on all the models to account for input, parameter, and structural model uncertainties. Within model and data uncertainty, the hypothesis that deep water cycling, together with a combination of plate strength and mantle viscosity resisting mantle overturn, can account for paleo data constraints on mantle cooling.
DS202009-1640
2020
Seales, J.Lenardic, A., Seales, J., Weller, M.B.Convective and tectonic plate velocities in a mixed heating mantle.Researchgate, July 29p. Pdf doi:101002 /essoar.10503603.1Mantleplate tectonics

Abstract: Mantle convection and, by association, plate tectonics is driven by the transport of heat from a planetary interior. This heat may come from the internal energy of the mantle or may come from the core beneath and in general there will be contributions from both sources. Past investigations of such mixed-mode heating have revealed unusual behavior that confounds our intuition based on boundary layer theory applied to end-member cases. In particular, the addition of internal heat to a bottom-heated system causes a decrease in convective velocity despite an increase in surface heat flow. We investigate this behavior using a suite of numerical experiments and develop a scaling for velocity in the mixed-heating case. We identify a significant planform transition as internal heating increases from sheet-like to plume-like downwellings that impacts both heat flux and convective velocities. More significantly, we demonstrate that increased internal heating leads not only to a decrease in internal velocities but also a decrease in the velocity of the upper thermal boundary layer (a model analog of the Earth's lithosphere). This behavior is connected to boundary layer interactions and is independent of any particular rheological assumptions. In simulations with a temperature-dependent viscosity and a finite yield stress, increased internal heating does not cause an absolute decrease in surface velocity but does cause a decrease in surface velocity relative to the purely bottom or internally heated cases as well as a transition to rigid-lid behavior at high heating rates. The differences between a mixed system and end-member cases have implications for understanding the connection between plate tectonics and mantle convection and for planetary thermal history modeling.
DS1860-0642
1889
Sealey, H.G.Sealey, H.G.Resources of the Cape Colony 1889Cape Town:, Africa, South AfricaDiamond mining
DS1991-1535
1991
Searle, D.H.Searle, D.H., Bingham, M.S.Environment and the lawThe Canadian Mining and Metallurgical Bulletin (CIM Bulletin) , Special Feature on environment, Vol. 84, No. 952, Augustpp. 44-51CanadaLegal -provinces, Environmental issues
DS2001-1045
2001
Searle, M.Searle, M., Hacker, B.R., Bilham, R.The Hindu Kush seismic zone as a paradigm for the creation of ultrahigh pressure pressure diamond and coesite ...Journal of Geology, Vol. 109, pp. 143-53.Mantleultra high pressure (UHP) continental rocks, Subduction - ophiolites
DS1984-0644
1984
Searle, M.P.Searle, M.P.Alkaline peridotite, pyroxenite and gabbroic intrusions in the Oman Mountains Arabia.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 21, pp. 396-406.GlobalAlkaline Rocks
DS200612-1359
2006
Searle, M.P.St.Onge, M.R., Searle, M.P., Wodicka, N.Trans Hudson Orogen of North America and Himalaya Karakoram Tibetan Orogen of Asia: structural and thermal characteristics of the lower and upper plates.Tectonics, Vol. 25, 4, TC4006Canada, AsiaGeothermometry
DS200712-0599
2006
Searle, M.P.Law, R.D., Searle, M.P., Godin, L.Channel flow, ductile extrusion and exhumation in continental collision zones.Geological Society of London , SP 268, Nov. 632p. $ 225. www.geolsoc.org.uk/bookshopCanadaGeodynamics
DS200912-0106
2009
Searle, M.P.Chan, G.H.N., Waters, D.J., Searle, M.P., Aitchison, J.C., Horstwood, M.S.A., Crowley, Q., Lo, C.H., Chan J.Probing the basement of southern Tibet: evidence from crustal xenoliths entrained in a Miocene ultrapotassic dyke.Journal of the Geological Society, Vol. 166, 1, pp. 45-52.Asia, TibetAlkalic
DS201810-2318
2018
Searle, M.P.Gardiner, N.J., Searle, M.P., Morley, C.K., Robb, L.J., Whitehouse, M.J., Roberts, N.M.W., Kirkland, C.L., Spencer, C.J.The crustal architecture of Myanmar imaged through zircon U-Pb, Lu-Hf and O isotopes: tectonic and metallogenic implications. ReviewGondwana Research, Vol. 62, pp. 27-60.Asia, Myanmartectonics

Abstract: The Tethys margin in central and eastern Asia is comprised of continental terranes separated by suture zones, some of which remain cryptic. Determining the crustal architecture, and therefore the geological history, of the Eastern Tethyan margin remains challenging. Sited in the heart of this region, Myanmar is a highly prospective but poorly explored minerals jurisdiction. A better understanding of Myanmar's mineralization can only be realized through a better understanding of its tectonic history, itself reflected in at least four major magmatic belts. The Eastern and the Main Range Provinces are associated with the Late Permian to Early Triassic closure of Palaeo-Tethys. The Mogok-Mandalay-Mergui Belt and Wuntho-Popa Arc are a response to the Eocene closure of Neo-Tethys. However, magmatic ages outside these two orogenic events are also recorded. We present new zircon U-Pb, Lu-Hf and O isotope data from magmatic rocks across Myanmar, which we append to the existing dataset to isotopically characterize Myanmar's magmatic belts. Eastern Province Permian I-type magmatism has evolved eHf (-10.9 to -6.4), whilst Main Range Province Triassic S-type magmatism also records evolved eHf (-13.5 to -8.8). The Mogok-Mandalay-Mergui Belt is here divided into the Tin Province and the Mogok Metamorphic Belt. The Tin Province hosts ca. 77-50 Ma magmatism with evolved eHf (-1.2 to -15.2), and d 18 O of 5.6-8.3‰. The Mogok Metamorphic Belt exhibits a more complex magmatic and metamorphic history, and granitoids record Jurassic, Late Cretaceous, and Eocene to Miocene phases of magmatism, all of which exhibit evolved eHf values between -4.6 and -17.6, and d 18 O between 6.3 and 9.2‰. From the Tagaung-Myitkyina Belt, we report a magmatic age of 172 Ma and eHf of 18.1 to 10.8. To accommodate the geological evidence, we propose a tectonic model for Myanmar involving a greater Sibumasu - where the documented zircon isotopic variations reflect compositional variations in magmatic source - and invoke the role of a Tengchong Block. The Baoshan Block and Greater Sibumasu were likely assembled on or before the Triassic, a former Andean margin and suture which may lie across the Northern Shan Plateau, and reflected in isotopic differences between the northern and southern parts of the Mogok Metamorphic Belt. This contiguous Sibumasu-Baoshan Block then sutured onto the Indochina margin in the Late Triassic. We propose that a Tengchong Block within Myanmar provides for a southerly termination of the Meso-Tethys suture immediately north of the Mogok area. A discrete Tengchong Block may explain a discontinuous arc of Late Triassic to Jurassic I-type magmatism in central Myanmar, representing an Andean-type margin sited above a subducting Meso-Tethys on the margin of Sibumasu. The Tengchong Block sutured onto Greater Sibumasu before the Late Cretaceous, after which subduction of Neo-Tethys drove the magmatism of the Wuntho-Popa Arc and ultimately that of the Tin Province. The metallogenic character of granite belts in Myanmar reflects the crustal architecture of the region, which is remarkable for its prolific endowment of granite-hosted Sn-W mineralization in two quite distinct granite belts related to sequential Indosinian and Himalayan orogenesis.
DS2003-0109
2003
Sears, C.Bielinski, R.A., Park, S.K., Rybin, A., Batalev, V., Jun, S., Sears, C.Lithospheric heterogeneity in the Kyrgyz Tien Shan imaged by magnetotelluric studiesGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, No. 15, Aug. 1, DOI 10.1029/2003GLO17455ChinaGeophysics - tellurics
DS200412-0152
2003
Sears, C.Bielinski, R.A., Park, S.K., Rybin, A., Batalev, V., Jun, S., Sears, C.Lithospheric heterogeneity in the Kyrgyz Tien Shan imaged by magnetotelluric studies.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, no. 15, Aug. 1, DOI 10.1029/2003 GLO17455ChinaGeophysics - tellurics
DS1970-0766
1973
Sears, C.E.Meyer, H.O.A., Guilbert, C.M., Taylor, L.A., Sears, C.E.Mineralogy of Mica Peridotite, Lake NorrisEos, Vol. 54, No. 4, P. 493. (abstract.).Appalachia, TennesseeRelated Rocks
DS1970-0818
1973
Sears, C.E.Sears, C.E., Gilbert, M.C.Petrography of the Mt. Horeb Virginia, PeridotiteGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 5, No. 5, P. 434. (abstract.).Appalachia, VirginiaPetrography
DS1975-0404
1976
Sears, C.E.Sears, C.E., Gilbert, M.C.Nature of Central Appalachian KimberlitesEos, Vol. 57, No. 10, P. 761. (abstract.).Appalachia, VirginiaKimberlite, Mt. Horeb, Heavy Minerals
DS1992-1356
1992
Sears, D.W.G.Sears, D.W.G., Lu Jie, Benoit, P.H., DeHart, J.M., Lofgren, G.E.A compositional classification scheme for meteoritic chondrulesNature, Vol. 357, No. 6376, May 21, pp. 207-210GlobalMeteorites, Classification
DS1990-1327
1990
Sears, J.W.Sears, J.W., Alt, D.A composite Proterozoic cratonic basin drawn from examples in North America and AustraliaGeological Society of Australia, Abstracts No. 26, 9th. Inter. Conference on Basement, p. 25, AbstractsMidcontinent, AustraliaCraton, Tectonics
DS1993-0468
1993
Sears, J.W.Fritz, W.J., Sears, J.W.Tectonics of the Yellowstone hotspot wake in southwestern MontanaGeology, Vol. 21, No. 5, May pp. 427-430MontanaPaleovalley, Volcanics
DS1994-1565
1994
Sears, J.W.Sears, J.W., Jacob, J.P., Poage, M.A., Sims, J.L., Skinner, L.L.Mid-continent rift analog for middle Proterozoic belt basinGeological Society of America Abstracts, Vol. 26, No. 6, April p. 62. Abstract.GlobalTectonics, Midcontinent
DS2001-1046
2001
Sears, J.W.Sears, J.W.Emplacement and denudation history of the Lewis Eldorado Hoadley thrust slab in the northern Montana :American Journal of Science, Vol. 301, No. 4-5, pp.359-73.Montana, CordilleraSlab, Orogenic processes - steady state
DS2003-0690
2003
Sears, J.W.Karlstrom, K.E., Sears, J.W., Holm, D.K., Williams, M.L., Wooden, HatcherSouthern Laurentia in Rodinia: collaborative compilation of a tectonic map for IGCPGeological Society of America, Annual Meeting Nov. 2-5, Abstracts p.342.RodiniaTectonics
DS2003-1245
2003
Sears, J.W.Sears, J.W., Price, R.A.Tightening the Siberian connection to western LaurentiaGeological Society of America Bulletin, Vol. 115, 8, August pp. 943-53.Russia, Australia, CanadaCordillera, Rodinia, plate reconstruction, Proterozoic
DS200412-0954
2003
Sears, J.W.Karlstrom, K.E., Sears, J.W., Holm, D.K., Williams, M.L., Wooden, Hatcher, Finn, Price, Miller, BerquistSouthern Laurentia in Rodinia: collaborative compilation of a tectonic map for IGCP 440.Geological Society of America, Annual Meeting Nov. 2-5, Abstracts p.342.Gondwana, RodiniaTectonics
DS200412-1780
2003
Sears, J.W.Sears, J.W., Price, R.A.Tightening the Siberian connection to western Laurentia.Geological Society of America Bulletin, Vol. 115, 8, August pp. 943-53.Russia, Australia, CanadaCordillera, Rodinia, plate reconstruction, Proterozoic
DS200512-0957
2005
Sears, J.W.Sears, J.W., St.George, G.M., Winne, J.C.Continental rift systems and anorogenic magmatism.Lithos, Vol. 80, 1-4, March pp. 147-154.Rift, Gondwana, Laurentia, plume
DS200712-0963
2007
Sears, J.W.Sears, J.W.Lithospheric control of Gondwana breakup: implications of a trans-Gondwana icosahedral fracture system.Plates, plumes and Planetary Processes, pp. 593-602.MantleGondwana
DS201212-0630
2012
Sears, J.W.Sears, J.W.Transforming Siberia along the Laurussian margin.Geology, Vol. 40, 6, pp. 535-538.RussiaCraton
DS1993-1364
1993
Sears, S.Sage, R., Morris, T., Sears, S.MNDM ( Ontario Geological Survey) announces the possibility of Diamond bearing kimberlite in the Wawa area.Ontario Geological Survey News release, No. 182, December 14, 2p.OntarioNews item, Dead River, indicator minerals
DS2002-1438
2002
Searsm J.W.Searsm J.W., Price, R.A.Break up and dispersal of the Early Neoproterozoic Siberia - Laurentia Australia troika.Geological Society of America Annual Meeting Oct. 27-30, Abstract p. 559.Australia, Russia, Canada, OntarioTectonics, Gondwana
DS1989-0962
1989
Seasor, R.O.Mauk, J.J., Seasor, R.O., Kelly, W.C., Van der Plum, B.A.The relationship between structure and second stage copper mineralization in the White Pine district of the Midcontinent Rift, northern MichiganGeological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting Abstracts, Vol. 21, No. 6, p. A130. AbstractMichiganMidcontinent, Tectonics
DS201012-0846
2010
Seaton, N.C.A.Whitney, D.L., Seaton, N.C.A.Garnet polycrystals and the significance of clustered crystallization.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 160, 4, pp. 591-607.TechnologyMineralogy - not specific to diamonds
DS1860-1055
1899
Seattle Washington IntelligenceSeattle Washington IntelligenceDiamonds Formed in Ancient Rock "blue Ground" Evidently Not the Birth place of the Gem.Seattle Washington Intelligence., Oct. 15TH.GlobalDiamond Genesis
DS1860-0857
1894
Seaver, F.I.C.Seaver, F.I.C.Diamonds and Gold; Anglo-saxon Supremacy in South Africa. 1814-1894.New Science Review., JULY P. 11.Africa, South AfricaPolitics, History
DS1993-1408
1993
Sebagenzi, M.N.Sebagenzi, M.N., Vasseur, G., Louis, P.First heat flow density determinations from south eastern Zaire, CentralAfricaJournal of African Earth Studies, Vol. 16, No. 4, pp. 413-424Democratic Republic of CongoHeat flow
DS1993-1409
1993
Sebagenzi, M.N.Sebagenzi, M.N., Vasseur, G., Louis, P.First heat flow density determinations from southeastern Zaire (CentralAfrica).Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 16, No. 4, May, pp. 413-424.Democratic Republic of CongoMantle, Pan-African belt, Heat flow
DS201112-0489
2011
Sebagenzi, S.N.Kadima, E., Delvaux, D., Sebagenzi, S.N., Tack, L., Kabeya, S.M.Structure and geological history of the Congo basin: an integrated interpretation of gravity, magnetic and reflection seismic data.Basin Research, in press availableAfricaGeophysics - seismics
DS201112-0490
2011
Sebagenzi, S.N.Kadima, E., Delvaux, D., Sebagenzi, S.N., Tack, L., Kaybeya, S.M.Structure and geological history of the Congo basin: an integrated interpretation of gravity, magnetic and reflection seismic data.Basin Research, Vol. 23, 5, Oct. pp. 499-527.Africa, Democratic Republic of CongoGeophysics - seismics
DS200612-1256
2006
Sebai, A.Sebai, A., Stutzmann, E., Montagner, J-P., Sicilia, D., Beucler, E.Anistropic structure of the African upper mantle from Rayleigh and Love wave tomography.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 155, 1-2, pp. 48-62.Mantle, AfricaGeodynamics, cratons, West Africa, Congo, Kalahari
DS1990-1035
1990
Sebald, A.Merwin, L., Rothlisberger, F., Sebald, A., Seifert, F.A combined 29SI HR MAS NMR 57Fe Mossbauer and X-ray diffraction study Of the modulated structure in melilitesTerra, Abstracts of Experimental mineralogy, petrology and, Vol. 2, December abstracts p. 89GlobalMelilites, X-ray diffraction
DS1985-0596
1985
Sebba, F.Sebba, F., Sugarman, N.Did Burton Synthesize Diamonds in 1905Nature., Vol. 316, No. 6025, JULY 18TH. P. 220.GlobalSynthetic Diamonds
DS202012-2246
2020
Sebele, M.Rogov, Y., Kremenets, V., Sapozhnikov, M., Sebele, M.Application of tagged neutron method for detecting diamonds in kimberlite.Instruments, Vol. 4, 4, doi.org/103390/ instruments4040033Globalneutron technology

Abstract: The results of testing a prototype of a separator for detecting diamonds in kimberlite ore using tagged neutron method are discussed. Kimberlite ore was irradiated with fast tagged neutrons with an energy of 14.1 MeV. The elemental content of the tray with kimberlite ore was determined. The criterion for detecting diamond was the presence of excess carbon concentration in a certain region of a kimberlite sample.
DS1993-1410
1993
Seber, D.Seber, D., Barazangi, M., Chamov, T.A., Al-Saad, D., Sawaf, T., Khaddour, M.Upper crustal velocity structure and basement morphology beneath theGeophysical Journal International, Vol. 113, pp. 752-766.SyriaGeophysics -seismics, Tectonics
DS200412-0020
2004
Seber, D.Al-Lazki, A.I., Sandvol, E., Seber, D., Barazangi, M., Turkelli, N., Mohamad, R.Pn tomographic imaging of mantle lid velocity and anisotropy at the junction of the Arabian, Eurasian and African plates.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 158, 3, pp. 1024-1040.AfricaGeophysics - seismics, tomography
DS200712-0993
2006
Seber, D.Sinha, A.K., Lin, K., Hana, B.B., Shirey, S.B., Shervais, J.W., Seber, D.Informatics based discovery and integration of dat a towards understanding the fate of paleo-lithospheres for eastern North America.Geological Society of America Annual Meeting, Vol. 38, 7, Nov. p. 448. abstractUnited States, AppalachiaSCLM
DS1997-1014
1997
Seber. D.Seber. D., Vallve, M., et al.Middle East Tectonics: applications of geographic information systems(GIS)Gsa Today, Vol. 7, No. 2, Feb. pp. 1-7GlobalTectonics, Computers - GIS
DS1982-0553
1982
Seborowski, .D.Seborowski, .D.The composition and origin of the Beemerville carbonatite, Sussex New JerseyMsc. Thesis Rutgers, The State University, Newark, N.j., 58pGlobalCarbonatite, Petrology
DS1988-0619
1988
Sebrier, M.Sebrier, M., Lavenu, A., Fornari, SoulasTectonics and uplift in Central Andes from Eocene to presentGeodynamique, Eng., Vol. 3, No. 1-2, pp. 85-106.Peru, Bolivia, ChileTectonics
DS1996-0412
1996
Sebrier, M.Ego, F., Sebrier, M., Beate, B.Do the Billecocha normal faults reveal extension due to lithospheric body forces in the northern AndesTectonophysics, Vol. 265, No. 3/4, Nov. 30, pp. 255-274EcuadorTectonics, Faults
DS200612-1257
2006
Sebrier, M.Sebrier, M., Siame, L., Zouine, E.M., Winter, T., Missenard, Y., Leturmy, P.Active tectonics in the Moroccan High Atlas.Comptes Rendus Geoscience, Vol. 338, 1-2, pp. 65-79.Africa, MoroccoTectonics
DS200912-0680
2009
Sebti, S.Sebti, S., Saddiqi, O., El Haimer, F.Z., Michard, A., Ruiz, G., Bousquet, R., Baidder, L., Frizonde Lamotte, D.Vertical movements at the fringe of the West African Craton: first zircon fission track datings from the Anti Atlas Precambrian basement, Morocco.Comptes Rendus Geoscience, Vol. 341, no. 1, pp. 71-77.Africa, MoroccoTectonics
DS1986-0160
1986
SeccoCundari, J.B., Dal Negro, A., Piccirillo, E.M., Della Gusta, A., SeccoIntracrystalline relationships in olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxeneContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 94, No. 4, pp. 523-532AustraliaXenoliths, Mineralogy
DS1985-0546
1985
Secco, L.Princivalle, F., Secco, L.Crystal Structure Refinement of 13 Olivines in the Forsterite-fayalite Series from Volcanic Rocks and Ultramafic Nodules.Tschermaks Mineralogische und Petrographische Mitteilungen MITTEILUNGEN., Vol. 34, No. 2, PP. 105-116.GlobalMineralogy
DS1988-0620
1988
Secco, L.Secco, L.Crystal chemistry of high pressure clinopyroxene fromspinel lherzolitenodules: Mts. Leura and Noorat suites, Victoria, AustraliaMineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 39, pp. 175-185AustraliaChemistry, analyses, Mt. Leura, Noorat
DS1999-0645
1999
Secco, L.Secco, L., Lavina, B.Crystal chemistry of natural magmatic norsethites, Ba Mg Co3 2 from magnesium carbonatite of alkaline carbonatitic .Neues Jahrbuch Mineralogische Abhandlung, No. 2, pp. 87-96.BrazilCarbonatite, Tapira Complex
DS200912-0534
2009
Secco, L.Nestola, F., Smyth, J.R., Parisatto, M., Secco, L., Princivalle, F., Bruno, M., Prencipe, M., Dal Negro, A.Effects of non-stochiometry on the spinel structure at high pressure: implications for Earth's mantle mineralogy.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 73, 2, pp. 489-492.MantleUHP
DS201905-1062
2019
Secco, L.Nestola, F., Jacob, D.E., Pamato, M.G., Pasqualatto, L., Oliveira, B., Greene, S., Perritt, S., Chinn, I., Milani, S., Kueter, N., Sgreva, N., Nimis, P., Secco, L., Harris, J.W.Protogenetic garnet inclusions and the age of diamonds.Geology, doi.10.1130/G45781.1Mantlediamond inclusions

Abstract: Diamonds are the deepest accessible “fragments” of Earth, providing records of deep geological processes. Absolute ages for diamond formation are crucial to place these records in the correct time context. Diamond ages are typically determined by dating inclusions, assuming that they were formed simultaneously with their hosts. One of the most widely used mineral inclusions for dating diamond is garnet, which is amenable to Sm-Nd geochronology and is common in lithospheric diamonds. By investigating worldwide garnet-bearing diamonds, we provide crystallographic evidence that garnet inclusions that were previously considered to be syngenetic may instead be protogenetic, i.e., they were formed before the host diamond, raising doubts about the real significance of many reported diamond “ages.” Diffusion modeling at relevant pressures and temperatures, however, demonstrates that isotopic resetting would generally occur over geologically short time scales. Therefore, despite protogenicity, the majority of garnet-based ages should effectively correspond to the time of diamond formation. On the other hand, our results indicate that use of large garnet inclusions (e.g., >100 µm) and diamond hosts formed at temperatures lower than ~1000 °C is not recommended for diamond age determinations.
DS201910-2288
2019
Secco, L.Nestola, F., Zaffiro, G., Mazzucchelli, M.L., Nimis, P., Andreozzi, G.B., Periotto, B., Princivalle, F., Lenaz, D., Secco, L., Pasqualetto, L., Logvinova, A.M., Sobolev, N.V., Lorenzetti, A., Harris, J.W.Diamond inclusion system recording old deep lithosphere conditions at Udachnaya ( Siberia).Nature Research, Vol. 9, 12586 8p. PdfRussia, Siberiadeposit - Udachnaya

Abstract: Diamonds and their inclusions are unique fragments of deep Earth, which provide rare samples from inaccessible portions of our planet. Inclusion-free diamonds cannot provide information on depth of formation, which could be crucial to understand how the carbon cycle operated in the past. Inclusions in diamonds, which remain uncorrupted over geological times, may instead provide direct records of deep Earth’s evolution. Here, we applied elastic geothermobarometry to a diamond-magnesiochromite (mchr) host-inclusion pair from the Udachnaya kimberlite (Siberia, Russia), one of the most important sources of natural diamonds. By combining X-ray diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy data with a new elastic model, we obtained entrapment conditions, Ptrap?=?6.5(2) GPa and Ttrap?=?1125(32)-1140(33) °C, for the mchr inclusion. These conditions fall on a ca. 35?mW/m2 geotherm and are colder than the great majority of mantle xenoliths from similar depth in the same kimberlite. Our results indicate that cold cratonic conditions persisted for billions of years to at least 200?km in the local lithosphere. The composition of the mchr also indicates that at this depth the lithosphere was, at least locally, ultra-depleted at the time of diamond formation, as opposed to the melt-metasomatized, enriched composition of most xenoliths.
DS202009-1663
2020
Secco, L.Smith, E.M., Nestola, F., Pasqualetto, L., Zorzi, F., Secco, L., Wang, W.The new mineral crowningshieldite: a high temperature NiS polymorph found in a type IIa diamond from the Letseng mine, Lesotho.The American Mineralogist, in press available, 33p. PdfAfrica, Lesothodeposit - Letseng
DS202103-0409
2021
Secco, L.Smith, E.M., Nestola, F., Paqualetto, L., Zorzi, F., Secco, L., Wang, W.The new mineral crowningshieldite: a high temperature NiS polymorph found in a type IIa diamond from the Letseng mine, Lesotho.American Mineralogist, Vol. 106, pp. 301-308. pdfAfrica, Lesothodeposit - Letseng

Abstract: Crowningshieldite is the natural analog of the synthetic compound a-NiS. It has a NiAs-type structure and is the high-temperature polymorph relative to millerite (ß-NiS), with an inversion temperature of 379 °C. Crowningshieldite is hexagonal, space group P63/mmc, with a = 3.44(1) Å, c = 5.36(1) Å, V = 55.0(2) Å3, and Z = 2. It has an empirical formula (Ni0.90Fe0.10)S and dcalc = 5.47(1) g/cm3. The five strongest lines in the powder X-ray diffraction data are [dmeas in angstroms (I) (hkl)]: 1.992 (100) (102), 1.718 (55) (110), 2.978 (53) (100), 2.608 (35) (101), and 1.304 (17) (202). Crowningshieldite was found as part of a multiphase inclusion in a gem-quality, colorless, type IIa (containing less than ~5 ppm N) diamond from the Letseng mine, Lesotho. The inclusion contains crowningshieldite along with magnetite-magnesioferrite, hematite, and graphite. A fracture was observed that extended from the inclusion to the diamond exterior, meaning that fluids, possibly kimberlite-related, could have penetrated into this fracture and altered the inclusion. Originally, the inclusion might have been a more reduced, metallic Fe-Ni-C-S mixture made up of cohenite, Fe-Ni alloy, and pyrrhotite, akin to the other fracture-free, pristine inclusions within the same diamond. Such metallic Fe-Ni-C-S primary inclusions are a notable recurring feature of similar type IIa diamonds from Letseng and elsewhere that have been shown to originate from the sublithospheric mantle. The discovery of crowningshieldite confirms that the a-NiS polymorph occurs in nature. In this case, the reason for its preservation is unclear, but the relatively iron-rich composition [Fe/(Fe+Ni) = 0.1] or the confining pressure of the diamond host are potential factors impeding its transformation to millerite. The new mineral name honors G. Robert Crowningshield (1919-2006) (IMA2018-072).
DS1991-1536
1991
Secco, R.A.Secco, R.A., Manghnani, M.H., Teleching LiuVelocities and compressibilities of komatiitic meltsGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 18, No. 8, August pp. 1397-1400GlobalKomatiite, Experimental petrology
DS2001-1047
2001
Secco, R.A.Secco, R.A., Balog, P.S.On the possibility of anisotropic heat flow in the inner coreCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 38, No. 6, June pp. 975-82.MantleGeothermometry
DS201912-2836
2019
Secco, R.A.Yong, W., Secco, R.A., Littleton, J.A.H., Silber, R.A., Reynaold, E.The iron invariance: implications for thermal convection in Earth's core.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 46, 20, pp. 11065-110670.Mantlegeothermometry

Abstract: Earth's magnetic field is produced by a dynamo in the core that requires motion of the fluid Fe alloy. Both thermal convection, arising from the transport of heat in excess of conducted heat, and compositional convection, arising from light element exsolution at the freezing inner core boundary, are suggested as energy sources. The contribution of thermal convection (possibly ranging from nothing to significant) depends on thermal conductivity of the outer core. Our experimental measurements of electrical resistivity of solid and liquid Fe at high pressures show that resistivity is constant along the pressure-dependent melting boundary of Fe. Using our derived thermal conductivity value at the inner core (freezing) boundary, we calculate the heat conducted in the liquid outer core and find that thermal convection is needed to carry additional heat through the outer core to match the heat extracted through the core-mantle boundary.
DS1980-0301
1980
Secher, K.Secher, K., Larsen, L.M.Geology and Mineralogy of the Sarfartoq Carbonatite Complex southern West Greenland.Lithos, Vol. 13, PP. 199-212.GreenlandRelated Rocks
DS1982-0554
1982
Secher, K.Secher, K., Thorning, L.Detailed ground magnetic survey in the central part of the Sarfartoq carbonatite complex, southern West GreenlandGeological Survey Greenland Report of Activities, Vol. 110, pp. 32-38GreenlandCarbonatite, Geophysics
DS1983-0388
1983
Secher, K.Larsen, L.M., Rex, D.C., Secher, K.The Age of Carbonatites, Kimberlites and Lamprophyres from Southern West Greenland: Recurrent Alkaline Magmatism During2500 Million Years.Lithos, Vol. 16, No. 3, PP. 215-221.GreenlandGeochronology, Related Rocks, Ivigtut, Fiskenaesset
DS1985-0374
1985
Secher, K.Kunzendorf, H., Secher, K.Dispersion of Niobium and Phosphorus in Soil Overlying the Qaqarssuk Carbonatite Complex, Southwestern Greenland.11th. International Geochem. Symposium Held Toronto, April 28-may, ABSTRACT VOLUME, P. 67. (abstract.).GreenlandBlank
DS1989-1366
1989
Secher, K.Secher, K.Phosphate resources in the Sarfartoq carbonatite complex southern westGreenlandPhosphate deposits of the World, Vol. 2, pp. 87-89GreenlandCarbonatite, Sarfartoq
DS2002-0780
2002
Secher, K.Jensen, S.M., Hanson, H., Secher, K., Steenfelt, A., Schjoth, F., Rasmussen, T.M.Kimberlites and other ultramafic alkaline rocks in the Sismiut-Kangerfussuaq region, southwest Greenland.Geology of Greenland Survey Bulletin, No. 191, pp. 57-66.GreenlandDistribution and magnetic signatures of dykes
DS2003-0653
2003
Secher, K.Jensen, S.M., Lind, M., Rasmussen, T.M., Schjoth, F., Secher, K.Greenland exploration dat a on DVD - the guide to future kimberlite targets in theDanmarks og Gronlands Geologiske Undersagelse Rapport, 2003/21, 50p. plus 1 DVD $100.US www.geus.dkGreenlandMineral analyses, samples, drill logs
DS2003-0654
2003
Secher, K.Jensen, S.M., Lind, M., Rasmussen, T.M., Schjoth, F., Secher, K.Diamond exploration dat a from West GreenlandDanmarks OG Gronlands Geologiske Undersogelse, Rapport 2003-21, 50p.GreenlandBlank
DS2003-0655
2003
Secher, K.Jensen, S.M., Secher, K., Rasmussen, T.M., Tukiainen, T., Krebs, J.D., Schifth, F.Distribution and magnetic signatures of kimberlitic rocks in the Sarfartoq region8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 8, POSTER abstractGreenlandBlank
DS200412-0912
2003
Secher, K.Jensen, S.M., Lind, M., Rasmussen, T.M., Schjoth, F., Secher, K.Greenland exploration dat a on DVD - the guide to future kimberlite targets in the compilation Diamond Exploration dat a from WestDanmarks OG Gronlands Geologiske Undersogelse, 2003/21, 50p. plus 1 DVD $100.US www.geus.dkEurope, GreenlandMaps, tables, data from assessment reports, GIS, Pdf Mineral analyses, samples, drill logs
DS200412-0913
2003
Secher, K.Jensen, S.M., Lind, M., Rasmussen, T.M., Schjoth, F., Secher, K.Diamond exploration dat a from West Greenland.Danmarks OG Gronlands Geologiske Undersogelse, Rapport 2003-21, 50p.Europe, GreenlandOverview of available company data, analyses
DS200412-0914
2003
Secher, K.Jensen, S.M., Secher, K., Rasmussen, T.M., Tukiainen, T., Krebs, J.D., Schifth, F.Distribution and magnetic signatures of kimberlitic rocks in the Sarfartoq region, southern West Greenland.8 IKC Program, Session 8, POSTER abstractEurope, GreenlandDiamond exploration
DS200712-1036
2007
Secher, K.Steenfelt, A., Neilsen, T.D.F., Sand, K.K., Secher, K.,Tappe, S.Kimberlites, ultramafic lamprophyres and carbonatites in west Greenland - an update on occurrences, ages and diamonds.Geological Association of Canada, Gac-Mac Yellowknife 2007, May 23-25, Volume 32, 1 pg. abstract p.79.Europe, GreenlandGeochronology
DS200812-0796
2008
Secher, K.Nielsen, T.F.D., Jensen, S.M., Secher, K., Sand, K.K.Regional and temporal variations in the magmatism of the diamond province of southern west Greenland.9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractEurope, GreenlandDykes - Sisimiut, Sarfartoq
DS200812-0999
2007
Secher, K.Sand, K.K., Nielsen, T.F.D., Secher, K., Steenfelt, A.Kimberlite and carbonatite exploration in southern West Greenland: summary of previous activities and recent work by the kimberlite research group at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland.Vladykin Volume 2007, pp. 127-140.Europe, Denmark, GreenlandExploration activity
DS200912-0535
2009
Secher, K.Nielsen, T.F.D., Jensen, S.M., Secher, K., Sand, K.K.Distribution of kimberlite and aillikite in the diamond province of southern West Greenland: a regional perspective based on groundmass mineral chemistry and bulk compositions.Lithos, In press - available 45p.Europe, GreenlandGeochemistry
DS200912-0681
2009
Secher, K.Secher, K., Heaman, L.M., Nielsen, T.F.D., Jensen, S.M., Schjeth, F., Creaser, R.A.Timing of kimberlite, carbonatite and ultramafic lamprophyric emplacement in the alkaline province located at 64 - 67 N in southern West Greenland.Lithos, In press available, 21p.Europe, GreenlandGeochronology
DS200912-0733
2009
Secher, K.Steenfelt, A., Jensen, S.M., Nielsen, T.F.D., Sand, K.K., Secher, K.Diamonds and lithospheric mantle properties in the neo-proterzoic igneous province of southern West Greenland. ( Garnet Lake area).Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Bulletin 17, pp. 65-68.Europe, GreenlandDiamond exploration - brief overview
DS1986-0810
1986
Sechos, B.Toombs, G.A., Sechos, B.Examination of the surface features of Argyle diamonds, from WesternAustraliaAustralian Gemologist, Vol. 16, No. 2, pp. 41-44AustraliaCrystallography, Morphology
DS1994-0322
1994
Sechos, B.Coenraads, R.R., Webb, G., Sechos, B.Alluvial diamond deposits of the Guaniamo region, Bolivar State, Venezuela.Australian Gemologist, Vol. 18, No. 9, February pp. 287-293.VenezuelaAlluvials, placers, Deposit -Guaniamo
DS1994-1566
1994
Sechos, B.Sechos, B.Fracture filled diamondsThe Australian Gemologist, Vol. 18, No. 12, Nov. pp. 379-385.GlobalDiamond morphology, Diamonds -fracture filled
DS1987-0800
1987
Seck, H.A.Witt, G., Seck, H.A.Temperature history of sheared mantle xenoliths from the WestEifel, WestGermany: evidence for mantle diapirism beneath the Rhenish massifJournal of Petrology, Vol. 28, No.3, June pp. 475-494GermanyXenoliths, Mantle diapirisM.
DS2003-1492
2003
Seck, H.A.Witt Eickschen, G., Seck, H.A., Mezger, K., Eggins, S.M., Altherr, R.Lithospheric mantle evolution beneath the Eifel ( Germany): constraints from Sr Nd PbJournal of Petrology, Vol. 44, 6, pp. 1077-96.GermanyMineral chemistry
DS2003-1493
2003
Seck, H.A.Witt Erickschen, G., Klemd, R., Seck, H.A.Density contrast of fluid inclusions associated with melt ( glass) from two distinct suitesEuropean Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 15, 1, pp. 95-102.GermanyMantle peridotites - melt
DS200412-2138
2003
Seck, H.A.Witt Eickschen, G., Seck, H.A., Mezger, K., Eggins, S.M., Altherr, R.Lithospheric mantle evolution beneath the Eifel ( Germany): constraints from Sr Nd Pb isotopes and trace element abundances in sJournal of Petrology, Vol. 44, 6, pp. 1077-96.Europe, GermanyGeochronology Mineral chemistry
DS1990-1288
1990
Secor, D.T.Jr.Sacks, P.E., Secor, D.T.Jr.Kinematics of Late Paleozoic continental collision between Laurentia andGondwanaScience, Vol. 250, December 21, pp. 1702-1705Appalachia, MidcontinentTectonics, Orogeny
DS1996-1273
1996
Seddon, G.Seddon, G.Thinking like a geologist: the culture of geology( Mawson lecture1996)Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 43, pp. 487-495GlobalGeology - philosophy, Typology
DS1993-1411
1993
Sedlak, V.Sedlak, V.Magnetic induction applied to borehole deviation problemsGeotechnical and Geological Engineering, Vol. 11, No. 1, March pp. 25-36GlobalGeophysics -magnetics, Drillholes
DS200612-1429
2006
SedovaTitkov, S.V., Gorshkov, A.I., Solodova, Ryabchikov, Magazina, Sivtsov, Gasanov, Sedova, SamosorovMineral Micro inclusions in cubic diamonds from the Yakutian deposits based on analytical electron microscopy data.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 410, no. 7 July-August, pp. 1106-1108.Russia, YakutiaDiamond inclusions
DS200712-1014
2006
Sedova, E.A.Solodova, Y.P., Sedova, E.A., Samosorov, G.G., Kurbatov, K.K.Comparative investigation of diamonds from various pipes in the Malaya Botuobiya and Daldyn Alakit areas, Siberia.Gems & Gemology, 4th International Symposium abstracts, Fall 2006, p.141-2. abstract onlyRussiaDiamond morphology
DS200712-1084
2006
Sedova, E.A.Titkov, S.V., Solodova, Y.P., Gorshkov, A.I., Magaina, L.O., Sivtsov, A.V., Sedova, E.A., Gasanov, SamosorovInclusions in white gray diamonds of cubic habit from Siberia.Gems & Gemology, 4th International Symposium abstracts, Fall 2006, p.127-8. abstract onlyRussiaDiamond morphology
DS1989-0836
1989
Sedova, Ye.A.Kulakov, V.M., Plotnikova, S.P., Sedova, Ye.A.Optical and luminesence properties of unique Diamonds from the diamond fund of the USSR.(Russian)Mineral. Zhurnal., (Russian), Vol. 11, No. 5, pp. 73-80RussiaDiamond morphology, Luminescence
DS1988-0621
1988
Seeber, L.Seeber, L., Armbruster, J.G., Evans, K.Recent historic seismicity in northeastern Ohio: reactivation of Precambrian faults and the role of deep fluid injectionGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstract Volume, Vol. 20, No. 5, March p. 387. abstractGlobalBlank
DS1996-1274
1996
Seedhouse, J.K.Seedhouse, J.K., Donaldson, C.H.Compositional convection caused by olivine crystallization in a synthetic basalt melt.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 60, pp. 115-30.MantleMagma chambers
DS1991-1582
1991
Seeger, C.M.Sidder, G.B., Nuelle, L.M., Day, W.C., Rye, R.O., Seeger, C.M.Paragenesis and conditions of formation of the Pea Ridge iron and rareearth element deposit, MissouriGeological Society of America Annual Meeting Abstract Volume, Vol. 23, No. 5, San Diego, p. A 292MissouriRare earths, Midcontinent
DS1992-1401
1992
Seeger, C.M.Sidder, G.B., Day, W.C., Nuelle, L.M., Seeger, C.M., KisvarsanyiMineralogic and fluid inclusion studies of the Pea Ridge iron-rare earth-element deposit, southeast MissouriUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Bulletin, No. 2039, pp. 205-216MissouriRare earths, Olympic Dam type mineralization study
DS200712-0766
2007
Seegers, J.Mutagwaba, W., Seegers, J., Mwaipopo, R.Mining for a greater future at Mwadui.African Mining, Vol. 12, 1, Jan-Feb. pp. 48-52.Africa, TanzaniaDeposit - Mwadui
DS200812-0780
2007
Seegers, J.Mutagawaba, W., Seegers, J., Mwaipopo, R.Mining for a greater future at Mwadui.African Mining, Jan-Feb. pp. 48-52.Africa, TanzaniaNews item - Mwadui
DS2003-1228
2003
Seek, H.Schmidt, G., Witt Eiscksen, G., Palme, H., Seek, H., Spettel, B., Kratz, K.L.Highly siderophile elements ( PGE Re and Au) in mantle xenoliths from the west EiffelChemical Geology, Vol. 196, No. 1-4, pp. 77-105.GermanyXenoliths
DS200412-1757
2003
Seek, H.Schmidt, G., Witt Eiscksen, G., Palme, H., Seek, H., Spettel, B., Kratz, K.L.Highly siderophile elements ( PGE Re and Au) in mantle xenoliths from the west Eiffel volcanic field, Germany.Chemical Geology, Vol. 196, no. 1-4, pp. 77-105.Europe, GermanyXenoliths
DS200512-0061
2005
Seek, H.A.Ban, M., Witt-Eickschen, G., Klein, M., Seek, H.A.The origin of glasses in hydrous mantle xenoliths from the West Eifel, Germany: incongruent break down of amphibole.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 148, 5, p. 511-523.Europe, GermanyXenoliths
DS1991-1537
1991
Seeley, T.P.Seeley, T.P., Novak, G.A.stereo graphic projection of bedding attitudes using Microsoft ExcelComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 17, No. 7, pp. 1051-1058GlobalComputer, Program -Microsoft Excel
DS1995-1924
1995
Seet, L.H.Towie, N.J., Seet, L.H.Diamond laboratory techniquesJournal of Geochemical Exploration, Vol. 52, pp. 205-212.AustraliaDiamond exploration, Techniques -laboratory, sampling
DS200512-0958
2006
SEG ConferenceSEG ConferenceWealth Creation in the Minerals Industry.seg2006.org, May 14-16, Keystone Colorado USAUnited States, Colorado PlateauNews item - conference
DS1992-1357
1992
SEG NewsletterSEG NewsletterArkansaw diamond projectSeg Newsletter, No. 10 July p. 18ArkansasNews item, Crater of diamonds
DS1992-1358
1992
SEG NewsletterSEG NewsletterExploration overview - brief summary of diamond activities in NorthwestTerritoriesSeg Newsletter, No. 10 July p. 17Northwest TerritoriesNews item, Lac de Gras area
DS1993-1412
1993
SEG NewsletterSEG NewsletterMichigan - diamond exploration - briefSeg Newsletter, No. 12, January p. 17.MichiganNews item, Ashton, Crystal
DS1993-1413
1993
SEG NewsletterSEG NewsletterCanada- brief overview of diamond activitiesSeg Newsletter, No. 12, January p. 17.Northwest Territories, OntarioNews item, Exploration activities -brief
DS201808-1787
2018
SEG NewsletterSEG NewsletterSonic drilling ( brief mention of useage in Siberia on alluvial diamonds.SEG Newsletter, No. 114, July, p. 10-11.Russia, Siberiaalluvials
DS1997-1015
1997
Segal, N.Segal, N.Mining in Africa - a South African perspectiveMiga Conference Held June 3-5, Denver, 10pSouth AfricaEconomics, Mining overview
DS1997-0077
1997
Segal, S.J.Barbieri, M., Ghiara, M.R., Segal, S.J.Trace element and isotope constraints on the origin of ultramafic lamprophyres from Los Alisos.Journal of South American Earth Science, Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 39-48.ArgentinaGeochronology, Lamprophyres
DS200812-0963
2008
Segali, P.Rivalta, E., Segali, P.Magma compressability and the missing source for some dike intrusions.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 35, 4, pp. L04306.MantleMagmatism
DS1993-0873
1993
Segall, B.Lambrecht, W.R., Lee, C.H., Segall, B., Angus, J.C., Sunkara, M.Diamond nucleation by hydrogenation of the edges of graphitic precursorsNature, Vol. 364, August 12, pp. 607-610.GlobalDiamond morphology
DS1993-0874
1993
Segall, B.Lambrect, W.R.L., Lee, C.H., Segall, B., Angus, J.C., Li, Z.Diamond nucleation by hydrogenation of the edges of graphitic precursorsNature, Vol. 364, No. 6438, August 12, pp. 607-610GlobalDiamond morphology, Graphite
DS1997-1016
1997
Segall, P.Segall, P., Davis, J.L.GPS applications for geodynamics and earthquake studiesAnnual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 25, pp. 301-336GlobalGlobal Positioning System, geodesy, coseismic, Tectonics, plate boundaries, glacial isostatic
DS1999-0357
1999
Segall, P.Kenner, S., Segall, P.Time dependence of the stress shadowing effect and its relation to the structure of the lower crust.Geology, Vol. 27, No. 2, Feb. pp. 119-22.Mantle, CaliforniaRheology, Shear-zone model
DS1989-0028
1989
Segalstad, T.V.Anthony, E.Y., Segalstad, T.V., Neumann, E.R.An unusual mantle source region for nephelinites from the Oslo Rift, NorwayGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 53, pp. 1067-1076NorwayNephelinite, Basanites, Analyses
DS2003-0673
2003
Segawa, J.Joseph, E.J., Segawa, J., Kusumoto, S., Nakayama, E., Ishihara, T., KomazawaAirborne gravimetry - a new gravimeter system and test resultsExploration Geophysics, Vol. 34, 1-2, pp. 82-86.GlobalGeophysics - gravimetry not specific to diamonds
DS200412-0932
2003
Segawa, J.Joseph, E.J., Segawa, J., Kusumoto, S., Nakayama, E., Ishihara, T., Komazawa, M., Sakuma, S.Airborne gravimetry - a new gravimeter system and test results.Exploration Geophysics, Vol. 34, 1-2, pp. 82-86.TechnologyGeophysics - gravimetry not specific to diamonds
DS1991-1872
1991
Segel, M.Wilkinson, D., Segel, M.Production and exploration are stepping up... Australian sceneRegister of Australian Mining, 1990/91, pp. 295-297AustraliaOverview -brief, Exploration/mining activities
DS1991-1873
1991
Segel, M.Wilkinson, D., Segel, M.A big turnaround to end the decade... international sceneRegister of Australian Mining, 1990/91, pp. 298-310Australia, GlobalExploration activities, Overview
DS1985-0303
1985
Segero, A.S.Ito, M., Segero, A.S., Winani, P.Kimberlites and Kimberlite Prospecting in Western KenyaGeological Survey of Kenya, in: Geology for the development of Kenya, Publishing No., pp. 49-57KenyaProspecting
DS2000-0877
2000
Segev, A.Segev, A.Synchronous magmatic cycles during the fragmentation of Gondwana: radiometric ages from the Levant (provinces)Tectonophysics, Vol. 235, No.3-4, Oct. 30, pp. 257-Australia, GondwanaGeochronology, Magmatism
DS201505-0243
2015
Segev, A.Katzir, Y., Anenburg, M., Kaminchik, J., Segev, A., Blichert-Toft, J., Spicuzza, M.J., Valley, J.W.Garnet pyroxenites as markers of recurring extension and magmatism at the rifted margins of the Levant basin.Israel Geological Society, Abstracts 1p.Europe, Israel, Mt. CarmelPyroxenite
DS1999-0725
1999
SeggieTainton, K.M., Seggie, Bayly, Tomlinson, QuadlingGarnet therombarometry: implications for mantle heat flow within the Tanzanian Craton.7th International Kimberlite Conference Nixon, Vol. 2, pp. 852-60.TanzaniaCraton mineral chemistry, Deposit - Mwadui, Kisumbi, Negezi, Mhunse, Nzega
DS1998-1440
1998
Seggie, A.Tainton, K., Seggie, A., Bayly, B., Tomlinson, QuadlingRegional variation in mantle heat flow within the Tanzanian Craton7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 880-2.TanzaniaGeotherm - garnets, Deposit - Mwadui
DS1995-0025
1995
Seggie, A.G.Allsopp, H.L., Smith, C.B., Seggie, A.G.The emplacement age and geochemical character of the Venetia kimberlitebodies, Limpopo Belt, n Transvaal.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 98, No. 3, Sept. pp. 239-244.South AfricaGeochemistry, geochronology, Deposit -Venetia
DS1998-1309
1998
Seggie, A.G.Seggie, A.G., Hannweg, G.W., Colgan, E.A., Smith, C.B.Geology and geochemistry of the Venetia kimberlite cluster, northernProvince, South Africa.7th. Kimberlite Conference abstract, pp. 775-7.South AfricaGeology, petrography, mineral chemistry, Deposit - Venetia cluster
DS1999-0646
1999
Seggie, A.G.Seggie, A.G., Hannweg, G.W., Colgan, E.A., Smith, C.B.The geology and geochemistry of the Venetia kimberlite cluster: northern province South Africa.7th International Kimberlite Conference Nixon, Vol. 2, pp. 750-56.South Africa, ZimbabweGeology, geochemistry, mineral analyses, Group I, Deposit - Venetia, River Ranch
DS200712-0840
2006
Seghedi, A.Pharaoh, T.C., Winchester, J.A., Verniers, J., Lassen, A., Seghedi, A.The Western accretionary margin of the East European Craton: an overview.Geological Society of London Memoir, No. 32, pp. 291-312.Russia, Europe, UralsCraton
DS2001-1048
2001
Seghedi, I.Seghedi, I., Downes, H., Pecskay, Thirlwall, Szakacsmagma genesis in a subduction related post collisional volcanic arc segment: the Ukrainian Carpathians.Lithos, Vol. 57, No. 4, July, pp. 237-62.UKraineAlkaline magmatism, Subduction - not specific to diamonds
DS200612-1258
2006
Seghedi, I.Seghedi, I., Ntaflos, T.The role of fluorine in the genesis of Gataia lamproite, Romania.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 16. abstract only.Europe, RomaniaLamproite
DS200612-1259
2006
Seghedi, I.Seghedi, I., Szakacs, A., Pachero, A.H., Matesanz, J-L.B.Miocene lamproite volcanoes in south eastern Spain - an association of phreatomagmatic and magmatic products.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, In press, availableEurope, SpainLamproite
DS200812-0903
2008
Seghedi, I.Podolsky, M.H., Seller, M.H., Kryvoshlyk, I.N., Seghedi, I., Maicher, D.Whole rock geochemistry investigations of the 5034 and Tuzo kimberlites and potential applications to improving geology and resource models, Gahcho Kue project, NWTNorthwest Territories Geoscience Office, p. 72. abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Gahcho Kue
DS200812-1033
2008
Seghedi, I.Seghedi, I., Ntaflos, T., Pecskay, Z.The Gataia Pleistocene lamproite: a new occurrence at the southeastern edge of the Pannonian Basin, Romania.Geological Society of London, Special Publications no. 293, pp.83-100.Europe, RomaniaLamproite
DS200912-0682
2009
Seghedi, I.Seghedi, I., Kurzlaukis, S., Maicher, D.Basaltic diatreme to root zone volcanic processes in Tuzo kimberlite pipe (Gahcho Kue kimberlite field, NWT, Canada).GAC/MAC/AGU Meeting held May 23-27 Toronto, Abstract onlyCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Tuzo
DS200912-0683
2009
Seghedi, I.Seghedi, I., Kurzlaukis, T., Ntaflos, S., Maicher, D.Mineralogy of digested wall rock xenoliths in transitional coherent kimberlites of Tuzo pipe, Gahcho Kue kimberlite field, NWT, Canada.Goldschmidt Conference 2009, p. A1190 Abstract.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Gacho Kue
DS200912-0684
2009
Seghedi, I.Seghedi, I., Maicher, D., Kurslaukis, S.Volcanology of Tuzo pipe ( Gahcho Kue cluster) root diatreme processes re-interpreted.Lithos, In press available 37p.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Gahcho Kue
DS201012-0333
2010
Seghedi, I.Kaldos, R., Seghedi, I., Szabo, Cs.Silicate melt and fluid inclusions in olivine phenocryst from the Gataia lamproite ( Banat, Romania).International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 199.Europe, RomaniaLamproite
DS200712-0084
2006
Sego, D.Blowes, D.,Moncur, M., Smith, L., Sego, D., Klassen, Neuner, Gravie, Gould, ReinsonMining in the continuous permafrost: construction and instrumentation of two large scale waste rock piles.34th Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 6. abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - Diavik
DS200812-0763
2008
Sego, D.Moore, M.L., Blowes, D.W., Ptacek, C.J., Gould, W.D., Smith, L.,Sego, D.Humidity cell analysis of waste rock from the Diavik diamond mine NWT, Canada.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A647.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS200812-1085
2008
Sego, D.Smith, L., Neuner, M., Gupton, M., Bailey, B.L., Blowes, D., Smith, L., Sego, D.Diavik test piles project: design and construction of large scale research waste rock piles in the Canadian Arctic.Northwest Territories Geoscience Office, p. 57-58. abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS201709-2072
2017
Sego, D.Wilson, D., Amos, R., Blowes, D., Langman, J., Smith, L., Sego, D.Diavik waste rock project: scale up of a reactive transport conceptual model for temperature and sulfide dependent geochemical evolution.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Canada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit, Diavik
DS200812-0073
2008
Sego, D.C.Bailey, B.L., Smith, L., Neuner, M., Gupton, M., Blowes, D.W., Smith, L., Sego, D.C., Gould, D.Diavik waste rock project: early stage geochemistry and microbiology of effluent from low sulfide content waste rock piles.Northwest Territories Geoscience Office, p. 11-12. abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS200812-1034
2008
Sego, D.C.Sego,D.C., Pham, N., Blowes, D., Smith, L.Heat transfer in waste rock piles at Diavik diamond mine.Northwest Territories Geoscience Office, p. 55. abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS201012-0031
2010
Sego, D.C.Bailey, B.L., Smith, L.J.D., Blowes, D.W., Ptacek, C.J., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.Diavik waste rock project: blasting residuals in waste rock piles.38th. Geoscience Forum Northwest Territories, Abstract p. 30.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDiavik
DS201112-0409
2011
Sego, D.C.Hannam, S., Bailey, B.L., Lindsay, M.B.J., Gibson, B., Blowes, D.W., Paktunc, A.D., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.Diavik waste rock project: geochemical and mineralogical characterization of waste rock weathering at the Diavik diamond mine.Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts for 2011, abstract p. 43-44.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - waste rock
DS201212-0046
2012
Sego, D.C.Bailey, B.L., Smith, L.J.D., Blowes, D.W.,Ptacek, C.J., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.The Diavik waste rock project: persistence of contaminants from blasting agents in waste rock effluent.Applied Geochemistry, in press availableCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik mining
DS201312-0157
2012
Sego, D.C.Chi, X., Amos, R.T., Stastna, M., Blowes, D.W., Sego, D.C., Smith, L.The Diavik waste rock project: implications of wind-induced gas transport.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 246-255.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik, environmental
DS201312-0644
2013
Sego, D.C.Neuner, M., Smith, L., Blowes, D.W., Sego, D.C., Smith, L.J.D., Fretz, N., Gupton, M.The Diavik waste rock project: water flow through mine waste rock in a permafrost terrain.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 222-233.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - Diavik
DS201312-0705
2013
Sego, D.C.Pham, N.H., Sego, D.C., Arenson, L.U., Blowes, D.W., Amos, R.T., Smith, L.The Diavik waste rock project: measurement of the thermal regime of a waste rock test pile in a permafrost environment.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 234-245.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - Diavik
DS201312-0849
2013
Sego, D.C.Smith, L.J.D., Blowes, D.W., Jambor, J.L., Smith, L., Sego, D.C., Neuner, M.The Diavik waste rock project: initial geochemical response from a low sulfide waste rock pile.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 200-209.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - Diavik
DS201312-0850
2013
Sego, D.C.Bailey, B.L., Smith, L.J.D., Blowes, D.W., Ptacek, C.J., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.The Diavik waste rock project: persistence of contaminants from blasting agents in waste rock effluent.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 256-270.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - Diavik
DS201312-0852
2013
Sego, D.C.Smith, L.J.D., Moncur, M.C., Neuner, M., Gupton, M., Blowes, D.W., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.The Diavik waste rock project: particle size distribution and sulfur characteristics of low- sulfide waste rock.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 187-199.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - Diavik
DS201507-0303
2015
Sego, D.C.Bailey, B.L., Blowes, D.W., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.The Diavik waste rock project: geochemical and microbiological characterization of drainage from low sulfide waste rock: active zone field experiments.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 187-199.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS201512-1896
2015
Sego, D.C.Bailey, B.L., Blowes, D.W., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.The Diavik waste rock project: geochemical and microbiological characterization of low sulfide content large-scale waste rock test piles.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 62, pp. 18-34.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik

Abstract: Two experimental waste-rock piles (test piles), each 15 m in height × 60 m × 50 m, were constructed at the Diavik diamond mine in Northern Canada to study the behavior of low-sulfide content waste rock, with a similarly low acid-neutralization potential, in a continuous permafrost region. One test pile with an average of 0.035 wt.% S (<50 mm fraction; referred to as Type I) and a second test pile with an average of 0.053 wt.% S (<50 mm fraction; referred to as Type III) were constructed in 2006. The average carbon content in the <50 mm fraction of waste rock in the Type I test pile was 0.031 wt.% as C and in the Type III test pile was 0.030 wt.% as C. The NP:AP ratio, based on the arithmetic mean of particle-size weighted NP and AP values, for the Type I test pile was 12.2, suggesting this test pile was non-acid generating and for the Type III test pile was 2.2, suggesting an uncertain acid-generating potential. The Type I test pile maintained near-neutral pH for the 4-year duration of the study. Sulfate and dissolved metal concentrations were low, with the exception of Ni, Zn, Cd, and Co in the fourth year following construction. The pore water in the Type III test pile contained higher concentrations of SO42- and dissolved metals, with a decrease in pH to <4.7 and an annual depletion of alkalinity. Maximum concentrations of dissolved metals (20 mg L-1 Ni, 2.3 mg L-1 Cu, 3.7 mg L-1 Zn, 35 µg L-1 Cd, and 3.8 mg L-1 Co) corresponded to decreases in flow rate, which were observed at the end of each field season when the contribution of the total outflow from the central portion of the test pile was greatest. Bacteria were present each year in spite of annual freeze/thaw cycles. The microbial community within the Type I test pile included a population of neutrophilic S-oxidizing bacteria. Each year, changes in the water quality of the Type III test-pile effluent were accompanied by changes in the microbial populations. Populations of acidophilic S-oxidizing bacteria and Fe-oxidizing bacteria became more abundant as the pH decreased and internal test pile temperatures increased. Irrespective of the cold-climate conditions and low S content of the waste rock, the geochemical and microbiological results of this study are consistent with other acid mine drainage studies; indicating that a series of mineral dissolution-precipitation reactions controls pH and metal mobility, and transport is controlled by matrix-dominated flow and internal temperatures.
DS201601-0002
2016
Sego, D.C.Bailey, B.L., Blowes, D.W., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.The Diavik waste rock project: geochemical and microbiological characterization of low sulfide content large-scale waste rock test piles.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 65, pp. 54-72.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik

Abstract: Two experimental waste-rock piles (test piles), each 15 m in height × 60 m × 50 m, were constructed at the Diavik diamond mine in Northern Canada to study the behavior of low-sulfide content waste rock, with a similarly low acid-neutralization potential, in a continuous permafrost region. One test pile with an average of 0.035 wt.% S (<50 mm fraction; referred to as Type I) and a second test pile with an average of 0.053 wt.% S (<50 mm fraction; referred to as Type III) were constructed in 2006. The average carbon content in the <50 mm fraction of waste rock in the Type I test pile was 0.031 wt.% as C and in the Type III test pile was 0.030 wt.% as C. The NP:AP ratio, based on the arithmetic mean of particle-size weighted NP and AP values, for the Type I test pile was 12.2, suggesting this test pile was non-acid generating and for the Type III test pile was 2.2, suggesting an uncertain acid-generating potential. The Type I test pile maintained near-neutral pH for the 4-year duration of the study. Sulfate and dissolved metal concentrations were low, with the exception of Ni, Zn, Cd, and Co in the fourth year following construction. The pore water in the Type III test pile contained higher concentrations of SO42- and dissolved metals, with a decrease in pH to <4.7 and an annual depletion of alkalinity. Maximum concentrations of dissolved metals (20 mg L-1 Ni, 2.3 mg L-1 Cu, 3.7 mg L-1 Zn, 35 µg L-1 Cd, and 3.8 mg L-1 Co) corresponded to decreases in flow rate, which were observed at the end of each field season when the contribution of the total outflow from the central portion of the test pile was greatest. Bacteria were present each year in spite of annual freeze/thaw cycles. The microbial community within the Type I test pile included a population of neutrophilic S-oxidizing bacteria. Each year, changes in the water quality of the Type III test-pile effluent were accompanied by changes in the microbial populations. Populations of acidophilic S-oxidizing bacteria and Fe-oxidizing bacteria became more abundant as the pH decreased and internal test pile temperatures increased. Irrespective of the cold-climate conditions and low S content of the waste rock, the geochemical and microbiological results of this study are consistent with other acid mine drainage studies; indicating that a series of mineral dissolution-precipitation reactions controls pH and metal mobility, and transport is controlled by matrix-dominated flow and internal temperatures.
DS201801-0081
2018
Sego, D.C.Wilson, D., Amos, R.T., Blowes, D.W., Langman, J.B., Ptacek, C.J., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.Diavik waste rock project: a conceptual model for temperature and sulfide content dependent geochemical evolution of waste rock - Laboratory scale.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 89, pp. 160-172.Canada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Diavik

Abstract: The Diavik Waste Rock Project consists of laboratory and field experiments developed for the investigation and scale-up of the geochemical evolution of sulfidic mine wastes. As part of this project, humidity cell experiments were conducted to assess the long-term geochemical evolution of a low-sulfide waste rock. Reactive transport modelling was used to assess the significant geochemical processes controlling oxidation of sulfide minerals and their dependence on temperature and sulfide mineral content. The geochemical evolution of effluent from waste rock with a sulfide content of 0.16 wt.% and 0.02 wt.% in humidity cells was simulated with the reactive transport model MIN3P, based on a conceptual model that included constant water flow, sulfide mineral content, sulfide oxidation controlled by the availability of oxidants, and subsequent neutralization reactions with carbonate and aluminosilicate minerals. Concentrations of Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, and SO4 in the humidity cell effluent were simulated using the shrinking core model, which represented the control of oxidant diffusion to the unreacted particle surface in the sulfide oxidation process. The influence of temperature was accounted for using the Arrhenius relation and appropriate activation energy values. Comparison of the experiment results, consisting of waste rock differentiated by sulfide mineral content and temperature, indicated surface area and temperature play important roles in rates of sulfide oxidation and release of sulfate and metals. After the model was calibrated to fit the effluent data from the higher sulfide content cells, subsequent simulations were conducted by adjusting only measured parameters, including sulfide mineral content and surface area.
DS201809-2115
2018
Sego, D.C.Wilson, D., Amos, R.T., Blowes, D.W., Langman, J.B., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.Diavik waste rock project: Scale up of a reactive transport model for temperature and sulfide content dependent geochemical evolution of waste rock.Applied Geochemisty, Vol. 96, pp. 177-190.Canada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Diavik

Abstract: The Diavik Waste Rock Project, located in a region of continuous permafrost in northern Canada, includes complementary field and laboratory experiments with the purpose of investigating scale-up techniques for the assessment of the geochemical evolution of mine waste rock at a large scale. As part of the Diavik project, medium-scale field experiments (~1.5?m high active zone lysimeters) were conducted to assess the long term geochemical evolution and drainage of a low-sulfide waste rock under a relatively simple (i.e. constrained by the container) flow regime while exposed to atmospheric conditions. A conceptual model, including the most significant processes controlling the sulfide-mineral oxidation and weathering of the associated host minerals as observed in a laboratory humidity cell experiment, was developed as part of a previous modelling study. The current study investigated the efficacy of scaling the calibrated humidity cell model to simulate the geochemical evolution of the active zone lysimeter experiments. The humidity cell model was used to simulate the geochemical evolution of low-sulfide waste rock with S content of 0.053?wt.% and 0.035?wt.% (primarily pyrrhotite) in the active zone lysimeter experiments using the reactive transport code MIN3P. Water flow through the lysimeters was simulated using temporally variable infiltration estimated from precipitation measurements made within 200?m of the lysimeters. Flow parameters and physical properties determined during previous studies at Diavik were incorporated into the simulations to reproduce the flow regime. The geochemical evolution of the waste-rock system was simulated by adjustment of the sulfide-mineral content to reflect the values measured at the lysimeters. The temperature dependence of the geochemical system was considered using temperature measurements taken daily, adjacent to the lysimeters, to correct weathering rates according to the Arrhenius equation. The lysimeter simulations indicated that a model developed from simulations of laboratory humidity cell experiments, incorporating detailed representations of temporally variable temperature and water infiltration, can be scaled to provide a reasonable assessment of geochemical evolution of the medium-scale field experiments.
DS201809-2116
2018
Sego, D.C.Wilson, D., Sinclair, S.A., Blowes, D.W., Amos,R.T., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.Diavik waste rock project: analysis of measured and simulated acid neutralization processes within a large scale field experiment.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractCanada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Diavik

Abstract: The geochemical evolution of mine-waste rock often includes concurrent acid generation and neutralization processes. Deposition of mine-waste rock in large, oxygenated, and partially saturated piles can result in release of metals and decreased pH from weathering of sulfide minerals. Acid neutralization processes can often mitigate metals and pH impacts associated with sulfide oxidation. The Diavik Waste Rock Project included large field experiments (test piles built in 2006) conducted to characterize weathering of sulfide waste rock at a scale representative of full size waste-rock piles. Water samples from the unsaturated interior of one of the test piles, constructed of waste rock with ~0.05 wt.% S, were collected using soil water solution samplers and drains at the base of the pile. Field observations indicated pH decreased throughout the depth of the pile during 2008 and 2009 and that carbonate mineral buffering was entirely depleted by 2011 or 2012. Carbonate mineral exhaustion was accompanied by increased concentrations of dissolved Al and Fe in effluent samples collected at the basal drains. These results suggest that dissolution of Al and Fe(oxy)hydroxides occurred after the depletion of carbonate minerals following an acid neutralization sequence that is similar to observations made by previous researchers. A conceptual model of acid neutralization proceses within the pile, developed using physical and geochemical measurements conducted from 2008 to 2012, was used to inform reactive transport simulations conducted in 2017 to quantify the dominant acid neutralization processes within the test pile interior. Reactive transport simulations indicate that the conceptual model developed using the results of field samples provides a reasonable assessment of the evolution of the acid neutralization sequence.
DS201312-0513
2013
Segonyane, P.Kramers, J.D., Andreoli, M.A.G., Atanasova, M., Belyanin, G.A., Block, D.L., Franklyn, C., Harris, C., Lekgoathi, M., Montross, C.S., Ntsoane, T., Pischedda, V., Segonyane, P., Viljoen, K.S., Westraadt, J.E.Unique chemistry of a diamond bearing pebble from the Libyan desert glass strewnfield, SW Egypt: evidence for a shocked comet fragment.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.382, pp. 21-31.Africa, EgyptShock diamonds
DS1985-0597
1985
Seguin, M.K.Seguin, M.K., Clark, T.Reconnaissnace paleomagnetic study of igneous rocks from the eastern sectorof the Labrador Trough.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 22, pp. 1561-70.Quebec, LabradorGeophysics - Paleomagnetics
DS1987-0660
1987
Seguin, M.K.Seguin, M.K.Paleomagnetism of Carboniferous diabase dykes from Gaspe QuebecCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 24, No. 8, August pp. 1705-1714QuebecPaleomagnetism, Craton
DS200612-1314
2006
SeherSingh, S.C., Crawford, W.C., Carton, Seher, Combier, Cannat, Canales, Dusunur, Escartin, MirandaDiscovery of a magma chamber and faults beneath a Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal field.Nature, Vol. 442 Aug. 31, pp. 1029-1031.MantleTectonics
DS1995-1694
1995
Sehlkov, D.Sehlkov, D., Verchovsky, A.B., Milledge, H.J., PillingerCarbonado: a comparison between Brazilian and Ubangui sources based on carbon and nitrogen isotopes.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 518-520.Brazil, Central African RepublicCarbonado, Geochronology
DS1991-0748
1991
Seiberl, W.Huckenholz, H.G., Yoder, H.S.Jr., Kunzmann, T., Seiberl, W.The akermanite-gehlenite sodium melilite join at 950 C and 5 Kbar in the presence of CO2 and H2OCarnegie Institute Annual Report of the Director Geophysical Laboratory, No. 2250, pp. 75-81GlobalExperimental petrology, Melilite
DS1993-1414
1993
Seibold, E.Seibold, E.The sea floor: an introduction to marine geologySpringer Verlag, 354pGlobalBook review, Marine geology
DS1995-1695
1995
Seibold, E.Seibold, E.The sea floorSpringer, 372p. approx. $ 60.00GlobalBook -ad, Sea floor
DS200612-0528
2006
SeidelHanson, R.E., Harmer,Blenkinsop, Bullen, Dalziel, Gose, Hall, Kampunzu, Key, Mukwakwami, Munyaniwa, Pancake, Seidel, WardMesoproterozoic intraplate magmatism in the Kalahari Craton: a review.Journal of African Earth Sciences, In press available,Africa, South AfricaAlkaline rocks, carbonatite, Premier kimberlite cluster
DS201312-0328
2013
Seidel, E.K.Gose, W.A., Hanson, R.E., Harmer, R.E., Seidel, E.K.Reconnaissance paleomagnetic studies of Mesoproterozoic alkaline igneous complexes in the Kaapvaal craton, South Africa.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 85, pp. 22-30.Africa, South AfricaGeophysics - magnetics
DS200412-1781
2004
Seidel, K.Seidel, K., Martinec, J.Remote sensing in snow hydrology.Springer, 200p. approx. $ 120. ISBN 3-540-40880-0GlobalGeomorphology, glaciations, climate
DS1992-1359
1992
Seidensticker, U.Seidensticker, U., Wiedemann, C.M.Geochemistry and origin of lower crustal granulite facies rocks in the Serra do Caparao region, Espirito Santo/Minas GeraisJournal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 6, No. 4, pp. 289-298BrazilGeochemistry, Calc-alkaline rocks
DS1990-0129
1990
Seifert, F.Armbruster, T., Rothlisberger, F., Seifert, F.Layer topology, stacking variation, and site distortion in melilite-related compounds in the system CaO-ZnO-GeO2-SiO2American Mineralogist, Vol. 75, No. 7-8, July-August pp. 847-858GlobalMelilite, Experimental petrology
DS1990-1035
1990
Seifert, F.Merwin, L., Rothlisberger, F., Sebald, A., Seifert, F.A combined 29SI HR MAS NMR 57Fe Mossbauer and X-ray diffraction study Of the modulated structure in melilitesTerra, Abstracts of Experimental mineralogy, petrology and, Vol. 2, December abstracts p. 89GlobalMelilites, X-ray diffraction
DS1990-1261
1990
Seifert, F.Rothlisberger, F., Seifert, F.Chemical control of the commensurate-incommensurate phase transition in synthetic melilitesEuropean Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 2, pp. 585-594GlobalMelilites, TEM.
DS1991-1813
1991
Seifert, F.Voll, G., Topel, J., Pattison, DR.M., Seifert, F.Equilibrium and kinetics in contact metamorphismSpringer-Verlag Pub, 424p. approx. $ 190.00 United StatesGlobalmetamorphism, Book -ad
DS1993-1415
1993
Seifert, F.Seifert, F., Rothlisberger, F.Macroscopic and structural changes at the incommensurate normal phase transition in melilites.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 48, No. 2-4, pp. 179-192.GlobalMineralogy, Melilites
DS1994-0782
1994
Seifert, F.Hogrefe, A., Rubie, D.C., Sharp, T.G., Seifert, F.Metastability of enstatite in deep subducting lithosphereNature, Vol. 372, Nov. 24, pp. 351-353.MantleSubduction, Petrology -experimental
DS1997-0558
1997
Seifert, F.Jianping, L., O'Neill, H. St., Seifert, F.Experimental study on the solubility of Cr2 in olivine, orthopyroxene and spinel solid solutions.Chinese Journal of Geochem. (Eng.), Vol. 16, No. 2, pp. 139-47.GlobalPetrology - experimental, Olivine
DS2002-1023
2002
Seifert, F.McCammon, C., Lauterbach, S., Van Akern, P., Langenhorst, F., Seifert, F.EELS studies of lower mantle mineral assemblages: a window to redox conditions18th. International Mineralogical Association Sept. 1-6, Edinburgh, abstract p.77.MantleUHP mineralogy - perovskite
DS200412-1258
2004
Seifert, F.McCammon, C.A., Lauterbach, S., Seifert, F., Langenhorst, F., Van Aken, P.A.Iron oxidation state in lower mantle mineral assemblages. Part 2.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 222, 2, pp. 435-449.MantleMineral chemistry
DS1992-1360
1992
Seifert, K.E.Seifert, K.E., Peterman, Z.E., Thieben, S.E.Possible crustal contamination of Midcontinent Rift igneous rocks: examples from the Mineral Lake intrusions, WisconsinCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 29, No. 6, June pp. 1140-1153WisconsinIgneous rocks, Tectonics
DS1992-1361
1992
Seifert, K.E.Seifert, K.E., Peterman, Z.E., Thieben, S.E.Possible crustal contamination of Midcontinent Rift igneous rocks: examples from the Mineral Lake intrusions, WisconsinCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 29, No. 6, June pp. 1140-1153WisconsinMidcontinent Rift, Igneous rocks
DS1992-1681
1992
Seifert, K.E.Windom, K.E., Seifert, K.E., Van Schmus, W.R., Wallin, E.T.Archean and Proterozoic rocks from northwestern IowaGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstract Volume, Vol. 24, No. 4, April p. 71. abstract onlyIowaGeneral geology, Precambrian
DS1993-1745
1993
Seifert, K.E.Windom, K.E., Van Schmus, W.R., Seifert, K.E., Wallin, E.T., Anderson, R.R.Archean and Proterozoic tectono-magmatic activity along the southern Margin of the Superior Province in northwestern Iowa, United States.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 30, No. 6, June pp. 1275-1285.IowaTectonics
DS200512-0959
2004
Seifert, K.E.Seifert, K.E., Olmstedt, J.F.Geochemistry of North Shore hypabyssal dikes and sills in the midcontinent rift of Minnesota: an example - the 47th Avenue sill.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 41, 7, pp. 829-United States, MinnesotaDike geochemistry
DS201708-1753
2017
Seifert, T.Seifert, T.A mantle metasomatic injection event linked to Permo-Carboniferous lamprophyre magmatism and associated rare metal ore deposition ( Sn-W-Mo-Sc-In-Li-Ag(Au) in-base metal) in the eastern European Variscides.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, PosterEuropemagmatism

Abstract: Located at the northwestern border of the Bohemian Massif in the eastern part of the European Variscides, the Erzgebirge-Krušné hory is one of the most important metallogenic provinces in Europe with a 800-year history of mining. The following rare metal resources are associated with late-Variscan (315 - 280 Ma), postmagmatic mineralization pulses in the Erzgebirge-Krušné hory and surrounded areas: 900 kt Sn, 230 kt W, 10 kt Mo, 1 kt Ta, 300 kt Li, 200 kt Rb, 2 kt Cs, 1.5 kt In, 230 t Ge, 320 t Sc, 14 kt Sb, 10 kt Bi, and 3 kt Ag. At the end of the Variscan Orogeny the regional tectonic regime in Central Europe changed, indicating the beginning of the break-up of the supercontinent. The Late Carboniferous-Early Permian in Europe was a period of widespread basin formation that was associated in many areas with mantle-derived magmatic activity. 300 Ma-old dike swarms in NE England and the Scottish Midland Valley, the Oslo Graben and Scania, radiate from a triple junction in the northernmost part of Jutland. This triple junction marked the axis of a deep-mantle plume centered in this area. In this context it is important to note that the mantle plume center is surrounded by significant lamprophyre intrusions which show in some districts spatial-time relationships to Sn-W-polymetallic, Ag-base metal, and U mineralization. During the Late Carboniferous and Early Permian an extensive magmatic province developed within the present northern and central Europe, intimately with extensional tectonics, in an area stretching from southern Scandinavia, through the North Sea, into Northern Germany. Peak magmatic activity was concentrated in a narrow time-span from 300 to 280 Ma. Simultaneously in Stephanian-Early Permian an intensive bimodal magmatism associated with intra-continental extensional setting occurs in the European Variscides. Permo-Carboniferous volcanism in the Spanish Central System, Iberian Ranges, Cantabrian Chain, Pyrenees and the French Massif Central includes a range of mafic calc-alkaline and shoshonitic rock types, and lamprophyres (spessartites and camptonites) with age data between 300-270 Ma. The Mid-European Variscides show a large number of Permo-Carboniferous magmatic complexes with similar ages (Halle Volcanic Complex, Saar-Nahe Basin, Thuringian Forest, Harz Mts., Northwest-Saxonian Volcanic Complexes, bimodal volcanic rocks of the Sub-Erzgebirge basin and the Rhyolite Complex of Tharandt as well as Li-F-Sn small intrusion granites and lamprophyric intrusions in the Erzgebirge. It is important to note that the late-Variscan W-Mo, Sn-W-Mo, Ag-bearing Sn-In-base metal, Ag-Sb-base metal, and U mineralizations in the Erzgebirge-Krušné hory are spatially and temporal associated with intrusion centers of Permo-Carboniferous post-collisional mafic and rhyolitic (sub)volcanic bimodal magmatism (315-290 Ma) along deep-rooted NW-SE fault zones, especially at the intersections with NE-SW, E-W, and N-S major regional structural zones. The bimodal lamprophyre-rhyolite assemblage in the Erzgebirge / Sub-Erzgebirge basin area was formed during intracontinental rifting in a 'Fast Extension' setting by melting of a metasomatic enriched mantle source. The emplacement of fluid-enriched lamprophyres and F-rich rhyolitic intrusions at the same time is probably associated with decompression melting of updoming asthenosphere which is possibly associated with the above mentioned mantle plume.
DS201708-1754
2017
Seifert, T.Seifert, T.Cal-alkaline mica-lamprophyres and F-Sn rhyolite intrusions associated F-Sn explosive breccia pipes and their relationship to Sn- polymetallic mineralization.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, PosterEuropealkaline rocks
DS201112-1012
2011
Seifert, Th.Stremprok, M., Seifert, Th., Dolejs, D.Geochemistry of lamprophyres in rare metal districts related to granitoids.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1937.Europe, RussiaMinette, kersantite
DS201312-0002
2013
Seifert, Th.Abdelfadil, Kh.M., Romer, R.L., Seifert, Th., Lobst, R.Calc-alkaline lamprophyres from Lusatia ( Germany) - evidence for a repeatedly enriched mantle source.Chemical Geology, Vol. 353, pp. 230-245.Europe, GermanyLamprophyre
DS1984-0430
1984
Seifert, W.Kramer, W., Seifert, W.Xenolithe, Lamprophyre und Kruste Mantel BeziehungenFreiberger Forshungshefte Geowissen. Min. Geochem., Vol. C389, No. 2, PP. 38-49.GermanyInclusions, Rare Earth Elements (ree), Geochemistry
DS1985-0366
1985
Seifert, W.Kramer, H., Seifert, W., Kramer, E., Volger, P.Regional variability of peridotitic xenolith associations of the Saxothuringian zone and substantial differentiation of The upper mantle.(in German)Gerl. Beitr., (in German), Vol. 94, No. 4-6, pp. 308-326GermanyMantle
DS1994-0946
1994
Seifert, W.Kramer, W., Seifert, W.Mica -lamprophyres and related volcanics of the Erzgebirge and metallogenicaspects.Seltman, Metallogeny Collisional Orogens, pp. 159-165.Europe, GermanyLamprophyres
DS1996-1275
1996
Seifert, W.Seifert, W., Thomas, R.Silicate carbonate immiscibility - a melt inclusion study of Olivineme lilite and wehrlite.. Elbe zoneChem. die Erde, Vol. 55, No. 4, Nov. pp. 263-279.GermanyMelilite, Petrology
DS2000-0878
2000
Seifert, W.Seifert, W., Kampf, H., Wasternack, J.Compositional variation in apatite, phlogopite and other accessory minerals of ultramafic Deltzch ComplexLithos, Vol. 53, No. 2, Aug. pp. 81-100.GermanyCarbonatite - implication for cooling history
DS2003-1246
2003
Seifert, W.Seifert, W., Kramer, W.Accessory titanite: an important carrier of zirconium in lamprophyresLithos, Vol. 71, 1, Nov. pp. 81-98.GermanyKersantite, minette
DS200412-1782
2003
Seifert, W.Seifert, W., Kramer, W.Accessory titanite: an important carrier of zirconium in lamprophyres.Lithos, Vol. 71, 1, Nov. pp. 81-98.Europe, GermanyKersantite, minette
DS1970-0409
1971
Seigel, H.O.Seigel, H.O.Geophysical Exploration for Kimberlite PlugsScintrex Company Application Brief., No. 71-1, 12P.GlobalKimberlite, Geophysics
DS1993-1416
1993
Seigel, H.O.Seigel, H.O.The application of geoelectrochemical methods to the exploration for kimberlite intrusives.Northwest Territories Exploration Overview for 1993, November pp. 50.Northwest TerritoriesGEC., Mobile metallic ions
DS2002-1439
2002
Seigel, H.O.Seigel, H.O., Gingerich, J.C., Kostlin, E.O.Explore or acquire? The dilemmaC.i.m. Bulletin, Vol.95,1058,Feb.pp.9.62-GlobalEconomics - ore reserves, exploration, discoveries
DS201012-0679
2010
Seigel, H.O.Seigel, H.O., Nind, C.J.M., Milanov, A., MacQueen, J.Results from the initial field tests of a borehole gravity meter for mining and geotechnical applications. NOT specific to diamonds.Scintrex, 5p. distributed Jan. 2010 PPT also availableTechnologyGravity methodology
DS201812-2774
2018
Seigneur, V.Arnould, M., Coltice, N., Flament, N., Seigneur, V., Muller, R.D.On the scales of dynamic topography in whole- mantle convection models.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 19, 9, pp. 3140-3163.United States, Californiasubduction

Abstract: Mantle convection shapes Earth's surface by generating dynamic topography. Observational constraints and regional convection models suggest that surface topography could be sensitive to mantle flow for wavelengths as short as 1,000 and 250 km, respectively. At these spatial scales, surface processes including sedimentation and relative sea-level change occur on million-year timescales. However, time-dependent global mantle flow models do not predict small-scale dynamic topography yet. Here we present 2-D spherical annulus numerical models of mantle convection with large radial and lateral viscosity contrasts. We first identify the range of Rayleigh number, internal heat production rate and yield stress for which models generate plate-like behavior, surface heat flow, surface velocities, and topography distribution comparable to Earth's. These models produce both whole-mantle convection and small-scale convection in the upper mantle, which results in small-scale (<500 km) to large-scale (>104 km) dynamic topography, with a spectral power for intermediate scales (500 to 104 km) comparable to estimates of present-day residual topography. Timescales of convection and the associated dynamic topography vary from five to several hundreds of millions of years. For a Rayleigh number of 107, we investigate how lithosphere yield stress variations (1050 MPa) and the presence of deep thermochemical heterogeneities favor small-scale (200500 km) and intermediate-scale (500104 km) dynamic topography by controlling the formation of small-scale convection and the number and distribution of subduction zones, respectively. The interplay between mantle convection and lithosphere dynamics generates a complex spatial and temporal pattern of dynamic topography consistent with constraints for Earth.
DS1992-0416
1992
Seilacher, A.Einsele, G., Ricken, W., Seilacher, A.Cycles and events in stratigraphySpringer-Verlag, 1040pGlobalStratigraphy, Ad -outline
DS2001-1049
2001
Seiler, K.P.Seiler, K.P., Wohnlich, S.New approaches to characterising groundwater flowBalkema Publishing, 1356p. $ 250.00 approx.GlobalBook - ad, Groundwater - flow and transport
DS2003-1247
2003
Seipold, U.Seipold, U., Schilling, F.R.Heat transport in serpentinitesTectonophysics, Vol. 370, 1-4, pp. 147-162.GlobalGeothermometry
DS200412-1783
2003
Seipold, U.Seipold, U., Schilling, F.R.Heat transport in serpentinites.Tectonophysics, Vol. 370, 1-4, pp. 147-162.TechnologyGeothermometry
DS200712-0687
2007
Seit, H-M.Marschall, H.R., Pogge von Stranmann, P.A.E., Seit, H-M., Elliott, NiuThe lithium isotopic composition of orogenic eclogites and deep subducted slabs.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 262, 3-4, Oct. 30, pp. 563-580.MantleSubduction
DS1995-0808
1995
Seitz, H.M.Hock, J.D., Seitz, H.M.Continental mafic dyke swarms as tectonic indicators: an example from the Vestfold Hills, East Antarctica.Precambrian Research, Vol. 75, No. 3-4 Dec. 1, pp. 121-140.AntarcticaDike, Tectonics
DS1995-1696
1995
Seitz, H.M.Seitz, H.M.Trace element partitioning between mantle minerals and their potential asgeothermometers.Terra Nova, Abstract Vol., p. 337.MantleGeothermometry
DS1998-1310
1998
Seitz, H.M.Seitz, H.M., Woodland, A.B.Lithium and beryllium abundances in peridotitic, pyroxenitic and eclogitic mantle assemblages.7th. Kimberlite Conference abstract, pp. 778-80.East African Rift, Massif Central, MongoliaPeridotites, Eclogites
DS2002-1735
2002
Seitz, H.M.Woodland, A.B., Seitz, H.M., Altherr, R., Marschall, H., Olker, B., Ludwig, T.Li abundances in eclogite minerals: a clue to a crustal or mantle origin?Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 143, 5, pp.587-601.MantleEclogites - lithium
DS2002-1736
2002
Seitz, H.M.Woodland, A.B., Seitz, H.M., Altherr, R., Marschall, H., Olker, B., Ludwig, T.Li abundances in eclogite minerals: a clue to a crustal or mantle origin?Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol.143,5, Aug.pp.587-601.MantleMineralogy - ecologite
DS2003-1248
2003
Seitz, H.M.Seitz, H.M., Brey, G.P., Stachel, T., Harris, J.W.Li abundances in inclusions in diamonds from the upper and lower mantleChemical Geology, Vol. 201, 3-4, Nov. 28, pp. 307-318.MantleEclogites, peridotites, diamond
DS2003-1249
2003
Seitz, H.M.Seitz, H.M., Brey, G.P., Stachel, T., Harris, J.W.Lithium abundances in inclusions in diamonds from the upper and lower mantle8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 4, POSTER abstractMantleMantle geochemistry, Diamond - inclusions
DS200412-2141
2004
Seitz, H.M.Woodland, A.B., Seitz, H.M., Yaxley, G.M.Varying behaviour of Li in metasomatised spinel peridotite xenoliths from western Victoria, Australia.Lithos, Vol. 75, 1-2, July pp. 55-66.AustraliaGeochemistry - trace element fingerprinting, petrogenet
DS200612-1260
2006
Seitz, H.M.Seitz, H.M., Brey, G.P., Harris, J.W., Ludwig, T.Lithium isotope composition of lower mantle ferropericlase inclusions in diamonds from Sao Luiz, Brazil.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 17. abstract only.South America, BrazilDeposit - Sao Luiz, diamond inclusions
DS201212-0040
2012
Seitz, H.M.Aulbach, S., Stachel, T., Heaman, L.M., Creaser, R.A., Seitz, H.M., Shirey, S.B.Diamond formation in the slab and mantle wedge: examples from the Slave Craton.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDiamond genesis
DS201212-0653
2012
Seitz, H.M.Shu, Q., Brey, G.P., Gerdes, A., Hofer, H.E., Seitz, H.M.Eclogites and garnet pyroxenites from the mantle: their age and ageing- two point isochrons, Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf closure temperatures, model ages.emc2012 @ uni-frankfurt.de, 1p. AbstractAfrica, South AfricaDeposit - Bellsbank
DS2003-1250
2003
Seitz, H-M.Seitz, H-M., Brey, G.P., Stahel, T., Harris, J.W.Li abundances in inclusions in diamonds from the upper and lower mantleChemical Geology, Vol. 201, 3-4, Nov. 28, pp. 307-318.MantleBlank
DS200412-1784
2003
Seitz, H-M.Seitz, H-M., Brey, G.P., Stahel, T., Harris, J.W.Li abundances in inclusions in diamonds from the upper and lower mantle.Chemical Geology, Vol. 201, 3-4, Nov. 28, pp. 307-318.MantleDiamond inclusions, eclogites, peridotites, websterite.
DS200512-0960
2004
Seitz, H-M.Seitz, H-M., Brey, G.P., Lahaye, Y., Durali, S., Weyer, S.Lithium isotopic signatures of peridotite xenoliths and isotopic fractionation at high temperature between olivine and pyroxenes.Chemical Geology, Vol. 212, 1-2, pp. 163-177.MantlePetrology - not specific to diamonds
DS200712-0685
2007
Seitz, H-M.Marschall, H., Von Strandmann, P.P., Seitz, H-M., Elliott, T.Heavy lithium in subducted slabs.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A625.MantleSubduction
DS200712-0686
2007
Seitz, H-M.Marschall, H.R., Pogge Von Strandemann, P.A.E., Seitz, H-M., Elliott, T., Niu, Y.The lithium isotopic composition of orogenic eclogites and deep subduction zones.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, In press availableMantleSubduction
DS200812-0501
2008
Seitz, H-M.Ionov, D.A., Seitz, H-M.Lithium abundances and isotopic compositions in mantle xenoliths from subduction and intra plate settings: mantle sources vs. eruption histories.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 266, 3-4, pp. 316-331.RussiaVitim field
DS200812-1035
2008
Seitz, H-M.Seitz, H-M., Brey, G.P.Lithium abundances and Li isotope compositions of the Roberts Victor kimberlite and its olivines.9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractAfrica, South AfricaDeposit - Roberts Victor
DS200912-0276
2009
Seitz, H-M.Hannahan, M., Brey, G., Woodland, A., Altherr, R., Seitz, H-M.Li as a barometer for bimineralic eclogites: experiments in CMAS.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, In press available 16p.MantleEclogite - barometry
DS200912-0277
2009
Seitz, H-M.Hannahan, M., Brey, G., Woodland, A., Seitz, H-M., Ludwig, T.Li as a barometer for bimineralic eclogites: experiments in natural systems.Lithos, In press available, 34p.TechnologyDeposit - Roberts Victor
DS201212-0041
2012
Seitz, H-M.Aulbach, S., Stachel, T., Seitz, H-M., Brey, G.P.Chalcophile and siderophile elements in sulphide inclusions in eclogitic diamonds and metal cycling in a Paleoproterozoic subduction zone.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol 93, Sept. 15, pp. 278-299.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS201312-0824
2013
Seitz, H-M.Sieber, M., Brey, G.P., Seitz, H-M., Gerdes, A., Hoefer, H.E.The age of eclogitisation underneath the Kaapvaal craton - a composite xenolith from Roberts Victor.Goldschmidt 2013, 1p. AbstractAfrica, South AfricaDeposit - Roberts Victor
DS201806-1248
2018
Seitz, H-M.Seitz, H-M., Brey, G.P., Harris, J.W., Durali-Muller, S., Ludwig, T., Hofer, H.E.Ferropericlase inclusions in ultradeep diamonds from Sao Luiz ( Brazil): high Li abundances and diverse Li-isotope and trace element compositions suggest an origin from a subduction melange.Mineralogy and Petrology, in press available, 10p.South America, Brazil, Juinadeposit - Sao Luiz

Abstract: The most remarkable feature of the inclusion suite in ultradeep alluvial and kimberlitic diamonds from Sao Luiz (Juina area in Brazil) is the enormous range in Mg# [100xMg/(Mg?+?Fe)] of the ferropericlases (fper). The Mg-richer ferropericlases are from the boundary to the lower mantle or from the lower mantle itself when they coexist with ringwoodite or Mg- perovskite (bridgmanite). This, however, is not an explanation for the more Fe-rich members and a lowermost mantle or a “D” layer origin has been proposed for them. Such a suggested ultra-deep origin separates the Fe-rich fper-bearing diamonds from the rest of the Sao Luiz ultradeep diamond inclusion suite, which also contains Ca-rich phases. These are now thought to have an origin in the uppermost lower mantle and in the transition zone and to belong either to a peridotitic or mafic (subducted oceanic crust) protolith lithology. We analysed a new set of more Fe-rich ferropericlase inclusions from 10 Sao Luiz ultradeep alluvial diamonds for their Li isotope composition by solution MC-ICP-MS (multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry), their major and minor elements by EPMA (electron probe micro-analyser) and their Li-contents by SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry), with the aim to understand the origin of the ferropericlase protoliths. Our new data confirm the wide range of ferropericlase Mg# that were reported before and augment the known lack of correlation between major and minor elements. Four pooled ferropericlase inclusions from four diamonds provided sufficient material to determine for the first time their Li isotope composition, which ranges from d7Li?+?9.6 ‰ to -3.9 ‰. This wide Li isotopic range encompasses that of serpentinized ocean floor peridotites including rodingites and ophicarbonates, fresh and altered MORB (mid ocean ridge basalt), seafloor sediments and of eclogites. This large range in Li isotopic composition, up to 5 times higher than ‘primitive upper mantle’ Li-abundances, and an extremely large and incoherent range in Mg# and Cr, Ni, Mn, Na contents in the ferropericlase inclusions suggests that their protoliths were members of the above lithologies. This mélange of altered rocks originally contained a variety of carbonates (calcite, magnesite, dolomite, siderite) and brucite as the secondary products in veins and as patches and Ca-rich members like rodingites and ophicarbonates. Dehydration and redox reactions during or after deep subduction into the transition zone and the upper parts of the lower mantle led to the formation of diamond and ferropericlase inclusions with variable compositions and a predominance of the Ca-rich, high-pressure silicate inclusions. We suggest that the latter originated from peridotites, mafic rocks and sedimentary rocks as redox products between calcite and SiO2.
DS201910-2260
2019
Seitz, H-M.Graf, C., Sandner, T., Woodland, A., Hofer, H., Seitz, H-M., Pearson, G., Kjarsgaard, B.Metasomatism, oxidation state of the mantle beneath the Rae craton, Canada.Goldschmidt2019, 1p. AbstractCanadacraton

Abstract: The Rae craton is an important part of the Canadian Shield and was amalgamated to the Slave craton at ?? 1.9 Ga [1]. Recent geophysical and geochemical data indicate a protracted geodynamic history [1, 2]. Even though the oxidation state of the Earth’s mantle has an important influence of fluid compositions and melting behavior, no data on the oxidation state of the Rae’s mantle are available. The aims of this study were to 1) determine the oxidation state (ƒO2) of the lithosphere beneath the Rae craton, 2) link these results to potential metasomatic overprints and 3) compare the geochemical evolution with the Slave craton. We studied 5 peridotite xenoliths from Pelly Bay (central craton) and 22 peridotites from Somerset Island (craton margin). Pelly Bay peridotites give T < 905°C and depths of ??80- 130 km. Garnets have depleted or “normal” REE patterns, the latter samples recording fO2 values ??0.5 log units higher. The deeper samples are more enriched and oxidised. Peridotites from Somerset Island record T ??825-1190°C, a ?logfO2 ranging from ?? FMQ - FMQ-3.6 from a depth interval of ??100-150 km. Garnets exhibit two REE signatures - sinusoidal and “normal” - indicating an evolutionary sequence of increasing metasomatic re-enrichment and a shift from fluid to melt dominated metasomatism. Compared to the Slave craton, the Rae mantle is more reduced at ??80km but becomes up to 2 log units more oxidised (up to ??FMQ-1) at ??100-130 km. Similar oxidising conditions can be found >140 km in the Slave mantle [3]. Especially under Somerset Island, the lithospheric mantle has contrasting fO2 and metasomatic overprints in the same depth range, which may represent juxtaposed old and rejuvenated domains [2].
DS202103-0422
2021
Seitz, H-M.Woodland, A.B., Graf, C., Sandner, T., Hofer, H.E., Seitz, H-M., Pearson, D.G., Kjarsgaard, B.A.Oxidation state and metasomatism of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Rae craton, Canada: strong gradients reflect craton formation and evolution.Nature Scientific Reports, 10.1038/s41598-021-83261-6 11p. PdfCanada, Northwest Territoriesmetasomatism

Abstract: We present the first oxidation state measurements for the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath the Rae craton, northern Canada, one of the largest components of the Canadian shield. In combination with major and trace element compositions for garnet and clinopyroxene, we assess the relationship between oxidation state and metasomatic overprinting. The sample suite comprises peridotite xenoliths from the central part (Pelly Bay) and the craton margin (Somerset Island) providing insights into lateral and vertical variations in lithospheric character. Our suite contains spinel, garnet-spinel and garnet peridotites, with most samples originating from 100 to 140 km depth. Within this narrow depth range we observe strong chemical gradients, including variations in oxygen fugacity (ƒO2) of over 4 log units. Both Pelly Bay and Somerset Island peridotites reveal a change in metasomatic type with depth. Observed geochemical systematics and textural evidence support the notion that Rae SCLM developed through amalgamation of different local domains, establishing chemical gradients from the start. These gradients were subsequently modified by migrating melts that drove further development of different types of metasomatic overprinting and variable oxidation at a range of length scales. This oxidation already apparent at ~?100 km depth could have locally destabilised any pre-existing diamond or graphite.
DS202107-1100
2019
Seitz, H-M.Graf, C., Woodland, A., Hofer, H., Seitz, H-M., Pearson, G., Kjarsgaard, B.Metasomatism and oxidation state of lithospheric mantle beneath the Rae Craton, Canada as revealed by xenoliths from Somerset Island and Pelly Bay. ** Note dateGeophysical Research Abstracts , 1p. PdfCanada, Somerset Island , Nunavutcratons

Abstract: We present the first oxidation state measurements for the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath the Rae craton, northern Canada, one of the largest components of the Canadian shield. In combination with major and trace element compositions for garnet and clinopyroxene, we assess the relationship between oxidation state and metasomatic overprinting. The sample suite comprises peridotite xenoliths from the central part (Pelly Bay) and the craton margin (Somerset Island) providing insights into lateral and vertical variations in lithospheric character. Our suite contains spinel, garnet-spinel and garnet peridotites, with most samples originating from 100 to 140 km depth. Within this narrow depth range we observe strong chemical gradients, including variations in oxygen fugacity (ƒO2) of over 4 log units. Both Pelly Bay and Somerset Island peridotites reveal a change in metasomatic type with depth. Observed geochemical systematics and textural evidence support the notion that Rae SCLM developed through amalgamation of different local domains, establishing chemical gradients from the start. These gradients were subsequently modified by migrating melts that drove further development of different types of metasomatic overprinting and variable oxidation at a range of length scales. This oxidation already apparent at ~?100 km depth could have locally destabilised any pre-existing diamond or graphite.
DS1990-0525
1990
Seitz, R.Geballe, T.H., Pohl, R.O., Seitz, R.Cool diamonds. Letters to Science in response to E. Marshall's articleScience, Vol. 250, November 30, pp. 1194-1195GlobalDiamond synthesis, Thermal conductivity
DS1981-0374
1981
Sekata, N.Sekata, N.Diamond Synthesis from Carbon Precursor by Explosive Shock CompressionJournal of MATERIALS SCIENCE., Vol. 16, No. 6, PP. 1728-1730.GlobalBlank
DS201702-0234
2016
Sekatcheff, J.M.Presser, J.L.B., Farina-Dolsa, S., Larroza-Cristaldo, F.A., Rocca, M., Alonso, R.N., Acededo, R.D., Cabral-Antunez, N.D., Baller, L., Zarza-Lima, P.R., Sekatcheff, J.M.Modeled mega impact structures in Paraguay: II the eastern region. **PortBoletin del Museo Nacional de Historia Narural del Paraguay, Vol. 20, 2, pp. 205-213. pdf available in * PortSouth America, ParaguayImpact Crater

Abstract: We report here the discovery and study of several new modeled large impact craters in Eastern Paraguay, South America. They were studied by geophysical information (gravimetry, magnetism), field geology and also by microscopic petrography. Clear evidences of shock metamorphic effects were found (e.g., diaplectic glasses, PF, PDF in quartz and feldspar) at 4 of the modeled craters: 1) Negla: diameter:~80-81 km., 2) Yasuka Renda D:~96 km., 3) Tapyta, D: ~80 km. and 4) San Miguel, D: 130-136 km. 5) Curuguaty, D: ~110 km. was detected and studied only by geophysical information. Target-rocks range goes from the crystalline Archaic basement to Permian sediments. The modeled craters were in some cases cut by tholeiitic/alkaline rocks of Mesozoic age and partially covered by lavas of the basaltic Mesozoic flows (Negla, Yasuka Renda, Tapyta and Curuguaty). One of them was covered in part by sediments of Grupo Caacupé (age: Silurian/Devonian). Some of these modeled craters show gold, diamonds, uranium and REE mineral deposits associated. All new modeled large impact craters are partially to markedly eroded.
DS2002-0421
2002
SekerinEgorov, K.N., Menshagin, Sekerin, Koshkarev, UshchapovNew dat a on mineralogy of sedimentary reservoirs of diamonds in the southwestern Siberian platform.Doklady, Vol.382, 1, Jan-Feb.pp. 109-11.Russia, SiberiaAlluvials, placers
DS200612-0366
2006
SekerinEgorov, K.N., Soloveva, Kovach, Menshagin, Maslovskaya, Sekerin, BankovskayaPetrological features of olivine phlogopite lamproites of the Sayan region: evidence from the Sr Nd isotope and ICP MS trace element data.Geochemistry International, Vol. 44, 7. pp. 729-735.RussiaLamproite
DS1988-0622
1988
Sekerin, A.P.Sekerin, A.P., Menshagin, I.V., Lashchenov, V.A.Alkaline-ultrabasic rocks and carbonatites of the eastern Sayan. (Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 299, No. 3, pp. 711-714RussiaBlank
DS1989-1367
1989
Sekerin, A.P.Sekerin, A.P., Menshagin, Yu.V., Lashchenov, V.A., Tverdokh, ebova, A.A.New occurrence of carbonatites and the structural control of alkaline Rocks in the eastern Sayan Province, USSR. (Russian)Izk. Iruktsk. USSR. Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR, No. 8, pp. 34-41RussiaAlkaline rocks, Carbonatite
DS1990-1031
1990
Sekerin, A.P.Menshagin, I.V., Sekerin, A.P., Medvedev, T.I., Ushchapo.., Z.F.Ist find of priderite in kimberlites of the Irutsk Per-Sayan.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 312, No. 6, pp. 1440-1442RussiaMineralogy, Priderite
DS1990-1328
1990
Sekerin, A.P.Sekerin, A.P., Menshagin, I.V., Bogdanov, G.V., Medvedeva, T.I.On the occurrence of basic and ultrabasic inclusions in Precambrian kimberlites of the Peri-Sayan.(Russian)Dokl. Akad., Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 312, No. 5, pp. 1231-1234RussiaKimberlite, Basic inclusions
DS1991-1538
1991
Sekerin, A.P.Sekerin, A.P., Menshagin, V., Vladimirov, B.M., Lashchenov, V.A.Precambrian diamond bearing veined bodies from southwest of the SiberianPlatformProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 543-544RussiaVeins, lamproite, Chrome spinellids, geochronology
DS1992-1362
1992
Sekerin, A.P.Sekerin, A.P., Menshagin, Yu.V., Bogdanov, G.V., Medvedeva, T.I.Find of mafic and ultramafic inclusions in Precambrian kimberlite from the Sayan regionDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 312, No. 1-3, June pp. 203-205RussiaUltramafic inclusions, Kimberlite
DS1992-1363
1992
Sekerin, A.P.Sekerin, A.P., Menshagin, Yu.V., Lashchenov, V.A.New dat a on Precambrian kimberlites from the near Sayan regionSoviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 32, No. 12, pp. 57-63.Russia, SayanKimberlites, Textures
DS1993-1417
1993
Sekerin, A.P.Sekerin, A.P., Mensgagin, Y.V., Laschen..VA.Dokembrian lamproites of the Prisayan. (Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 329, No. 3, March pp. 328-331. # LG762RussiaLamproites
DS1994-1567
1994
Sekerin, A.P.Sekerin, A.P., Menshagin, Yu.V., Lepin, V.S., Revenko, A.high pressureotassium picritic basalts of the Sayan region, near IrkutskDoklady Academy of Sciences USSR, Vol. 326, Oct. pp. 127-130.Russia, SiberiaCraton, Alkaline rocks
DS1995-1234
1995
Sekerin, A.P.Menshagin, Yu.V., Sekerin, A.P.Composition and localization features of lamproite -like rocks in the Irkutsk Prisayanye area.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 377-378.Russia, IrkutskLamproite, Petrography
DS1995-1697
1995
Sekerin, A.P.Sekerin, A.P., Menshagin, Yu.V., Lashchenov, V.A.Sayan Precambrian lamproitesDoklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 329A, No. 3, April, pp. 99-104.Russia, SayanLamproites
DS1995-1698
1995
Sekerin, A.P.Sekerin, A.P., Menshagin, Yu.V., Lashenov, V.A.high Pressureotassic mantle magmatism and the problems of diamond bearing in the Irkutsk Prisyanye area.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 492-493.Russia, Irkutsk, PrisyanyeLamproite, Deposit -Ingashinskoe
DS1996-0944
1996
Sekerin, A.P.Menshagin, Yu.V., Sekerin, A.P.Ultrabasic rocks of the Kolba-Uda zone of the major Sayan faultRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 37, No. 6, pp. 24-30.RussiaAlkaline rocks
DS1996-0945
1996
Sekerin, A.P.Menshagin, Yu.V., Sekerin, A.P.Mineralogy of mantle rocks of high Potassium content in the southern Siberian PlatformInternational Geological Congress 30th Session Beijing, Abstracts, Vol. 2, p. 387.Russia, SiberiaMineralogy, Potassium, Metamorphic rocks
DS1996-1276
1996
Sekerin, A.P.Sekerin, A.P., Menshagin, Yu.V., Lashchenov, V.A.Origin of ultrabasic rocks of the dunite harzburigite association occurring in the Main Sayan Fault zone.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 340, No. 2, March., pp. 89-95.RussiaSiberian Craton, Malyy Tagui
DS1997-1017
1997
Sekerin, A.P.Sekerin, A.P., Egorov, K.N., Menshagin, Yu.V.Structural control and diamond potential of mantle magmatic rocks of The southwestern Siberian PlatformDoklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 355A, No. 6, July-Aug. pp. 1324-26.Russia, SiberiaStructure, tectonics, Diamond genesis
DS2000-0879
2000
Sekerin, A.P.Sekerin, A.P., Menshagin, Y.U., Egorov, K.N.Mantle magmatism and diamond potential of the Tumanshet Graben, northeastern Sayany Region.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 371, No. 2, pp. 247-50.RussiaMagmatism, Tumanshet region
DS2003-0375
2003
Sekerin, A.P.Egorov, K.N., Denisnko, E.P., Menshagin, Yu.V., Sekerin, A.P., Koshkarev, D.A.New occurrence of alkaline ultramafic rocks in the southern Siberian platformDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 390, 4, May-June pp. 478-82.RussiaAlkaline rocks
DS200412-0508
2003
Sekerin, A.P.Egorov, K.N., Denisnko, E.P., Menshagin, Yu.V., Sekerin, A.P., Koshkarev, D.A.New occurrence of alkaline ultramafic rocks in the southern Siberian platform.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 390, 4, May-June pp. 478-82.RussiaAlkalic
DS200412-0509
2004
Sekerin, A.P.Egorov, K.N., Mishenin, S.G., Menshagin, Yu.V., Serov, V.P., Sekerin, A.P., Koshkarev, D.A.Kimberlite minerals from the lower Carboniferous deposits of the Mura-Kovinsky diamond bearing area.*** IN RUSSIAN LANGUAGEProceedings of the Russian Mineralogical Society ***in RUSSIAN, Vol. 133, 1,pp. 32-40 ***RUSSIANRussiaMineralogy
DS200612-0367
2005
Sekerin, A.P.Egorov, K.N., Soloveva, L.V., Kovach, V.P., Menshagin, Y.V., Maslovskaya, Sekerin, A.P., Bankovskaya, E.V.Mineralogical and isotope geochemical characteristics of Diamondiferous lamproites of the Sayan region.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 403A, 6, pp. 861-865.RussiaGeochronology
DS2003-1251
2003
Seki, K.Seki, K., Hirahara, M., Hoshino, M., et al.Cold ions in the hot plasma sheet of Earth's magnetotailNature, Vol. 6932, April 10, pp. 589-91.MantleGeophysics - magnetics
DS200412-1785
2003
Seki, K.Seki, K., Hirahara, M., Hoshino, M., et al.Cold ions in the hot plasma sheet of Earth's magnetotail.Nature, Vol. 6932, April 10, pp. 589-91.MantleGeophysics - magnetics
DS1970-0075
1970
Seki, Y.Ernst, W.G., Seki, Y., et al.Comparative Study of Low Grade Metamorphism in the California Coast Ranges and the Outer Metamorphic Belt of Japan.Geological Society A, ER. MEMOIR., No. 124, 270P.United States, California, West CoastBlank
DS1989-1661
1989
SekineWyllie, P.J., Carroll, M.R., Johnston, A.D., Rutter, M.J., SekineInteraction among magmas and rocks in subduction zone regions-experimental studies from slab to mantle to crustEuropean Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 165-180GlobalMantle, Experimental petrology
DS1983-0566
1983
Sekine, T.Sekine, T., Wyllie, P.J.Phase Relationships in the Join Grossularite-pyrope-7.5% H2o at 30kb.American Journal of Science, Vol. 283, No. 5, MAY, PP. 435-453.GlobalMineral Chemistry
DS1984-0645
1984
Sekine, T.Sekine, T., Wyllie, P.J.Hybridization of Magmas Above Subducted Oceanic CrustIn: Proceedings of the 27th. International Geological Congress held Moscow, August, Vol. 9, Petrology pp. 561-580GlobalMantle
DS1986-0718
1986
Sekine, T.Sekine, T., Ringwood, A.E.A comparison of garnet ilmenite perovskite phase equilibration temperatures ingermanate and silicate systems at high pressuresPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 41, No. 4, January 31, pp. 240-248GlobalBlank
DS1988-0623
1988
Sekine, T.Sekine, T.Diamond from shocked magnesiteNaturwissenschaften, Vol. 75, pp. 462-463GlobalDiamond genesis
DS200912-0237
2009
Sekine, T.Furukawa, Y., Sekine, T., Oba, M., Kakegawa, T., Nakazawa, H.Biomolecule formation by oceanic impacts on early Earth. ( subducting .. conversion to graphite or diamond....)Nature Geoscience, Vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 62-66.MantleSubduction
DS201312-0799
2013
Sekisova, V.S.Sekisova, V.S., Sharygin, V.V., Zaitsev, A.N.Silicate natrocarbonate immisicibility in ijolites at Oldoinyo Lengai Tanzania: melt inclusion study.Goldschmidt 2013, 1p. AbstractAfrica, TanzaniaIjolite
DS201602-0236
2015
Sekisova, V.S.Sekisova, V.S., Sharygin, V.V., Zaitsev, A.N., Strekopytov, S.Liquid immiscibility during crystallization of forsterite-phlogopite ijolites at Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania: study of melt inclusions.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 56, pp. 1717-1737.Africa, TanzaniaDeposit - Oldoinyo Lengai

Abstract: The paper is concerned with study of melt inclusions in minerals of ijolite xenoliths at Oldoinyo Lengai Volcano. Melt inclusions with different phase compositions occur in forsterite macrocrysts and in diopside, nepheline, fluorapatite, Ti-andradite, and Ti-magnetite crystals. Nepheline contains primary melt inclusions (silicate glass + gas-carbonate globule ± submicron globules ± sulfide globule ± daughter/trapped phases, represented by diopside, fluorapatite, Ti-andradite, and alumoakermanite). The gas-carbonate globule consists of a gas bubble surrounded by a fine-grained aggregate of Na-Ca-carbonates (nyerereite and gregoryite). Fluorapatite contains primary carbonate-rich melt inclusions in the core, which consist of nyerereite, gregoryite, thenardite, witherite, fluorite, villiaumite, and other phases. Their mineral composition is similar to natrocarbonatites. Primary melt inclusions (glass + gas bubble ± daughter phases) are rare in diopside and Ti-andradite. Diopside and forsterite have trails of secondary carbonate-rich inclusions. Besides the above minerals, these inclusions contain halite, sylvite, neighborite, Na-Ca-phosphate, alkali sulfates, and other rare phases. In addition, diopside contains sulfide inclusions (pyrrhotite ± chalcopy- rite ± djerfisherite ± galena ± pentlandite). The chemical compositions of silicate glasses in the melt inclusions vary widely. The glasses are characterized by high Na, K, and Fe contents and low Al contents. They have high total alkali contents (16-23 wt.% Na2O + K2O) and peralkalinity index [(Na + K)/Al] ranging from 1.1 to 7.6. The carbonate-rich inclusions in the ijolite minerals are enriched in Na, P, S, and Cl. The data obtained indicate that the parental melt in the intermediate chamber was heterogeneous and contained silicate, natrocarbonate, and sulfide components during the ijolite crystallization. According to heating experiments with melt inclusions, silicate-carbonate liquid immiscibility occurred at temperature over 580 °C.
DS1990-0430
1990
Sekner, G.I.DuBray, E.A., Quick, J.E., Sekner, G.I., Pallister, J.S.SAVEWARE I: a dozen programs designed to read DATASAVE files, perform various petrologic calculations and produce printed and graphical dataanalysisUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open file, No. 90-616-A, B, C $ 4.50, $6.00, $12.00GlobalComputer, Program -SAVEWAREI
DS2002-1440
2002
Selbekk, R.S.Selbekk, R.S., Skjerlie, K.P.Petrogenesis of the anorthosite dyke swarm of Tromso: experimental evidence for hydrous anatexis of an alkaline mafic complex.Journal of Petrology, Vol.43,6,pp.943-62.Norway, northAlkaline rocks
DS201805-0973
2017
Selbekk, R.S.Ravna, E.K., Zozulya, D., Kullerud, K., Corfu, F., Nabelek, P.I., Janak, M., Slagstad, T., Davidsen, B., Selbekk, R.S., Schertl, H-P.Deep seated carbonatite intrusion and metasomatism in the UHP Tromso Nappe, northern Scandinavian Caledonides - a natural example of generation of carbonatite from carbonated eclogite.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 58, 12, pp. 2403-2428.Europe, Sweden, Norwaycarbonatite

Abstract: Carbonatites (sensu stricto) are igneous rocks typically associated with continental rifts, being emplaced at relatively shallow crustal levels or as extrusive rocks. Some carbonatites are, however, related to subduction and lithospheric collision zones, but so far no carbonatite has been reported from ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes. In this study, we present detailed petrological and geochemical data on carbonatites from the Tromsø Nappe—a UHP metamorphic terrane in the Scandinavian Caledonides. Massive to weakly foliated silicate-rich carbonate rocks, comprising the high-P mineral assemblage of Mg-Fe-calcite?±?Fe-dolomite?+?garnet?+?omphacitic clinopyroxene?+?phlogopite?+?apatite?+?rutile?+?ilmenite, are inferred to be carbonatites. They show apparent intrusive relationships to eclogite, garnet pyroxenite, garnet-mica gneiss, foliated calc-silicate marble and massive marble. Large grains of omphacitic pyroxene and megacrysts (up to 5?cm across) of Cr-diopside in the carbonatite contain rods of phlogopite oriented parallel to the c-axis, the density of rods being highest in the central part of the megacrysts. Garnet contains numerous inclusions of all the other phases of the carbonatite, and, in places, composite polyphase inclusions. Zircon, monazite and allanite are common accessory phases. Locally, veins of silicate-poor carbonatite (up to 10?cm across) occur. Extensive fenitization by K-rich fluids, with enrichment in phlogopite along contacts between carbonatite and silicate country rocks, is common. Primitive mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns for the carbonatite document a strong enrichment of light rare earth elements, Ba and Rb, and negative anomalies in Th, Nb, Ta, Zr and Hf. The carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of the carbonatite are distinctly different from those of the spatially associated calc-silicate marble, but also from mantle-derived carbonatites elsewhere. Neodymium and Sr isotope data coupled with the trace element distribution indicate a similarity of the Tromsø carbonatite to orogenic (off-craton) carbonatites rather than to anorogenic (on-craton) ones. U-Pb dating of relatively U-rich prismatic, oscillatory-zoned zircon gives an age of 454•5?±?1•1?Ma. We suggest that the primary carbonatite magma resulted from partial melting of a carbonated eclogite at UHP, in a deeply subducted continental slab.
DS1992-1364
1992
Selbert, P.Selbert, P.Combing the CraterLapidary Journal, November pp. 53-54, 84-92.ArkansasMineral collecting, Diamonds
DS200912-0367
2009
Selby, D.Kendall, B., Creaser, R.A., Selby, D.187Re-187-Os geochronology of Precambrian organic rich sedimentary rocks.Global Neoproterozoic Petroleum Systems: the emerging potential in North Africa., Geological Society of London Spec. Publ. 326 pp.85-107Gondwana, RodiniaStratigraphy
DS201710-2256
2017
Selby, D.Pogge von Strandmann, P.A.E., Desrochers, A., Murphy, M.J., Finlay, A.J., Selby, D., Lenton, T.M.Global climate stabilisation by chemical weathering during the Hirnantian glaciation.Geochemical Perspectives Letters, Vol. 3, pp. 230-237.Canada, Quebec, Anticosti Islandcarbon cycle

Abstract: Chemical weathering of silicate rocks is a primary drawdown mechanism of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The processes that affect weathering are therefore central in controlling global climate. A temperature-controlled “weathering thermostat” has long been proposed in stabilising long-term climate, but without definitive evidence from the geologic record. Here we use lithium isotopes (d7Li) to assess the impact of silicate weathering across a significant climate-cooling period, the end-Ordovician Hirnantian glaciation (~445 Ma). We find a positive d7Li excursion, suggestive of a silicate weathering decline. Using a coupled lithium-carbon model, we show that initiation of the glaciation was likely caused by declining CO2 degassing, which triggered abrupt global cooling, and much lower weathering rates. This lower CO2 drawdown during the glaciation allowed climatic recovery and deglaciation. Combined, the data and model provide support from the geological record for the operation of the weathering thermostat.
DS1989-1368
1989
Selby, J.Selby, J.A possible Precambrian land surfaceGeology Today, July-August pp. 124-126AustraliaKimberley Plateau, Tectonics
DS2002-1441
2002
Selby, N.D.Selby, N.D., Woodhouse, J.H.The Q structure of the upper mantle: constraints from Ryleigh wave amplitudesJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 107, No. 5, ESE5MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200612-0345
2006
Selenge, D.Dorjnamjaa, D., Selenge, D., Garanin, K.V.Diamond bearing astropipes in Mongolia their recognition and characteristics.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 1. abstract only.Asia, MongoliaUHP Breccia pipes
DS201012-0164
2010
Selenge, D.Dorjnamjaa, D., Selenge, D., Amarsaikhan, T., Enkhbaatar, B.Some new scientific facts on the diamond and gold forming astropipe geostructures of Mongolia.Goldschmidt 2010 abstracts, PosterAsia, MongoliaMeteorite
DS201709-1980
2011
Selenge, D.Dorjnamjaa, D., Voinkov, D.M., Kondratov, L.S., Selenge, D., Altanshagai, G., Enkhbatar, B.Concerning diamond and gold bearing astropipes of Mongolia.International Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Vol. 1, pp. 98-104.Asia, Mongoliaastropipes, impact craters

Abstract: In this paper we present summation of eighteen year’s investigation of the all gold and diamond-bearing astropipes of Mongolia. Four astropipe structures are exemplified by the Agit Khangay (10 km in diameter, 470 38' N; 960 05' E), Khuree Mandal (D=11 km; 460 28' N; 980 25' E), Bayan Khuree (D=1 km; 440 06' N; 1090 36' E), and Tsenkher (D=7 km; 980 21' N; 430 36' E) astropipes of Mongolia. Detailed geological and gas-geochemical investigation of the astropipe structures show that diamond genesis is an expression of collision of the lithospheric mantle with the explosion process initiated in an impact collapse meteor crater. The term "astropipes" (Dorjnamjaa et al., 2010, 2011) is a neologism and new scientific discovery in Earth science and these structures are unique in certain aspects. The Mongolian astropipes are genuine "meteorite crater" structures but they also contain kimberlite diamonds and gold. Suevite-like rocks from the astropipes contain such minerals, as olivine, coesite, moissanite (0,6 mm), stishovite, coesite, kamacite,tektite, khamaravaevite (mineral of meteorite titanic carbon), graphite-2H, khondrite, picroilmenite, pyrope, phlogopite, khangaite (tektite glass, 1,0-3,0 mm in size), etc. Most panned samples and hand specimens contain fine diamonds with octahedrol habit (0, 2-2,19 mm, 6,4 mg or 0,034-0,1 carat) and gold (0,1-5 g/t). Of special interest is the large amount of the black magnetic balls (0,05-5,0 mm) are characterized by high content of Ti, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mn, Mg, Cd, Ga, Cl, Al, Si, K. Meanwhile, shatter cones (size approx. 1.0 m) which are known from many meteorite craters on the Earth as being typical of impact craters were first described by us Khuree Mandal and Tsenkher astropipe structures. All the described meteorite craters posses reliable topographic, geological, mineralogical, geochemical, and aerospace mapping data, also some geophysical and petrological features (especially shock metamorphism) have been found, all of which indicate that these structures are a proven new type of gold-diamond-bearing impact structure, termed here "astropipes". The essence of the phenomenon is mantle manifestation and plume of a combined nuclear-magma-palingenesis interaction.
DS201012-0680
2010
Seleverstone, J.Seleverstone, J., Frezzotti, M.L., Sharp, Z.D., Compagnoni, R.Low temperature diamonds in oceanic rocks from the western Alps.Geological Society of America Abstracts, 1/2p.Europe, AlpsUHP - microdiamonds
DS1986-0472
1986
Seleznev, L.D.Kuznetsov, O.L., Kokorev, A.A., Migunov, N.I., Seleznev, L.D.Determination of the boundaries of kimberlite pipes using the seismoelectric method. (Russian)Izvest. Vyssh. Uch. Zaved. Geol. I Razved.(Russian), Vol 1986, No. 4, pp. 113-117RussiaBlank
DS200812-0483
2008
Self, M.V.Holmes, P.K., Grenon, H., Self, M.V., Pell, J., Neilson, S.The Chidliak property, a new diamond district on Baffin Island, Nunavut.Northwest Territories Geoscience Office, p. 35. abstractCanada, Nunavut, Baffin IslandBrief overview - Peregrine
DS1982-0555
1982
Self, P.G.Self, P.G., Buseck, P.R.Tem Study of a New Ca-ti Mineral from a Mantle AssemblageEos, Vol. 63, No. 45, P. 1141, (abstract.).GlobalJosephine Creek, Bultfontein, Wesselton
DS1990-1378
1990
Self, S.Smith, G., Fisher, R., Cas, R., Self, S.The definition and use of epiclastic. Discussion on the terminologyCommission on Volcanogenic sediments, Newsletter, No. 3, June pp. 4pGlobalEpiclastic, Terminology
DS200812-1036
2008
Self, S.Self, S., Blake, S.Consequences of explosive supereruptions.Elements, Vol. 4, 1, Feb. pp. 41-46.MantleMagmatism
DS1997-1018
1997
Selfe, G.Selfe, G.New applications of borehole geophysical logging in mining and mineralexploration.Exploration Geophysics, Vol. 28, pp. 127-129.Namibia, BotswanaGeophysics - density, neutron, natural gamma probes, Deposit - Oranjemund
DS1998-1311
1998
Selfe, G.R.Selfe, G.R., Trofimczyk, K.K.Recent developments in the application of borehole geophysical logging techniques in diamond mining -7th. Kimberlite Conference abstract, pp. 781-2.BotswanaGeophysics - borehole, Exploration technology
DS1996-1586
1996
Selivanov, V.A.Zakharov, V.S., Selivanov, V.A.Identification of zones of tectonic and geomorphic activation in SouthAmericaDoklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 345A, No. 9, Oct. pp. 232-237South AmericaTectonics
DS200612-0908
2006
SelivanovaMenishikov, Y.P., Krivovichev, S.V., Pakhomovsky, Yakovenchuk, Ivanyuk, Mikhailova, Armbruster,SelivanovaChivruaiite, Ca(Ti,Nb)5(Si6O17)2 (OH,O)5.13-14H20, a new mineral from hydrothermal veins of Khibiny and Lovozero alkaline massifs.American Mineralogist, Vol. 91, 5-6, May pp. 922-928.Russia, Kola PeninsulaMineralogy - alkaline
DS201508-0368
2015
Selivanova, E.Lyalina, L., Zolotarev, A.Jr., Selivanova, E., Savchenko, Ye., Zozulya, D., Krivovichev, S., Mikhailova, Yu.Structural characterization and composition of Y-rich hainite from Sakharojok nepheline syenite pegmatite ( Kola Peninsula, Russia).Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 109, 4, pp. 443-451.Russia, YakutiaNepheline syenite
DS201602-0216
2015
Selivanova, E.A.Konopleva, N.G., Ivanyuk, G.Yu., Pakhomovsky, Ya.A., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Mikhailova, Yu.A., Selivanova, E.A.Typochemistry of rinkite and products of its alteration in the Khibiny alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 57, 7, pp. 614-625.Russia, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Khibiny

Abstract: The occurrence, morphology, and composition of rinkite are considered against the background of zoning in the Khibiny pluton. Accessory rinkite is mostly characteristic of foyaite in the outer part of pluton, occurs somewhat less frequently in foyaite and rischorrite in the central part of pluton, even more sparsely in foidolites and apatite-nepheline rocks, and sporadically in fenitized xenoliths of the Lovozero Formation. The largest, up to economic, accumulations of rinkite are related to the pegmatite and hydrothermal veins, which occur in nepheline syenite on both sides of the Main foidolite ring. The composition of rinkite varies throughout the pluton. The Ca, Na, and F contents in accessory rinkite and amorphous products of its alteration progressively increase from foyaite and fenitized basalt of the Lovozero Formation to foidolite, rischorrite, apatite-nepheline rocks, and pegmatite-hydrothermal veins.
DS201912-2795
2019
Selivanova, E.A.Krivovichev, S.V., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Panikorovskii, T.L., Savchenko, E.E., Pakhailova, Yu, A., Selivanova, E.A., Kadyrova, G.I., Ivanyuk, G.Yu.,Krivovchev, S.V.Nikmelnikovite: Ca 12 Fe 2+ Fe 3+3 Al3(SiO4) 6(OH)20: a new mineral from the Kovdor Massif ( Kola Peninsula, Russia)Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 488, 2, pp. 1200-1202.Russia, Kola Peninsuladeposit - Kovdor
DS1995-1699
1995
Selivanova, V.V.Selivanova, V.V.Prediction of kimberlite provinces, fields bodies from the chemical composition of picroilmenites.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 494-495.RussiaPicroilmenites, Deposit -Kuoika field
DS1991-1539
1991
Selivanovskaya, T.V.Selivanovskaya, T.V., Mashchak, M.S., Masaytis, V.L.Impact breccias and impactites of the Kara and Ust-Kara astroblemesInternational Geology Review, Vol. 33, No. 5, May pp. 448-477RussiaImpact crater, Kara
DS1995-0659
1995
SeliversGorshov, A.I., Selivers, Sivtsov, A.V.Crystal chemistry and mineralogy of moissanite from alkaline ultrabasic volcanic complex (Kamchatka). #1Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 37, No. 4, Jul-Aug. pp. 313-321.Russia, KamchatkaGeochemistry, Moissanite
DS1999-0372
1999
SeliverstovKoloskov, A.V., Flerov, G.B., Seliverstov, DorendorfPotassic volcanics of central Kamchatka and the Late Cretaceous Paleogene Kuril Kamchatka alkaline Province.Petrology, Vol. 7, No. 5, pp. 527-RussiaAlkaline rocks
DS1960-0599
1965
Seliverstov, JU.Seliverstov, JU.La Geomorphologie de la Guinee et Ses Questions FondamentaleAkad. Nauk Sssr, Ser. Geol., Vol. 165, No. 1West Africa, GuineaGeomorphology
DS1995-1700
1995
Seliverstov, K.V.Seliverstov, K.V., Treschin, N.N., et al.South Kazakhstan diamondsProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 496-497.Russia, KazakhstanBasalts, alnoite dikes, Deposit -Chulii, Sarykamys
DS1970-0987
1974
Seliverstov, V.A.Seliverstov, V.A., Tsikunov, A.G.Meymechite in the Northern Part of the Valaginskiy Range, Eastern Kamchatka.Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 217, No. 1-6, PP. 60-62.RussiaKimberlite
DS1984-0646
1984
Seliverstov, V.A.Seliverstov, V.A., Koloskovm a, V., LAPUTINA, I.p., et al.Ist Dat a on the Composition of Minerals of Deep Seated Inclusion in the Meimechites of Kamchatke.Doklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 278, No. 4, PP. 949-952.RussiaBlank
DS1986-0719
1986
Seliverstov, V.A.Seliverstov, V.A., Koloskov, A.V., Laputina, I.P.First dat a on the composition of minerals of deep seated inclusions in meymechite from Kamchatka #2Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 278, No. 1-6, April, pp. 123-126RussiaMineralogy, Meymechite
DS1986-0720
1986
Seliverstov, V.A.Seliverstov, V.A., Koloskov, A.V., Laputina, I.P., et al.First dat a on the composition of minerals of deep seated inclusions in meymechite from Kamchatka #1Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 278, No. 10-6, pp. 127-130RussiaInclusions
DS1994-1568
1994
Seliverstov, V.A.Seliverstov, V.A., Koloskov, A.V., Chubarov, V.M.Potassic alkaline ultrabasic rocks of the Valaginiski Range, easternKamchatka.Petrology, Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 170-185.Russia, KamchatkaLamproites
DS1995-0656
1995
Seliverstov, V.A.Gorshkov, A.I., Seliverstov, V.A., et al.Crystallochemistry and genesis of carbonado from the melanocratic basaltoids of the Avacha volcano.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 37, No. 1, Jan-Feb. pp. 44-55.Russia, KamchatkaCarbonado, Basalt
DS1995-0657
1995
Seliverstov, V.A.Gorshkov, A.I., Seliverstov, V.A., Sivtsov, A.V.Crystal chemistry and mineralogy of Moissanite from alkaline ultrabasic volcanic complex (Kamchatka). #2Petrology, Vol. 37, No. 4, pp. 313-321.Russia, KamchatkaMineral chemistry, Moissanite
DS1996-0547
1996
Seliverstov, V.A.Gorshkov, A.I., Seliverstov, V.A., Sivstov, A.V., LapinaThe first discovery of native aluminum in carbonadoGeology of ore deposits, Vol. 38, No. 4, pp. 341-343.RussiaCarbonado, Kedrovka River
DS1996-1277
1996
Seliverstov, V.A.Seliverstov, V.A.Kamchatkan carbonatites produced by liquid immiscibility phenomenaDoklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 340, No. 2, March., pp. 96-98.Russia, KamchatkaCarbonatite
DS1997-1019
1997
Seliverstov, V.A.Seliverstov, V.A., Gorshkov, A.I., Shcheka, SivtsovDiamonds and carbonado of the Primorskii Krai: mineralogy, crystal chemistry and genesis.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 38, No. 6, pp. 429-441.ChinaDiamond morphology, Crystallography
DS1998-1177
1998
Seliverstov, V.A.Pokrovskii, B.G., Seliverstov, V.A.Carbon and oxygen isotope composition of carbonatites from easternKamchatka.Geochemistry International, Vol. 36, No. 1, Jan. pp. 34-39.Russia, KamchatkaCarbonatite, Geochronology
DS1998-1312
1998
Seliverstov, V.A.Seliverstov, V.A.Alkaline basaltoids of the alkaline ultramafic complex, Valagin Range, eastern Kamchatka.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 359, No. 2, pp. 186-89.Russia, KamchatkaAlkaline rocks
DS200912-0685
2009
Seliverstov, V.A.Seliverstov, V.A.Thermobarophyllic mineral paragenesises of Diamondiferous alkaline ultramafic volcanic complex in eastern Kamchatka.Vestnik Kraunz, IN RUSSIAN, 12p.RussiaLamproite
DS1986-0385
1986
Selkine, T.Irifune, T., Selkine, T., Ringwood, A.E., Hibberson, W.O.The eclogite garnetite transformation at high pressure and some geophysicalimplicationsEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 77, pp. 245-256GlobalEclogite
DS200912-0310
2009
Sell, M.Holmes, P., Pell, J., Clements, B., Grenon, H., Sell, M.The Chidliak diamond project, Baffin Island, one year after initial discovery.37th. Annual Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, Abstracts p. 24.Canada, Nunavut, Baffin IslandHistory
DS200712-0679
2006
Sellars, M.J.Manson, N.B., Harrison, J.P., Sellars, M.J.Nitrogen vacancy center in diamond: model of the electronic structure and associated dynamics.Physical Review Letters, Vol. 74, 10, 104303 ingenta 1064798716TechnologyDiamond mineralogy
DS201212-0672
2012
Seller, M.Smit, K.V., Stachel, T., Seller, M.Constraints on composition of possible diamond bearing lithosphere as sampled by the Victor kimberlite.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractCanada, Ontario, AttawapiskatDeposit - Victor
DS201312-0838
2013
Seller, M.Smit, K.V., Stachel, T., Creaser, R.A., Ickert, R.B., Dufrane, S.A., Stern, R.A., Seller, M.Origin of eclogite and pyroxenite xenoliths from the Victor kimberlite, Canada, and implications for Superior Craton formation.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 125, pp. 308-337.Canada, OntarioDeposit - Victor
DS201412-0322
2013
Seller, M.Grunsky, EC., Kjarsgaard, B.A., Kurzlaukis, S., Seller, M., Knight, R., Moroz, M.Classification of whole rock geochemistry based on statistical treatment of whole rock geochemical analyses and portable XRF analyses at the Attawapiskat kimberlite field of Ontario.Geological Survey of Canada, Scientific Presentation 15,, 1 sheet 10.4095/292446Canada, Ontario, AttawapiskatGeochemistry - whole rock
DS201412-0323
2011
Seller, M.Grunsky, E.C., Kjarsgaard, B.A., Kurzlaukis, S., Seller, M.The use of statistical methods applied to multi-element geochemistry for phase discrimination in kimberlites - examples from the Star and Whiskey kimberlites.GAC/MAC joint annual meeting, Vol. 36, p. 1. abstractCanada, Saskatchewan, OntarioGeochemistry - whole rock
DS201412-0844
2014
Seller, M.Smit, K.V., Pearson, D.G., Stachel, T., Seller, M.Peridotites from Attawapiskat, Canada: Mesoproterozoic reworking of Paleoarchean lithospheric mantle beneath the northern Superior Superterrane.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 55, 9, pp. 1829-1863.Canada, Ontario, AttawapiskatDeposit - Victor arena
DS201412-0845
2014
Seller, M.Smit, K.V., Stachel, T., Creaser, R.A., Ickert, R.B., DuFrane, S.A., Stern, R.A., Seller, M.Origin of eclogite and pyroxenite xenoliths from the Victor kimberlite, Canada, and implications for Superior craton formation.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 125, pp. 308-337.Canada, Ontario, AttawapiskatDeposit - Victor
DS1998-1008
1998
Seller, M.H.Miller, A.R., Seller, M.H., Armitage, A.E., DavisLate Triassic kimberlitic magmatism, western Churchill structural Canada.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 591-3.Northwest TerritoriesKimberlite magmatism, dikes, Deposit - Rankin Inlet area
DS1999-0647
1999
Seller, M.H.Seller, M.H.Petrology of the Melladine kimberlite dikes, District of Keewatin, Northwest Territories.University Alberta, Msc. thesis, 227p.Northwest TerritoriesPetrology, Melladine dikes
DS200812-0903
2008
Seller, M.H.Podolsky, M.H., Seller, M.H., Kryvoshlyk, I.N., Seghedi, I., Maicher, D.Whole rock geochemistry investigations of the 5034 and Tuzo kimberlites and potential applications to improving geology and resource models, Gahcho Kue project, NWTNorthwest Territories Geoscience Office, p. 72. abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Gahcho Kue
DS201312-0438
2013
Seller, M.H.Januszczak, N., Seller, M.H., Kurszlaukis, S.A multidisciplinary approach to the Attawapiskat kimberlite field, Canada: accelerating discovery-to-production pipeline.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, Special Issue of the Journal of the Geological Society of India,, Vol. 2, pp. 157-171.Canada, Ontario, AttawapiskatDeposit - Victor
DS201412-0424
2013
Seller, M.H.Januszczak, N., Seller, M.H., Kurzlaukis, S., Murphy, C., Delgaty, J., Tappe, S., Ali, K., Zhu, J., Ellemers, P.A multidisciplinary approach to the Attwapiskat kimberlite field, Canada: accelerating the discovery-to-production pipeline.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, pp. 157-172.Canada, Ontario, AttawapiskatDeposit - Victor area
DS201809-2084
2017
Seller, M.H.Seller, M.H.Lithosphere thickness determinations and kimberlite diamond potential.Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 8345 pp. 35-40.Canada, Northwest Territoriesgeophysics - seismic
DS201212-0338
2012
Seller, S.Januszcak, M.H., Seller, S., Kurzlaukis, C., Murphy, J., Delgaty, S., Tappe, K., Ali, J.Zhu, Ellemers, P.A multidisciplinary approach to the Attawapiskat kimberlite field, Canada Canada: accelerating the discovery to production pipeline.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractCanada, Ontario, AttawapiskatDeposit - Victor
DS1989-1112
1989
Seller, W.Newell, R.E., Reichle, H.G. Jr., Seller, W.Carbon monoxide and the burning earthScientific American, Vol. 261, No. 4, October, pp. 82-89. Database # 18158GlobalAtmosphere, Carbon monoxide
DS2002-1759
2002
SellesYanez, G., Cembrano, J., Pardo, M., Ranero, C., SellesThe Challinger Juan Fernadex Maipo major tectonic transition of the Nazca Andean subduction system 33-34Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol.15,1,Apr.pp.23-38.Chile, AndesSubduction, Geodynamic evidence and implications
DS1996-1278
1996
Selles-Martinez, J.Selles-Martinez, J.Concretion morphology, classification and genesisEarth Science Reviews, Vol. 41, pp. 177-210South AmericaDiagenesis, Concretion morphology
DS1970-0410
1971
Sellevoll, M.A.Sellevoll, M.A., Warrick, R.E.A Refraction Study of the Crustal Structure in Southern Norway.Seis. Soc. American Bulletin., Vol. 61, PP. 457-471.Norway, ScandinaviaTectonics
DS1970-0819
1973
Sellevoll, M.A.Sellevoll, M.A.Mohorovicic Discontinuity Beneath Fennoscandia and Adjacent parts of the North Sea.Tectonophysics, Vol. 20, PP. 359-366.Norway, ScandinaviaTectonics
DS1995-1701
1995
Selley, R.C.Selley, R.C.Ancient sedimentary environments. 4th. editionChapman and Hall, 224pGlobalBook -ad, Sedimentary environments
DS1995-1702
1995
Selley, R.C.Selley, R.C.Ancient sedimentary environments and their subsurface diagnosisChapman Hall, 220p. 4th. editionGlobalSedimentary environments, Book -ad
DS1997-1020
1997
Selley, R.C.Selley, R.C.African basinsElsevier, 440p. approx. 290.00 United StatesAfricaBook - table of contents, Sedimentary Basins of the World
DS200412-1786
2004
Selley, R.C.Selley, R.C., Cocks, R., Plimer, I.R.Encyclopedia of Geology, Five Volume Set.Elsevier, TechnologyResource - source Books
DS1993-1418
1993
Sellock, R.L.Sellock, R.L., Ortega-Gutierrez, F., Speed, R.C.Tectonostratigraphic terranes and tectonic evolution of MexicoGeological Society of America Special Paper, No. 278, 150p. approx. $ 50.00MexicoBook -table of contents, Tectonics
DS1970-0681
1973
SellschopFesq, H.W., Bibby, D.M., Erasmus, C.S., Kable, E.J.D., SellschopA Comparative Trace Element Study of Diamonds from Premier, finsch and Jagersfontein Mines. #21st International Kimberlite Conference, EXTENDED ABSTRACT VOLUME, PP. 111-114.South AfricaMineralogy
DS1993-1419
1993
Sellschop, J.P.Sellschop, J.P., Connell, S.H., Prysbylo.., W.J., Meyer, H.O.A.Comparison of proton and electron microbeam studies of mineral inclusions in diamond.Nucl. Institute B., Vol. 77, No. 1-4, May pp. 144-150.GlobalSpectrometry, Mineral inclusions
DS1970-0682
1973
Sellschop, J.P.F.Fesq, H.W., Bibby, D.M., Sellschop, J.P.F., Watterson, J.The Determination of Trace Element Impurities in Natural Diamonds by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis.Journal of RADIOANAL. CHEM., Vol. 17, PP. 195-216.South AfricaProbe Analyses
DS1970-0820
1973
Sellschop, J.P.F.Sellschop, J.P.F., Gibson, W.M.Studies of Ion Channeling and Surface Impurities in DiamondDiamond Research, VOLUME FOR 1973, PP. 32-39.GlobalDiamond Genesis
DS1970-0821
1973
Sellschop, J.P.F.Sellschop, J.P.F., Verhagen, B.TH., Mazor, E., et al.Groundwater at Orapa, Botswana, Isotopic, Chemical and Hydrogeological Studies.Johannesburg: University Witwatersrand, Npru Report., 42P.BotswanaMining Engineering, Diamond Recovery, Kimberley
DS1970-0988
1974
Sellschop, J.P.F.Sellschop, J.P.F. , Mingay, D.W., Bibby, D.M., Erasmus, C.S.Determination of Impurities in Diamond by Nuclear MethodsDiamond Research, VOLUME FOR 1974 PP. 43-50.GlobalDiamond Genesis, Inclusions
DS1975-0182
1975
Sellschop, J.P.F.Sellschop, J.P.F.Evidence on the Environment of Diamond Genesis from Trace Element Studies of Natural Diamonds.Diamond Research, VOLUME FOR 1975 PP. 35-41.GlobalDiamond Genesis
DS1975-1213
1979
Sellschop, J.P.F.Sellschop, J.P.F.Nuclear Properties in Physical and Geochemical Studies of Natural Diamond.In: J.e.field " The Properties of Diamond", PP. 107-164.GlobalDiamond Genesis
DS1975-1214
1979
Sellschop, J.P.F.Sellschop, J.P.F.The Gem CarbonaceousIndiaqua., No. 26, 1980/3, PP. PP. 95-99.GlobalGemstones, Diamonds Analysis, Diamond Genesis, Probe
DS1975-1215
1979
Sellschop, J.P.F.Sellschop, J.P.F., Madiba, C.C.P., Annegarn, H.J.Volatile Light Elements in DiamondDiamond Research, VOLUME FOR 1979, PP. 24-30.GlobalDiamond Genesis, Microprobe
DS1981-0375
1981
Sellschop, J.P.F.Sellschop, J.P.F.Muons, protons and heavy ions in the quantitative elucidation of the properties of diamond.Ieee Transactions On Nuclear Science, Vol. NS-28, No. 2, Apr. pp. 1858-GlobalDiamond - Properties, Elemental Data
DS1986-0721
1986
Sellschop, J.P.F.Sellschop, J.P.F., Watterson, J.I.W., Erasmus, C.S.Mineral physics of goldGeocongress 86, 4p. preprintGlobalApplication used for diamonds
DS1987-0118
1987
Sellschop, J.P.F.Connell, S., Bharythram, K., Appel, H., Sellschop, J.P.F., StemmetResidence sites for F-19 ions implanted into diamondHyperfine Interactions, Vol. 36, No. 3-4, October pp. 185-200GlobalBlank
DS1988-0430
1988
Sellschop, J.P.F.Madiba, C.C.P., Sellschop, J.P.F., Van Wyx, J.A.Light volatiles in synthetic diamond analyzed by ion probesNucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. Sect. B., Vol. B35, No. 3-4, 12(II) pp. 442-445GlobalDiamond synthesis
DS1990-1511
1990
Sellschop, J.P.F.Verhagen, B.Th., Tredoux, M., Lindsay, N.M., Sellschop, J.P.F., von Sails PerchImplications of isotopic and other geochemical dat a from Cretaceous-Tertiary transition in southern AfricaChemical Geology, Vol. 80, pp. 319-325South AfricaGeochemistry, Cretaceous-Tertiary transition
DS1991-0677
1991
Sellschop, J.P.F.Hart, R.J., Damarupurshad, A., Sellschop, J.P.F., Meyer, H.O.A.The trace element analysis of single diamond crystal by neutron activationanalysisProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 163-166Colorado, Brazil, South AfricaDiamond morphology, Geochemistry, George Creek, Romaria, Finsch
DS200612-1261
2006
Selly, R.C.Selly, R.C., Cocks, L.R.M., Plimer, I.R.Encyclopedia of geology. 5 volume set Dec. 2004, 2750p. Hardbound $ US 1318.00.Precambrian Research, in press,TechnologyBook review
DS201912-2830
2019
Selmo, E.Toscani, L., Salvioli-Mariani, E., Mattioli, M., Tellini, C., Boschetti, T., Iacumin, P., Selmo, E.The pyroclastic breccia of the Cabezo Negro de Tallant ( SE Spain): the first finding of carbonatite volcanism in the internal domain of the Betic Cordillera.Lithos, in press available, 16p.Europe, Spaincarbonatite
DS1988-0624
1988
Selner, G.I.Selner, G.I., Taylor, R.B.GSMAP and other United States Geological Survey (USGS) microcomputer programs for earth scienceapplicationsGeobyte, Vol. 3, No. 4, November pp. 36-43. Database # 17517GlobalComputer, Program - GSMAP
DS1990-1329
1990
Selner, G.I.Selner, G.I., Green, G.N.DLGGSMUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 90-0459 A, B, 5p. 1 disc. $ 1.25 and $ 6.00GlobalProgram -DLGGSM.
DS1990-1330
1990
Selner, G.I.Selner, G.I., Plesha, J.L.GSMGRASSUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 90-0539 A, B, $ 2.00 and $ 6.00GlobalComputer, Program -GSMGRASS
DS1990-1331
1990
Selner, G.I.Selner, G.I., Taylor, R.B.GSMROSE, a program to plot rose diagrams from linear dat a in GSDRAW and GSMAP dat abases using a microcomputerUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 90-0488 A, B, $ 3.00 and $ 6.00GlobalProgram -GSMROSE.
DS1991-1540
1991
Selner, G.I.Selner, G.I., Taylor, R.B.GSMAP version 7.0United States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 91-0001-A, B. $ 25.25 and $ 24.00GlobalComputer, Program -GSMAP
DS1992-1365
1992
Selner, G.I.Selner, G.I., Taylor, R.B.System -8 GSLITH. Drill hole dataUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 92-0260 A, B, $ 25.00GlobalComputer, Program -GSLITH
DS1992-1366
1992
Selner, G.I.Selner, G.I., Taylor, R.B.System -8 GSMAP, GSEDIT, GSMUTIL, GSPOST, GSDIGUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 92-0217 A, B, $ 35.25 plus $ 6.00 discGlobalComputer, Program -GSMAP et al.
DS1993-1420
1993
Selner, G.I.Selner, G.I., Taylor, R.B.System 9, GSMAP and other programs for the IBM PC to assist workers in the earth sciencesUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 93-0511, 372p. 2 maps, 2 discs $ 80.00GlobalComputer Program, GSMAP
DS1993-1421
1993
Selner, G.I.Selner, G.I., Taylor, R.B.GSMDATUM and GSPDATUM programs for DOS microcomputers to convert dataUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 93-0536, 3 discs $ 30.50GlobalComputer Program, GSMDATUM.
DS1994-1921
1994
Selner, G.I.Williams, V.S., Selner, G.I.HPGLUTIL a computer program for processing Hewlett Packard graphics language HPGL files and plots basemapsUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 94-0284, 18p. 1 disc $ 12.75GlobalComputer, Program -HPGLUTIL
DS1986-0357
1986
Selo, M.Henderson, P., Selo, M., Storzer, D.An investigation of olivine crystal growth in a picrite dike using the fission track methodMineralogical Magazine, Vol. 50, No. 1, No. 355, March pp. 27-33GlobalPicrite
DS2001-1274
2001
Seltmann, R.Yakubchuk, A., Seltmann, R., Shatov, V., Cole, A.The Altoids: tectonic evolution and metallogenySeg Newsletter, No. 46, July pp. 1, 7-14.Europe, Siberia, Russia, ChinaCraton, Tectonics
DS2002-1755
2002
Seltmann, R.Yakubchuk, A., Cole, A., Seltmann, R., Shatov, V.Tectonic setting, characteristics and regional exploration criteria for gold mineralization...Society of Economic Geologists Special Publication, No.9,pp.177-201.China, Tien ShanOrogeny - Altaid orogenic collage, key example, Deposit - lists
DS200912-0845
2009
Seltmann, R.Yusupov, R.G., Stanley, C.J., Welch, M.D., Spratt, J., Cressey, G., Rusmsey, M.S., Seltmann, R., IgamberdievMavlyanovite, Mn5813: a new mineral species from a lamproite diatreme, Chatkal Ridge, Uzbekistan.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 73, 1, Feb. pp. 43-50.RussiaLamproite mineralogy
DS201012-0681
2010
Seltmann, R.Seltmann, R., Solovive, S., Shatov, V., Piranjo, F., Naumov, E., Cherkasov, S.Metallogeny of Siberia: tectonic, geologic and metallogenic settings of selected significant deposits.Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 57, no. 8, pp. 655-706.Russia, SiberiaOverview ... brief mention of diamonds
DS201412-1015
2014
Seltmann, R.Zaitsev, A.N., Williams, C.T., Jeffreis, T.E., Strekopytov, S., Moutte, J., Ivashchenkova, O.V., Spratt, J., Petrov, S.V., Wall, F., Seltmann, R., Borozdin, A.P.Rare earth elements in phoscorites and carbonatites of the Devonian Kola alkaline province, Russia: examples from Kovdor, Khibina, Vuoriyarvi and Turiy Mys complexes.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 64, pp. 204-225.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS201412-1017
2014
Seltmann, R.Zaitsev, A.N., Williams, C.T., Jeffries, T.E., Strekopytov, S., Moutte, J., Ivashchenkova, O.V., Spratt, J., Petrov, S.V., Wall, F., Seltmann, R., Borozdin, A.P.Rare earth elements in phoscorites and carbonatites of the Devonian Kola alkaline province, Russia: examples from Kovdor, Khibina, Vuoriyarvi and Turiy Mys complexes.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 61, pp. 204-225.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS201412-1019
2014
Seltmann, R.Zaitsev, A.N., Williams, C.T., Jeffries, T.E., Strekopytov, S., Moutte, J., Ivashchenkova, O.V., Spratt, J., Petrov, S.V., Wall, F., Seltmann, R., Borozdin, A.P.Rare earth elements in phoscorites and carbonatites of the Devonian Kola alkaline province, Russia: examples from Kovdor, Khibina, Vuoriyarvi and Turiy Mys complexes.Ore Geology Reviews, in press availableRussia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS1981-0193
1981
Seltrust mining corp. pty. ltd.Gregory, G.P., Seltrust mining corp. pty. ltd.Tr 7668h Alice Hill Diamond Exploration Dixon Range SheetWest Australia Geological Survey Open File., No. GSWA 1199 ROLL 403, M 2712, 27P.Australia, Western AustraliaProspecting, Photogeology, Stream Sediment Sampling
DS201412-0302
2013
Selvaraj, C.Gokarn, S.G., Rao, C.K., Selvaraj, C., Gupta, G., Singh, B.P.Crustal evolution and tectonics of the Archean Bundelk hand craton, central India.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 82, No. 5, pp. 455-460.IndiaTectonics
DS1991-1344
1991
Selverstone, J.Philippot, P., Selverstone, J.Trace element rich brines in eclogitic veins: implications for fluid composition and transport during subductionContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 417-430GlobalOphiolites, Brines -fluid inclusions -subduction
DS1991-1541
1991
Selverstone, J.Selverstone, J., Getty, S., Franz, G., Thomas, S.Fluid heterogeneities and vein formation in 2 GPa eclogites: Implications for the scale of fluid migration during subductionGeological Society of America Annual Meeting Abstract Volume, Vol. 23, No. 5, San Diego, p. A 360AustriaEclogites, Subduction
DS1993-1422
1993
Selverstone, J.Selverstone, J., Gutzler, D.S.Post 125 Ma carbon storage associated with continent-continent collisionGeology, Vol. 21, No. 10, October pp. 885-889GlobalTectonics, Alpine, Carbon storage
DS1997-0743
1997
Selverstone, J.Mattie, P.D., Condie, K.C., Selverstone, J., Kyle, P.R.Origin of the continental crust in the Colorado Plateau: geochemical evidence from mafic xenoliths....Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 61, No. 10, May pp. 2007-22.Colorado PlateauXenoliths, Navajo Volcanic Field
DS1999-0142
1999
Selverstone, J.Condie, K.C., Latysh, N., Selverstone, J.Geochemistry, neodymium and Strontium isotopes and uranium-lead (U-Pb) zircon ages of granitoid metasedimentary xenoliths from Navajo...Chemical Geology, Vol. 156, No. 1-4, Apr. 1, pp. 95-134.Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, WyomingFour Corners area, Navajo volcanic field, Xenoliths
DS1999-0143
1999
Selverstone, J.Condie, K.C., Selverstone, J.The crust of the Colorado Plateau: new views of an old arcJournal of Geology, Vol. 107, No. 4, July pp. 387-98.Colorado Plateau, Arizona, New MexicoGeophysics - seismics, xenoliths, Crustal model
DS1999-0648
1999
Selverstone, J.Selverstone, J., Pun, A., Condie, K.C.Xenolithic evidence for Proterozoic crustal evolution beneath the ColoradoPlateau.Geological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 111, No. 4, Apr. pp. 590-606.Colorado, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado PlateauMinettes, Navajo volcanic field
DS2000-0880
2000
Selverstone, J.Selverstone, J., Condie, K.C.The crust of the Colorado Plateau: evidence from the xenolithic recordGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstracts, Vol. 32, No. 7, p.A-386.Colorado PlateauGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics - Four Corners area
DS2003-0229
2003
Selverstone, J.Cavosie, A., Selverstone, J.Early Proterozoic oceanic crust in the northern Colorado Front Range: implications forTectonics, Vol. 22, 2, April 30, 10.1029/2001TC001325Colorado, WyomingTectonics
DS200412-0297
2003
Selverstone, J.Cavosie, A., Selverstone, J.Early Proterozoic oceanic crust in the northern Colorado Front Range: implications for crustal growth and initiation of basementTectonics, Vol. 22, 2, April 30, 10.1029/2001 TC001325United States, Colorado, WyomingTectonics
DS200612-1075
2006
Selverstone, J.Perkins, G.B., Sharp, Z.D., Selverstone, J.Oxygen isotope evidence for subduction and rift related mantle metasomatism beneath the Colorado Plateau, Rio Grande Rift transition.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 151, 6, pp. 633-650.United States, Colorado PlateauGeochronology
DS200612-1182
2005
Selverstone, J.Roy, M., MacCarthy, J.K., Selverstone, J.Upper mantle structure beneath eastern Colorado Plateau and Rio Grande rift revealed by Bouguer gravity, seismic velocities and xenolith data.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 6, 10.1029/2005 GC001008United States, Colorado PlateauGeophysics - seismics
DS201112-0941
2011
Selverstone, J.Sharp, Z.D., Selverstone, J., Mercer, J.A.The Cl isotope composition of the mantle revisited.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1848.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesCl bearing diamonds
DS201212-0210
2012
Selverstone, J.Frezzotti, M.L., Selverstone, J., Sharp, Z.D., Compagnoni, R.Carbonate dissolution during subduction revealed by diamond-bearing rocks from the Alps.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 4, 10, pp. 703-706.Europe, AlpsPetrology
DS201412-0254
2013
Selverstone, J.Frezzotti, M-L., Huizenga, J-M., Compagnoni, R., Selverstone, J.Diamond formation by carbon saturation in C-O-H fluids during cold subduction of oceanic lithosphere.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, in press availableMantleSubduction
DS200712-0668
2007
Selway, K.Maier, R., Heinson, G., Thiel, S., Selway, K., Gill, R., Scroggs, M.A 3D lithospheric resistivity model of the Gawler Craton: southern Australia.Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 116, 1, pp. 13-21.AustraliaGeophysics - resistivity
DS201412-0791
2014
Selway, K.Selway, K.On the causes of electrical conductivity anomalies in tectonically stable lithosphere.Surveys in Geophysics, Vol. 35, 1, pp. 219-257.MantleGeophysics
DS201412-0792
2014
Selway, K.Selway, K., Yi, J., Karato, S-I.Water content of the Tanzanian lithosphere from magnetotelluric data: implications for cratonic growth and stability.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 388, pp. 175-186.Africa, TanzaniaGeophysics
DS201503-0173
2015
Selway, K.Selway, K., Ford, H., Kelemen, P.The seismic mid-lithosphere discontinuity.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 414, March 15, pp. 45-57.MantleGeophysics - seismic
DS201909-2083
2019
Selway, K.Selway, K., O'Donnell, J.P., Ozaydin, S.Upper mantle melt distribution from petrologically constrained magnetotellurics.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 20, 7, pp. 3328-3346.Mantlemelting

Abstract: Plate tectonics occurs because the strong tectonic plates sit on underlying weaker and softer mantle that flows over geological timescales. We do not fully understand why this deeper mantle is weak—the two main contenders are that a small part of it is molten or that it contains nominal amounts of the element hydrogen. The electrical conductivity of the mantle is increased both by the presence of molten rock and by hydrogen, so when we interpret conductivity data, it is difficult to distinguish between these two interpretations. We have written a new code to help this. It analyzes whether the conductivity of the mantle could only be explained by the presence of molten rock, whether it could only be explained by large hydrogen contents, or whether it could be explained by either. Our results show that the distribution of partially molten rock is very uneven: Most lies beneath hot spot volcanic islands, while there is no need for molten rock to be present beneath old continents or old parts of the ocean. Beneath young parts of the ocean, the electrical conductivities could be explained by either a small amount of molten rock or by large hydrogen contents.
DS202104-0576
2021
Selway, K.Foerster, M.W., Selway, K.Melting of subducted sediments reconciles geophysical images of subduction zones.Nature Communications, Vol. 12, 1, doi:10.10.1038/ s41467-021-21657-8 8p. PdfMantlegeophysics - seismic

Abstract: ediments play a key role in subduction. They help control the chemistry of arc volcanoes and the location of seismic hazards. Here, we present a new model describing the fate of subducted sediments that explains magnetotelluric models of subduction zones, which commonly show an enigmatic conductive anomaly at the trenchward side of volcanic arcs. In many subduction zones, sediments will melt trenchward of the source region for arc melts. High-pressure experiments show that these sediment melts will react with the overlying mantle wedge to produce electrically conductive phlogopite pyroxenites. Modelling of the Cascadia and Kyushu subduction zones shows that the products of sediment melting closely reproduce the magnetotelluric observations. Melting of subducted sediments can also explain K-rich volcanic rocks that are produced when the phlogopite pyroxenites melt during slab roll-back events. This process may also help constrain models for subduction zone seismicity. Since melts and phlogopite both have low frictional strength, damaging thrust earthquakes are unlikely to occur in the vicinity of the melting sediments, while increased fluid pressures may promote the occurrence of small magnitude earthquakes and episodic tremor and slip.
DS202107-1121
2021
Selway, K.Ozaydin, S., Selway, K., Griffin, W.L.Are xenoliths from southwestern Kaapvaal Craton representative of the broader mantle? Constraints from magnetotelluric modeling. KimberlitesAGU Research Letter, 10.1029/2021GL092570 11p. PdfAfrica, South Africageophysics - magnetotellurics

Abstract: Measuring the composition of the Earth’s mantle is important for understanding mantle processes like plate tectonics, but is surprisingly difficult. Our most accurate information comes from mantle rocks, called xenoliths, that have been brought to the surface during volcanic eruptions. However, these rocks only come from a handful of places. We tend to expect that the rest of the mantle has the same composition as the xenoliths but this might be incorrect. We tested whether xenolith compositions really are representative of the broader mantle by comparing them with compositions interpreted from electrical conductivity models of the mantle. We carried out this comparison in the Kimberley region, South Africa, because it has excellent xenolith and electrical conductivity data. Our results show that xenolith compositions do seem to be broadly representative but there are two important differences: Hydrous minerals found in some xenoliths may not be spatially extensive depending on temperature, and the water contents of some other minerals are different from the broader region. This means that the compositions of xenoliths are at least partly controlled by local processes. Electrical conductivity data may be more useful for measuring some aspects of the composition of the broader mantle, especially its water content.
DS200512-0900
2005
Selyatisky, A.Yu.Reverdatto, V.V., Selyatisky, A.Yu., Remizov, D.N., Khlestov, V.V.Geochemical distinctions between mantle and crustal high/ultrahigh pressure peridotites and pyroxenites.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 400, 1, pp. 72-76.MantleUHP
DS200412-1658
2004
Selyatitski, A.Yu.Reverdatto, V.V., Selyatitski, A.Yu.Chloritic rocks and chloritized basalts as plausible precursors of metamorphic peridotites and pyroxenites in the Kokchetav MassDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 394, 1, Jan-Feb. pp. 130-133.Russia, KazakhstanMetamorphism
DS200612-1157
2006
Selyatitskii, A.Y.Reverdatto, V.V., Selyatitskii, A.Y.Olivine garnet olivine spinel and orthopyroxene metamorphic rocks of the Kokchetav Massif, northern Kazakhstan.Petrology, Vol. 13, 6, pp. 513-539.RussiaUHP
DS201112-0583
2011
Selyatitskii, A.Yu.Lesnov, F.P., Khlestov, V.V., Selyatitskii, A.Yu.Multiparametric discrimination of ultramafic rocks by rare earth elements in clinopyroxenes.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 438, 2, pp. 825-829.MantleREE chemistry
DS201112-0935
2011
Selyatitskii, A.Yu.Selyatitskii, A.Yu., Reverdatto, V.V.Comparison of the compositions of olivines and clinopyroxenes from mantle and crustal peridotites of collisional high pressure ultrahigh pressure zones.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 438, 1, pp. 705-710.MantleUHP
DS201212-0631
2012
Selyatitskii, A.Yu.Selyatitskii, A.Yu., Reverdatto, V.V.Comparison of the compositions of clinopyroxenes, garnets and spinels from mantle and crustal peridotites of collisional high pressure/ultrahigh pressure zones.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 441, 2, pp.MantleUHP - Kokchetav
DS201212-0632
2012
Selyatitskii, A.Yu.Selyatitskii, A.Yu., Reverdatto, V.V., Kuzmin, D.V., Sobolev, N.V.Minor elements in unusual olivines from high pressure peridotites of the Kokchetav Massif (Northern Kazakhstan).Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 445, 2, pp. 1015-1020.Russia, KazakhstanDeposit - Kokchetav
DS200812-0953
2008
Selyatitskiy, A.Yu.Reverdatto, V.V., Selyatitskiy, A.Yu., Carswell, D.A.Geochemical distinctions between crustal and mantle derived peridotites/pyroxenites in high/ultrhigh pressure metamorphic complexes.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 49, pp. 73-90.Russia, KazakhstanKokchetav massif, UHP
DS2002-1330
2002
Selyatitsky, A.Y.Reverdatto, V.V., Kolmogorov, Y.P., Parkhomenko, V.S., Selyatitsky, A.Y.Geochemistry of peridotites from the Kolchetav Massif, KazakhstanDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 386, 7, Sept-Oct.pp. 786-90.Russia, KazakhstanGeochemistry
DS200512-0901
2004
Selyatitsky, A.Y.Reverdatto, V.V., Selyatitsky, A.Y., Remizov, D.N., Khlestov, V.V.Geochemical distinctions between mantle and crustal high/ultrahigh pressure peridotites and pyroxenites.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 400, 1, pp. 72-76.MantleGeochemistry
DS2003-1158
2003
Selyatitsky, A.Yu.Reverdatto, V.V., Korolyuk, V.N., Selyatitsky, A.Yu.Evidence of the existence of peraluminous clinopyroxene ( tschermakite) in garnetDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 391A, 6, July-August, pp. 896-99.Russia, KazakhstanPetrology
DS200412-1657
2003
Selyatitsky, A.Yu.Reverdatto, V.V., Korolyuk, V.N., Selyatitsky, A.Yu.Evidence of the existence of peraluminous clinopyroxene ( tschermakite) in garnet pyroxenites from the Kokchetav Massif, KazakhsDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 391A, 6, July-August, pp. 896-99.Russia, KazakhstanPetrology
DS1986-0770
1986
Selyukov, S.N.Sobolev, V.V., Slobodskoy, V.Ya., Selyukov, S.N., Udoyev, A.A.Transformation of chaoite into other hydrocarbon phases.(Russian)Zapiski Vsesoy. Mineral. Obshchestva, (Russian), pp. 218-221RussiaBlank
DS201802-0228
2018
Sembroni, A.Corti, G., Molin, P., Sembroni, A., Bastow, I.D., Keir, D.Control of pre-rift lithospheric structure on the architecture and evolution of continental rifts: insights from the Main Ethiopian Rift, East Africa.Tectonics, Africa, Ethiopiatectonics

Abstract: We investigate the along-axis variations in architecture, segmentation and evolution of the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER), East Africa, and relate these characteristics to the regional geology, lithospheric structure and surface processes. We first illustrate significant along-axis variations in basin architecture through analysis of simplified geological cross-sections in different rift sectors. We then integrate this information with a new analysis of Ethiopian topography and hydrography to illustrate how rift architecture (basin symmetry/asymmetry) is reflected in the margin topography and has been likely amplified by a positive feedback between tectonics (flexural uplift) and surface processes (fluvial erosion, unloading). This analysis shows that ~70% of the 500 km-long MER is asymmetric, with most of the asymmetric rift sectors being characterized by a master fault system on the eastern margin. We finally relate rift architecture and segmentation to the regional geology and geophysical constraints on the lithosphere. We provide strong evidence that rift architecture is controlled by the contrasting nature of the lithosphere beneath the homogeneous, strong Somalian Plateau and the weaker, more heterogeneous Ethiopian Plateau, differences originating from the presence of pre-rift zones of weakness on the Ethiopian Plateau and likely amplified by surface processes. The data provided by this integrated analysis suggest that asymmetric rifts may directly progress to focused axial tectonic-magmatic activity, without transitioning into a symmetric rifting stage. These observations have important implications for the asymmetry of continental rifts and conjugate passive margins worldwide.
DS1988-0259
1988
Semeneev, R.R.Golovko, A.V., Semeneev, R.R., Visnevskii, Ya.S.Characteristics and composition of camptonite dikes from the upper reaches of the Tamshush River in the Gissar Ridge (Uzbek SSSR).(Russian)Uzbekiston Geologiya Zhurnal., (Russian), No. 5, pp. 10-12RussiaCamptonite
DS1970-0187
1970
Semenenko, M.P.Semenenko, M.P.Diamond Deposits of the Southwestern Ukraine Russian PlatforKiev: Izdat Narkova Dumka., 120P.Russia, UkraineKimberlite, Diamond, Kimberley
DS2001-1289
2001
SemenovZaitseva, T.S., Goncharov, G.N., Gittsovich, SemenovCrystal chemistry of chromium spinel from Imandra Layered pluton, Kola PeninsulaGeochemistry International, Vol. 39, No. 5, pp. 479-81.Russia, Kola PeninsulaSpinels
DS1990-0183
1990
Semenov, D.F.Bekhtol, D.A.F., Semenov, D.F.Metabasites and ultrabasites of the Susunay Range, Sakhalin Island.(Russian)Tikhookeanskaya Geol. (Russian), Vol. 1990, No. 1, pp. 121-126RussiaPetrology, Diamond mentioned
DS1997-1021
1997
Semenov, E.Semenov, E.Minerals and ores of the Khibiny Lovozero alkaline Massif, KolaRussian Acad. of Sciences, Fersman Min. MuseuM., 70p.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkaline rocks, Geology, mineralogy
DS2000-0702
2000
Semenov, G.A.Neprochov, Y.P., Semenov, G.A., Heikkinen, P.Comparison of the crustal structure of the Barents Sea and the Baltic Shield from seismic data.Tectonophysics, Vol.321, No.4, June 30, pp.429-48.Baltic States, Norway, Sweden, Kola, RussiaTectonics, Geophysics - seismics
DS1970-0002
1970
Semenov, G.S.Akimov, A.P., Semenov, G.S.Content of Radioactive Elements in the Kimberlites of the Siberian PlatformDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 190, No. 1-6, PP. 205-208.RussiaBlank
DS1983-0373
1983
Semenov, G.S.Kozlov, A.A. , Malov, YU., Semenov, G.S.Manganese Concentrators of Some Siberia Platform KimberlitesGeokimiya., No. 5, PP. 781-790.RussiaMineralogy
DS1984-0429
1984
Semenov, G.S.Kozlov, A.A., Petrukhin, V.A., Semenov, G.S., Frantcesson, E.V.Rare and Radioactive Elements in Accessory Perovskites From the Kimberlites of Western Yakutia.Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya)., No. 11, NOVEMBER PP. 1684-1688.Russia, YakutiaUranium
DS1985-0358
1985
Semenov, G.S.Koslov, A.A., Malov, Y.V., Semenov, G.S.Mineral concentrators of manganese in some kimberlites ofSiberianPlatform*(in Russian)Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), No. 5, pp. 781-783RussiaBlank
DS1985-0365
1985
Semenov, G.S.Kozlov, A.A., Petrukhin, V.A., Semenov, G.S., Frantsesson, YE.V.Rare and radioactive elements in accessory perovskite from WestYakutiakimberlitesGeochemistry International, Vol. 22, No. 4, pp. 34-39RussiaGeochemistry
DS200512-0930
2006
Semenov, S.V.Samykina, E.V., Surkov, A.V., Epplebaum, L.V., Semenov, S.V.Do old spoils contain large amounts of economically valuable minerals?Minerals Engineering, Vol. 18, 6, May, pp. 643-645. Note only 2 pagesRussia, Africa, South Africa, South AmericaGravity concentration, gold, diamonds
DS200712-0932
2005
Semenov, S.V.Samykina, E.V., Surkov, A.V., Eppelbaum, L.V., Semenov, S.V.Do old spoils contain large amounts of economically valuable minerals?Minerals Engineering, Vol. 18, 6, May pp. 643-645.Russia, AfricaMineral processing - gravel deposits
DS1992-0019
1992
Semenov, V.S.Amelin, J.V., Semenov, V.S.Enriched and depleted components in early Proterozoic mantle: evidence from neodymium and Sr isotopic study of layered intrusions and mafic dykes eastern shieldEos Transactions, Vol. 73, No. 14, April 7, supplement abstracts p.338Russia, eastern shieldMantle, Dykes, Geochronology
DS1995-0030
1995
Semenov, V.S.Amelin, Yu.V., Heaman, L.M., Semenov, V.S.Uranium-lead (U-Pb) geochronology of layered mafic intrusions in the eastern BalticShield: implications for timing and duration..Precambrian Research, Vol. 75, pp. 31-46.Russia, Baltic States, Kola PeninsulaGeochronology, Pechenga, nickel, platinum group elements (PGE), Ultramafic intrusions
DS1996-1279
1996
Semenov, V.Y.Semenov, V.Y., Rodkin, M.Conductivity structure of the upper mantle in an active subduction zoneJournal of Geodynamics, Vol. 21, No. 4, July pp. 355-364.Russia, Sakhalin IslandSubduction, Geophysics - seismics
DS200612-1262
2006
Semenov, V.Y.Semenov, V.Y., Jozwiak, W.Lateral variations of the mid-mantle conductance beneath Europe.Tectonophysics, Vol. 416, 1-4, April 5, pp. 279-288.EuropeGeophysics - seismics, geothermometry
DS200812-1037
2008
Semenov, V.Y.Semenov, V.Y., Pek, J., et al.Electrical structure of the upper mantle beneath Central Europe: results of the CEMES project.Acta Geophysica, Vol. 56, 4, pp. 957-981.EuropeGeophysics - seismics
DS1994-1569
1994
Semenov, Ye.I.Semenov, Ye.I.Minerals and ores of the Khibiny Lovozero alkali massifGeochemistry International, Vol. 31, No. 3, pp. 160-RussiaAlkaline rocks
DS1986-0239
1986
SemenovaFedoseyev, D.V., Semenova, Tyan-Shanskaya, A.S., Klyuyev, Yu.A.Large scale crystallization of diamond in the zone of itsthermodynamicstabilityDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 281, No. 1-6, November pp. 144-147RussiaDiamond Morphology, Crystallography
DS2001-0319
2001
SemenovaFisenko, A.V., Verhovsky, Semenova, Ivanov, PillingerThe Kaidun meteorite: interstellar diamond in the chromium and Ci carbonaceous components.Geochemistry International, Vol. 38, Suppl. 3, pp. S294-301.GlobalMeteorite, Diamond - mineralogy
DS2002-0461
2002
SemenovaFisenko, A.V., Verchovsky, Semenova, PillingerInterstellar diamond in the Efremovka CV3 chondrite: pyrolysis of different size fractions of grains.Geochemistry International, Vol.40,3,pp.209-28.GlobalMetorite - diamond
DS1984-0273
1984
Semenova, A.S.Fedoseyev, D.V., Semenova, A.S., et al.Kinetics of Nucleation of Diamonds in a Colloidal Solution Of Carbon in Metal.Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 274, No. 1-6, PP. 161-163.RussiaDiamond Morphology
DS200712-1064
2007
Semenova, D.V.Talibova,A.G., Ponomarchuk, V.A., Semenova, D.V.EA-IRMS: analysis of graphite and diamond.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A997.TechnologyDiamond
DS200912-0686
2009
Semenova, D.V.Semenova, D.V., Ponomarchuk, V.A.Carbon isotopic composition in diamonds and crystalline graphite - continuous flow GB-IRMS method.Goldschmidt Conference 2009, p. A1193 Abstract.TechnologyChemistry
DS2003-1404
2003
Semenova, I.F.Valter, A.A., Oleynik, H.S., Fisenko, A.V., Semenova, I.F.Structural and morphological evidence of the impact induced development of diamondGeochemistry International, Vol. 41, 10, pp. 939-946.GlobalMeteoritic - diamond
DS200512-0290
2005
Semenova, I.F.Fisenko, A.V., Semenova, I.F.Hl and N populations of nanodiamond grains in meteorites.Geochemistry International, Vol. 43, 2, pp. 105-116.Meteorite
DS1992-0464
1992
Semenova, L.F.Fisenko, A.V., Semenova, L.F., Tatsii, V.F., Baryshnikov, G.V.Diamonds in carbonaceous chondrite Efremovka CV3. (Russian)Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), No. 1, Jan. pp. 150-154RussiaChondrite, Diamondiferous
DS1992-0465
1992
Semenova, L.F.Fisenko, A.V., Semenova, L.F., Tatsiy, V.F., Baryshnikova, G.V.Diamonds from the Yefremovka CV3 carbonaceous chondriteGeochemistry International, Vol. 29, No. 8, pp. 154-RussiaChondrite
DS1995-0544
1995
Semenova, L.F.Fisenko, A.V., Verkhovskiy, A.B., Semenova, L.F.Inert gases in interstellar diamond in the Yefremovka C3V chondriteGeochemistry International, Vol. 32, No. 2, pp. 1-12.GlobalMeteorites
DS2003-1405
2003
Semenova, L.F.Valter, A.A., Oleynik, H.S., Fisenko, A.V., Semenova, L.F.Structural and morphological evidence from impact induced development of diamondGeochemistry International, Vol. 41, 10, pp. 939-46.GlobalMicromorphology - martensite transformation
DS200412-2031
2003
Semenova, L.F.Valter, A.A., Oleynik, H.S., Fisenko, A.V., Semenova, L.F.Structural and morphological evidence from impact induced development of diamond after graphite in the Novo-Urei meteorite.Geochemistry International, Vol. 41, 10, pp. 939-46.TechnologyMicromorphology - martensite transformation
DS1995-0484
1995
Semenova, V.G.Egorov, K.N., Semenova, V.G., Bogdanov, G.V.Common patterns of the process of early serpentinization of dunites andkimberlites.. UralsRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 36, No. 9, pp. 79-84.Russia, Yakutia, UralsKosva, ultrabasites, lizardite, brucite, Mineralogy -serpentization, kimberlites
DS1994-0525
1994
Semenova L.F.Fisenko, A.V., Verkhovskiy, A.B., Semenova L.F., Shukolyukov, A.Inert gases in diamonds from Yefremovka CV3 carbonaceous chondriteDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 328, No. 1, Nov. pp. 189-194.GlobalMeteorite, Chondrite
DS1984-0647
1984
Semenovatianshanskaia, A.S.Semenovatianshanskaia, A.S.Kinetics of Diamond Nucleation in Colloidal Solution of Carbon in a Metal.Doklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 274, No. 4, PP. 910-912.RussiaMineralogy
DS1985-0183
1985
Semenovatianshanskaia, A.S.Federoseev, D.V., Semenovatianshanskaia, A.S., Kliuev, I.A.Mass Crystallization of Diamonds in the Region of its Thermodynamic Stability.Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk. SSSR., Vol. 281, No. 5, PP. 1192-1195.RussiaCrystallography
DS1986-0722
1986
Semenova-Tyan-Shanakaya, A.S.Semenova-Tyan-Shanakaya, A.S., Yakubova, S.A.Internal morphology and microhardness of natural diamond.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR (Russian), Vol. 286, No. 6, pp. 1491-1493RussiaBlank
DS1985-0185
1985
Semenova-Tyanshanskaya, A.S.Fedoseev, D.V., Semenova-Tyanshanskaya, A.S., Klyuev, IU.Mass Crystallization of Diamond in the Regio of its Thermodynamic Stability.Doklady Academy of Sciences Nauk SSSR., Vol. 281, No. 5, PP. 1192-1195.RussiaDiamond Mass Crystal, Morphology, Crystallography
DS1984-0271
1984
Semenova-Tyan-Shanskaya, A.S.Federoseyev, D.V., Semenova-Tyan-Shanskaya, A.S.Kinetics of nucleation of diamonds in a colloidal solution of carbon inmetalDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 274, Jan-Feb, No. 1-6, pp. 161-163RussiaDiamond Morphology
DS1987-0661
1987
Semenova-Tyan-Shanskaya, A.S.Semenova-Tyan-Shanskaya, A.S., Yakubova, S.A.Internal morphology and microhardness of natural diamondDokl. Acad. Sciences USSR Earth Science Section, Vol. 286, No. 1-6, September pp. 150-151RussiaBlank
DS200712-0309
2007
Sements, E.Fedortchouk, Y., Canil, D., Sements, E.Mechanisms of diamond oxidation and their bearing on the fluid composition in kimberlite magmas.American Mineralogist, Vol. 92, 7, pp. 1200-1212.MantleMagmatism - diamond genesis
DS2003-0060
2003
Semenyna, L.Ayer, J.A., Conceicao. R.V., Ketchum, J.W.F., Sage, R.P., Semenyna, L.The timing and petrogenesis of Diamondiferous lamprophyres in the Michipicoten andOntario Geological Survey Open File, No. 6120, pp. 10 1-9.Ontario, Wawa, Lalibert, OhioPetrology - Oasis
DS200412-0081
2003
Semenyna, L.Ayer, J.A., Conceicao,R.V., Ketchum, J.W.F., Sage, R.P., Semenyna, L., Wyman, D.A.The timing and petrogenesis of Diamondiferous lamprophyres in the Michipicoten and Abitibi greenstone belts.Ontario Geological Survey Open File, No. 6120, pp. 10 1-9.Canada, Ontario, WawaPetrology - Oasis
DS1995-0248
1995
Semepere, T.Butler, R.F., Richards, D.R., Semepere, T., Marshall, L.G.Paleomagnetic determinations of vertical axis tectonic rotation from Late Cretaceous and Paleoene strataGeology, Vol. 23, No. 9, Sept. pp. 799-802BoliviaStratigraphy, Paleomagnetism
DS1960-1022
1968
Semilyakin, F.P.Semilyakin, F.P.Kimberlite Rocks from Vuoriyarvi Kola PeninsulaZap. Vses. Miner. Obshch., PT. 97, No. 2, PP. 236-240.RussiaBlank
DS200712-0964
2007
Seminskii, K.Seminskii, K., Radziminovich, Y.A.Seismicity of the southern Siberian platform: spatiotemporal characteristics and genesis.Izvestia, Physics of the Solid Earth, Vol. 43, 9, Sept., pp. 726-737. IngentaRussiaGeophysics - seismics
DS201212-0633
2012
Semiz, B.Semiz, B., Coban, H., Roden, M.F., Ozpinar, Y., Flower, M.F.J., McGregor, H.Mineral composition in cognate inclusions in Late Miocene-Early Pliocene potassic lamprophyres with affinities to lamproites from the Denizli region, Western Anatolia, Turkey: implications for uppermost mantle processes in a back arc setting.Lithos, in press available, 20p.Africa, TurkeyLamproite
DS1998-0430
1998
SemjonovaFisenko, A.V., Semjonova, Aronin, Tatsii et al.Size separation of interstellar diamondsGeochemistry International, Vol. 36, No. 5, pp. 467-470.GlobalMeteor, Diamond homegeneity
DS201012-0700
2010
Semjonova, L.Shiryaev, A.A., Fisenko, A.V., Vlasov, I., Semjonova, L.Study of impurities in nanodiamonds from meteorites by spectroscopic methods: implications for their formation.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 798.TechnologyMeteorite
DS200512-1185
2005
Semken, S.Wilson, D., Aster, R., Ni, J., Grand, S., West, M., Gao, W.,Baldridge, W.S., Semken, S.Imaging the seismic structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Great Plains, Rio Grande Rift, and Colorado Plateau using receiver functions.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 110, B5, 10.1029/2004 JB003492United States, Colorado PlateauGeophysics - seismics
DS200512-1186
2005
Semken, S.Wilson, D., Aster, R., Ni, J., Grand, S., West, M., Gao, W., Baldridge, W.S., Semken, S.Imaging the seismic structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Great Plains, Rio Grande Rift and Colorado Plateau using receiver functions.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 110, B5 May 28, B05306 10.1029/2004 JB003492United States, ColoradoGeophysics - seismics
DS1995-1703
1995
Semlova, G.B.Semlova, G.B.The sequence of crystallization of different types of bort from Yakutian kimberlites and conditions/formationProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 538-540.Russia, YakutiaCarbonado -bort, Deposit -Aikal, Udachnaya
DS1982-0236
1982
Semonov.Gurvich, M.Y., Kozlov, A.A., Malkov, Y.V., Pavlov, Y.G., Semonov.Structures of disintegration in rutile of kimberlite in Letseng la Teraipipe, Lesotho.(Russian)Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), No. 10, pp. 1520-1523LesothoBlank
DS1990-0936
1990
Semopere, J.C.Lin, J., Purdy, G.M., Schouten, H., Semopere, J.C., Zervas, C.Evidence from gravity dat a for focused magmatic accretion along the mid-Atlantic RidgeNature, Vol. 344, No. 6267, April 12, pp. 627-632Mid-Atlantic RidgeGeophysics -gravity, Magma
DS1997-1022
1997
Sempere, T.Sempere, T., Butler, R.F., et al.Stratigraphy and chronology of Upper Cretaceous lower Paleogene strata Bolivia and northwest ArgentinaGeological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin, Vol. 109, No. 6, June pp. 709-727Bolivia, ArgentinaStratigraphy, Geochronology
DS2002-1442
2002
Sempere, T.Sempere, T., et al.Late Permian Middle Jurassic lithospheric thinning in Peru and Bolivia, its bearing on Andean age tectonicsTectonophysics, Vol.345, 1-4, Feb.15, pp. 153-81.Peru, BoliviaGeodynamics - tectonics
DS201910-2296
2019
Semple, A.Semple, A., Lenardic, A.The seismic signature of pressure driven flow in the Earth's asthenosphere.AGU Fall Meeting, 1p. AbstractMantlegeophysics - seismic
DS202008-1441
2020
Semple, A.Semple, A., Lenardic, A.On the robustness of asthenosphere plug flow in mantle convection models with plate like behaviour.Researchgate, 11p. PdfMantleconvection

Abstract: Conventional wisdom holds that the motion of tectonic plates drives motion in the Earth’s rocky interior (i.e., in the Earth’s asthenosphere). Recent seismological observations have brought this view into question as they indicate that the velocity of the asthenosphere can exceed tectonic plate velocity. This suggests that interior motions can drive plate motions. We explore models of coupled plate tectonics and interior motions to address this discrepancy. The models reveal that the coupling between plates and the asthenosphere is not an issue of plates drive asthenosphere motion or asthenosphere motion drives plates. Both factors work in tandem with the balance being a function of plate margins strength and asthenosphere rheology. In particular, a power-law viscosity allows pressure gradients to generate interior flow that can locally drive plate motion. The models also reveal a hysteresis effect that allows different tectonic states (plate tectonics versus a single plate planet) to exist at the same parameter conditions. This indicates that history and initial conditions can play a role in determining if a planet will or will not have plate tectonics.
DS202010-1874
2020
Semple, A.Semple, A., Lenardic, A.The robustness of pressure-driven asthenospheric flow in mantle convection models with plate-like behavior.Geophysical Research Letters, 10.1029/2020/GL089556 11p. PdfMantleconvection

Abstract: It is generally thought that tectonic plates drive motion in the Earth's rocky interior. Recent observations have challenged this view as they indicate that interior motion can drive tectonic plates. Models of coupled tectonics and interior flow are used to address this discrepancy. The models reveal that the question of “does plate tectonics drive interior flow or does interior flow drive plate tectonics” may be ill founded as both possibilities may be active at the same time. The balance between the two drivers is found to depend on plate margin strength. The models also reveal that different tectonic modes can exist under the same physical conditions. This indicates a planet's initial state can determine if it will or will not have plate tectonics.
DS201807-1524
2018
Semple, A.G.Semple, A.G., Lenardic, A.Plug flow in the Earth's asthenosphere.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 496, pp. 29-36.Mantlerheology, tectonics

Abstract: Recent seismic observations, focused on mantle flow below the Pacific plate, indicate the presence of two shear layers in the Earth's asthenosphere. This is difficult to explain under the classic assumption of asthenosphere flow driven by plate shear from above. We present numerical mantle convection experiments that show how a power law rheology, together with dynamic pressure gradients, can generate an asthenosphere flow profile with a near constant velocity central region bounded above and below by concentrated shear layers (a configuration referred to as plug flow). The experiments show that as the power law dependence of asthenosphere viscosity is increased from 1 to 3, maximum asthenosphere velocities can surpass lithosphere velocity. The wavelength of mantle convection increases and asthenosphere flow transitions from a linear profile (Couette flow) to a plug flow configuration. Experiments in a 3D spherical domain also show a rotation of velocity vectors from the lithosphere to the asthenosphere, consistent with seismic observations. Global mantle flow remains of whole mantle convection type with plate and asthenosphere flow away from a mid-ocean ridge balanced by broader return flow in the lower mantle. Our results are in line with theoretical scalings that mapped the conditions under which asthenosphere flow can provide an added plate driving force as opposed to the more classic assumption that asthenosphere flow is associated with a plate resisting force.
DS202101-0032
2020
Semple, A.G.Semple, A.G., Lenardic, A.Feedbacks between a non-Newtonian upper mantle, mantle viscosity structure and mantle dynamics.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 224, 2, pp. 961-972.Mantlegeophysics - seismics

Abstract: Previous studies have shown that a low viscosity upper mantle can impact the wavelength of mantle flow and the balance of plate driving to resisting forces. Those studies assumed that mantle viscosity is independent of mantle flow. We explore the potential that mantle flow is not only influenced by viscosity but can also feedback and alter mantle viscosity structure owing to a non-Newtonian upper-mantle rheology. Our results indicate that the average viscosity of the upper mantle, and viscosity variations within it, are affected by the depth to which a non-Newtonian rheology holds. Changes in the wavelength of mantle flow, that occur when upper-mantle viscosity drops below a critical value, alter flow velocities which, in turn, alter mantle viscosity. Those changes also affect flow profiles in the mantle and the degree to which mantle flow drives the motion of a plate analogue above it. Enhanced upper-mantle flow, due to an increasing degree of non-Newtonian behaviour, decreases the ratio of upper- to lower-mantle viscosity. Whole layer mantle convection is maintained but upper- and lower-mantle flow take on different dynamic forms: fast and concentrated upper-mantle flow; slow and diffuse lower-mantle flow. Collectively, mantle viscosity, mantle flow wavelengths, upper- to lower-mantle velocities and the degree to which the mantle can drive plate motions become connected to one another through coupled feedback loops. Under this view of mantle dynamics, depth-variable mantle viscosity is an emergent flow feature that both affects and is affected by the configuration of mantle and plate flow.
DS1996-1280
1996
Semple, P.G.Semple, P.G.Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS): mining and change #2Mining Engineering, Vol. 48, No. 9, Sept. pp. 52-55Russia, Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)Legal, environmental, Costs
DS1996-1281
1996
Semple, P.G.Semple, P.G.Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS): mining and change #1Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME)-American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME) Preprint, 96-158Russia, Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)Mining
DS201012-0682
2010
Semprich, J.Semprich, J., Simon, N.S.C., Podladchikov, Y.Y.Density variations in the thickened crust as a function of pressure, temperature and composition.International Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 99, 7, pp. 1487-1510.MantleGeophysics
DS201412-0793
2014
Semprich, J.Semprich, J., Simon, N.S.C.Inhibited eclogitization and consequences for geophysical rock properties and delamination models: constraints from cratonic lower crustal xenoliths.Gondwana Research, Vol. 25, pp. 668-684.MantleGeophysics - eclogites
DS201907-1565
2019
Semprich, J.J.Oliveira, E.P., Talavera, C., Windley, B.F., Zhao, L., Semprich, J.J., McNaughton, N.J., Amaral, W.S., Sombini, G., Navarro, M., Silva, D.Mesoarchean ( 2820 Ma )high pressure mafic granulite at Uaus, Sao Francisco craton, Brazil, and its potential significance for the assembly of Archean supercraton.Precambrian Research, Vol. 331, 105266 20p.South America, Brazilcraton
DS1989-1370
1989
SenSen, ZekaiCumulative semivariogram models of regionalized variablesMathematical Geology, Vol. 21, No. 8, November pp. 891-904GlobalGeostatistics, SemivariograM.
DS1992-1368
1992
SenSen, ZekaiStandard cumulative semivariograms of stationary stochastic processes and regional correlationMathematical Geology, Vol. 24, No. 4, pp. 417-435GlobalComputers -semivariograms, Geostatistics
DS1984-0648
1984
Sen, A.K.Sen, A.K., Varma, O.P.Some aspects of magnetite mineralization associated with the Sung Valley alkaline carbonatite complex, MaghalayaSymposium on chromite deposits of India and related problems of their, pp. 13-14. AbstractIndiaCarbonatite
DS1991-0784
1991
Sen, A.K.Jaireth, S., Sen, A.K., Varma, O.P.Fluid inclusion studies in apatite of the Sung Valley carbonatite northeast India: evidence of melt-fluid immiscibilityJournal of Geological Society India, Vol. 37, June pp. 547-559IndiaCarbonatite, Geochemistry
DS1999-0649
1999
Sen, A.K.Sen, A.K.Origin of the Sung Valley carbonatite complex, Meghalaya India: major element geochemistry constraintsJournal of Geological Society India, Vol. 53, No. 3, Mar. pp. 285-98.IndiaCarbonatite, Geochemistry
DS2003-0552
2003
Sen, A.K.Harijan, N., Sen, A.K., Sarkar, S., Das, J.D., Kanungo, D.P.Geomorphotectonic around the Sung Valley carbonatite complex, Shillong PlateauGeological Society of India Journal, Vol. 62, 1, pp. 103-109.IndiaCarbonatite
DS2003-0553
2003
Sen, A.K.Harijan, N., Sen, A.K., Sarkar, S., Das, J.D., Kanungo, D.P.Geomorphotectonics around the Sung Valley carbonatite Complex Shillong Plateau NEJournal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 62, 1, July, pp. 103-109.India, northeastCarbonatite
DS200412-0791
2003
Sen, A.K.Harijan, N., Sen, A.K., Sarkar, S., Das, J.D., Kanungo, D.P.Geomorphotectonics around the Sung Valley carbonatite Complex Shillong Plateau NE India: a remote sensing and GIS approach.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 62, 1, July, pp. 103-109.IndiaTectonics Carbonatites
DS201809-2007
2018
Sen, A.K.Chakrabarty, A., Mitchell, R.H., Ren, M., Sen, A.K., Supriyo, P., Supratim, P.Nb Zr REE re-mobilization and implications for transitional agpaitic rock formation: insights from the Sushin a Hill complex, India.Petrology, doi: 10.1093/petrology/egy084Indianepheline syenite

Abstract: The formation of transitional agpaitic rocks is not a well understood process as there are few studies of miaskitic to agpaitic transitions. The Mesoproterozoic Sushina Hill complex (India) provides a suitable site to investigate these "transitions" as this complex hosts diverse miaskitic and agpaitic nepheline syenites, together with syenites containing exotic mineral assemblages. In this study, we have used mineralogical and geochemical data to describe the evolution of the transitional agpaitic rocks occurring at Sushina Hill. In common with other occurrences, high field strength elements (HFSE) in miaskitic nepheline syenites are mainly sequestered by primary zircon and magnetite. In contrast, the major HFSE carriers in agpaitic nepheline syenites (agpaitic unit-I) are late-magmatic eudialyte and rinkite-(Ce) - nacareniobsite-(Ce), formed at T between 825° - 784ºC and aSiO2 in the range of 0.41 - 0.44. With decreasing temperature (~ 575ºC) and aSiO2(0.30), coupled with an increase in aH2O, this assemblage has undergone extensive subsolidus alteration leading to the decomposition of late-magmatic eudialyte to wöhlerite - marianoite, alkali-zirconosilicates (catapleiite/gaidonnyaite, hilairite), and pectolite - serandite. Decomposition of late-magmatic eudialyte resulted in a more alkaline fluid by increasing the a(Na+)/a(Cl-) ratio, facilitating crystallization of hydrothermal eudialyte replacing late-magmatic eudialyte. Crystallization of hydrothermal eudialyte leads to evolving fluids which are less alkaline, resulting in the crystallization of a transitional agpaitic assemblage of pyrochlore + zircon + niobokupletskite + wadeite in agpaitic unit-II in the temperature range 547º - 455ºC with aSiO2 in the range 0.27 - 0.25. Regional scale deformation contemporaneous with the subsolidus alteration stage leads to separation of the evolving fluid from the system, resulting in extensive albitization, with superposition of a new miaskitic-like assemblage in syenite I in the form of late-stage zircon - magnetite - xenotime - monazite-(Ce) upon the early assemblage of primary zircon and magnetite. During deformation, syenite unit-II composed of eudialyte - albite - aegirine was also formed and considered as a later stage pegmatitic offshoot of agpaitic unit I. The mineralogical changes are also complemented by variations in the bulk-rock composition in which the total REE, Nb, U and Th concentrations increase in order from: miaskitic unit ? agpaitic unit I ? syenite unit II, -I ? agpaitic unit II at constant Zr concentration. This suggests that the REE-Nb are mainly mobilized in agpaitic unit-II during the agpaitic - to - transitional agpaitic assemblage transformation in a relatively less alkaline environment.
DS202103-0376
2021
Sen, A.K.Dey, M., Mitchell, R.H., Bhattacharjee, S., Chakrabarty, A., Pal, S., Pal, S., Sen, A.K.Composition and genesis of albitite-hosted antecrystic pyrochlore from the Sevattur carbonatite complex, India.Mineralogical Magazine, 20p. Doi:10.1180/mgm.2021.6 24p. PdfIndiadeposit - Sevattur
DS202109-1460
2021
Sen, A.K.Dey, M., Bhattacharjee, S., Chakrabarty, A., Mitchell, R.H., Pal, S., Pal, S, Sen, A.K. Compositional variation and genesis of pyrochlore, belkovite and baotite from the Sevattur carbonatite complex, India.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 85, 4, pp. 588-606.Indiadeposit - Sevattur

Abstract: Pyrochlore-group minerals are common in the Neoproterozoic Sevattur carbonatite complex. This complex is composed of dolomite-, calcite-, banded- and blue carbonatite together with pyroxenite, albitite and diverse syenites. This work reports the paragenetic-textural types and compositional variation of pyrochlore hosted by dolomite carbonatite, banded carbonatite and albitite together with that of alteration assemblages containing belkovite and baotite. On the basis of composition, five different types of pyrochlore are recognised and termed Pcl-I through to Pcl-V. The Pb-rich Pcl-I are present exclusively as inclusions in U-rich Pcl-IIa in dolomite carbonatite. The alteration assemblages of Pb-poor Pcl-IIb + Ba-rich or Ba-Si- rich Pcl-IV + belkovite (dolomite carbonatite) and Si-rich Pcl-V + baotite (banded carbonatite) formed after Pcl-IIa differ in these carbonatites. The albitite hosts extremely U-Ti-rich Pcl-III, mantled by Ba-rich potassium feldspar. In common with the banded carbonatite, Pcl-V is formed by alteration of Pcl-III where this mantle is partially, or completely broken. The Ba-Si-enrichment of Pcl-IV and Pcl-V together with the ubiquitous presence of baryte in all Sevattur lithologies suggests late-stage interaction with a Ba-Si-rich acidic hydrothermal fluid. This fluid was responsible for leaching silica from the associated silicates and produced Pcl-V in the silicate-rich lithologies of the banded carbonatite and albitite. The absence of Pcl-V in dolomite carbonatite is a consequence of the low modal abundance of silicates. The complex compositional diversity and lithology specific pyrochlore alteration assemblages suggest that all pyrochlore (Pcl-I to Pcl-IV) were formed initially in an unknown source and transported subsequently in their respective hosts as altered antecrysts.
DS202109-1461
2021
Sen, A.K.Dey, M., Mitchell, R.H., Bhattacharjee, S., Chakrabarty, A., Pal, S., Pal, S, Sen, A.K. Compositiion and genesis of albitite-hosted antecrystic pyrochlore from the Sevattur carbonatite complex, Inida.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 85, 4, pp. 568-587.Indiadeposit - Sevattur

Abstract: The Neoproterozoic Sevattur complex is composed essentially of calcite and dolomite carbonatites together with pyroxenites and diverse syenites. This work reports the compositions and paragenesis of different pyrochlore generations hosted by albitite veins in this complex. The pyrochlore are distinctive, being exceptionally rich in uranium (26 to 36 wt.% UO2). Five types of pyrochlore (Pcl-I to Pcl-V) are recognised on the basis of composition and texture. With the exception of Pcl-V, the majority of the pyrochlore (Pcl-II to Pcl-IV) are surrounded by a thick orbicular mantle of Ba-rich potassium feldspar. This mantle around Pcl-V is partially-broken. Pcl-I is restricted to the cores of crystals, and associated with Pcl-II and -III and is relatively rich in Nb (0.53-0.62 apfu) together with more A-site vacancies (0.37-0.71 apfu) compared to Pcl-II to Pcl-IV. Other pyrochlore (Pcl-II to Pcl-IV) are characterised by elevated Ca and Ti compared to Pcl-I, which are related to the (3Nb5+ + Na+ ? 3Ti4+ + U4+) and (2Nb5+ ? 2Ti4+ + Ca2+) substitutions, respectively. These substitutions represent replacement of Pcl-II to Pcl-IV. Alteration and Ba-enrichment in all the pyrochlore are marked by interaction with an externally-derived Ba-rich hydrothermal fluid following the (2Nb5+ ? 2Ti4+ + Ba2+) substitution. This substitution, coupled with extensive metamictisation leads to the formation of Ba-rich (15.9-16.3 wt.% BaO) patchy-zoned Pcl-V. The orbicular mantles around Pcl-I to Pcl-IV have prevented extensive metamictisation and extensive secondary alteration compared to Pcl-V, where mantling is partially disrupted. The compositional and textural variation suggests that Pcl-II to Pcl-IV form by nucleation on Pcl-I, and are transported subsequently as antecrysts in the host albitite.
DS1995-1705
1995
Sen, C.Sen, C., Dunn, T.Experimental model metasomatism of a spinel lherzolite and production of amphibole bearing peridotite.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 119, No. 4, April pp. 422-432.New MexicoKilbourne Hole, experimental petrology, Peridotites
DS1986-0723
1986
Sen, G.Sen, G.Equilibration of Hawaiian garnet-spinel peridotitesGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstract Volume, Vol. 18, No. 6, p. 745. (abstract.)HawaiiBlank
DS1988-0625
1988
Sen, G.Sen, G., Jones, R.E.Exsolved silicate and oxide phases from clinopyroxenes in a single Hawaiian xenolith: implications for oxidation state of the Hawaiian uppermantleGeology, Vol. 16, No. 1, January pp. 69-72HawaiiComparison with kimberlites, Analyses of clinopyroxene
DS1991-1542
1991
Sen, G.Sen, G.On the scale of heterogeneities in clinopyroxenes of spinel lherzolite xenoliths from Oahu, Hawaii: implications for non-modal advection-diffusion controlled trace eProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 356-358HawaiiTrace elements, Xenoliths -spinel lherzolites
DS1992-1367
1992
Sen, G.Sen, G., Dunn, T.Preliminary results of mantle metasomatism experimentsEos Transactions, Vol. 73, No. 14, April 7, supplement abstracts p.335-6MantleExperimental petrology, Metasomatism
DS1993-1423
1993
Sen, G.Sen, G., Macfarlane, A., Srimal, N.Mantle metasomesGeological Society of America Annual Abstract Volume, Vol. 25, No. 6, p. A99 abstract onlyHawaiiMantle, Metasomatism
DS2001-0589
2001
Sen, G.Keshav, S., Sen, G.Majoritic garnets in Hawaiian xenoliths.. preliminary resultsGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 28, No. 18, Sept. 15, pp. 3509-12.HawaiiXenoliths
DS2002-0833
2002
Sen, G.Keshav, S., Sen, G.A rare composite xenolith from Salt Lake Crater, Oahu: high-pressure fractionation and implications for kimberlitic melts in the Hawaiian mantleContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, DOI. 10.1007/s00410-002-0415-0HawaiiComposite xenolith, olivine-bearing garnet clinopyroxenite, spinel, garnet
DS202009-1620
2020
Sen, K.Choudhary, S., Sen, K., Kumar, S., Rana, S., Ghosh, S.Forsterite repricipitation and carbon dioxide entrapment in the lithospheric mantle during its interaction with carbonatitic melt: a case study from the Sung Valley ultramafic-alkaline-carbonatite complex, Meghalaya, NE India.Geological Magazine, 10.1017/S001675 68200000631 12p.Indiacarbonatites

Abstract: Carbonatite melts derived from the mantle are enriched in CO2- and H2O-bearing fluids. This melt can metasomatize the peridotitic lithosphere and liberate a considerable amount of CO2. Experimental studies have also shown that a CO2-H2O-rich fluid can form Fe- and Mg-rich carbonate by reacting with olivine. The Sung Valley carbonatite of NE India is related to the Kerguelen plume and is characterized by rare occurrences of olivine. Our study shows that this olivine is resorbed forsterite of xenocrystic nature. This olivine bears inclusions of Fe-rich magnesite. Accessory apatite in the host carbonatite contains CO2-H2O fluid inclusions. Carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses indicate that the carbonatites are primary igneous carbonatites and are devoid of any alteration or fractionation. We envisage that the forsterite is a part of the lithospheric mantle that was reprecipitated in a carbonatite reservoir through dissolution-precipitation. Carbonation of this forsterite, during interaction between the lithospheric mantle and carbonatite melt, formed Fe-rich magnesite. CO2-H2O-rich fluid derived from the carbonatite magma and detected within accessory apatite caused this carbonation. Our study suggests that a significant amount of CO2 degassed from the mantle by carbonatitic magma can become entrapped in the lithosphere by forming Fe- and Mg-rich carbonates.
DS202101-0003
2020
Sen, K.Choudhary, S., Sen, K., Kumar, S., Rana, S., Ghosh, S.Forsterite reprecipitation and carbon dioxide entrapment in the lithospheric mantle during its interaction with carbonatitic melt: a case study from the Sung Valley ultramafic-alkaline-carbonatite complex, Meghalaya, NE India.Geological Magazine, doi:1017/S001 6756820000631, 12p.Indiadeposit - Sung Valley

Abstract: Carbonatite melts derived from the mantle are enriched in CO2- and H2O-bearing fluids. This melt can metasomatize the peridotitic lithosphere and liberate a considerable amount of CO2. Experimental studies have also shown that a CO2-H2O-rich fluid can form Fe- and Mg-rich carbonate by reacting with olivine. The Sung Valley carbonatite of NE India is related to the Kerguelen plume and is characterized by rare occurrences of olivine. Our study shows that this olivine is resorbed forsterite of xenocrystic nature. This olivine bears inclusions of Fe-rich magnesite. Accessory apatite in the host carbonatite contains CO2-H2O fluid inclusions. Carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses indicate that the carbonatites are primary igneous carbonatites and are devoid of any alteration or fractionation. We envisage that the forsterite is a part of the lithospheric mantle that was reprecipitated in a carbonatite reservoir through dissolution-precipitation. Carbonation of this forsterite, during interaction between the lithospheric mantle and carbonatite melt, formed Fe-rich magnesite. CO2-H2O-rich fluid derived from the carbonatite magma and detected within accessory apatite caused this carbonation. Our study suggests that a significant amount of CO2 degassed from the mantle by carbonatitic magma can become entrapped in the lithosphere by forming Fe- and Mg-rich carbonates.
DS202103-0372
2021
Sen, K.Choudhary, S., Sen, K., Kumar, S., Rana, S., Ghosh, S.Forsterite reprecipitation and carbon dioxide entrapment in the lithospheric mantle during its interaction with carbonatitic melt: a case study from the Sung Valley ultramafic-alkaline-carbonatite complex, Meghalaya, NE India.Geological Magazine, Vol. 158, 3, pp. 475-486.Indiadeposit - Sung Valley

Abstract: Carbonatite melts derived from the mantle are enriched in CO2- and H2O-bearing fluids. This melt can metasomatize the peridotitic lithosphere and liberate a considerable amount of CO2. Experimental studies have also shown that a CO2-H2O-rich fluid can form Fe- and Mg-rich carbonate by reacting with olivine. The Sung Valley carbonatite of NE India is related to the Kerguelen plume and is characterized by rare occurrences of olivine. Our study shows that this olivine is resorbed forsterite of xenocrystic nature. This olivine bears inclusions of Fe-rich magnesite. Accessory apatite in the host carbonatite contains CO2-H2O fluid inclusions. Carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses indicate that the carbonatites are primary igneous carbonatites and are devoid of any alteration or fractionation. We envisage that the forsterite is a part of the lithospheric mantle that was reprecipitated in a carbonatite reservoir through dissolution-precipitation. Carbonation of this forsterite, during interaction between the lithospheric mantle and carbonatite melt, formed Fe-rich magnesite. CO2-H2O-rich fluid derived from the carbonatite magma and detected within accessory apatite caused this carbonation. Our study suggests that a significant amount of CO2 degassed from the mantle by carbonatitic magma can become entrapped in the lithosphere by forming Fe- and Mg-rich carbonates.
DS1975-0863
1978
Sen, N.B.Sen, N.B.Glorious History of Koh-i-noor. the Brightest Jewel in the British Crown.New Delhi: New Book Society of India., 127P.IndiaDiamonds Notable, Kohinur
DS200812-1038
2007
Sen, R.Sen, R., Chakrabarti, S.Nonlinearity and holism in geological systems - some reflections.Current Science, Vol. 91, 10, Nov. 25, pp. 1364-1366.TechnologyMusings
DS1970-0188
1970
Sen, S.N.Sen, S.N., Narasimha rao, CH.Chelima Dykes. #2Proceedings SECD Symposium ON UPPER MANTLE PROJECT., SESSION 5 DECEMBER PP. 435-439.IndiaLamproite
DS1970-0411
1971
Sen, S.N.Sen, S.N.Chelima Dykes. #1Hyderabad: National Geophysical Research Institute (ngri) Geophys. Report, PP. 435-439.India, Andhra PradeshGeology, Petrology, Lamproite
DS1970-0989
1974
Sen, S.N.Sen, S.N.Integrated Exploration for Diamond in IndiaIndian Minerals, Vol. 28, No. 1, Jan.-MAR, PP. 20-23.IndiaHistory
DS1975-0616
1977
Sen, S.N.Sen, S.N., Chakraborty, D.K.A Few Observations on the Recent Studies of the Indian Kimberlites.India Geological Survey Miscellaneous Publishing, No. 31, PP. 85-87.IndiaGeology
DS1991-1543
1991
Sen, Z.Sen, Z.Spatial simulation of geologic variablesMath. Geol, Vol. 23, No. 6, August pp. 887-890GlobalGeostatistics, Spatial
DS1995-1704
1995
Sen GautaM.Sen GautaM.A simple petrologic model for the generation of Deccan Trap magmasInternational Geology Review, Vol. 37, No. 9, Sept. pp. 825-IndiaMagma, Petrology -Deccan Traps
DS1989-1369
1989
Sen Gupta, S.Sen Gupta, S., Dutta, A., Bandopadhyay, R.Ultra-potassic rock from Raniganj coalfieldIndian Minerals, Vol. 43, No. 1, January-March pp. 19-24IndiaLamproite -Ultra-potassic, Alkaline rocks
DS1993-1424
1993
Sen. G.Sen. G.Oceanic ultramafic rocks: clues to chemical layering of the lithosphere and magma extraction processes.Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union, Vol. 74, No. 16, April 20, supplement abstract p. 321.MantlePeridotite
DS201112-0936
2011
Senachin, V.N.Senachin, V.N., Baranov, A.A.Lateral density In homogeneities of the continental and oceanic lithosphere and their relationship with the Earth's crust formation.Russian Journal of Pacific Geology, Vol. 5, 4, pp. 369-379.MantleIsostasy, density
DS200712-0965
2007
Senda, R.Senda, R., Suzuki, K., Kawabata, H., Kaneoka, I.Re-Os isotope systematics of kimberlites from SW Greenland: implications for an isolated lithospheric mantle during 500 m.y.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A915.Europe, GreenlandSarfatoq dykes
DS200812-1039
2008
Senda, R.Senda, R., Kogiso, T., Suzuki, K., Suzuki, T., Uesugi, K., Takeuchi, A., Sukari, Y.Detection of sub micro scale highly siderophile element nugget in kimberlite by synchrontron radiation X ray fluoresence analysis.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A847.Europe, GreenlandSpectroscopy
DS201609-1741
2016
Senda, R.Senda, R., Shimizu, K., Suzuki, K.Ancient depleted mantle as a source of boninites in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc: evidence from Os isotopes in Cr- spinel and magnetite.Chemical Geology, Vol. 439, pp. 110-119.MantleBoninites

Abstract: Boninite is a volcanic rock derived from shallow melting of highly depleted hydrous mantle, fluxed with water from subducted slabs. The eruption of boninite early in the history of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc (~ 48-45 Ma), suggests generation by melting of upper mantle material that was relatively unmodified by subducted components. Thus, the boninite composition should largely reflect that of the sub-arc mantle. For better understanding of the mantle sources of nascent arc settings and the contributions of different components to arc melts, we analyzed Os isotope ratios (187Os/188Os) of bulk rocks and mineral separates (euhedral Cr-spinel from boninites and euhedral Cr-spinel/magnetite mixtures from tholeiites younger than 45 Ma that erupted after boninites) from the Bonin Islands and Guam. The age-corrected (initial) Os isotope ratios of the whole-rock samples (0.1179-0.2050) were more radiogenic and variable than those of the mineral separates, possibly because of contamination with crustal materials during magma ascent or alteration after emplacement. The age-corrected Os isotope ratios of euhedral Cr-spinel in boninite from the Bonin Islands (0.1187-0.1254) and from Guam (0.1220-0.1269) are unradiogenic relative to primitive mantle, and those of the Cr-spinel/magnetite mixtures from the tholeiites from the Bonin Islands are similar to or slightly more radiogenic (0.1224-0.1382). The most depleted Os isotope ratio of the Cr-spinel from boninite yielded a model Re depletion (TRD) age of 1.4 Ga, suggesting that the mantle source of the boninite experienced melt extraction prior to 1.4 Ga. The source of the boninites is interpreted to be mostly highly depleted mantle with a small contribution of slab flux arising from altered oceanic crust that has radiogenic Os components, with or without contributions from components with relatively unradiogenic Os such as volcaniclastics of oceanic island basalt affiliation or very young mid-ocean ridge basalt.
DS201710-2270
2017
Senda, R.Umino, S., Knayama, K., Kitamura, K., Tamura, A., Ishizuka, A., Senda, R., Arai, S.Did boninite originate from the heterogeneous mantle with reycled ancient slab?Island Arc, Sept. 28, 3p.Mantlesubduction

Abstract: Boninites are widely distributed along the western margin of the Pacific Plate extruded during the incipient stage of the subduction zone development in the early Paleogene period. This paper discusses the genetic relationships of boninite and antecedent protoarc basalt magmas and demonstrates their recycled ancient slab origin based on the T-P conditions and Pb-Hf-Nd-Os isotopic modeling. Primitive melt inclusions in chrome spinel from Ogasawara and Guam islands show severely depleted high-SiO2, MgO (high-silica) and less depleted low-SiO2, MgO (low-silica and ultralow-silica) boninitic compositions. The genetic conditions of 1?346?°C at 0.58?GPa and 1?292?°C at 0.69?GPa for the low- and ultralow-silica boninite magmas lie on adiabatic melting paths of depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt mantle with a potential temperature of 1?430?°C in Ogasawara and of 1?370?°C in Guam, respectively. This is consistent with the model that the low- and ultralow-silica boninites were produced by remelting of the residue of the protoarc basalt during the forearc spreading immediately following the subduction initiation. In contrast, the genetic conditions of 1?428?°C and 0.96?GPa for the high-silica boninite magma is reconciled with the ascent of more depleted harzburgitic source which pre-existed below the Izu-Ogasawara-Mariana forearc region before the subduction started. Mixing calculations based on the Pb-Nd-Hf isotopic data for the Mariana protoarc basalt and boninites support the above remelting model for the (ultra)low-silica boninite and the discrete harzburgite source for the high-silica boninite. Yb-Os isotopic modeling of the high-Si boninite source indicates 18-30?wt% melting of the primitive upper mantle at 1.5-1.7?Ga, whereas the source mantle of the protoarc basalt, the residue of which became the source of the (ultra)low-Si boninite, experienced only 3.5-4.0?wt% melt depletion at 3.6-3.1?Ga, much earlier than the average depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt mantle with similar degrees of melt depletion at 2.6-2.2?Ga.
DS201907-1527
2019
Senda, R.Batanova, V.G., Thompson, J.M., Danyushevsky, L.V., Portnyagin, M.V., Garbe-Schonberg, D., Hauri, E., Kimura, J-I., Chang, Q., Senda, R., Goemann, K., Chauvel, C., Campillo, S., Ionov, D.A., Sobolev,A.V.New olivine reference material for in situ microanalysis.Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research, in press available, 21p.Asia, Mongoliaolivine

Abstract: A new olivine reference material - MongOL Sh11-2 - for in situ analysis has been prepared from the central portion of a large (20 × 20 × 10 cm) mantle peridotite xenolith from a ~ 0.5 My old basaltic breccia at Shavaryn-Tsaram, Tariat region, central Mongolia. The xenolith is a fertile mantle lherzolite with minimal signs of alteration. Approximately 10 g of 0.5-2 mm gem quality olivine fragments were separated under binocular microscope and analysed by EPMA, LA-ICP-MS, SIMS and bulk analytical methods (ID-ICP-MS for Mg and Fe, XRF, ICP-MS) for major, minor and trace elements at six institutions world-wide. The results show that the olivine fragments are sufficiently homogeneous with respect to major (Mg, Fe, Si), minor and trace elements. Significant inhomogeneity was revealed only for phosphorus (homogeneity index of 12.4), whereas Li, Na, Al, Sc, Ti and Cr show minor inhomogeneity (homogeneity index of 1-2). The presence of some mineral and fluid-melt micro-inclusions may be responsible for the inconsistency in mass fractions obtained by in situ and bulk analytical methods for Al, Cu, Sr, Zr, Ga, Dy and Ho. Here we report reference and information values for twenty-seven major, minor and trace elements.
DS1997-1023
1997
Sendaula, G.Sendaula, G.Presentation on UgAnd a by Minister of Natural resourcesMiga Conference Held Denver June 3-5, 10pUgandaMining, Legal
DS1980-0302
1980
Sendlein, L.V.A.Sendlein, L.V.A., Gilmore, J.L.Bedrock Topography of Southwest IowaUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) miscellaneous INVEST. MAP, I-1222, 1: 125, 000.GlobalMid-continent
DS1996-0684
1996
Senechal, G.Ji, S., Rondenay, S., Senechal, G.Obliquity between seismic and electrical anisotropies as potential indicator of movement sense for ductile .Geology, Vol. 24, No. 11, Nov. pp. 1033-36MantleShear zones, Geophysics - seismics
DS1996-1282
1996
Senechal, G.Senechal, G., Mareschal, M., Hubert, C., Calvert, et al.Integrated geophysical interpretation of crustal structures in the northern Abitibi belt: seismics, ,Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 33, No. 9, Sept. pp. 1343-1362QuebecGeophysics - seismics, structure, Abitibi belt
DS2001-1050
2001
Seneshen, D.Seneshen, D., Grunsky, E., Rencz, A., Hall, G., Dunn, C.Geochemical exploration for kimberlites in northern Alberta37th. Forum Industrial Minerals;, May 23-5, pp. 33-4.AlbertaGeochemistry
DS202106-0942
2021
Senesi, G.S.Harmon, R.S., Senesi, G.S.Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy - a geochemical tool for the 21st century. * not specific to diamondsApplied Chemistry, Vol. 128, 104929 55p. PdfGlobalgeochemistry

Abstract: Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a simple, straightforward, and versatile form of atomic emission spectroscopy that focuses a rapidly-pulsed laser beam onto a sample to form a plasma containing its constituent elements and then uses spectral analysis of the emitted light to detect the elements present. In theory, LIBS is capable of qualitative, semi-quantitative, and quantitative analysis of all elements in the periodic table. LIBS can be performed in the laboratory or outside in the ambient environment for on-site analysis in situ; LIBS can also be used for rapid microscale compositional imaging. This review first presents a description of the LIBS technique and then discusses and illustrates through a historic literature review how LIBS has been used to analyze gases, natural waters, minerals, rocks, sediments, and soils. Given the persistent need of analytical instrumentation for the rapid chemical analysis of geologic materials in the field, and the capability of LIBS to analyze any type of sample in real time with little to no preparation, there is a vast potential for the routine application of LIBS across a broad spectrum of the geosciences that is as yet only minimally realized.
DS1995-0287
1995
Seney, P.J.Chalokwu, C.I., Seney, P.J., Wurie, C.A.Petrology of Free town layered complex, Sierra Leone: Pt. 1, Stratigraphy and mineral chemical evidence..International Geology Review, Vol. 37, pp. 230-253Sierra LeoneLayered intrusion, Magma, Freetown Complex
DS1992-1706
1992
Sengor, A.H.C.Xu, Shutong, Okay, A.I., Ji, S.Y., Sengor, A.H.C., Wen, S., LiuDiamond from the Dabie-Shaw metamorphic rocks and its implication for tectonic settingScience, Vol. 256, No. 5053, April 3, pp. 80-82ChinaMetamorphic rocks, Diamonds
DS1990-1332
1990
Sengor, A.M.Sengor, A.M., Dewey, J.F.Terranology: vice or virtue?Phil. Transactions Royal Society. Lond., Vol. A331, pp. 457-77.GlobalTectonics - terranes
DS1993-1425
1993
Sengor, A.M.Sengor, A.M., Burke, K., Natalin, B.A.Asia: a continent made and assembled during the PhanerozoicShort Course NOtes for Geological Society of America Meeting, Boston, 261p.AsiaCraton, Continent evolution
DS1993-1426
1993
Sengor, A.M.Sengor, A.M., Natalin, B.A., Burtman, V.S.Evolution of the Altaid tectonic collage and Paleozoic crustal growth inEurasiaNature, Vol. 364, July 22, pp. 299-306AsiaAngaran Craton, Plate tectonics
DS1991-0378
1991
Sengor, A.M.C.Dewey, J.F., Gass, O.G., Curry, G.B., Harris, N.B.W., Sengor, A.M.C.Allochthonous terranesCambridge University Press, 150p. approx. $ 50.00GlobalTerranes, Book -ad
DS1992-1135
1992
Sengor, A.M.C.Okay, A.I., Sengor, A.M.C.Evidence for intracontinental thrust related exhumation of ultra high pressure rocks in ChinaGeology, Vol. 20, No. 5, May pp. 411-414ChinaCoesite, Diamond bearing metamorphic rocks
DS1999-0650
1999
Sengor, A.M.C.Sengor, A.M.C.Continental interiors and cratons any relation?Tectonophysics, Vol. 305, No. 1-3, May 10, pp. 1-42.MantleCraton, Geodynamics
DS2001-1051
2001
Sengor, A.M.C.Sengor, A.M.C.Elevation as indicator of mantle plume activityGeological Society of America, Special Paper, Special Paper. 352, pp. 183-226.MantleRifting, tectonics, Plumes
DS2003-1252
2003
Sengor, A.M.C.Sengor, A.M.C.The large wavelength deformation of the lithosphere: materials for a history of theGeological Society of America Memoir, MWR 196, 330p. www.geosociety.org $ 100.GlobalBook - advertisement, tectonics not specific to diamond
DS2003-1253
2003
Sengor, A.M.C.Sengor, A.M.C.The large wavelength deformations of the lithosphere: materials for a history of theGeological Society of America Memoir, MWR 196, ISBN 0-8137-1196-7 www.geosociety.orgGlobalBlank
DS200412-1787
2003
Sengor, A.M.C.Sengor, A.M.C.The large wavelength deformation of the lithosphere: materials for a history of the evolution of thought from the earliest timesGeological Society of America Memoir, MWR 196, 330p. geosociety.org $ 100.GlobalTectonics - not specific to diamond
DS201911-2539
2019
Sengor, A.M.C.Le Pichon, X., Sengor, A.M.C., Imren, C.Pangea and lower mantle tectonics.Researchgate, doi.org/10.1029/2018TC005445Mantletectonics

Abstract: We show that the peripheral Pangea subduction zone closely followed a polar great circle. We relate it to the band of faster-than-average velocities in lowermost mantle. Both structures have an axis of symmetry in the equatorial plane. Assuming geologically long-term stationarity of the deep mantle structure, we propose to use the axis of symmetry of Pangea to define an absolute reference frame. This reference frame is close to the slab remnants and NNR frames of reference but disagrees with hot spot-based frames. We apply this model to the last 400 Myr. We show that a hemispheric supercontinent appeared as early as 400 Ma. However, at 400 Ma, the axis of symmetry was situated quite far south and progressively migrated within the equatorial plane that it reached at 300 Ma. From 300 to 110-100 Ma, it maintained its position within the equatorial plane. We propose that the stationarity of Pangea within a single hemisphere surrounded by subduction zones led to thermal isolation of the underlying asthenosphere and consequent heating as well as a large accumulation of hot plume material. We discuss some important implications of our analysis concerning the proposition that the succession of supercontinents and dispersed continents is controlled by an alternation from a degree 1 to a degree 2 planform.
DS201911-2561
2019
Sengor, A.M.C.Sengor, A.M.C., Lom, N., Sagdic, N.G.Tectonic inheritance in the lithosphere.IN: Cycle Concepts in Plate Tectonics, editors Wilson and Houseman , Geological Society of London special publication 470, pp. 105-136.Mantleplate tectonics
DS202106-0951
2021
Sengor, A.M.C.Le Pichon, X., Jellinek, M., Lenardic, A., Sengor, A.M.C., Imren, C.Pangea migration.Tectonics, e2020TC006585 42p. PdfMantleplate tectonics

Abstract: We confirm the proposition of Le Pichon et al. (2019) that Pangea was ringed by a hemispheric subduction girdle from its formation 400 Ma to its dispersal 100 Ma. We quantify the northward migration, that we attribute to True Polar Wander (TPW), of its axis of symmetry, between 400 Ma and 150 Ma, from southern latitudes to the equatorial zone. The spatial stabilizing within the equatorial zone of the axis of symmetry in a fixed position with respect to lower mantle, was marked by alternating CW and CCW oscillations between 250 Ma and 100 Ma that we relate to tectonic events. A subduction girdle is predicted to set up lateral temperature gradients from relatively warm sub-Pangean mantle to cooler sub-oceanic mantle. Over time, this effect acts to destabilize the Pangea landmass and its associated subduction girdle. Quantitatively, a scaling theory for the stability of the subduction girdle against mantle overturn constrains the maximum magnitude of sub-Pangean warming before breakup to be order 100 oC, consistent with constraints on Pacific-Atlantic oceanic crustal thickness differences. Our predictions are in line with recent analyses of Jurassic-Cretaceous climate change and with existing models for potential driving forces for a TPW oscillation of Pangea across the equator. The timing and intensity of predicted sub-Pangean warming potentially contributed to the enigmatically large Siberian Traps and CAMP flood basalts at 250 Ma and 201 Ma, respectively.
DS1996-1283
1996
Sengor, A.N.C.Sengor, A.N.C., Natalin, B.A.Turkic-type orogeny and its role in the making of the continental crustAnnual Rev. Earth Planetary Sciences, Vol. 24, pp. 263-337GlobalOrogeny, Tectonics, Collisional mountain building
DS1999-0448
1999
Sengpiel, K.P.Maus, S., Sengpiel, K.P., et al.Variogram analysis of helicopter magnetic dat a to identify paleochannels Of the Omaruru River, Namibia.Geophysics, Vol. 64, No. 3, May-June pp. 785-94.NamibiaGeophysics - magnetics, Geomorphology - not specific to diamonds
DS1998-1313
1998
Sengpiel, K-P.Sengpiel, K-P., Siemon, B.Examples of 1- D inversion of multifrequency HEM dat a from 3 - Dresistivity distributions.Exploration Geophysics, Vol. 29, No. 1-2, Aug. pp. 133-141.NamibiaGeophysics - HEM data for groundwater study
DS201702-0240
2016
Sengupta, D.Sengupta, D., Van Gosen, B.S.Placer type rare earth element deposits.Reviews in Economic Geology, Vol. 18, pp. 81-100.GlobalREE placers
DS202106-0947
2021
Sengupta, K.Kumar, S., Kumar, D., Sengupta, K., Giri, T.K.Impact of community based business model and competitive advantage on exports: evidence from diamond industry.Competitive Review, Vol. 31, 2, pp. 276-296. pdfGlobalmarkets

Abstract: his study aims to examine the altering paradigms for two specific characteristics of the international diamond industry: community-based business model and competitive advantage and their impact and interaction effect.
DS1993-1427
1993
Sengupta, M.Sengupta, M.Environmental impacts of mining: monitoring, restoration and controlLewis Publishers, 512pGlobalBook -ad, Environment
DS1998-1354
1998
Sengupta, M.Sinha, D., Sengupta, M.Expert system approach to mine investment decisionsSociety for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME) Preprint, No. 98-2GlobalEconomics, Mining - investment
DS1980-0298
1980
Sengupta, N.R.Sarkar, A., Paul, D.K., Balasubrahmanyan, M.N., Sengupta, N.R.Lamprophyres from Indian Gondwanas Potassium-argon Ages and ChemistryGeological Society INDIA Journal, Vol. 21, MARCH PP. 188-193.IndiaGeochronology, Petrography, Chemistry
DS1990-1333
1990
Sengupta, P.Sengupta, P., Dasgupta, S., Bhattacharya, P.K., Mukherjee, M.An orthopyroxene-biotite geothermometer and its application in crustal granulites and mantle derived rocksJournal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 8, No. 2, March pp. 191-198IndiaMetamorphism, Granulite
DS200912-0267
2009
Sengupta, P.Griffin, W.L., Kobussen, A.F., Babu, E.V.S.S.K., O'Reilly, S.Y., Norris, R., Sengupta, P.A translithospheric suture in the vanished 1 Ga lithospheric root of South India: evidence from contrasting lithospheric sections in the Dharwar Craton.Lithos, In press available, 31p.IndiaKimberlites - xenoliths
DS201012-0251
2009
Sengupta, P.Griffin, W.L., Kobussen, A.F., Babu, E.V.S.S.K., O'Reilly, S.Y., Norris, R., Sengupta, P.A translithospheric suture in the vanished 1 Ga lithospheric root of South India: evidence from contrasting lithosphere sections in the Dharwar craton.Lithos, Vol. 112 S pp. 1109-1119.IndiaKimberlites and garnet geotherms
DS202007-1170
2020
Sengupta, P.Phani, R., Sengupta, P., Basu, S.Geochemistry and petrology of two kimberlites at Krishtipadu from Gooty cluster, Andhra Pradesh, southern India - evidence of kimberlite magmatism and a possible carbonate association within Paleoproterozoic lower Cuddapah Basin.Russian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 20, ES3006 14p. PdfIndia, Andhra Pradeshdeposit - Kristipadu

Abstract: This paper addresses geochemical and petrological aspects of two outcropping kimberlites (5023 and 5119) of the Gooty cluster, emplaced in carbonate sediments of Vempalli Formation of lower Cuddapah basin at Krishtipadu, Anantapur district, Andhra Pradesh, southern India. These pipes were discovered by the Rio Tinto Exploration Group in the recent past. The 5023 kimberlite is enriched in olivine and serpentine while the 5119 pipe possesses haematitised olivine pseudomorphs. The field, textural characteristics and whole rock geochemistry qualify both the pipes for hypabyssal kimberlite breccias of Group-I type similar to world’s classical occurrences. The carbon and oxygen stable isotope data, aided with field and petrological studies, indicates existence of possible carbonatite (sovite) phase associated with the 5119 kimberlite. The two kimberlites appear to be originated from a low degree of partial melting ranging from 0.5 to 2.5%. Enrichment of LREE with a high LREE/HREE ratio indicates fractionation at the mantle source region. Whole rock geochemistry supports their diamondiferous nature. Presence of crustal xenoliths post-dates subsequent emplacement of the two pipes to lower Cuddapah sedimentation (2.4 Ga), manifesting kimberlite magmatism. These pipes are the only known Group-I kimberlites from the Proterozoic Cuddapah Basin and therefore warrant detailed investigations. KEYWORDS: Kimberlite; carbonatite; archetypal Group-I; Gooty Kimberlite Cluster; lower Cuddapah basin; stable isotope; Palaeoproterozoic.
DS1993-1334
1993
Sengupta, P.R.Roy, A.K. G., Sengupta, P.R.Alkalic carbonatitic magmatism and associated mineralization along the Porapaha Tamar lineament.Indian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 20, No. 3-4, pp. 193-200.IndiaCarbonatite
DS1997-0103
1997
Sengupta, R.Bhattacharyya, S., Sengupta, R., Chakraborty, M.Elemental chemistry of ilmenite - an indicator of provenance?Journal of Geological Society India, Vol. 50, No. 6, Dec. 1, pp. 787-790.IndiaIlmenite, Geochemistry - not specific to diamonds
DS1989-1371
1989
Sengupta, S.Sengupta, S., Acharyya, S.K., Van Den Hul, H.J., Chattopadhyay, B.Geochemistry of volcanic rocks from the Naga Hillsophiolites,northeast India and their inferred tectonic settingJournal of the Geological Society of London, Vol. 146, No. 3, May pp. 491-498IndiaHarzburgite, Tectonics
DS1990-1334
1990
Sengupta, S.Sengupta, S., Ray, K.K., Acharyya, S.K., de Smeth, J.B.Nature of ophiolite occurrences along the eastern margin of the Indian plate and their tectonicsignificanceGeology, Vol. 18, No. 5, May pp. 439-442IndiaOphiolites, Tectonics
DS1996-1284
1996
Sengupta, S.Sengupta, S., Corfu, D.K.Mesoarchean crustal history of the eastern Indian Craton: Sm neodymium and uranium-lead (U-Pb)isotopic evidencePrecambrian Research, Vol. 77, No. 1-2, March 1, pp. 17-22IndiaTectonics, geochronology, trondjemites, Craton
DS1998-1314
1998
Sengupta, S.Sengupta, S., Ghosh, M., Chattopadhyay, A.Petrology of post Archean magmatic rocks in the eastern Indian CratonJournal of Geological Society India, Vol. 51, No. 1, Jan. 1, pp. 31-42IndiaCraton, Magmatism
DS201112-0706
2011
Sengupta, S.Mukhopadhyay, S., Ray, J., Chattopadhyay, B., Sengupta, S., Ghosh, B., Mukhopadhyay, S.Significance of mineral chemistry of syenites and associated rocks of Elagiri complex, southern granulite terrane of the Indian shield.Journal of the Geological Society of India, Vol. 77, pp. 113-129.IndiaAlkaline rocks, magmatism
DS1991-1544
1991
Senikhatov, M.A.Senikhatov, M.A., et al.A new stratigraphic scale for the Precambrian of the USSRInternational Geology Review, Vol. 33, No. 5, May pp. 413-422RussiaStratigraphy, Precambrian
DS2000-0656
2000
Senin, B.Migulin, V.V., Larkina, V.I., Sergeeva, N.G., Senin, B.Reflection of geodynamic processes in characteristics of electromagnetic radiation above Baltic Shield...Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 373, No. 5, June-July, pp.845-50.Russia, Baltic Shield, Barents-Kara regionTectonics, Geophysics
DS201112-0987
2011
Senin, V.Sorokhtina, N.V., Asavin, A.M., Konomkova, N.N., Senin, V.Composition of K bearing sulfide associations in carbonatites of the Guli massif of the Polar Siberia.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.144-146.Russia, SiberiaGuli
DS201112-0988
2011
Senin, V.Sorokhtina, N.V., Asavin, A.M., Konomkova, N.N., Senin, V.Composition of K bearing sulfide associations in carbonatites of the Guli massif of the Polar Siberia.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.144-146.Russia, SiberiaGuli
DS1993-1356
1993
Senin, V.G.Ryabchikov, I.D., Orlova, G.P., Senin, V.G., Trubkin, N.V.Partitioning of rare earth elements between phosphate rich carbonatitemelts and mantle peridotites.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 49, No. 1-2, pp. 1-12.RussiaCarbonatite
DS1994-1255
1994
Senin, V.G.Muravyeva, N.S., Senin, V.G.Geochemistry and origin of sulfides from Baikal rift zone basaltoidsGeochemistry International, Vol. 31, No. 3, pp. 143-159.Russia, BaikalAlkaline rocks
DS200512-0250
2005
Senin, V.G.Dudnikova, V.B., Gaister, A.V., Zharikov, E.V., Senin, V.G., Urusov, V.S.Chromium distribution between forsterite and its melt: dependence on chromium content in melt and redox conditions.Geochemistry International, Vol. 43, 5, pp. 471-477.MantleMelting
DS200912-0015
2009
Senin, V.G.Asavin, A.M., Senin, V.G.Evolution of the meimechite magmas by the dat a of the microprobe research meimechite tuffolavas.alkaline09.narod.ru ENGLISH, May 10, 2p. abstractRussiaMeimechite
DS201012-0521
2009
Senin, V.G.Muraveva, N.S., Senin, V.G.Carbonate silicate equilibration temperatures in the high magnesia ultrapotassic volcanics of the Toro-Ankole Province Eastern African Rift Zone.Geochemistry International, Vol. 47, 9, Sept. pp. 882-900.AfricaAlkalic
DS201112-0033
2011
Senin, V.G.Asavin, A.M., Senin, V.G.West Africa ( Guinea) flow basalt high Fe magmatism. Is it young Karoo province peripheries?Peralk-Carb 2011, workshop held Tubingen Germany June 16-18, PosterAfrica, GuineaMagmatism
DS201112-0709
2011
Senin, V.G.Muravyeva, N.S., Belyatsky, B.V., Senin, V.G.87 Sr/86Sr- 143Nd/144 Nd systematic and clinopyroxenes host rock disequilibrium in high potassium magmas of the East-African Rift - insight to mantle source heterogeneity.Peralk-Carb 2011, workshop held Tubingen Germany June 16-18, PosterAfrica, KenyaGeochronology
DS201910-2262
2019
Senker, J.Gruninger, H., Liu, Z., Siegel, R., Boffa Ballaran, T., Katsura, T., Senker, J., Frost, F.J.Oxygen vacancy ordering in aluminous bridgmanite in the Earth's lower mantle.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 46, 15, pp. 8731-8740.Mantlebridgmanite

Abstract: The lower mantle encompasses the largest region of the Earth's interior and is mainly composed of the perovskite-structured mineral (Mg,Fe,Al)(Al,Si)O3 bridgmanite. Its properties, therefore, control both the diffusive transport of elements and solid state flow in the lower mantle, which will be strongly influenced by point defects. We have identified and quantified defects in bridgmanite that arise from the replacement of silicon by aluminum and result in the creation of a vacant oxygen site. These oxygen defects are also found to form clusters in the structure, which in other perovskite structured minerals have been shown to strongly affect physical properties. As defect formation and ordering is dependent on composition and pressure, strong variations in physical properties may be expected within the upper 300 km of the lower mantle.
DS1999-0782
1999
Seno, T.Watanabe, T., Koyaguchi, T., Seno, T.Tectonic stress controls on ascent and emplacement of magmasJournal of Volcan. Geothermal Res., Vol. 91, pp. 65-78.GlobalMagmatism, Tectonics, heat flow, emplacement depth
DS200812-1040
2008
Seno, T.Seno, T.Conditions for a crustal block to be sheared off from subducted continental lithosphere: what is an essential factor to cause features associated with collision?Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 113, B4, B04414MantleSubduction
DS200812-1041
2008
Seno, T.Seno, T.Conditions for a crustal block to be sheared off from the subducted continental lithosphere: what is an essential factor to cause features associated with collision?Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 113, B004414.MantleSubduction
DS201412-0794
2014
Seno, T.Seno, T., Kirby, S.H.Formation of plate boundaries: the role of mantle volatization.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 129, pp. 85-99.MantleSubduction, hotspots
DS201803-0437
2018
Sensarma, S.Chandra, J., Paul, D., Viladar, S.G., Sensarma, S.Origin of Amba Dongar carbonatite complex, India and its possible linkage with the Deccan Large Igneous Province.Geological Society of London Special Publication, No. 463, pp. 137-169.Indiacarbonatite

Abstract: The genetic connection between Large Igneous Province (LIP) and carbonatite is controversial. Here, we present new major and trace element data for carbonatites, nephelinites and Deccan basalts from Amba Dongar in western India, and probe the linkage between carbonatite and the Deccan LIP. Carbonatites are classified into calciocarbonatite (CaO, 39.5-55.9 wt%; BaO, 0.02-3.41 wt%; SREE, 1025-12 317 ppm) and ferrocarbonatite (CaO, 15.6-31 wt%; BaO, 0.3-7 wt%; SREE, 6839-31 117 ppm). Primitive-mantle-normalized trace element patterns of carbonatites show distinct negative Ti, Zr-Hf, Pb, K and U anomalies, similar to that observed in carbonatites globally. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns reveal high LREE/HREE fractionation; average (La/Yb)N values of 175 in carbonatites and approximately 50 in nephelinites suggest very-low-degree melting of the source. Trace element modelling indicates the possibility of primary carbonatite melt generated from a subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) source, although it does not explain the entire range of trace element enrichment observed in the Amba Dongar carbonatites. We suggest that CO2-rich fluids and heat from the Deccan plume contributed towards metasomatism of the SCLM source. Melting of this SCLM generated primary carbonated silicate magma that underwent liquid immiscibility at crustal depths, forming two compositionally distinct carbonatite and nephelinite magmas.
DS202005-0730
2020
Sensarma, S.Fareeduddin., Pant, N.C., Gupta, S., Chakraborty, P., Sensarma, S., Jain, A.K., Prasad, G.V.R., Srivastava, P., Rjan, S., Tiwari, V.M.The geodynamic evolution of the Indian subcontinent - an introduction.Episodes ( IUGS), Vol. 43, 1, pp. 1-18.Indiacarbonatite
DS202009-1627
2020
Sensarma, S.Fareeduddin, Pant, N.C., Gupta, S., Chakraborty, P., Sensarma, S., Jain, A.K., Prasad, G.V.R., Srivastava, P., Rajan, S., Tiwari, V.M.The geodynamic evolution of the Indian subcontinent - an introduction.Episodes, Vol. 43, 1, pp. 8p.Indiacarbonatites
DS201412-0389
2014
Senshu, H.Ichikawa, H., Kameyama, M., Senshu, H., Kawai, K., Maruyama, S.Influence of majorite on hot plumes.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 26, pp. 461-468.MantleHotspots
DS1985-0598
1985
Senterfit, R.M.Senterfit, R.M., Mohr, P., Horton, R.Geophysical studies of breccia pipe locations on the HualapaiIndianreservation, ArizonaUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 85-0400, 30pColorado Plateau, ArizonaGeophysics
DS202106-0974
2021
Seoane, L.Tchoukeu, C.D.N., Baseka, C.A., Djomani, Y.P., Rousse, S., Etame,J., Llubes, M., Seoane,L., Mbang, C.S., Yomba, A.E.Crustal thickness, depth to the bottom of magnetic sources and thermal structure of the crust from Cameroon to Central African Republic: preliminary results for a better understanding of the origin of the Bangui Magnetic Anomaly.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 179, 104206, 21p. pdfAfrica, Cameroon, Central African Republicgeophysics

Abstract: The Bangui Magnetic Anomaly (BMA) is one of the largest magnetic anomalies in the world whose origin is still not known. This research investigated the crustal thickness, Curie depths and thermal structures in the Central African sub-regions - Cameroon, Central African Republic and adjacent countries - which are largely characterized by the Bangui Magnetic Anomaly. To achieve a better understanding and clearer idea of the location of the possible sources of the BMA, analyses of geothermal structures were conducted. Two potential methods were used: gravity to evaluate the crustal thickness and magnetics for geothermal analysis. Spectral analysis of gravity data shows that crustal thickness range between 14 and 55 km. The highest depths were found in Central African Republic. The lower values of crustal thickness were obtained in South-Chad basin with a minimum of roughly 14 km. Geothermal analysis is carried out using the Curie point depth, thermal gradient and heat-flow evaluations. The results show that the BMA is related to a thick crust of roughly 40 km. Depth to the bottom of possible sources does not exceed the lower crust. The mean Curie point depth estimated is 38 km with an error of ±2 km. Geothermal results also show the difference in the thermal behaviour between the crust in the Pan African and Precambrian domain. The mobile zone which constitutes the Pan African domain is associated with a thin crust of high heat-flow values of 65 mW/m2. However, the Precambrian domain beneath the BMA is associated with a thick crust with lower heat-flow values (roughly 45 mW/m2). The difference between crustal thickness and Curie point depths shows that all the sources of the BMA are crustal. The present results are in favour of a geological origin for the Bangui Magnetic anomaly.
DS202012-2225
2020
Seoung, D.Lee, C., Seoung, D., Cerpa, N.G.Effect of water solubilities on dehydration and hydration in subduction zones and water transport to the deep mantle: implications for natural subduction zones.Gondwana Research, Vol. 89, pp. 287-305. pdfMantlesubduction

Abstract: Understanding water transport by the subducting slab and the corner flow of the mantle wedge is a crucial topic because it is a prime control on seismic tremors, arc-to-intraplate volcanoes as well as on global water distribution in the mantle. However, most of previous studies focused on water transport by the subducting slab and did not quantitatively evaluated the amount of water carried by the corner flow into the deep mantle. Using two-dimensional numerical experiments, we model both the dehydration of the subducting slab and (de)hydration of the mantle wedge and quantify the amount of water transported by both of them. We use the water solubilities of basalt and peridotite derived from laboratory measurements and from thermodynamic calculations, and compare the implications of their differences. Our calculations show that the two models for the water solubilities of basalt result in either abundant or scarce free water through extensive or negligible dehydration of the sub-forearc oceanic crust, leading to a hydrated or a dry cold nose of the mantle wedge, respectively. Further, the oceanic crust of the subducting slab is almost dehydrated prior to reaching a depth of 250 km, regardless of subduction parameters and the models for the water solubilities of basalt. The dehydration depth of the lithospheric mantle of the subducting slab deepens with decreasing slab temperature. The lithospheric mantle of cold subducting slab (e.g., Northeast Japan) experiences partial dehydration at sub-backarc depths and transports the remaining bound water beyond a depth of 250 km, regardless of the models for the water solubilities of peridotite. Deep water transport by the corner flow of the mantle wedge is negligible regardless of the models for the water solubilities of peridotite. The water carried by the lithospheric mantle may be the cause of backarc and intraplate volcanoes in Northeast Asia.
DS201803-0474
2017
Sepehri, M.Sepehri, M., Apel, D.B., Hall, R.A.Prediction of mining induced surface subsidence and ground movements at a Canadian diamond mine using electroplastic finite element model. International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences, Vol. 100, pp. 73-82.Canada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Diavik
DS2003-0464
2003
Sepold, U.Gibert, B., Sepold, U., Tommasi, A., Mainprice, D.Thermal diffusivity of upper mantle rocks: influence of temperature, pressure and theJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, 8, ECV 1 , DOI 10.1029/2002JB002108MantleGeothermometry
DS200412-0661
2003
Sepold, U.Gibert, B., Sepold, U., Tommasi, A., Mainprice, D.Thermal diffusivity of upper mantle rocks: influence of temperature, pressure and the deformation fabric.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, 8, ECV 1 , DOI 10.1029/2002 JB002108MantleGeothermometry
DS1988-0626
1988
Seppala, M.Seppala, M.Former southwesterly ice flows in the Abitibi-Timiskaming region:implications for the configuration of the Late Wisconsi nan ice sheet:discussionCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 25, No. 2, February pp. 352-353OntarioBlank
DS202001-0034
2019
Sepulchre, P.Ramstein, G., Godderis, Y., Donnadieu, Y., Sepulchre, P., Fluteau, F., Zhang, Z., Zhang, R., Su, B., Jiang, D., Schuster, M., Besse, J.Some illustrations of large tectonically driven climate changes in Earth history.Tectonics, doi.org/10.1029/ 2019TC005569Mantletectonics

Abstract: For the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the publication of the pioneering papers that established the basis of plate tectonic, this paper was solicited to illustrate the close relation between tectonics and climate. Amongst the large spectrum of interactions that depict how tectonics modified the climate at geological time steps, we choose to illustrate two major issues: (1) How the “tryptic” climate/long-term carbon cycle/tectonics explains the extraordinary glacial episode (717-635 Ma) occurring during Neoproterozoic era? (2) How major tectonic events (i.e., the slow shrinkage of a huge epicontinental sea and the uplift of large mountains ranges in Asia and Africa) drastically changed the climate and shaped the pattern of present-day monsoons systems. This paper is the result of long-standing collaboration with many researchers from different countries.
DS2001-0824
2001
SepulvedaNarteau, C., Le Mouel, Poirier, Sepulveda, ShnirmanOn a small scale roughness of the core mantle boundaryEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 191, No. 1-2, Aug. 30, pp. 49-60.MantleCore - boundary
DS1982-0556
1982
Sequin, M.K.Sequin, M.K.Emplacement of the Montregian Hills of Quebec: Geophysical Evidence.Tectonophysics, Vol. 86, PP. 305-317.Canada, QuebecEmplacement Mechanism
DS1985-0599
1985
Serbyanaya, N.R.Serbyanaya, N.R., Losev, V.G., Voronov, O.A., Bakhamina, A.V.The Morphology of Diamond Crystals Synthesized from Hydrocarbons.(russian)Kristallografiya, (Russian), Vol. 30, No. 5, pp. 1026-1027RussiaDiamond Morphology
DS1984-0432
1984
Serdobova, L.I.Kravchenko, S.M., Katayeva, Z.T., Serdobova, L.I., Lyapunov, S.M.Lateral zoning of alkalic ultramafic provinces, as expressed in the distribution of mean trace element concentrations in like rocks and mineralsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 274, Jan-Feb. pp. 200-204RussiaCarbonatite, Odikhincha, Rare Earth
DS201710-2237
2017
Serdyukov, A.S.Kulrenya, M.V., Chernyshov, G.S., Serdyukov, A.S., Duchkov, A.A.Procedure and results of seismic investigations into causes of landslides in permafrost rocks.Journal of Mining Science, Vol. 52, 5, pp. 835-841.Russiadeposit - Yubilieny

Abstract: The article focuses on seismic monitoring of causes of landslides. Such studies are of great importance in open pit mining in permafrost rocks. Extensive mining-induced impact in combination with natural thawing of permafrost as a consequence of the planet warming may end in catastrophe. The authors describe a procedure for plotting velocity profiles of seismic waves along slopes in the presence of extremely contrast discontinuities conditioned by permafrost rocks. The presented approach enables studying slip surfaces of landslides and detecting potential failure zones where wave velocities are lower due to extensive jointing. The processed field data obtained in the area near Chagan-Uzun settlement in Kosh-Agach district of the Republic of Altai are reported.
DS200512-0441
2005
Serearuno, M.Holden, T., Serearuno, M.A hybrid artificial experience approach for improving yield in precious stone manufacturing.Journal of Intelligent Manufacturing, Vol. 16, 1, Feb. pp. 21-38. Kluwer Academic Publ.Diamond cutting
DS1996-1285
1996
Serebritsky, I.A.Serebritsky, I.A., Sergeev, A.V.Geochemical pecularities of alkaline rocks of the Pilanesberg complex, South African Republic.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Abstracts, Vol. 21, abstract only p.A84.South AfricaAlkaline rocks, Pilanesberg Complex
DS1985-0600
1985
Serebrya, N.R.Serebrya, N.R., Losev, V.G., Voronov, O.A., Rakmani, A.V., Yakol.The Morphology of Diamond Crystals Synthesized from Hydrocarbons. a Technical Note.Kristallogr., Vol. 30, No. 5, PP. 1026-1027.RussiaDiamond Morphology, Synthetics
DS1986-0724
1986
Serebryakov, G.V.Serebryakov, G.V., Imanbaeva, N.F., Shchitchenko, L.M.Procedures in prospecting for diamond deposits of nonkimberliteorigin.(Russian)Probl. I Perspektivy Razv. Prikl. Mineral I Geokhimmii V Kazakh. Alma, pp. 27-37RussiaDiamond prospecting
DS201112-0264
2011
SerebryanayaDenison, V.N., Mavrin, Serebryanaya, Dubitsky, Aksenenkov, Kirichenko, Kuzmin, kulnitsky, PerehoginFirst priniples, UV Raman, X-ray diffraction and TEM study of the structure and lattic dynamics of the diamond lonsdaleite system.Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 20, 7, pp. 951-953.TechnologyLonsdaleite
DS1996-1286
1996
Serebryytski, I.A.Sergeev, A.V., Serebryytski, I.A.Nature of the melteigite ijolite urtite rocks laminations of the Khbines Massif (Kola Peninsula).Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Abstracts, Vol. 21, abstract only p.A84.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkaline rocks, Ijolite
DS2002-1443
2002
Seredkin, M.V.Seredkin, M.V., Zotov, I.A., Karchevsky, P.I.Mineralogical types of calcitic carbonatites of the Kovdor Massif and their genetic interpretation.Doklady, Vol.383A,3,March-April,pp. 301-3.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite, Deposit - Kovdor massif
DS200512-0878
2005
Seredkin, M.V.Prokofev, V.Y., Seredkin, M.V., Zotov, I.A., Anoshechkina, V.A.Genesis of magnetite apatite and phlogopite deposits in the Kovdor Massif, Kola Peninsula: evidence from melt and fluid inclusions.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 403, 5, pp. 727-731.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkalic
DS1996-1470
1996
SerenkoVasilenko, V.B., Zinchuk, N.N., Kuznetsova, L.G., SerenkoPetrochemical model of the Mir kimberlite pipeRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 37, No. 2, pp. 88-101.RussiaGeochemistry, petrology, model, Deposit -Mir
DS2000-0008
2000
SerenkoAgashev, A.M., Orihashi, Watanabe, Pkhilenko, SerenkoIsotope geochemical features of the Siberian Platform kimberlites in connection with problem of their origin.Russ. Geol. and Geophys., Vol. 41, No. 1, pp. 87-97.Russia, SiberiaGeochemistry, geochronology, Genesis
DS1995-1347
1995
Serenko, et al.Neymark, L.A., Nemchin, A.A., Rozen, O.M., Serenko, et al.Sm neodymium isotope systems in lower crust xenoliths from kimberlites ofYakutia.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 329A, No. 3, April, pp. 88-93.Russia, YakutiaKimberlite -xenoliths, Geochronology
DS1980-0356
1980
Serenko, V.P.Zinchuk, N.N., Kostina, L.E., Serenko, V.P., et al.The composition of the groundmass and secondary minerals in the Kimberlites of the Sytkan pipe.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 21, No. 6, pp. 62-69.RussiaMineral Chemistry, Deposit - Sytykan
DS1982-0364
1982
Serenko, V.P.Lazko, E.E., Serenko, V.P., et al.Disthen Diamond Bearing Eclogites of Sytykanskaya Kimberlite Pipe ( Yakutia ).Academy of Science SSSR, GEOL. SER. Bulletin., No. 7, JULY, PP. 55-69.RussiaKimberlite
DS1982-0365
1982
Serenko, V.P.Lazko, E.E., Serenko, V.P., Muravickaja. g.n.Zoned Garnets in a Xenolith of Cataclastic Peridotite from The Udchanaya Kimberlite Pipe in Yakutia.Doklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 268, No. 5, PP. 1204-1208.RussiaBlank
DS1982-0366
1982
Serenko, V.P.Lazko, YE.YE., Serenko, V.P., et al.Diamond rich eclogites with kyanite in the Sitykanskaya kimberlite @Yakutia.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 268, No. 6, pp. 55-69RussiaEclogite
DS1982-0557
1982
Serenko, V.P.Serenko, V.P., Nikinov, K.N., Lazko, E.E.Zoned Garnets in Porphyroblast Lherzolites from the Mir Kimberlite Pipe.Doklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 267, No. 2, PP. 438-441.RussiaBlank
DS1982-0558
1982
Serenko, V.P.Serenko, V.P., Nikishov, K.N., Lazko, E.E.Zonal Garnets in the Porphyroblastic Lherzolites from the Kimberlite Pipe Mir.Doklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 267, No. 2, PP. 438-441.RussiaBlank
DS1983-0394
1983
Serenko, V.P.Lazko, E.E., Serenko, V.P.Peridotites Containing Zonal Garnets from Kimberlites in Yakutia an Evidence for High Temperature Deep Metasomatism And intermantle Diapirism.Soviet Geology, No. 12, PP. 41-53.Russia, YakutiaGenesis
DS1983-0395
1983
Serenko, V.P.Lazko, E.E., Serenko, V.P., Muravitskaia, G.N.Zonal Granites in Xenolite of Cataclazed Peridotite from The Kimberlite Pipe Udachnaia (yakutia).Doklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 268, No. 5, PP. 1204-1207.Russia, YakutiaMineralogy, Petrography
DS1983-0396
1983
Serenko, V.P.Lazko, YE.YE., Serenko, V.P.Zoned garnet peridotites in Yakutia kimberlites: indicators of deep metasomatism at high temperature and intramantlediapirisim? (Russian)Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR Ser. Geol. (Russian), No. 12, pp. 41-53RussiaMantle
DS1983-0397
1983
Serenko, V.P.Lazko, YE.YE., Serenko, V.P., et al.Zoned garnets in a xenolith of cataclastic peridotite in the Udachnaya kimberlite pipe, Yakutia. (Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 268, No. 5, pp. 1204-1208RussiaPetrology
DS1983-0398
1983
Serenko, V.P.Lazko, YE.YE., Serenko, V.P., et al.Cataclase peridotite with garnet of variable composition in the Udachnaya kimberlitic pipe, Yakutia.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 268, No. 6, pp. 1458-1462RussiaPetrology
DS1983-0399
1983
Serenko, V.P.Lazko, YE.YE., Serenko, V.P., Koptil, V.I., Rudnitskaya, YE.S.The Diamond Bearing Kyanite Eclogites from the Sytykanskaya kimberlite Pipe Yakutia.International Geology Review, Vol. 25, No. 4, APRIL, PP. 381-394.RussiaGenesis, Mineralogy, Petrography
DS1984-0446
1984
Serenko, V.P.Lazko, YE.YE., Serenko, V.P.Peridotites with Zoned Garnets from Yakutian Kimberlites: Evidence for Deep High Temperature Metasomatism and Mantle Diapirism?International Geology Review, Vol. 26, No. 3, MARCH PP. 318-331.Russia, South Africa, United States, Colorado PlateauGenesis, Mineralogy
DS1984-0618
1984
Serenko, V.P.Rotman, A.J., Serenko, V.P., Okrugin, A.V., Ivanov, A.G., Makho.Garnets from Basite Explosion Pipes of Western YakutiaDoklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 276, No. 3, PP. 693-697.RussiaMineralogy
DS1984-0649
1984
Serenko, V.P.Serenko, V.P., Nikishov, K.N., Lazko, YE.YE.Zoned Garnets in Porphyroblastic Lherzolite Xenoliths from The Mir Kimberlite Pipe.Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 267, No. 1-6, JUNE PP. 116-118.RussiaMineralogy
DS1986-0436
1986
Serenko, V.P.Kharkiv, A.D., Serenko, V.P., Mamchur, G.P., Melnik, Yu.M.Carbon isotope composition of carbonates from deep horizons Of the Mirpipe.(Russian)Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), No. 3, pp. 304-310RussiaGeochronology, Carbonate
DS1986-0437
1986
Serenko, V.P.Kharkiv, A.D., Serenko, V.P., Zinchuk, N.N., Namchur, G.P., MelnikCarbon isotope composition of carbonates from deep horizons In the MirpipeGeochem. Internat, Vol. 23, No. 7, pp. 79-84RussiaIsotope, Geochronology
DS1986-0679
1986
Serenko, V.P.Rotman, A.Ya., Serenko, V.P., Okrugin, A.V., Ivanov, A.G., MakhotkoGarnets from mafic volcanic pipes of western YakutiaDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 276, January pp. 119-122RussiaMineralogy, Analyses
DS1987-0346
1987
Serenko, V.P.Kharkiv, A.D., Serenko, V.P., Zinchuk, N.N., Potapov, E.E.Xenoliths of deep seated rocks in the Mir pipe.(Russian)Izv. Akad. Nauk SSR ser. geol., (Russian), No. 1, pp. 290-37RussiaPetrology
DS1987-0662
1987
Serenko, V.P.Serenko, V.P., Romanov, N.N.Pecularities of the composition of petromagnetic rock complexes of the Permian Triassic trap formation in the Malobotuoba kimberlite regionSoviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 28, No. 9, pp. 34-39RussiaBlank
DS1988-0249
1988
Serenko, V.P.Gerasimchuk, A.V., Serenko, V.P.Physical substance prerequisites for the zonation Of the basement of Daldyno-Alakit region according to geophysical data.(Russian)Geologii i Geofiziki, (Russian), No. 11, pp. 74-80RussiaMineralogy, Daldyno-Alakit
DS1988-0343
1988
Serenko, V.P.Kaskarov, L.L., Pavlenko, A.S., Baryshinskiy, G.V., Serenko, V.P.Uranium in xenoliths of mantle from kimberlite pipes Udachanaya andObnazhennaya, northern Yakutia- new determination by Fradiographytechnique.(Russian)Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), No. 1, pp. 100-114RussiaBlank
DS1988-0627
1988
Serenko, V.P.Serenko, V.P., Spetsius, Z.V.Petrochemical model of the earth crust in kimberlitic magmatism regions ofYakutia.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 299, No. 2, pp. 471-476RussiaBlank
DS1990-0222
1990
Serenko, V.P.Boris, E.I., Rotman, A.Ya., Serenko, V.P.Time of occurrence of vent facies of basite volcanism within BotuobiyaupliftSoviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 31, No. 7, pp. 48-53RussiaBasite, Tectonics
DS1991-0964
1991
Serenko, V.P.Lazko, E.E., Serenko, V.P.Unequilibrated ultramafic xenoliths from Udachnaya kimberlite pipe, westernYakutiaProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 228-230RussiaPeridotites, garnets, Geochemistry
DS1992-0919
1992
Serenko, V.P.Lazko, E.E., Serenko, V.P.Unequilibriated ultramafic xenoliths from Udachnaya kimberlite pipe, YakutiaProceedings of the 29th International Geological Congress. Held Japan August 1992, Vol. 1, abstract p. 179Russia, YakutiaXenoliths, Peridotites, zoned garnets
DS1992-1122
1992
Serenko, V.P.Neymark, L.A., Nemchin, A.A., Rosen, O.M., Serenko, V.P.samarium-neodymium (Sm-Nd) isotope systematics of lower crustal xenoliths from the Yakutiankimberlites. (Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 327, No. 3, pp. 374-378.Russia, YakutiaXenoliths, Geochronology
DS1995-0548
1995
Serenko, V.P.Fomin, A.S., Serenko, V.P., Zankovich, N.S.Two phase pipes of the Yakutian Diamondiferous provinceProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Almazy Rossii Sakha abstract, p. 6.Russia, YakutiaAutoliths, Deposit -Daldyn Alakit, Malo Botuobiya, Malokuonamka
DS1995-0549
1995
Serenko, V.P.Fomin, A.S., Serenko, V.P., Zinchuk, N.N.Three series of kimberlite bodies from Dadlyn-Alakit region of westernSiberia.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 167-8.Russia, Siberia, Daldyn AlakitTectonics, Deposit -Aikal, Komsomolskaya
DS1995-1584
1995
Serenko, V.P.Roden, M.F., Lazko, E.E., Ponomarenko, A.I., Serenko, V.P.Mineralogy of peridotite xenoliths from the Mir kimberlite Yakutia, Russia.Proceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 462-464.Russia, YakutiaXenoliths, Deposit -Mir
DS200512-0911
2002
Serenko, V.P.Rosen, O.M., Serenko, V.P., Spetsius, Z.V., Manakov, A.V., Zinchuk, N.N.Yakutian kimberlite province: position in the structure of the Siberian Craton and composition of the upper and lower crust.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 45, 1, pp. 1-24.Russia, SiberiaTectonics
DS200612-1176
2005
Serenko, V.P.Rosen, O.M., Manakov, A.V., Serenko, V.P.Paleoproterozoic collisional system and Diamondiferous lithospheric keel of the Yakutian kimberlite province.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 46, 12, pp. 1237-51.Russia, YakutiaTectonics
DS200712-0970
2007
Seretkin, Yu.V.Sharygin, V.V., Kamenetsky, V.S., Kamenetskaya, M.B., Seretkin, Yu.V., Pokhilenko, N.P.Rasvumite from the Udachnaya East pipe: the first finding in kimberlites.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 445, 6, pp. DOI:10.1134/S1028334 X07060232Russia, YakutiaMineralogy
DS200512-0847
2005
SergeevPervov, V.A., Bogomolov, E.S., Larchenko, V.A., Levskii, L.K., Minchenko, Sabukov, Sergeev, StepanovRb Sr age of kimberlites of the Pionerskaya pipe, Arkangelsk Diamondiferous province.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 400, 1, pp. 67-71.Russia, Archangel, Kola PeninsulaGeochronology
DS200612-1083
2006
SergeevPervov, V.A., Larchenko, V.A., Minchenko, G.V., Stepanov, V.P., Bogomolov, E.S., Levskii, SergeevTiming and duration of kimberlitic magmatism in the Zimnii Bereg Diamondiferous province: evidence from Rb Sr age dat a on kimberlitic sills along the Mela River.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 407, 2, Feb-Mar. pp. 304-307.RussiaGeochronology - Zimnii Bereg
DS200812-1176
2008
Sergeev, A.M.Titkov, S.V., Shigley, J.E., Breeding, C.M., Mineeva, R.M., Zudin, N.G., Sergeev, A.M.Natural color purple diamonds from Siberia. Mir field.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 44, 1, spring pp. 56-64.Russia, SiberiaDiamond - purple
DS201412-0932
2015
Sergeev, A.M.Titkov, S.V., Mineeva, R.M., Zudina, N.N., Sergeev, A.M., Ryabchikov, I.D., Shiryaev, A.A., Speransky, A.V., Zhikhareva, V.P.The luminescent nature of orange coloration in natural diamonds: optical and EPR study.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 42, 2, pp. 131-141.TechnologyDiamond - spectroscopy
DS201503-0180
2015
Sergeev, A.M.Titkov, S.V., Mineeva, R.M., Zudina, N.N., Sergeev, A.M., Ryabchikov, I.D., Shiryaev, A.A., Speransky, A.V., Zhikhareva, V.P.The luminescent nature of orange coloration in natural diamonds: optical and EPR study.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 42, 2, pp. 131-144.TechnologyDiamond Colour
DS1996-1285
1996
Sergeev, A.V.Serebritsky, I.A., Sergeev, A.V.Geochemical pecularities of alkaline rocks of the Pilanesberg complex, South African Republic.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Abstracts, Vol. 21, abstract only p.A84.South AfricaAlkaline rocks, Pilanesberg Complex
DS1996-1286
1996
Sergeev, A.V.Sergeev, A.V., Serebryytski, I.A.Nature of the melteigite ijolite urtite rocks laminations of the Khbines Massif (Kola Peninsula).Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Abstracts, Vol. 21, abstract only p.A84.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkaline rocks, Ijolite
DS200412-1737
2004
Sergeev, A.V.Savatenkov, V.M., Sergeev, A.V.Nonline at Sr Nd trend of Kola alkaline province carbonatites (KAPC) as implication of the plume related mantle metasomatism.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 13th Goldschmidt Conference held Copenhagen Denmark, Vol. 68, 11 Supp. July, ABSTRACT p.A570.RussiaCarbonatite
DS200712-0397
2007
Sergeev, S.Gusvea, N., Sergeev, S., Lobach-Zhuchenko, S., Larinov, A., Berezhnaya, N.Archean age of miaskite lamproites from the Panzero complex, Karelia.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 413, 3, pp. 420-423.RussiaLamproite
DS200712-0398
2007
Sergeev, S.Gusvea, N., Sergeev, S., Lobach-Zhuchenko, S., Larinov, A., Berezhnaya, N.Archean age of miaskite lamproites from the Panzero complex, Karelia.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 413, 3, pp. 420-423.RussiaLamproite
DS201801-0030
2017
Sergeev, S.Koreshkova, M., Downes, H., Millar, I., Levsky, L., Larionov, A., Sergeev, S.Geochronology of metamorphic events in the lower crust beneath NW Russia: a xenolith Hf isotope study.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 58, 8, pp. 1567-1589.Russia, Kola Peninsulageochronology

Abstract: Hf isotope data for zircons and whole-rocks from lower crustal mafic granulite and pyroxenite xenoliths from NW Russia are presented together with the results of U-Pb zircon dating, Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic compositions of bulk-rocks and minerals, and trace element compositions of minerals. Most zircons preserve a record of only the youngest metamorphic events, but a few Grt-granulite xenoliths retain Archean magmatic zircons from their protolith. Metamorphic zircons have highly variable ?Hf(t) values from -25 to -4. The least radiogenic zircons were formed by recrystallization of primary magmatic Archean zircons. Zircons with the most radiogenic ?Hf grew before garnet or were contemporaneous with its formation. Zircons with ?Hf(t) from -15 to -9 formed by various mechanisms, including recrystallization of pre-existing metamorphic zircons, subsolidus growth in the presence of garnet and exsolution from rutile. They inherited their Hf isotopic composition from clinopyroxene, pargasite, rutile and earlier-formed zircon that had equilibrated with garnet. Subsolidus zircons were formed in response to a major change in mineral association (i.e. garnet- and zircon-producing reactions including partial melting). Recrystallized zircons date the onset of high-temperature conditions without a major change in mineral association. Age data for metamorphic zircons fall into five groups: >1•91 Ga, 1•81-1•86 Ga, 1•74-1•77 Ga, 1•64-1•67 Ga and <1•6 Ga. Most ages correlate with metamorphic events in the regional upper crust superimposed onto rocks of the Belomorian belt during formation of the Lapland Granulite Belt. Zircon formation and resetting at 1•64-1•67 Ga significantly postdates Lapland-Kola orogenic events and may relate to the onset of Mesoproterozoic rifting. The youngest ages (1•6-1•3 Ga) correspond to an event that affected only a few grains in some samples and can be explained by interaction with a localized fluid. The observed garnet-granulite associations were formed at 1•83 Ga in Arkhangelsk xenoliths and 1•74-1•76 Ga in most Kola xenoliths. By the end of the Lapland-Kola orogeny, the rocks were already assembled in the lower crust. However, no addition of juvenile material has been detected and preservation of pre-Lapland-Kola metamorphic zircon indicates that some xenoliths represent an older lower crust. Granulites, pyroxenites and Phl-rich rocks have a common metamorphic history since at least c. 1•75 Ga. At about 1•64 Ga metasomatic introduction of phlogopite took place; however, this was only one of several phlogopite-forming events in the lower crust.
DS200712-0538
2007
Sergeev, S.A.Khudolev, A.K., Kropachev, A.P., Tkachenko, V.I., Rublev, A.G., Sergeev, S.A., Matukov, D.I,LyahnitskayaMesoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic evolution of the Siberian Craton and adjacent microcontinents: an overview with constraints for a Laurentian Connection.SEPM Special Publication 86, pp. 209-226.RussiaCraton
DS200712-0539
2007
Sergeev, S.A.Khudolev, A.K., Kropachev, A.P., Tkachenko, V.I., Rublev, A.G., Sergeev, S.A., Matukov, D.I,LyahnitskayaMesoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic evolution of the Siberian Craton and adjacent microcontinents: an overview with constraints for a Laurentian Connection.SEPM Special Publication 86, pp. 209-226.RussiaCraton
DS200712-0568
2007
Sergeev, S.A.Kontinen, A., Kapyaho, A., Huhma, H., Karhu, J., Matukov, D.I., Larionov, A., Sergeev, S.A.Nurmes paragneisses in eastern Finland, Karelian Craton: provenance, tectonic setting and implications for Neoarchean craton correlation.Precambrian Research, Vol. 152, 3-4, pp. 119-148.Europe, FinlandKarelian Craton
DS200812-0039
2008
Sergeev, S.A.Antonov, A.V., Belyatsky, B.V., Savva, E.V., Rodonov, N.V., Sergeev, S.A.Hydrothermal zircon from Proterozoic carbonatite massif.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A29.Russia, KareliaTiksheozero
DS200812-0103
2008
Sergeev, S.A.Belyatsky, B.V., Antonov, A.V., Rodionov, N.V., Laiba, A.A., Sergeev, S.A.Age and composition of carbonatite kimberlite dykes in the Prince Charles Mountains, East Antarctica9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractAntarcticaCarbonatite
DS200812-0647
2008
Sergeev, S.A.Lepekhina, E.N., Rotman, AS.Ya., Antonov, A.V., Sergeev, S.A.SHRIMP U Pb dating of perovskite from kimberlites of the Siberian platform ( Verhnemunskoe and Alakite Marhinskoe fields.9IKC.com, 2p. extended abstractRussia, SiberiaEmplacement
DS200812-0648
2008
Sergeev, S.A.Lepekhina, E.N., Rotman, AS.Ya., Antonov, A.V., Sergeev, S.A.SHRIMP U Pb zircon ages of Yakutian kimberlite pipes.9IKC.com, 3p. extended abstractRussia, SiberiaGeochronology
DS200912-0410
2009
Sergeev, S.A.Koreshkova, M.Y., Downes, H., Nikitina, L.P., Vladykin, N.V., Larionov, A.N., Sergeev, S.A.Trace element and age characteristics of zircons in granulite xenoliths from the Udachnaya pipe, Siberia.Precambrian Research, Vol. 168, 3-4, pp. 197-212.Russia, YakutiaGeochronology
DS200912-0637
2009
Sergeev, S.A.Rodonov, N.V., Belyatsky, B.V., Antonov, A.V., Presnyakov, S.L., Sergeev, S.A.Baddeleyite U Pb shrimp II age determination as a tool for carbonatite massifs dating.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 428, 1, pp. 1166-1170.RussiaCarbonatite
DS201012-0435
2010
Sergeev, S.A.Lepekhina, E.N., Antonov, A.V., Belyatsky, B.V., Sergeev, S.A.Perovskite from the Proterozoic Tiksheozero carbonatite ( Russia): age and genesis.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 445.RussiaCarbonatite
DS201201-0859
2011
Sergeev, S.A.Rodionov, N.V., Belyatsky, B.V., Antonov, A.V., Kapitonov, I.N., Sergeev, S.A.Comparative in-situ U-Th-Pb geochronology and trace element composition of baddeleyite and low U zircon from carbonatites of the Paleozoic Kovdor, Kola Pen.Gondwana Research, in press available 17p.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS201212-0373
2012
Sergeev, S.A.Koreshkova, M.Yu., Downes, H., Rodionov, N.V., Antonov, A.V., Glebovitski, V.A., Sergeev, S.A., Schukina, E.V.Trace element and age characteristics of zircons in lower crustal xenoliths from the Grib kimberlite pipe, Arkhangelsk province, Russia.emc2012 @ uni-frankfurt.de, 1p. AbstractRussia, Archangel, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Grib
DS201212-0418
2012
Sergeev, S.A.Lokhov, K., Lukyanova, L., Kapitonov, I.N., Lepekhina, E.N., Antonov, A.V.,Sergeev, S.A.,Shokalsky, S.P.U-Pb and LU-HF isotopic systems in zircons from some kimberlites of the Siberian platform and from Ebeliakh alluvial deposit: age and geochemical pecularities of the source rocks.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractRussiaDeposit - Ebeliakh
DS201212-0419
2012
Sergeev, S.A.Lokhov, K., Lukyanova, L., Antonev, A.V., Polekhovsky, I.N., Antonov, A.V., Afanasev, Z.L., Bogomolov, E.S., Sergeev, S.A.U Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic systems in zircons and Hf-Nd isotopic systemization of the Kimozero kimberlites, Karelia.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractRussia, Archangel, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Kimozero
DS201212-0593
2012
Sergeev, S.A.Rodionov, N.V., Belyatsky, B.V., Antonov, A.V., Kapitonov, I.N., Sergeev, S.A.Comparative in-situ U-Th-Pb geochronology and trace element composition of baddeleyite and low U-zircon from carbonatites of the Paleozoic Kovdor alkaline ultramafic complex Kola Peninsula, Russia.Gondwana Research, Vol. 21, 4, pp. 728-744.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS201412-0203
2014
Sergeev, S.A.Doroshkevich, A.G., Ripp, G.S., Izbrodin, I.A., Sergeev, S.A., Travin, A.V.Geochronology of the Gulkhen Massif, Vitim alkali province, western Transbaikalia.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 457, 2, pp. 940-944.RussiaAlkalic
DS201412-0472
2014
Sergeev, S.A.Koreshkova, M.Yu., Downes, H., Glebovitsky, V.A., Rodionov, N.V., Antonov, A.V., Sergeev, S.A.Zircon trace element characteristics and ages in granulite xenoliths: a key to understanding the age and origin of the lower crust, Arkhangelsk kimberlite province, Russia.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 167, pp. 973-980.Russia, Archangel, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Grib
DS201709-2049
2017
Sergeev, S.A.Rodionov, N.V. , Lepekhina, E.N., Antonov, A.V., Petrov, O.V., Belyatsky, B.V., Shevchenko, S.S., Sergeev, S.A.Pyrochlore and baddeleyite from carbonatites of the Paleozoic polyphase Kovdor Massif ( N. Karelia).Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Russia, Kareliacarbonatite. Kovdor

Abstract: Pyrochlore is the main host of rare-metal elements of carbonatite rocks, including phoscorites, typical for prolonged history of alkaline magma crystallization at the mafic-ultramafic polyphase Kovdor massif. Pyrochlore associated with baddeleyite, zircon, zirkelite, zirkonolite and forms octahedral and cube-octahedral poikilitic crystals up to 2-5 cm, and represented by U, Ba-Sr and REE species of pyrochlore subgroup. The studied Kovdor pyrochlores are characterized by increased up to 6.5% U and an extremely high Th – up to 40%, with Th/U up to 500. Pyrochlore U-Pb SHRIMP ages of 290-364 Ma correlate with variations in U of different samples, whereas the Th and common Pb have a minor effect on this value. Obtained ages are significantly underestimated and may reflect the influence of the matrix effect or later low-temperature closing of the U-Pb pyrochlore system, as well as the actual transformations of pyrochlore crystal matrix due to the interaction with the late carbonate fluids. Thus the early pyrochlores and U-pyrochlores crystallized at 364 Ma within phoscorites and early calcite carbonatites, whereas Sr-Ba pyrochlores of late calcitedolomite carbonatite formed at 340 Ma, and Th-pyrochlore rims occured at the later stages of the interaction with metasomatizing fluids 290 m.y. ago. Kovdor baddeleyite is also charecterized by high composition heterogeneity determined by the difference in its origin from olivinites to ore-bearing foscorites and postmagmatic syenites. But baddeleyite from calcitemagnetite mineral association have uniform U: 184 ±40, Th: 6.4 ±1.7, ¦REE: 34 ±6, Hf: 7629 ± 599, Nb: 3595 ±840, Ti: 56 ±14, Y: 22 ±4 ppm, and HHf: +6.5 ±1.7 at the age of 379 ±6 Ma. The U-Pb SHRIMP age data demonstrate the concordance of all studied baddeleyite samples and the absence of a significant age difference between baddeleyites of the carbonatite phase: 379 ±3 and foscorites: 379 ±4 Ma. The weighted average age for all the studied baddeleyite samples (n = 8) is 379 ±2.4 Ma at MSWD of 0.6. This can also indicate a relatively short time-interval of magmatism in the formation of Kovdor polyphase massif which did not exceed 5 m.y. and could be related to the Devonian mantleplume activity.
DS201712-2678
2017
Sergeev, S.A.Chebotarev, D.A., Doroshkevich, A.G., Sharygin, V.V., Yudin, D.S., Ponomarchuk, A.V., Sergeev, S.A.Geochronology of the Chuktukon carbonatite massif, Chadobets uplift ( Krasnoyarsk Territory).Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 58, pp. 1222-1231.Russiacarbonatite

Abstract: We present results of U-Pb (SHRIMP II) and Ar-Ar geochronological study of the rocks of the Chuktukon massif, which is part of the Chadobets alkaline-carbonatite complex, and of the weathering crust developed after them. Perovskite from picrites and monazite from the weathering crust were dated by the U-Pb (SHRIMP II) method, and rippite from carbonatites, by the Ar-Ar method. Rippite has first been used as a geochronometer. The estimated ages (252 ± 12 and 231 ± 2.7 Ma) testify to two magmatism pulses close in time (within the estimation error) to the stages of alkaline magmatism in the Siberian Platform (250-245 and 238-234 Ma). These pulses characterize, most likely, the processes accompanying and completing the activity of the mantle superplume that formed the Siberian Igneous Province at 250-248 Ma. The monazite-estimated age (102.6 ± 2.9 Ma) reflects the time of formation of the ore-bearing weathering crust on the massif rocks.
DS201801-0067
2017
Sergeev, S.A.Sorokhtina, N.V., Belyatsky, B.V., Kononkova, N.N., Rodionov, N.V., Lepkhina, E.N., Antonov, A.V., Sergeev, S.A.Pyrochlore group minerals from Paleozoic carbonatite massifs of the Kola Peninsula: composition and evolution.Carbonatite-alkaline rocks and associated mineral deposits , Dec. 8-11, abstract p. 20-21.Russia, Kola Peninsulacarbonatites

Abstract: Chemical composition and evolution of pyrochlore-group minerals (Nb?Ta?Ti) from the early phoscorites and calcite carbonatites, and late rare-earth dolomite carbonatites from Seblyavr and Vuorijarvi Paleozoic massifs have been studied. There are two trends in pyrochlore composition evolution: the change of U, Ti, and Ta enriched varieties by calcium high-Nb, and the change of early calcium varieties by barium-strontium pyrochlores. The substitutions are described by the typical reactions: 2Ti4+ + U4+ ? 2Nb5+ + Ca2+; Ta5+ ? Nb5+; U4+ + v (vacancy) ? 2Ca2+. The Ca ranges in pyrochlores are explained by isomorphic occupation of the cation position A with Ba, Sr, and REE, the total concentration of which increases as the carbonatite melt evolved and reaches a maximum in rare-earth dolomite carbonatites. The formation of barium pyrochlore is mainly due to successive crystallization from the Ba and Sr enriched melt (oscillatory zoning crystals), or with the secondary replacement of grain margins of the calcium pyrochlore, as an additional mechanism of formation. High enrichments in LREE2O3 (up to 6 wt.%) are identified. The fluorine content in pyrochlore group minerals varies widely. A high concentration (up to 8 wt.%) is found in central and marginal zones of crystals from calcite carbonatites, while it decreases in the pyrochlore from dolomite carbonatites. Fluorine in the crystal lattice has sufficient stability during cation-exchange processes and it is not lost in the case of developing of late carbonatites over the earlier ones. In the late mineral populations the relics enriched by this component are observed. There is a positive correlation of fluorine with sodium. The marginal and fractured zones of pyrochlore crystals from all rock types are represented by phases with a cation deficiency in position A and an increased Si. The evolution of mineral composition depends on the alkaline-ultramafic melt crystallization differentiation, enrichment of the late melts by alkalis and alkaline earth metals at the high fluorine activity. It is determined that the fluorine sharply increases from the early pyroxenites to the carbonatite rocks of the massif. The foscorites and carbonatites of the early stages of crystallization are the most enriched in fluorine, while the late dolomite carbonatites are depleted by this component and enriched in chlorine and water. The fluorine saturation of the early stages of carbonatite melting leads to the formation of fluorapatite and pyrochlore minerals which are the main mineralsconcentrators of fluorine. Pyrochlore group minerals from the Paleozoic carbonatite complexes of the Kola Peninsula are characterized by decreasing Pb, Th and U, and Th/U ratios in the transition from the early foscorites to later calcite carbonatites and hydrothermal dolomite carbonatites. The pyrochlore age varies within the 420-320 m.y. interval (U-Pb SHRIMPII data), while the rocks of the earliest magmatic stages has an individual grain age of 423 ± 15 Ma, but pyrochlore ages for calcite and dolomite carbonatites are younger: 351 ± 8.0 Ma and 324 ± 6.1 Ma, respectively. Such a dispersion of the age data is apparently associated with a disturbed Th/U ratio due to high ability for cation-exchange processes of pyrochlore crystalline matrix including secondary transformations. The research was done within the framework of the scientific program of Russian Academy of Sciences and state contract K41.2014.014 with Sevzapnedra.
DS201806-1254
2018
Sergeev, S.A.Smolkin, V.F., Lokhov, K.I., Skublov, S.G., Sergeeva, L.Yu., Lokhov, D.K., Sergeev, S.A.Paleoproterozoic Keulik Kenirim ore bearing gabbro-peridotite complex, Kola region: a new occurrence of ferropicritic magmatism.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 60, 2, pp. 142-171.Russia, Kola Peninsulazircon - picrite

Abstract: Comprehensive research of ore-bearing differentiated intrusions of the Keulik-Kenirim structural unit, which represents a fragment of the Paleoproterozoic Pechenga-Varzuga Belt, has been carried out for the first time. The intrusions are subvolcanic by type and lenticular in shape, nearly conformable and steeply dipping. They are made up of peridotite, olivine and plagioclase pyroxenites, and gabbro metamorphosed under amphibolite facies conditions along with host basic volcanics. All intrusive rocks are enriched in TiO2 and FeO. Sulfide Cu-Ni mineralization is represented by disseminated, pocket, and stringer-disseminated types, which are clustered in the peridotitic zone as hanging units and bottom lodes. The Ni content in disseminated ore is estimated at 0.45-0.55 wt % and 1.15-3.32 wt % in ore pockets; the Cu grades are 0.17-0.20 and 0.46-5.65 wt %, respectively. To determine the age of intrusions and metamorphism of intrusive and volcanic rocks, various isotopic systems have been used: Sm-Nd (TIMS) in rock and U-Pb (SIMS SHRIMP) and Lu-Hf (LA-ICP-MS) in zircon. Conclusions on the origin of zircons are based on concentrations of trace elements including REE therein and Hf-Nd correlation in zircons and rocks. The U-Pb system of zircons reflects episodes of igneous rock formation (1982 ± 12 Ma) and their postmagmatic transformation (1938 ± 20 Ma). The last disturbance of the U-Pb isotopic system occurred 700 and 425 Ma. Xenogenic zircons dated from 3.17 to 2.65 Ga have been revealed in the studied samples. These zircons were captured by magma from the Archean basement during its ascent. The intrusions were emplaced synchronously with economic ore formation in the Pechenga ore field (1985 ± 10 Ma). The peak metamorphism of intrusive rocks under amphibolite facies conditions is recorded at 40 Ma later. The differentiated intrusions of the Keulik-Kenirim structural unit are close in their internal structure, mineralogy, and geochemistry, as well as in age and features of related Cu-Ni mineralization to ore-bearing intrusions of the Pechenga ore field, which are derivatives of ferropicritic (ferriferous) magmatism.
DS201905-1068
2019
Sergeev, S.A.Prokopyev, I.R., Doroshkevich, A.G., Sergeev, S.A., Ernst, R.E., Ponomarev, J.D., Redina, A.A., Chebotarev, D.A., Nikolenko, A.M., Dultsev, V.F., Moroz, T.N., Minakov, A.V.Petrography, mineralogy and SIMS U-Pb geochronology of 1.0 - 1.8 Ga carbonatites and associated alkaline rocks of the Central Aldan magnesiocarbonatite province ( South Yakutia, Russia).Mineralogy and Petrology, Doi.org/a0.1007/ s00710-019-00661-3 24p.Russiacarbonatites
DS201906-1339
2019
Sergeev, S.A.Prokopyev, I.R., Doroshkevich, A.G., Sergeev, S.A., Ernst, R.E., Ponomarev, J.D., Redina, A.A., Chebotarev, D.A., Nikolenko, A.M., Dultsev, V.F., Moroz, T.N., Minakov, A.V.Petrography, mineralogy and SIMS U-Pb geochronology of 1.9-1.8 Ha carbonatites and associated alkaline rocks of the Central-Aldan magnesiocarbonatite province ( South Yakutia, Russia).Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 113, pp. 329-352.Russia, Yakutiacarbonatites
DS201711-2527
2017
Sergeev, S.N.Saveliev, D.E., Puchkov, V.N., Sergeev, S.N., Misabirov, I.I.Deformation induced decomposition of enstatite in mantle peridotite and its role in partial melting and chromite ore formation.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 476, 1, pp. 1058-1061.Mantleperidotite

Abstract: Deformed orthopyroxene grains are studied in detail in mantle peridotite. It is shown that deformation of enstatite is accompanied by its decomposition with the formation of low-temperature phases (pargasite, Fe-rich olivine) and restite represented by depleted enstatite, forsterite, and small newly formed chrome spinellide grains. The role of plastic deformation in initiation of partial melting of peridotite and in the formation new chrome spinellide grains is discussed.
DS1987-0663
1987
Sergeev, V.M.Sergeev, V.M., Pashchin, V.N.Photoluminescence of nontransparent synthetic diamond crystals. (Russian)Dielektr. Krist. Slozh. Okislov, Dnep., (Russian), pp. 57-64RussiaDiamond morphology
DS202006-0921
2020
Sergeeva, L. Yu.Gusev, N.I., Sergeeva, L. Yu., Larionov, A.N., Skublov, S.G.Relics of the Eoarchean continental crust of the Anabar shield, Siberian Craton.Petrology, Vol. 28, 2, pp. 118-140.Russiadeposit - Daldyn

Abstract: In the northern part of the Anabar Shield, orthopyroxene plagiogneisses of the granulite Daldyn Group host lenses of mafic rocks surrounded by melanocratic rims. According to their chemical composition, the mafic rocks correspond to subalkaline gabbro, the plagiogneisses correspond to granodiorites contaminated with mafic material, and the rims are diorites. The orthopyroxene plagiogneisses of granodiorite composition have 147Sm/144Nd = 0.1097, eNd(?) = 1.6, TNd(DM) = 3.47 Ga and are metamorphosed anatectic granitoids with an age of 3.34 Ga. The mafic rocks have high Zr, Th, and Pb contents, are enriched in REE (SREE = 636 ppm), with a high degree of fractionation [(La/Yb)N = 17.73] and a well-defined Eu minimum (Eu/Eu* = 0.51), and have 147Sm/144Nd = 0.099, eNd(?) = 1.4 and TNd(DM) = 3.65 Ga. It is assumed that these rocks crystallized from melt derived from an enriched mantle (plume) source. Based on U-Pb (SHRIMP-II) dating of 50 zircon grains from the mafic rocks, a group of grains with concordant ages from 3567 to 1939 Ma was distinguished, along with a large number of discordant values. Multiple measurements in zircon grains with discordant age values make it possible to identify seven grains of Eoarchean age, with upper intercepts of the discordia corresponding to 3987 ± 71 to 3599 ± 33 Ma. The Lu-Hf systematics of 14 zircon grains is characterized by eHf(T) = +3.7 and by close values of THf(DM) = 3.95 and TCHf = 3.93 Ga (3.99 Ga for the oldest zircon). The Paleoarchean (3.57 Ga) zircons are characterized by negative values of eHf(T) = -5.3 and -6.8, THf(DM) = 3.92-3.98 Ga, and TCHf = 4.14-4.24 Ga, which indicate recycling of the preexisting Eoarchean and Hadean continental crust. The younger zircon (3287-2410 Ma) was also formed when the preexisting crust was recycled.
DS201806-1254
2018
Sergeeva, L.Yu.Smolkin, V.F., Lokhov, K.I., Skublov, S.G., Sergeeva, L.Yu., Lokhov, D.K., Sergeev, S.A.Paleoproterozoic Keulik Kenirim ore bearing gabbro-peridotite complex, Kola region: a new occurrence of ferropicritic magmatism.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 60, 2, pp. 142-171.Russia, Kola Peninsulazircon - picrite

Abstract: Comprehensive research of ore-bearing differentiated intrusions of the Keulik-Kenirim structural unit, which represents a fragment of the Paleoproterozoic Pechenga-Varzuga Belt, has been carried out for the first time. The intrusions are subvolcanic by type and lenticular in shape, nearly conformable and steeply dipping. They are made up of peridotite, olivine and plagioclase pyroxenites, and gabbro metamorphosed under amphibolite facies conditions along with host basic volcanics. All intrusive rocks are enriched in TiO2 and FeO. Sulfide Cu-Ni mineralization is represented by disseminated, pocket, and stringer-disseminated types, which are clustered in the peridotitic zone as hanging units and bottom lodes. The Ni content in disseminated ore is estimated at 0.45-0.55 wt % and 1.15-3.32 wt % in ore pockets; the Cu grades are 0.17-0.20 and 0.46-5.65 wt %, respectively. To determine the age of intrusions and metamorphism of intrusive and volcanic rocks, various isotopic systems have been used: Sm-Nd (TIMS) in rock and U-Pb (SIMS SHRIMP) and Lu-Hf (LA-ICP-MS) in zircon. Conclusions on the origin of zircons are based on concentrations of trace elements including REE therein and Hf-Nd correlation in zircons and rocks. The U-Pb system of zircons reflects episodes of igneous rock formation (1982 ± 12 Ma) and their postmagmatic transformation (1938 ± 20 Ma). The last disturbance of the U-Pb isotopic system occurred 700 and 425 Ma. Xenogenic zircons dated from 3.17 to 2.65 Ga have been revealed in the studied samples. These zircons were captured by magma from the Archean basement during its ascent. The intrusions were emplaced synchronously with economic ore formation in the Pechenga ore field (1985 ± 10 Ma). The peak metamorphism of intrusive rocks under amphibolite facies conditions is recorded at 40 Ma later. The differentiated intrusions of the Keulik-Kenirim structural unit are close in their internal structure, mineralogy, and geochemistry, as well as in age and features of related Cu-Ni mineralization to ore-bearing intrusions of the Pechenga ore field, which are derivatives of ferropicritic (ferriferous) magmatism.
DS2000-0656
2000
Sergeeva, N.G.Migulin, V.V., Larkina, V.I., Sergeeva, N.G., Senin, B.Reflection of geodynamic processes in characteristics of electromagnetic radiation above Baltic Shield...Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 373, No. 5, June-July, pp.845-50.Russia, Baltic Shield, Barents-Kara regionTectonics, Geophysics
DS200712-1211
2006
Sergeevich, S.V.Yurevich, S.M., Sergeevich, S.V.The contribution of remote sensing to diamond deposit prospecting on the Russian plate.IAGOD Meeting held August 2006, Abstract 1p.RussiaRemote sensing
DS1970-0412
1971
Sergeyeva, N.YE.Sergeyeva, N.YE.Electron Microscope Study of Micromorphology of Picroilmenite from Kimberlite Pipes of Yakutia.International Geology Review, Vol. 13, No. 8, PP. 1242-1246.RussiaBlank
DS1998-0135
1998
SerghiouBoehler, R., Zerr, A., Serghiou, Tschauner, HilgrenNew experimental constraints on the nature of DMineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 182-3.MantleCore mantle boundary layer, Perovskite
DS200812-0728
2008
SergieevMcCammon, C., Kantor, I., Narygina, O., Roquette, J., Ponkratz, Sergieev, Mezouar, Prakapenka, DubrovinskyStable intermediate spin ferrous iron in lower mantle perovskite.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 1, 10, pp. 684-687.MantlePerovskite
DS201412-0566
2013
SergueevMcCammon, C., Glazyrin, K., Kantor, A., Kantor, I., Kupenko, I., Narygina, O., Potapin, V., Vasily, P., Sinmyo, C., Chumakov, Ruffer, Sergueev, Smirnov, DubrovinskyIron spin state in silicate perovskite at conditions of Earth's deep interior.International Journal of High Pressure Research, Vol. 33, 3, pp. 663-672.MantlePerovskite
DS1990-1335
1990
Series, C.Series, C.Fractals, relections and distortionsNew Scientist, Sept. 22, 5pGlobalFractals, Reflections
DS1989-1075
1989
SerinMuravyeva, N.S., Polyakov, A.I., Kolesov, G.M., Shubina, N.A., SerinComposition of upper mantle and evidence of mantle metasomatism in the Baykal rift zoneGeochemistry International, Vol. 26, No. 9, pp. 24-38RussiaMantle -Lherzolites, Petrology
DS1998-1652
1998
Serokurov, Y.N.Zuev, V.M., Serokurov, Y.N., Kalmykov, V.D.Assessment of Diamondiferous perspectives of east European Platform according to the dat a of sounding...7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 1034-6.Russia, East European Platform, Finland, Kola, Baltic StatesStructure, tectonics, Remote sensing
DS1995-1706
1995
Serokurov, Yu.N.Serokurov, Yu.N., Kalmykov, V.D., Smirnova, L.S.Botswana diamond potential (according to satellite surveys)Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 36, No. 1, pp. 54-61.BotswanaRemote Sensing
DS1998-1378
1998
Serokurov, Yu.N.Sokolovsky, A.K., Serokurov, Yu.N., Kalmykov, V.D.System analysis of remote sensing dat a on structural control of diamondiferous areas.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 838-40.RussiaRemote sensing, Tectonics, structure
DS2001-1052
2001
Serov, I.V.Serov, I.V., Garanin, V.K., Zinchuk, N.N., Rotman, A.Ye.Mantle sources of the kimberlite volcanism of the Siberian PlatformPetrology, Vol.9, No. 6, pp. 576-88.Russia, Siberia, YakutiaGeochemistry - major, trace, ratios, mantle metasomatism, analyses, Deposit - Middle Markha, Daldyn-Alakit, Upper Muna
DS200512-0572
2004
Serov, I.V.Kostrovskii, S.I., Morikiyo, T., Serov, I.V., Rotman, A.Ya.Origin of kimberlites: evidence from isotopic geochemical data.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 399, Oct-Nov. pp. 1164-68.RussiaGeochronology
DS200712-0575
2007
Serov, I.V.Kostrovitsky, S.I., Morikyo, T., Serov, I.V., Yakovlev, D.A., Amirzhanov, A.A.Isotope geochemical systematics of kimberlites and related rocks from the Siberian Platform.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 48, pp. 272-290.RussiaGeochronology
DS201212-0439
2012
Serov, I.V.Malkovets, V.G., Griffin, W.L., Pokhilenko, N.P., O'Reilly, S.Y., Dak, A.I., Tolstov, A.V., Serov, I.V., Bazhan, I.S., Kuzmin, D.V.Lithosphere mantle structure beneath the Nakyn kimberlite field, Yakutia.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractRussia, YakutiaDeposit - Nakyn
DS201802-0237
2017
Serov, I.V.Garanin, K.V., Serov, I.V., Nikiforova, A.Yu., Grakhanov, O.S.The ALROSA geological prospecting complex and the analysis of the base for the diamond mining in Russian Federation to 2030. *** IN RUSStarosin, V.I. (ed) Problems of the mineralogy, economic geology and mineral resources. MAKS Press, Moscow *** IN RUS, pp. 22-40.Russiatechnology
DS201808-1722
2018
Serov, I.V.Agashev, A.M., Nakai, S., Serov, I.V., Tolstov, A.V., Garanin, K.V., Kovalchuk, O.E.Geochemistry and origin of the Mirny field kimberlites, Siberia.Mineralogy and Petrology, doi.org/10.1007/s00710-018-06174 12p.Russia, Siberiadeposit - Mirny

Abstract: Here we present new data from a systematic Sr, Nd, O, C isotope and geochemical study of kimberlites of Devonian age Mirny field that are located in the southernmost part of the Siberian diamondiferous province. Major and trace element compositions of the Mirny field kimberlites show a significant compositional variability both between pipes and within one diatreme. They are enriched in incompatible trace elements with La/Yb ratios in the range of (65-00). Initial Nd isotope ratios calculated back to the time of the Mirny field kimberlite emplacement (t?=?360 ma) are depleted relative to the chondritic uniform reservoir (CHUR) model being 4 up to 6 ?Nd(t) units, suggesting an asthenospheric source for incompatible elements in kimberlites. Initial Sr isotope ratios are significantly variable, being in the range 0.70387-0.70845, indicating a complex source history and a strong influence of post-magmatic alteration. Four samples have almost identical initial Nd and Sr isotope compositions that are similar to the prevalent mantle (PREMA) reservoir. We propose that the source of the proto-kimberlite melt of the Mirny field kimberlites is the same as that for the majority of ocean island basalts (OIB). The source of the Mirny field kimberlites must possess three main features: It should be enriched with incompatible elements, be depleted in the major elements (Si, Al, Fe and Ti) and heavy rare earth elements (REE) and it should retain the asthenospheric Nd isotope composition. A two-stage model of kimberlite melt formation can fulfil those requirements. The intrusion of small bodies of this proto-kimberlite melt into lithospheric mantle forms a veined heterogeneously enriched source through fractional crystallization and metasomatism of adjacent peridotites. Re-melting of this source shortly after it was metasomatically enriched produced the kimberlite melt. The chemistry, mineralogy and diamond grade of each particular kimberlite are strongly dependent on the character of the heterogeneous source part from which they melted and ascended.
DS202005-0719
2020
Serov, I.V.Agashev, A.M., Chervyakovskaya, M.V., Serov, I.V., Tolstov, A.V., Agasheva, E.V., Votyakov, S.L.Source rejuvenation vs. re-heating: constraints on Siberian kimberlite origin from U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotope compositions and geochemistry of mantle zircons. ( Silurian, Devonian, Triassic, Jurassic)Lithos, Vol. 364-365, 10p. PdfRussia, Siberiadeposit - Druzhba, Choumurdakh

Abstract: We have studied a suite of mantle zircons from several differently aged pipes of the Siberian kimberlite province via UPb and LuHf isotope analyses and trace element compositions. The UPb ages we obtained confirmed four main episodes (Silurian, Devonian, Triassic and Jurassic) of kimberlite activity on the Siberian craton. The Druzhba pipe had two populations of zircons dating from the Silurian and Devonian, respectively. The geochemical features of our suite of mantle zircons show low concentrations of U, Th and heavy rare earth elements (REEs), positive Ce anomalies, and weak or absent Eu anomalies, which is in accord with the mantle-derived nature of the zircon. Despite having broadly similar geochemistry, zircons from differently aged kimberlites had some clear differences arising from variations in the composition of the protokimberlite metasomatic melt and from peculiarities of fractional crystallization. The Th/U ratios were highest in the Silurian zircons and sharply decreased toward the Devonian. The Triassic zircons had elevated and highly variable Ce/Nb ratios with low and nearly constant Th/U ratios. Zircons from Siberian kimberlites with different UPb ages showed systematic variations in their initial Hf isotope compositions. The oldest Silurian kimberlite field, Chomurdakh, had two zircon populations: Silurian zircons, with ?Hft values in the range of +2.8 to +5.9 units, and Devonian zircons, with ?Hft values in the range of +1.6 to +2.0 units. Zircons from the Devonian field kimberlites were in the range of +5.6 to +9.6 ?Hft units. The Triassic kimberlitic zircons had the most juvenile Hf isotope composition, at +9.3 to +11.2 ?Hft units, while the Jurassic zircons had +6.9 ?Hft units. The combination of the UPb and LuHf isotope data suggests a periodic rejuvenation of the lithospheric mantle roots by low-volume melts from the asthenospheric mantle, resulting shortly after in kimberlite emplacements. Some Devonian and Jurassic kimberlites may have been melted by re-heating the Silurian and Triassic age sources, respectively, about 60 Myr after they were formed.
DS200712-1119
2007
Serov, P.A.Vetrin, V.R., Lepekhina, E.N., Larionov, A.N., Presnyakov, S.L., Serov, P.A.Initial subalkaline magmatism of the Neoarchean alkaline province of the Kola Peninsula.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 415, No. 5, June-July pp. 714-717.Russia, Kola PeninsulaAlkalic
DS201412-0045
2014
Serov, P.A.Bayanova, T.B., Mitrofanov, F.P., Serov, P.A., Elizarov, D.B., Nitkina, E.A.Ages and sources of alkaline and carbonatite complexes in the NE part of Fennoscandian shield.30th. International Conference on Ore Potential of alkaline, kimberlite and carbonatite magmatism. Sept. 29-, http://alkaline2014.comEurope, FennoscandiaCarbonatite
DS200712-1249
2007
Serov, P.N.Zozulya, D.R., Bayanova, T.B., Serov, P.N.Age and isotopic geochemical characteristics of Archean carbonatites and alkaline rocks of the Baltic shield.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 445, 6, pp. DOI:10.1134/S1028334 X07060104Russia, Baltic ShieldCarbonatite
DS201511-1881
2014
Serov, R.Sivovolenko, S., Shelementiev, Y., Holloway, G., Mistry, J., Serov, R., Zhulin, S., Zipa, K.How diamond performance attritbutes: brilliance, scintillation and fire depend on human vision features.Australian Gemmologist, Vol. 25, 3, July-Sept. pp.TechnologyDiamond features

Abstract: This study describes how visual properties determine the perception of a diamond’s appearance and its performance attributes of brilliance, scintillation and fire, and how these influence beauty. Further articles will describe other parts of our cut study project. This research enables the development of methods and instruments for diamond performance analyses, shifting from current diamond cut rejection based tools, to diamond performance scoring systems, and the introduction of a new consumer language for communication between diamond buyers and sellers. The proposed Performance Scoring System is consumer friendly and can be used to design and manufacture new diamond cuts with improved optical appearance.
DS201901-0074
2018
Serov, R.Serov, R.Quantitative absorption spectrum reconstruction for polished diamond.Gems & Gemology, Sixth International Gemological Symposium Vol. 54, 3, 1p. Abstract p. 276-7.Globaldiamond color

Abstract: Natural diamonds generally exhibit a very wide range of spectra. In polished stones, absorption along with proportions and size define perceived diamond color and thus beauty. In rough diamonds, the quantitative absorption spectrum (the “reference spectrum” in the context of this article) can be measured using an optical spectrometer through a set of parallel windows polished on a stone, so the diamond can be considered a planeparallel plate with known thickness. Polished diamonds lack the parallel facets that might allow plane-parallel plate measurement. That is why polished diamond colorimetry uses one of two approaches that have certain limitations for objective color estimation: 1) Qualitative spectrum assessment with an integrating sphere. Suppose three diamonds are polished from a yellow rough with even coloration: a round (with short ray paths), a cushion (with high color uniformity and long ray paths), and a “bow tie” marquise (with both long and short ray path areas). The spectra captured from these three stones by an integrating sphere will be completely different because the ray paths are very different. However, the quantitative absorption spectrum will be the same for all three stones, since they are cut from the same evenly colored rough. Therefore, spectrum assessment with an integrating sphere has very limited accuracy and is practical for qualitative estimations only. 2) Analysis of multiple images of a diamond made by color RGB camera. This method has low spectral resolution defined by digital camera color rendering. The camera has a smaller color gamut than the human eye, so most fancycolor diamonds are outside the color-capturing range of a digital camera. However, quantitative absorption data is very valuable for: 1) Color prediction and optimization for a new diamond after a recut process 2) Objective color assessment and description of a polished diamond This paper presents a new technology based on spectral lightemitting diodes (LEDs) and high-quality ray tracing, which together allow the reconstruction of a quantitative absorption spectrum for a polished diamond. The approach can be used for any transparent polished diamond. The recent technology prototype has a resolution of 20–60 nm, which is practical for color assessment. Figure 1 (top) presents three photorealistic diamond images: A is based on the reconstructed absorption spectrum collected from a polished diamond, B uses the reference spectrum collected in the rough stage through a pair of parallel windows, and C uses the averaged reference spectrum. Figure 1 (bottom) shows both measured quantitative absorption and reconstructed absorption spectra. This technology has the potential to ensure very close to objective color estimation for near-colorless and fancy-color polished diamonds. The reconstructed spectrum resolution can be enhanced to 10–15 nm in future devices.
DS200712-0966
2007
Serov, R.S.Serov, R.S., Viktoorv, M.A.Features of low temperature optical spectra of natural and treated diamonds.Moscow University Geology Bulletin, Vol. 62, 2, Mar-April pp. 127-TechnologyDiamond morphology
DS201012-0683
2007
Serov, R.S.Serov, R.S., Viktorov, M.A.Diagnostics of natural and synthetic diamonds with the aid of low temperature optical spectroscopy.Moscow University Geology Bulletin, Vol. 62, pp. 46-48.TechnologySpectroscopy
DS201706-1075
2017
Serov, S.G.Gordadze, G.N., Kerimov, V.Yu., Gaiduk, A.V., Giruts, M.V., Lobusev, M.A., Serov, S.G., Kuznetsov, N.B., Romanyuk, T.V.Hydrocarbon biomarkers and diamondoid hydrocarbons from Late Precambrian and Lower Cambrian rocks of the Katanga Saddle ( Siberian Platform).Geochemistry International, Vol. 55, 4, pp. 360-366.Russia, Siberiadiamondoid

Abstract: A broad suite of geological materials were studied a using a handheld laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument. Because LIBS is simultaneously sensitive to all elements, the full broadband emission spectrum recorded from a single laser shot provides a ‘chemical fingerprint’ of any material - solid, liquid or gas. The distinguishing chemical characteristics of the samples analysed were identified through principal component analysis (PCA), which demonstrates how this technique for statistical analysis can be used to identify spectral differences between similar sample types based on minor and trace constituents. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) was used to distinguish and classify the materials, with excellent discrimination achieved for all sample types. This study illustrates through four selected examples involving carbonate minerals and rocks, the oxide mineral pair columbite-tantalite, the silicate mineral garnet and native gold how portable, handheld LIBS analysers can be used as a tool for real-time chemical analysis under simulated field conditions for element or mineral identification plus such applications as stratigraphic correlation, provenance determination and natural resources exploration.
DS2003-0744
2003
Serov, V.P.Kostrovitsky, S.I., Alymova, N.V., Ivanov, A.S., Serov, V.P.Structure of the Daldyn field ( Yakutian Province) based on the study of picroilmenite8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 7, POSTER abstractRussia, YakutiaBlank
DS2003-1430
2003
Serov, V.P.Vladykin, N.V., Lelyukh, M.I., Tolstov, A.V., Serov, V.P.Petrology of kimberlite lamproite carbonatite rock association, east Prianabar'e (8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 7, POSTER abstractRussiaBlank
DS200412-0024
2004
Serov, V.P.Alymova, N.V., Kostrovitskii, S.I., Ivanov, A.S., Serov, V.P.Picroilmenite from kimberlites of the Daldyn Field, Yakutia.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 395, 4, March-April, pp. 444-447.Russia, YakutiaMineralogy
DS200412-0509
2004
Serov, V.P.Egorov, K.N., Mishenin, S.G., Menshagin, Yu.V., Serov, V.P., Sekerin, A.P., Koshkarev, D.A.Kimberlite minerals from the lower Carboniferous deposits of the Mura-Kovinsky diamond bearing area.*** IN RUSSIAN LANGUAGEProceedings of the Russian Mineralogical Society ***in RUSSIAN, Vol. 133, 1,pp. 32-40 ***RUSSIANRussiaMineralogy
DS200412-1047
2003
Serov, V.P.Kostrovitsky, S.I., Alymova, N.V., Ivanov, A.S., Serov, V.P.Structure of the Daldyn field ( Yakutian Province) based on the study of picroilmenite composition.8 IKC Program, Session 7, POSTER abstractRussia, YakutiaKimberlite petrogenesis
DS200412-2062
2003
Serov, V.P.Vladykin, N.V., Lelyukh, M.I., Tolstov, A.V., Serov, V.P.Petrology of kimberlite lamproite carbonatite rock association, east Prianabar'e ( Russia).8 IKC Program, Session 7, POSTER abstractRussiaKimberlite petrogenesis
DS200512-0961
2005
Serov, V.P.Serov, V.P., Kharkiv, A.D., Ustinov, V.I., Ukhanov, A.V.The Sobolev kimberlite pipe: structure and composition. YakutiaRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 46, 2, pp. 188-198.Russia, YakutiaMineralogy - Sobolev
DS1981-0103
1981
Serpa, L.Brown, L., Serpa, L., et al.Intra Crustal Complexities of the U.s. Midcontinent Preliminary Results from Cocorp Surveys in Northeast Kansas.Eos, Vol. 62, No. 45, P. 955. (abstract.).KansasMid Continent
DS1982-0559
1982
Serpa, L.Serpa, L., Brown, L., Setzer, T., Farmer, H., Oliver, J., Kaufman.Rift Structure from Cocorp Surveys in the MidcontinentEarthquake Notes, Vol. 54, No. 1, PP. 45-46.GlobalMid-continent
DS1983-0009
1983
Serpa, L.Allmendinger, R.W., Sharp, J.W., Von tish, D., Serpa, L.Cenozoic and Mesozoic Structure of the Eastern Basin and Range Province, Utah from Cocorp Seismic Reflection Data.Geology, Vol. 11, No. 9, PP. 532-536.GlobalMid-continent
DS1983-0155
1983
Serpa, L.Brown, L.D., Serpa, L., Setzer, T., Oliver, J., Kaufman, S., Lill.Intracrustal Complexity in the United States Midcontinent; PGeology, Vol. 11, No. 1, PP. 25-30.KansasMid-continent
DS1984-0650
1984
Serpa, L.Serpa, L., Setzer, T., Farmer, H., Brown, L., Oliver, J., Kaufman.Structure of the Southern Keweenawan Rift from Cocorp SurveyTectonics, Vol. 3, No. 3, JUNE PP. 367-384.United States, KansasMid-continent
DS1984-0651
1984
Serpa, L.Serpa, L., Setzer, T., Farmer, H., Peddy, C., Brown, L., Oliver, J.Cocorp Profiling Across the Midcontinent Gravity HighGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 16, No. 2, FEBRUARY P. 113. (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent
DS1985-0601
1985
Serpa, L.Serpa, L.Structure of the Precambrian Keweenawan Rift in Kansas6th. International Conference Basement Tectonics, Held Sante Fe, Septem, P. 33. (abstract.).United States, Central States, KansasGeotectonics
DS2002-0289
2002
Serre, M.L.Christakos, G., Bogaert, P., Serre, M.L.Temporal GIS: advanced functions for field based applicationsSpringer, 220p.GlobalBook - GIS ( not specific to diamond), Bayesian maximum entropy
DS201905-1082
2019
Serre, S.H.van der Meer, Q.H.A., Scott, J.M., Serre, S.H., Whitehouse, M.J., Kristoffersen, M., Le Roux, P.J., Pope, E.C.Low delta 18 O zircon xenocrysts in alkaline basalts; a window into the complex carbonatite-metasomatic history of the Zealandia lithospheric mantle.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 254, pp. 21-39.New Zealandmetasomatism

Abstract: Megacrystic zircon grains from alkaline basaltic fields are rare but can provide fundamental insights into mantle metasomatic processes. Here, we report in-situ U-Pb ages, trace element concentrations and hafnium and oxygen isotopes for fourteen zircon megacrysts from two intraplate alkaline basalt locations in New Zealand. U-Pb ages indicate the zircons crystallised between 12.1 and 19.8 Ma. Zircon oxygen isotopic compositions range from low to mantle-like compositions (grain average d ¹8 O = 3.8-5.1‰). Hafnium isotopes (eHf (t) = +3.3 to +10.4) mostly overlap with intraplate mafic rocks and clinopyroxene in metasomatized peridotitic mantle xenoliths but show no correlation with most trace element parameters or oxygen isotopes. The zircons are interpreted to have formed by the reaction between low-degree melts derived from pre-existing mantle metasomes and the depleted mantle lithosphere prior to eruption and transport to the surface. The low Hf concentration, an absence of Eu anomalies, and elevated U/Yb compared to Nb/Yb in the megacrystic zircons are interpreted to show that the source metasomes comprised subduction- and carbonatite-metasomatised lithospheric mantle. As these trace element characteristics are common for megacrystic zircon in intra-plate basaltic fields globally, they suggest the prevalence of subduction- and carbonatite-metsasomatised mantle under these intraplate volcanic regions. The unusually low d ¹8 O was likely present prior to metasomatic enrichment and may have resulted from high-temperature hydrothermal alteration during initial mantle lithosphere formation at a mid ocean ridge or, possibly, during subduction-related processes associated with continent formation. The combination of proportionally varied contributions from carbonatite- and subduction-metasomatised lithospheric melts with asthenospheric melts may explain the variety of primitive intraplate basalt compositions, including low d ¹8 O reported for some local intraplate lavas.
DS1988-0537
1988
Serri, G.Peccerillo, A., Poli, G., Serri, G.Petrogenesis of oreniditic and kamafugitic rocks from central ItalyCanadian Mineralogist, Vol. 26, No. 1, March pp. 23-44ItalyBlank
DS200412-2012
2003
Serri, G.Trua, T., Serri, G., Marani, M.P.Lateral flow of African mantle below the nearby Tyrrhenian plate: geochemical evidence.Terra Nova, Vol. 15, 6, pp. 433-440.AfricaGeochemistry
DS201212-0273
2012
Sertolki, W.Gurnell, A.M., Sertolki, W., Cornenblit, D.Changing river channels: the role of hydrological processes, plants and pioneer fluvial landforms in humid temperate, mixed load, gravel bed rivers.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 111, 1-2, pp. 129-141.TechnologyGeomorpholgy - not specific to diamonds
DS201312-0930
2013
Serv, V.Ustinov, V., Serv, V., Mituykhin, S.Diamond exploration of Alrosa in Russia: present and future.PDAC 2013, March 4, 1/2p. AbstractRussiaOverview - Alrosa
DS201605-0859
2016
Servali, A.Levin, V., Van Tongeren, J.A., Servali, A.How sharp is the sharp Archean Moho? Example from eastern Superior Province.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 43, 5, pp. 1928-1933.Canada, OntarioGeophysics - seismics

Abstract: The Superior Province of North America has not experienced major internal deformation for nearly 2.8?Gyr, preserving the Archean crust in its likely original state. We present seismological evidence for a sharp (less than 1?km) crust-mantle boundary beneath three distinct Archean terranes and for a more vertically extensive boundary at sites likely affected by the 1.2-0.9?Ga Grenville orogeny. At all sites crustal thickness is smaller than expected for the primary crust produced by melting under higher mantle potential temperature conditions of Archean time. Reduced thickness and an abrupt contrast in seismic properties at the base of the undisturbed Archean crust are consistent with density sorting and loss of the residues through gravitational instability facilitated by higher temperatures in the upper mantle at the time of formation. Similar sharpness of crust-mantle boundary in disparate Archean terranes suggests that it is a universal feature of the Archean crustal evolution.
DS201706-1090
2017
Servali, A.Levin, V., Servali, A., VanTongeren, J., Menke, W., Darbyshire, F.Crust-mantle boundary in eastern North America, from the (oldest) craton to the (youngest) rift.Geological Society of America, SPE 526 pp. 107-132.United Statescraton

Abstract: The North American continent consists of a set of Archean cratons, Proterozoic orogenic belts, and a sequence of Phanerozoic accreted terranes. We present an ~1250-km-long seismological profile that crosses the Superior craton, Grenville Province, and Appalachian domains, with the goal of documenting the thickness, internal properties, and the nature of the lower boundary of the North American crust using uniform procedures for data selection, preparation, and analysis to ensure compatibility of the constraints we derive. Crustal properties show systematic differences between the three major tectonic domains. The Archean Superior Province is characterized by thin crust, sharp Moho, and low values of Vp/Vs ratio. The Proterozoic Grenville Province has some crustal thickness variation, near-uniform values of Vp/Vs, and consistently small values of Moho thickness. Of the three tectonic domains in the region, the Grenville Province has the thickest crust. Vp/Vs ratios are systematically higher than in the Superior Province. Within the Paleozoic Appalachian orogen, all parameters (crustal thickness, Moho thickness, Vp/Vs ratio) vary broadly over distances of 100 km or less, both across the strike and along it. Internal tectonic boundaries of the Appalachians do not appear to have clear signatures in crustal properties. Of the three major tectonic boundaries crossed by our transect, two have clear manifestations in the crustal structure. The Grenville front is associated with a change in crustal thickness and crustal composition (as reflected in Vp/Vs ratios). The Norumbega fault zone is at the apex of the regional thinning of the Appalachian crust. The Appalachian front is not associated with a major change in crustal properties; rather, it coincides with a zone of complex structure resulting from prior tectonic episodes, and thus presents a clear example of tectonic inheritance over successive Wilson cycles.
DS201708-1575
2017
Servali, A.Levin, V., Servali, A., VanTongeren, J., Menke, W., Darbyshire, F.Crust mantle boundary in eastern North America, from the (oldest) craton to the (youngest) rift.Geological Society of London, Chapter 6, pp. 107-132.United States, Canadatectonics

Abstract: The North American continent consists of a set of Archean cratons, Proterozoic orogenic belts, and a Sequence of Phanerozoic accreted terranes. We present an ~1250-km-long seismological profile that crosses the Superior craton, Grenville Province, and Appalachian domains, with the goal of documenting the thickness, internal properties, and the nature of the lower boundary of the North American crust using uniform procedures for data selection, preparation, and analysis to ensure compatibility of the constraints we derive. Crustal properties show systematic differences between the three major tectonic domains. The Archean Superior Province is characterized by thin crust, sharp Moho, and low values of Vp/Vs ratio. The Proterozoic Grenville Province has some crustal thickness variation, near-uniform values of Vp/Vs, and consistently small values of Moho thickness. Of the three tectonic domains in the region, the Grenville Province has the thickest crust. Vp/Vs ratios are systematically higher than in the Superior Province. Within the Paleozoic Appalachian orogen, all parameters (crustal thickness, Moho thickness, Vp/Vs ratio) vary broadly over distances of 100 km or less, both across the strike and along it. Internal tectonic boundaries of the Appalachians do not appear to have clear signatures in crustal properties. Of the three major tectonic boundaries crossed by our transect, two have clear manifestations in the crustal structure. The Grenville front is associated with a change in crustal thickness and crustal composition (as reflected in Vp/Vs ratios). The Norumbega fault zone is at the apex of the regional thinning of the Appalachian crust. The Appalachian front is not associated with a major change in crustal properties; rather, it coincides with a zone of complex structure resulting from prior tectonic episodes, and thus presents a clear example of tectonic inheritance over successive Wilson cycles.
DS201902-0320
2018
Servali, A.Servali, A., Korenaga, J.Oceanic origin of continental mantle lithosphere.Geology, Vol. 46, pp. 1047-1050.Mantlexenoliths

Abstract: We present a global compilation of major element, as well as Re-Os isotope, data on mantle xenoliths from continental lithosphere to constrain the secular evolution of mantle depletion since the early Archean. Whereas a temporal dichotomy in the degree of mantle depletion has long been recognized in previous regional studies of mantle xenoliths, this global compilation reveals, for the first time, a smooth secular trend in mantle depletion, which is in remarkable agreement with what is expected from the secular cooling of the ambient mantle as inferred from the petrology of non-arc basalts. Depleted mantle now composing continental lithosphere is likely to have been originally formed beneath mid-ocean ridges or similar spreading environments, and a greater degree of depletion in the past can be seen as a corollary of the secular cooling of the mantle.
DS1930-0281
1938
Service, H.Service, H.Notes on the Bonsa Diamond FieldGhana Geological Survey Report For The Years 1937-1938, PP. 57-69.GlobalDiamonds
DS202010-1875
2020
Service, R.F.Service, R.F.The carbon vault. ( refers to Gahcho Kue crushed rock waste )as a vault to lock up CO2.Science, Vol. 369, 6508, pp. 1156-1159. pdfCanada, Northwest territoriesrock waste
DS1990-1610
1990
Serykh, S.V.Yarovoy, P.N., Konov, A.A., Serykh, S.V.Nature of the luminesence of certain minerals from the Murun alkalicmassifDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 304 No. 1-6, pp. 226-228RussiaAlkaline, Murun massif
DS202102-0215
2020
Seryotkin, Y.Pavlushkin, A., Loginova, A., Seryotkin, Y.Crystallographic orientation and geochemical features of mineral inclusions in diamonds.Russian Geology and Geophysics, doi:10.15372 /RG2020144 21p. PdfRussiadeposit - Mir, Udachnaya, Aikal, Yubileinya

Abstract: The orientation of 76 mineral inclusions represented by olivine (25 inclusions), pyrope (13 inclusions), and magnesiochromite (38 inclusions) was measured in 16 diamond samples from the major primary diamond deposits of Yakutia: Mir, Udachnaya, Internatsionalnaya, Aikhal, and Yubileynaya kimberlite pipes. The novelty of the study is that it provides a special purposeful approach to selection of samples containing not only olivine inclusions that have been extensively studied in the most recent years after the publication of the book Carbon in Earth (2013). The present collection accounts for more than 25% of all samples studied across the world and includes the most typical mineral inclusions of the predominant peridotitic paragenesis in almost all known kimberlites. Both this experiment and similar studies conducted by foreign colleagues in 2014-2019 have found no inclusions whose orientation meets the epitaxial criterion. Only single magnesiochromite inclusions in three diamonds demonstrate an orientation close to the regular one. A significant correlation between the carbon isotope composition and the mineral composition of inclusions of peridotitic and eclogitic paragenesis diamonds as well as the lack of a correlation with other properties may be considered one of the geochemical features. However, given the numerous published and proprietary data demonstrating the complex diamond growth history and, in some cases, wide variations in the composition of mineral inclusions in different zones, along with the difference in their morphology, the authors a believe that syngenetic and protogenetic inclusions can coexist in the same diamond. This is also confirmed by the discoveries of diamondiferous peridotite and eclogite xenoliths in kimberlites where diamonds are completely enclosed in garnet or olivine. Of particular note is the constant presence of heavy hydrocarbons (rel.%), from pentane (C5H12) to hexadecane (C16H34), that are predominant in fluid inclusions in kimberlite and placer diamonds as well as in pyrope and olivine of diamondiferous peridotite xenoliths.
DS200412-1869
2004
Seryotkin, Y.V.Sobolev, N.V., Logvinova, A.M., Zedgenizov, D.A., Seryotkin, Y.V., Tefimova, E.S., Floss, C., Taylor, L.A.Mineral inclusions in microdiamonds and macrodiamonds from kimberlites of Yakutia: a comparative study.Lithos, Vol. 77, 1-4, Sept. pp. 225-242.Russia, Yakutia, SiberiaDiamond inclusions, craton, eclogite, peridotite
DS201712-2728
2017
Seryotkin, Yu.V.Seryotkin, Yu.V., Skvortsova, V.L., Logvinova, A.M., Sobolev, N.V.Results of study of crystallographic orientation of olivine and diamond from Udachnaya kimberlite pipe, Yakutia.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 476, 2, pp. 1155-1158.Russia, Yakutiadeposit - Udachnaya

Abstract: The crystallographic orientation of three diamonds and 19 olivine inclusions from Udachnaya kimberlite pipe was studied using monocrystal X-ray diffractometry. No epitaxial olivine inclusions were found.
DS201012-0684
2010
Sesha Sai, V.V.Sesha Sai, V.V.Petrology and mineral chemistry of a major picrite dyke from Peddakudala Velpula area, in southwestern part of Proterozoic Cuddapah Basin, Andhra Pradesh, India.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractIndia, Andhra PradeshPicrite
DS201312-0470
2013
Sesha Sai, V.V.Khanna, T.C., Sesha Sai, V.V., Zhao, G.C., Subba Rao, D.V., Krishna, K.A., Sawant, S.S., Charan, .N.Petrogenesis of mafic alkaline dikes from Mahbubnagar large igneous province, eastern Dharwar craton, India: geochemical evidence for uncontaminated intracontinental mantle derived magmatism.Lithos, Vol. 179, pp. 84-98.IndiaAlkaline rocks, dykes
DS201801-0058
2017
Sesha Sai, V.V.Sesha Sai, V.V.Petrographic studies in understanding carbonatites.Carbonatite-alkaline rocks and associated mineral deposits , Dec. 8-11, abstract p. 48-49.Indiacarbonatites

Abstract: Carbonatites are mantle derived carbonate rich rocks of igneous origin. Carbonatites are often spatially associated with alkaline rocks and typically confined to continental rift related tectonic setting. Mineralogically, carbonatites are predominantly composed of primary carbonate minerals (calcite, dolomite), while, oxides, hydroxides, silicates, phosphate and sulphide minerals are also found as associated minerals in variable amounts. Although geochemical and isotope geology studies significantly contribute to understand the genetic aspects of these rare REE rich rocks of economic significance; petrographic studies with the aid of polarizing microscope play a critical role in (i) identification of the constituent minerals (ii) ascertain the relative abundance of various minerals and (iii) to recognise the textures. All these three aspects along with geochemical, isotope and mineral inclusion studies are extremely important to understand carbonatite petrogenesis. As per the IUGS classification scheme, the primary carbonate minerals [calcite CaCO3, dolomite (Ca, Mg) CO3, ankerite Ca (Fe, Mg, Mn) (CO3)2] constitute > 50 % by mode in carbonatites, while the SiO2 is < 20 % (Le Maitre, 2002). Though the primary mineralogy in carbonatite is variable, petrographic studies do help in establishing the presence of REE rich phases like apatite and pyrochlore; presence of mineral phases like phlogopite, perovskite, olivine, fluorite (transmitted light) and opaque oxides; eg. magnetite (reflected light) in carbonate rich rock with crystalline texture; as an initial stage for identification of a carbonatite. Based on the chemical composition, the carbonatites are classified as calciocarbonatites, magnesiocarbonatites and ferrocarbonatites (Woolley, 1982); the calciocarbonatites are further classified as sovite and alvikite (Le Bas, 1999). Based on the mineralogical-genetic criteria, carbonatites are divided into primary carbonatites and carbothermal residua (Mitchell, 2007). Petrographic studies help to initially identify the chemically distinct calciocarbonatites; sovite or alvikite. Sovite is texturally coarse grained, while alvikite is relatively fine grained. The coarse grained nature of the calciocarbonatites (average grain size of the carbonate minerals ranging from 1 to 5 mm) coupled with their equigranular nature makes them texturally distinct. Calcite and dolomite can be distinguished with the aid of staining techniques (Dickson, 1965). Staining technique will be useful for rapid estimation of the modal contents of the carbonate phases (calcite, ferroan calcite, dolomite,) in carbonatites. Though less abundant, the ferrocarbonatites are charecterised by the presence of clearly relatively large magnetite grains. Often the porphyritic appearance in the ferrocarbonatites is due to the presence of aggregates of celadonite and phlogopite leaving olivine and pyroxene as relict phases. Late stage magmatic-hydrothermal fluids can play a role in alteration of the textural and mineralogy in carbonatites (Duraiswami and Shaikh, 2014). Study the primary magmatic inclusions in silicates phases in carbonatites with the aid of optical and scanning electron microscopy provide critical information to understand the petrogenetic aspects of carbonatites (e.g. Nisbett and Kelly, 1977). Petrographic studies also contribute in identification of textures indicating crystal-melt interaction in carbonatites (Sesha Sai and Sengupta, 2017). Field and laboratory studies leading to chronological understanding of the geotectonic events in a given area, along with petrographic analyses with detailed mineralogical and textural descriptions, not only contribute to understand the fundamental aspects of carbonatites, but also form a solid substratum to build an acceptable petrogenetic model, by synthesising the information obtained by the geochemical, isotope geology and mineral inclusion studies.
DS201810-2338
2018
Sesha Sai, V.V.Khanna, T.C., Sesha Sai, V.V., Jaffri, S.H., Keshav Krishna, A., Korakoppa, M.M.Boninites in the ~3.3 Ga Holenarsipur greenstone belt, western Dharwar Craton, India.MDPI Geosciences, Researchgate 17p.Indiaboninites

Abstract: In this contribution, we present detailed field, petrography, mineral chemistry, and geochemistry of newly identified high-Si high-Mg metavolcanic rocks from the southern part of the ~3.3 Ga Holenarsipur greenstone belt in the western Dharwar craton, India. The rocks occur as conformable bands that were interleaved with the mafic-ultramafic units. The entire volcanic package exhibits uniform foliation pattern, and metamorphosed under greenschist to low grade amphibolite facies conditions. The rocks are extremely fine grained and exhibit relict primary igneous textures. They are composed of orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene phenocrysts with serpentine, talc, and amphibole (altered clinopyroxene). Cr-spinel, rutile, ilmenite, and apatite occur as disseminated minute grains in the groundmass. The mineralogical composition and the geochemical signatures comprising of high SiO2 (~53 wt. %), Mg# (~83), low TiO2 (~0.18 wt. %), and higher than chondritic Al2O3/TiO2 ratio (~26), reversely fractionated heavy rare earth elements (REE) (GdN/YbN ~ 0.8), resulting in concave-up patterns, and positive Zr anomaly, typically resembled with the Phanerozoic boninites. Depletion in the high field strength elements Nb, and Ti relative to Th and the REE in a primitive mantle normalized trace element variation diagram, cannot account for contamination by pre-existing Mesoarchean continental crust present in the study area. The trace element attributes instead suggest an intraoceanic subduction-related tectonic setting for the genesis of these rocks. Accordingly, the Holenarsipur high-Si high-Mg metavolcanic rocks have been identified as boninites. It importantly indicates that the geodynamic process involved in the generation of Archean boninites, was perhaps not significantly different from the widely recognized two-stage melt generation process that produced the Phanerozoic boninites, and hence provides compelling evidence for the onset of Phanerozoic type plate tectonic processes by at least ~3.3 Ga, in the Earth’s evolutionary history.
DS201905-1070
2019
Sesha Sai, V.V.Rai, A.K., Srivastava, R.K., Samal, A.K., Sesha Sai, V.V.Geochemistry, petrogenesis, and geodynamic implications of NE-SW to ENE - WSW trending Paleoproterozoic mafic dyke swarms from southern region of the western Dharwar Craton.Geological Journal, Doi: 10.1002/gj.3493Indiageodynamics

Abstract: A number of NE-SW to ENE-WSW trending Palaeoproterozoic mafic dykes, intruded within the Archean basement rocks and more conspicuous in the southern parts of the western Dharwar Craton (WDC), was studied for their whole-rock geochemistry to understand their petrogenetic and geodynamic aspects. Observed mineralogical and textural characteristics classify them either as meta-dolerites or dolerites/olivine-dolerites. They show basaltic to basaltic-andesitic compositions and bear sub-alkaline tholeiitic nature. Three geochemically distinct groups of mafic dykes have been identified. Group 1 samples show flat REE patterns (LaN/LuN = ~1), whereas the other two groups have LaN/LuN = ~2-3 (Group 2; enriched LREE and flat HREE patterns) and LaN/LuN = ~4 (Group 3; inclined REE patterns). Chemistry is not straightforward to support any significant role of crustal contamination and probably reflect their source characteristics. However, their derivation from melts originated from a previously modified metasomatized lithospheric mantle due to some ancient subduction event cannot be ignored. Most likely different mantle melts were responsible for derivation of these distinct sets of mafic dykes. The Group 2 dykes are derived from a melt generated within spinel stability field by ~10% batch melting of a lithospheric mantle source, whereas the Group 3 dykes have their derivation from a melt originated within the spinel-garnet transition zone and were fed from slightly higher (~12-15%) batch melting of a similar source. The Group 1 samples were also crystallized from a melt generated at the transition zone of spinel-garnet stability field by higher degrees (~20%) of melting of a primitive mantle source. Geochemistry of the studied samples is typical of Palaeoproterozoic mafic dykes emplaced within the intracratonic setting, reported elsewhere globally as well as neighbouring cratons. Geochemistry of the studied mafic dyke samples is also compared with the mafic dykes of the eastern Dharwar Craton (EDC). Except the Group 3 samples, which have good correlation with the 1.88-1.89 Ga Hampi swarm, no other group shows similarity with the EDC mafic dykes. There is an ample possibility to have some different mafic magmatic events in the WDC, which could be different from the EDC. However, it can only be confirmed after precise age determinations.
DS1984-0652
1984
Seshadri, G.R.Seshadri, G.R.Diamonds in India, 1983Mining Annual Review., FOR 1983, JUNE P. 345.IndiaReview Of Current Activities
DS1985-0602
1985
Seshadri, G.R.Seshadri, G.R.Diamonds in India, 1984Mining Annual Review., FOR 1984, JUNE, P. 390.India, PannaLeading Processor Of Uncut Diamonds, Bharat Diamond Bourse Re
DS2001-1053
2001
Seshadri, G.R.Seshadri, G.R.India - MARMining Annual Review, 9p.IndiaCountry - overview, economics, mining, Overview - brief
DS201712-2699
2017
SeshaSai, V.V.Khanna, T.C., Subba Rao, D.V., Bizimis, M., Satyanarayanan, M., Krishna, A.K., SeshaSai, V.V.~2.1 Ga intraoceanic magmatism in the central India tectonic zone: constraints from the petrogenesis of ferropicrites in the Mahakoshal suprarcustal belt.Precambrian Research, Vol. 302, pp. 1-17.Indiapicrites
DS1995-0019
1995
Seslabinsky, K.R.Algeo, T.J., Seslabinsky, K.R.The Paleozoic world: continental flooding, hypsometry and sea levelAmerican Journal of Science, Vol. 295, Summer, pp. 787-822China, SiberiaEustasy, Paleocontinental flooding
DS1995-0020
1995
Seslavinsky, K.B.Algeo, T.J., Seslavinsky, K.B.The Paleozoic world: continental flooding, hysometry, and sea levelAmerican Journal of Science, Vol. 295, summer, pp. 787-822.Baltica, China, Kazakhstan, Siberia, RussiaGeomorphology - flooding record
DS1996-0738
1996
Seslavinsky, K.B.Khain, V.Ye., Seslavinsky, K.B.The tectonic activity on cratons and quasicratons: a semiquantitativeanalysis.Doklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 340, No. 1, Feb., pp. 128-134.GlobalCraton, Tectonics
DS2001-1054
2001
Seta, A.Seta, A., Matsumoto, T., Matsuda, J.Concurrent evolution of 3He 4He ratio in the Earth's mantle reservoir for the first 2 Ga.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 188, No. 1, May 30, pp.211-19.MantleMineralogy
DS2002-1011
2002
Seta, A.Matsumoto, T., Seta, A., Matsuda, J.Helium in Archean komatiites revisited: significantly high 3He/4He ratios revisited by fractional crushingEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.196,3-4,pp. 213-25.GlobalKomatiites
DS1980-0243
1980
Setaka, N.Moriyoshi, Y., Setaka, N., Kamo, M.Microstructures of Natural Single and Poly Crystal DiamondsGemmol. Soc. Japan Journal, Vol. 7, No. 2, PP. 13-22.GlobalKimberlite, Diamond, Crystallography
DS1981-0231
1981
Setaka, N.Kanda, H., Setaka, N., et al.Asymmetrics of the Crystal Shapes of Synthetic DiamondsJournal of CRYSTAL GROWTH, Vol. 51, No. 3, PP. 629-631.GlobalCrystallography
DS1998-1315
1998
Seth, B.Seth, B., Kroner, A., Okrusch, M.Archean to neoproterozoic magmatic events in the Kaoko belt of northwest Namibia and their geodynamic significance.Precambrian Research, Vol. 92, No. 4, Dec. 1, pp. 341-365.NamibiaMagmatism, Tectonics
DS1970-0413
1971
Sethna, S.F.Sethna, S.F.A Note on the Trace Element Contents of Carbonatites of Amba Dongar and Surrounding Areas, Chhota Udaipur.Geological Society INDIA Journal, Vol. 12, No. 4, PP. 311-317.India, Chhota UdaipurDeccan Traps, Analyses, Geochemistry
DS2002-1046
2002
Sethna, S.F.Melluso, L., Sethna, S.F., D'Antonio, M., Javeri, BennioGeochemistry and petrogenesis of sodic and potassic mafic alkaline rocks in the Deccan volcanic Province.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 74, 2-4, pp. 323-42.IndiaAlkaline rocks, Deposit - Mumbai area
DS202012-2233
2020
Sethna, S.F.Melluso, L., Sethna, S.F., Srivastava, R.K.First occurrence of melilite, potassic richterite and tetraferriphlogopite in Deccan Trap- related alkaline rocks, and its petrogenetic significance: the Rajpuri ijolitenephlinite intrusion, Murud, Mumbai area, India.Journal of Mineralogy and Geochemistry, https://doi.org/ 10.1127/njma/2020/0236Indiamelilite
DS1997-0867
1997
Seto, S.Ohtani, E., Yurimoto, H., Seto, S.Element partitioning between metallic liquid, silicate liquid and Lower Mantle mineral: implications for corePhysics of the Earth and Plan. Interiros, Vol. 100, pp. 97-114.MantleGeothermometry, Heat transport, silicates
DS200612-1263
2006
Seto, Y.Seto, Y., Hamane, D., Nagai, T., Fujino, K.The fate of carbonates with subducted slabs into the lower mantle and a possible formation of diamonds.International Mineralogical Association 19th. General Meeting, held Kobe, Japan July 23-28 2006, Abstract p. 130.MantleDiamond genesis, subduction
DS200712-1061
2006
Seto, Y.Takafuji, N., Fujino, K., Nagai, T., Seto, Y., Hamane, D.Decarbonation reaction of magnesite in subduction slabs at the lower mantle.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 33, 10, pp. 651-654.MantleSubduction
DS200712-1062
2006
Seto, Y.Takafuji, N., Fujino, K., Nagai, T., Seto, Y., Hamane, D.Decarbonation reaction of magnesite in subducting slabs at the lower mantle.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 33, 10, pp. 651-654.MantleSubduction
DS200812-1042
2008
Seto, Y.Seto, Y., Hamane, D., Nagai, T., Fujino, K.Fate of carbonates within oceanic plates subducted to the lower mantle, and a possible mechanism of diamond formation.Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, Vol. 35, 4, pp. 223-229.MantleUHP, Diamond genesis
DS201312-0116
2013
Seton, M.Butterworth, N.P., Talsman, A.S., Muller, R.D., Seton, M., Bunge, H-P., Schuberth, B.S.A., Shephard, G.E., Heine, C.Geological, tomographic, kinematic and geodynamic constraints on the dynamics of sinking slabs.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 126, pp. 235-249.MantleSubduction
DS201312-0808
2013
Seton, M.Shephard, G., Muller, R.D., Seton, M.The tectonic evolution of the Arctic since Pangea breakup: integrating constraints from surface geology and geophysics with mantle structure.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 124, pp. 148-183.Mantle, Circum-Arctic, Russia, CanadaTectonics
DS201412-0087
2014
Seton, M.Butterworth, N.P., Talsma, A.S., Muller, R.D., Seton, M., Bunge, H-P., Schuberth, B.S.A., Shephard, G.E., Heine, C.Geological, tomographic, kinematic and geodynamic constraints on the dynamics of sinking slabs.Journal of Geodynamics, Vol. 73, pp. 1-13.MantleSubduction
DS201505-0239
2015
Seton, M.Zahirovic, S., Muller, R.D., Seton, M., Flament, N.Tectonic speed limits from plate kinematic reconstructions.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 418, pp. 40-52.GlobalPlate Tectonics
DS201607-1307
2016
Seton, M.Mallard, C., Coltice, N., Seton, M., Muller, R.D., Tackley, P.J.Subduction controls the distribution and fragmentation of Earth's tectonic plates.Nature, available eprintMantleSubduction, melting

Abstract: The theory of plate tectonics describes how the surface of Earth is split into an organized jigsaw of seven large plates1 of similar sizes and a population of smaller plates whose areas follow a fractal distribution2, 3. The reconstruction of global tectonics during the past 200 million years4 suggests that this layout is probably a long-term feature of Earth, but the forces governing it are unknown. Previous studies3, 5, 6, primarily based on the statistical properties of plate distributions, were unable to resolve how the size of the plates is determined by the properties of the lithosphere and the underlying mantle convection. Here we demonstrate that the plate layout of Earth is produced by a dynamic feedback between mantle convection and the strength of the lithosphere. Using three-dimensional spherical models of mantle convection that self-consistently produce the plate size -frequency distribution observed for Earth, we show that subduction geometry drives the tectonic fragmentation that generates plates. The spacing between the slabs controls the layout of large plates, and the stresses caused by the bending of trenches break plates into smaller fragments. Our results explain why the fast evolution in small back-arc plates7, 8 reflects the marked changes in plate motions during times of major reorganizations. Our study opens the way to using convection simulations with plate-like behaviour to unravel how global tectonics and mantle convection are dynamically connected.
DS201906-1327
2019
Seton, M.Muller, R.D., Zahirovic, S., Williams, S.E., Cannon, J., Seton, M., Bower, D.J., Tetley, M., Heine, C., Le Breton, E., Liu, S., Russell, S.H.J., Yang, T., Leonard, J., Gurnis, M.A global plate model including lithospheric deformation along major rifts and orogens since the Triassic.Tectonics, May 5, 36p. Mantleplate tectonics

Abstract: Global deep-time plate motion models have traditionally followed a classical rigid plate approach, even though plate deformation is known to be significant. Here we present a global Mesozoic-Cenozoic deforming plate motion model that captures the progressive extension of all continental margins since the initiation of rifting within Pangea at ~240 Ma. The model also includes major failed continental rifts and compressional deformation along collision zones. The outlines and timing of regional deformation episodes are reconstructed from a wealth of published regional tectonic models and associated geological and geophysical data. We reconstruct absolute plate motions in a mantle reference frame with a joint global inversion using hotspot tracks for the last 80 million years and minimizing global trench migration velocities and net lithospheric rotation. In our optimized model net rotation is consistently below 0.2°/Myr, and trench migration scatter is substantially reduced. Distributed plate deformation reaches a Mesozoic peak of 30 million km2 in the Late Jurassic (~160-155 Ma), driven by a vast network of rift systems. After a mid-Cretaceous drop in deformation it reaches a high of 48 million km2 in the Late Eocene (~35 Ma), driven by the progressive growth of plate collisions and the formation of new rift systems. About a third of the continental crustal area has been deformed since 240 Ma, partitioned roughly into 65% extension and 35% compression. This community plate model provides a framework for building detailed regional deforming plate networks and form a constraint for models of basin evolution and the plate-mantle system.
DS201907-1562
2019
Seton, M.Muller, D., Zahirovic, S., Williams, S.E., Cannon, J., Seton, M., Bower, D.J., Tetley, M., Heine, C., Le Breton, E., Liu, S., Russell, S.H.J., Yang, T., Leonard, J., Gurnis, M.A global plate model including lithospheric deformation along major rifts and orogens since the Triassic.Tectonics, in press available, 37p.Africa, globalplate tectonics, rotation

Abstract: Global deep-time plate motion models have traditionally followed a classical rigid plate approach, even though plate deformation is known to be significant. Here we present a global Mesozoic-Cenozoic deforming plate motion model that captures the progressive extension of all continental margins since the initiation of rifting within Pangea at ~240 Ma. The model also includes major failed continental rifts and compressional deformation along collision zones. The outlines and timing of regional deformation episodes are reconstructed from a wealth of published regional tectonic models and associated geological and geophysical data. We reconstruct absolute plate motions in a mantle reference frame with a joint global inversion using hot spot tracks for the last 80 million years and minimizing global trench migration velocities and net lithospheric rotation. In our optimized model, net rotation is consistently below 0.2°/Myr, and trench migration scatter is substantially reduced. Distributed plate deformation reaches a Mesozoic peak of 30 × 106 km2 in the Late Jurassic (~160-155 Ma), driven by a vast network of rift systems. After a mid-Cretaceous drop in deformation, it reaches a high of 48 x 106 km2 in the Late Eocene (~35 Ma), driven by the progressive growth of plate collisions and the formation of new rift systems. About a third of the continental crustal area has been deformed since 240 Ma, partitioned roughly into 65% extension and 35% compression. This community plate model provides a framework for building detailed regional deforming plate networks and form a constraint for models of basin evolution and the plate-mantle system.
DS1995-1707
1995
Setterholm, D.R.Setterholm, D.R., Morey, G.B.An extensive pre-Cretaceous weathering profile in east central and southwestern Minnesota.United States Geological Survey (USGS) Bulletin, No. 1989-H.MinnesotaWeathering, Geomorphology
DS1975-0864
1978
Setti, D.N.Setti, D.N., Srennivasa rao, T., Sobba raju, M.A Note on the Occurrence of Kimberlite -carbonatite Enclaves in the Peninsular Gneiss Warangal District, A.p.Indian Minerals, Vol. 32, No. 2, PP. 59-61.India, Andhra PradeshAlluvial Placer Deposits, Genesis
DS201112-0937
2011
Setzer, F.Setzer, F., Worgard, L., Wenzel, T., Makl, G.Element mobilization in the Agate Mountain carbonatite complex, NW Namibia.Peralk-Carb 2011, workshop held Tubingen Germany June 16-18, PosterAfrica, NamibiaCarbonatite
DS201112-0938
2011
Setzer, F.Setzer, F., Worgard, L., Wenzel, T., Markl, G.Element mobilization in the Agate Mountain carbonatite complex, NW Namibia.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.136-137.Africa, NamibiaAgate
DS201112-0939
2011
Setzer, F.Setzer, F., Worgard, L., Wenzel, T., Markl, G.Element mobilization in the Agate Mountain carbonatite complex, NW Namibia.Peralk-Carb 2011... workshop June 16-18, Tubingen, Germany, Abstract p.136-137.Africa, NamibiaNews item - Agate
DS1982-0559
1982
Setzer, T.Serpa, L., Brown, L., Setzer, T., Farmer, H., Oliver, J., Kaufman.Rift Structure from Cocorp Surveys in the MidcontinentEarthquake Notes, Vol. 54, No. 1, PP. 45-46.GlobalMid-continent
DS1983-0155
1983
Setzer, T.Brown, L.D., Serpa, L., Setzer, T., Oliver, J., Kaufman, S., Lill.Intracrustal Complexity in the United States Midcontinent; PGeology, Vol. 11, No. 1, PP. 25-30.KansasMid-continent
DS1983-0567
1983
Setzer, T.Setzer, T.A Cocorp Seismic Reflection Profile in Nrotheastern KansasAmerican Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) STUDIES IN GEOLOGY, No. 15, PP. 2.2.1-7.2.2.1-12.United States, KansasMid-continent
DS1984-0303
1984
Setzer, T.Gibbs, A.K., Payne, B., Setzer, T., Brown, L.D., Oliver, J.E.Seismic Reflection Study of the Precambrian Crust of Central Minnesota.Geological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 95, No. 3, PP. 280-294.GlobalMid-continent
DS1984-0650
1984
Setzer, T.Serpa, L., Setzer, T., Farmer, H., Brown, L., Oliver, J., Kaufman.Structure of the Southern Keweenawan Rift from Cocorp SurveyTectonics, Vol. 3, No. 3, JUNE PP. 367-384.United States, KansasMid-continent
DS1984-0651
1984
Setzer, T.Serpa, L., Setzer, T., Farmer, H., Peddy, C., Brown, L., Oliver, J.Cocorp Profiling Across the Midcontinent Gravity HighGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 16, No. 2, FEBRUARY P. 113. (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent
DS1970-0347
1971
Seva dassMathur, S.M., Mathur, P.C., Seva dass, BALAGO POLAN, M.k.Report on the Preliminary Prospecting for Diamonds between Urki and Majhgawan, District Panna, M.p.India Geological Survey, UNPUBL.India, Madhya PradeshProspecting
DS201608-1404
2016
Sevastyanov, V.S.Galimov, E.M., Sevastyanov, V.S., Karpova, G.A., Shilobreeva, S.N., Maksimov, A.P.Microcrystalline diamonds in the oceanic lithosphere and their nature. MicrodiamondsDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 469, 1, pp. 670-673.RussiaTolbachik Volcano

Abstract: The carbon isotope composition of microdiamonds found in products of the Tolbachik Volcano eruption, Kamchatka (porous lavas and ash), was studied. The isotope composition of microdiamonds (with an average value of d13C =-25.05‰) is close to that of microsized carbon particles in lavas (from-28.9 to-25.3‰). The general peculiarities of the diamond-forming environment include (1) no evidence for high pressure in the medium; (2) a reduced environment; and (3) mineralogical evidence for the presence of a fluid. The geochemical data characterizing the type of diamonds studied allow us to suggest that they were formed in accordance with the mechanism of diamond synthesis during cavitation in a rapidly migrating fluid, which was suggested by E.M. Galimov.
DS201906-1315
2019
Sevastyanov, V.S.Litasov, K.D., Kagi, H., Voropaev, S.A., Hirata, T., Ohfuji, H., Ishibashi., Makino, Y., Bekker, T.B., Sevastyanov, V.S., Afanasiev,V.P., Pokhilenko, N.P.Comparison of enigmatic diamonds from the Tolbachik arc volcano ( Kamchatka) and Tibetan ophiolites: assessing the role of contamination by synthetic materials. Gondwana Research, in press available 38p.Russia, Asia, Tibetdeposit - Tolbachik

Abstract: The enigmatic appearance of cuboctahedral diamonds in ophiolitic and arc volcanic rocks with morphology and infrared characteristics similar to synthetic diamonds that were grown from metal solvent requires a critical reappraisal. We have studied 15 diamond crystals and fragments from Tolbachik volcano lava flows, using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). FTIR spectra of Tolbachik diamonds correspond to typical type Ib patterns of synthetic diamonds. In TEM films prepared using focused ion beam technique, we find Mn-Ni and Mn-Si inclusions in Tolbachik diamonds. SRXRF spectra indicate the presence of Fe-Ni and Fe-Ni-Mn inclusions with Cr, Ti, Cu, and Zn impurities. LA-ICP-MS data show variable but significantly elevated concentrations of Mn, Fe, Ni, and Cu reaching up to 70?ppm. These transition metal concentration levels are comparable with those determined by LA-ICP-MS for similar diamonds from Tibetan ophiolites. Mn-Ni (+Fe) solvent was widely used to produce industrial synthetic diamonds in the former USSR and Russia with very similar proportions of these metals. Hence, it appears highly probable that the cuboctahedral diamonds recovered from Kamchatka arc volcanic rocks represent contamination and are likely derived from drilling tools or other hard instruments. Kinetic data on diamond dissolution in basaltic magma or in fluid phase demonstrate that diamond does not form under the pressures and temperature conditions prevalent within the magmatic system beneath the modern-day Klyuchevskoy group of arc volcanoes. We also considered reference data for inclusions in ophiolitic diamonds and compared them with the composition of solvent used in industrial diamond synthesis in China. The similar inclusion chemistry close to Ni70Mn25Co5 for ophiolitic and synthetic Chinese diamonds scrutinized here suggests that most diamonds recovered from Tibetan and other ophiolites are not natural but instead have a synthetic origin. In order to mitigate further dubious reports of diamonds from unconventional tectonic settings and source rocks, we propose a set of discrimination criteria to better distinguish natural cuboctahedral diamonds from those produced synthetically in industrial environments and found as contaminants in mantle- and crust-derived rocks.
DS202005-0731
2020
Sevastyanov, V.S.Galimov, E.M., Kaminsky, F.V., Shilobreeva, S.N., Sevastyanov, V.S., Voropaev, S.A., Khachatryan, G.K., Wirth, R., Schreiber, A., Saraykin, V.V., Karpov, G.A., Anikin, L.P.Enigmatic diamonds from the Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka.American Mineralogist, Vol. 105, pp. 498-509. pdfRussiadeposit - Tolbachik

Abstract: Approximately 700 diamond crystals were identified in volcanic (mainly pyroclastic) rocks of the Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. They were studied with the use of SIMS, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and utilization of electron energy loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. Diamonds have cube-octahedral shape and extremely homogeneous internal structure. Two groups of impurity elements are distinguished by their distribution within the diamond. First group, N and H, the most common structural impurities in diamond, are distributed homogeneously. All other elements observed (Cl, F, O, S, Si, Al, Ca, and K) form local concentrations, implying the existence of inclusions, causing high concentrations of these elements. Most elements have concentrations 3-4 orders of magnitude less than chondritic values. Besides N and H, Si, F, Cl, and Na are relatively enriched because they are concentrated in micro- and nanoinclusions in diamond. Mineral inclusions in the studied diamonds are 70-450 nm in size, round- or oval-shaped. They are represented by two mineral groups: Mn-Ni alloys and silicides, with a wide range of concentrations for each group. Alloys vary in stoichiometry from MnNi to Mn2Ni, with a minor admixture of Si from 0 to 5.20-5.60 at%. Silicides, usually coexisting with alloys, vary in composition from (Mn,Ni)4Si to (Mn,Ni)5Si2 and Mn5Si2, and further to MnSi, forming pure Mn-silicides. Mineral inclusions have nanometer-sized bubbles that contain a fluid or a gas phase (F and O). Carbon isotopic compositions in diamonds vary from -21 to -29‰ d13CVPDB (avg. = -25.4). Nitrogen isotopic compositions in diamond from Tolbachik volcano are from -2.32 to -2.58‰ d15NAir. Geological, geochemical, and mineralogical data confirm the natural origin of studied Tolbachik diamonds from volcanic gases during the explosive stage of the eruption.
DS1998-1316
1998
Sevdermich, M.Sevdermich, M., Miciak, A.R., Levinson, A.A.The diamond pipeline into the Third Millennium: a multi channel system From the mine to the consumer.Geoscience Canada, Vol. 25, No. 2, June pp. 71-84.GlobalDiamond markets, De Beers, diamond pipeline
DS1998-1317
1998
Sevdermish, M.Sevdermish, M., Miciak, A.R., Levinson, A.A.The rise to prominence of the modern diamond cutting industry in IndiaGems and Gemology, Vol. 34, Spring, pp. 4-23.IndiaDiamond cutting, History, economics, values, markets
DS200412-1788
2004
Sever, M.Sever, M.Next best friend: cultured diamonds.Geotimes, Vol. 49, 7, pp. 58-59.TechnologyDiamond synthesis
DS200612-1264
2006
Severmish, M.Severmish, M.Color communication: the analysis of color in gem materials. ( Color stones and diamonds).GIA Gemological Research Conference abstract volume, Held August 26-27, p. 9, 1/2p.TechnologyDiamonds - colour, ICC
DS200812-0121
2008
Severs, M.Bodnar, R.J., Azbej, T., Becker, S., Cannatelli, C., Fall, A., Hole, J., Severs, M.The whole Earth geohydrologic cycle.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A91.MantleWater
DS1991-1545
1991
Severson, R.C.Severson, R.C., Stewart, K.C., Hamms, T.F.Partioning of elements between two size sediment fractions in samples from nineteen areas of the western United StatesUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open file, No. 91-0381, 18p. $ 3.25CordilleraSedimentology, Geochemistry -samples
DS1988-0628
1988
Sevigny, J.H.Sevigny, J.H.Geochemistry of Late Proterozoic amphibolites and ultramafic rocks, southeastern Cordillera.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 25, pp. 1323-37.Canada, CordilleraUltramafic rocks
DS2003-1254
2003
Sevigny, J.H.Sevigny, J.H., Theriault, R.J.Geochemistry and Sr Nd isotopic composition of Eocene lamprophyre dykesCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 40, No. 7, July, pp. 853-64.British ColumbiaGeochemistry, lamprophyres, geochronology
DS200412-1789
2003
Sevigny, J.H.Sevigny, J.H., Theriault, R.J.Geochemistry and Sr Nd isotopic composition of Eocene lamprophyre dykes, southeastern British Columbia.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 40, no. 7, July, pp. 853-64.Canada, British ColumbiaGeochemistry, lamprophyres, geochronology
DS1950-0152
1953
Sevin, R.Sevin, R.Prospection et Exploitation des Gisements Diamantiferes Principalement En Aef et Aof.Echo Mines Metal. (paris), No. 3461, Nov. Oct. PP. 662-663.; No. 3462, PP. 733-737.GlobalProspecting, Sampling
DS1989-0473
1989
Sevon, W.D.Gardner, T.W., Sevon, W.D.Appalachian geomorphologyElsevier Publ, ISBN 0-444-88326-6 318p. Approx. $ 100.00 United StatesGlobalPiedmont, Geomorphology
DS2001-1113
2001
Seward, D.Spikings, R.A., Winkler, W., Seward, D., Handler, R.Along strike variations in the thermal and tectonic response of the continental Ecuadorian Andes- collisionEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 186, No. 1, Mar. 15, pp. 57-73.Andes, EcuadorTectonics, Geothermometry
DS2003-0475
2003
Seward, D.Glodny, J., Austrheim, H., Mlina, J.F., Rusin, A.J., Seward, D.Rb Sr record of fluid rock interaction in eclogites: the Marun-Keu complex, PolarGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 67, 22, pp. 4353-4371.Russia, UralsGeochronology, eclogites
DS200412-0677
2003
Seward, D.Glodny, J., Austrheim, H., Mlina, J.F., Rusin, A.J., Seward, D.Rb Sr record of fluid rock interaction in eclogites: the Marun-Keu complex, Polar Urals, Russia.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 67, 22, pp. 4353-4371.Russia, UralsGeochronology, eclogites
DS200412-1703
2004
Seward, D.Ruiz, G.M.H., Seward, D., Winkler, W.Detrital thermochronology - a new perspective on hinterland tectonics, an example from the Andean Amazon Basin, Ecuador.Basin Research, Vol. 16, 3, pp. 413-430.South America, EcuadorGeothermometry
DS200412-1790
2004
Seward, D.Seward, D., Grujic, D., Scheurs, G.An insight into the breakup of Gondwana: identifying events through low temperature thermochronology from the basement rocks ofTectonics, Vol. 23, 3, June 8, TC3007 10.1029/2003 TC001556Africa, MadagascarTectonics
DS202011-2028
2020
Seward, G.Apen, F.E., Rudnick, R.L., Cottle, J.M., Kylander-Clark, A.R.C., Blondes, M.S., Piccoli, P.M., Seward, G.Four dimensional thermal evolution of the East African Orogen: accessory phase petrochronology of crustal profiles through the Tanzanian Craton and Mozambique belt, northeastern Tanzania.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 175, 97, 30p. PdfAfrica, Tanzaniacraton

Abstract: U-Pb petrochronology of deep crustal xenoliths and outcrops across northeastern Tanzania track the thermal evolution of the Mozambique Belt and Tanzanian Craton following the Neoproterozoic East African Orogeny (EAO) and subsequent Neogene rifting. At the craton margin, the upper-middle crust record thermal quiescence since the Archean (2.8-2.5 Ga zircon, rutile, and apatite in granite and amphibolite xenoliths). The lower crust of the craton documents thermal pulses associated with Neoarchean ultra-high temperature metamorphism (ca. 2.64 Ga,?>?900 °C zircon), the EAO (600-500 Ma rutile), and fluid influx during rifting (?650 °C (above Pb closure of rutile and apatite) at the time of eruption. Zoned titanite records growth during cooling of the lower crust at 550 Ma, followed by fluid influx during slow cooling and exhumation (0.1-1 °C/Myr after 450 Ma). Permissible lower-crustal temperatures for the craton and orogen suggest variable mantle heat flow through the crust and reflect differences in mantle lithosphere thickness rather than advective heating from rifting.
DS200812-1159
2008
Seward, T.M.Teague, A.J., Seward, T.M., Harrison, D.Mantle source for Oldoinyo Lengai carbonatites: evidence from helium isotopes in fumarole gases.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, Vol. 175, 3. August 10, pp. 386-390.Africa, TanzaniaCarbonatite
DS200812-1160
2008
Seward, T.M.Teague, A.J., Seward, T.M., Harrison, D.Mantle source for Oldoinyo Lengai carbonatites: evidence from helium isotopes in fumarole gases.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, Vol. 175, 3, pp. 386-390.Africa, TanzaniaCarbonatite
DS2003-1086
2003
Sewawa, M.Plessis, L., Sewawa, M.FISH-State-of-the-art technology in the final diamond recoveryJournal South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 103, 9, pp. 557-562. Ingenta 1035419929GlobalBlank
DS200412-1557
2003
Sewawa, M.Plessis, L., Sewawa, M.FISH-State-of-the-art technology in the final diamond recovery.Journal of the South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 103, 9, pp. 557-562. Ingenta 1035419929TechnologyMining
DS1960-0057
1960
Sewel, E.J.B.Hodgson, H.F., Sewel, E.J.B.Mining Practice at the Premier MineSouth African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. Journal, Vol. 61, SEPT. PP. 61-89.South AfricaMining Methods, Recovery, Diamond, Kimberlite Pipes
DS1981-0234
1981
Sewell, D.K.B.Keays, R.R., Sewell, D.K.B., Mitchell, R.H.Platinum and Palladium Minerals in Upper Mantle Derived Lherzolites.Nature., Vol. 294, No. 5842, Dec. 17TH. PP. 646-648.Australia, VictoriaBasanite, Inclusions, Related Rocks, Platinum Group Elements (pge)
DS1989-1149
1989
Sewell, G.Oldenburg, C.M., Spera, F.J., Yuen, D.A., Sewell, G.Dynamic mixing in magma bodies: theory, simulations and implicationsJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 94, No. B7, July 10, pp. 9215-9236GlobalMagma, Genesis
DS1993-1428
1993
Sewell, R.J.Sewell, R.J., Hobden, B.J., Weaver, S.D.Mafic and ultramafic mantle and deep crustal xenoliths from BanksPeninsula, South Island, New Zealand.New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 36, No. 2, pp. 223-231.GlobalMantle xenoliths
DS1989-0643
1989
SextonHinze, W.J., McGinnis, L.D., Cannon, W.F., Milkereit, B., SextonStructure of the midcontinent rift system in E Lake Superior; preliminary35th. Annual Institute On Lake Superior Geology, Proceedings And, pp. 24MidcontinentGeophysics, Tectonics
DS1991-1546
1991
Sexton, J.Sexton, J., Henson, H.Lake Superior bedrock topography and rift structuresGeological Society of America Annual Meeting Abstract Volume, Vol. 23, No. 5, San Diego, p. A 138OntarioTectonics, Rifting
DS1980-0074
1980
Sexton, J.L.Braile, L.W., Hinze, W.J., Sexton, J.L., Keller, G.R., Lidiak, E.An Integrated Geophysical and Geological Study of the TectonNational Technical Information Service NUREG CR 0977, PP. 17-28.GlobalMid-continent
DS1982-0114
1982
Sexton, J.L.Braile, L.W., Hinze, W.J., Sexton, J.L., Keller, G.R., Lidiak, E.Seismicity and Tectonics of the Midcontinent United StatesU.s. Nat. Science Foundation Proceedings of The Third International, Vol. 1, PP. 25-38.GlobalMid-continent
DS1982-0115
1982
Sexton, J.L.Braile, L.W., Hinze, W.J., Sexton, J.L., Keller, G.R., Lidiak.A Tectonic Study of the Extension of the New Madrid Fault Zone Near its intersection with the 38th Parallel Lineament.National Technical Information Service NUREG CR/2741, 84P.GlobalMid-continent
DS1982-0560
1982
Sexton, J.L.Sexton, J.L., Hinze, W.J., Von frese, R.R.B., Braile, L.W.Long-wavelength Aeromagnetic Anomaly Map of the Conterminous United States.Geology, Vol. 10, No. 7, PP. 364-369.GlobalMid-continent, Mississippi Embayment, Geophysics, Magsat
DS1986-0100
1986
Sexton, J.L.Braile, L.W., Hinze, W.J., Keller, G.R., Lidiak, E.G., Sexton, J.L.Tectonic development of the new Madrid rift complex Mississippi North AmericaTectonophysics, Vol. 131, No. 1/2, November 15, pp. 1-22MidcontinentTectonics
DS1986-0725
1986
Sexton, J.L.Sexton, J.L., Braile, L.W., Hinze, W.J., Campbell, M.J.Seismic reflection profiling studies of a buried Precambrian rift beneath the Wabash Valley fault zoneGeophysics, Vol. 51, No. 3, March pp. 640-660GlobalMississippi embayment, Geophysics
DS1992-1369
1992
Sexton, J.L.Sexton, J.L., Hesson, H.Jr.Seismic reflection and gravity profile models of dat a from Lake SuperiorEos Transactions, Vol. 73, No. 14, April 7, supplement abstracts p. 320OntarioMidcontinent Rift, Gravity
DS1994-1570
1994
Sexton, J.L.Sexton, J.L., Henson, H.Jr.Interpretation of seismic reflection and gravity profile dat a in western Lake Superior.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 31, No. 4, April pp. 652-660.Ontario, MichiganGeophysics -seismics, gravity, Tectonics -Midcontinent rift
DS1991-0402
1991
Sexton, M.J.Drummond, B.J., Sexton, M.J., Barton, T.J., Shaw, R.D.The nature of faulting along the margins of the Fitzroy trough, CanningBasin, and implications for the tectonic development of the troughAustralian Society of Exploration Geophysicists and Geological Society of Australia, 8th. Exploration Conference in the Bulletin., Vol. 22, No. 1, March pp. 111-116AustraliaStructure, Geophysics
DS2001-0121
2001
SeylerBonatti, E., Brunelli, Fabretti, Ligi, Portara, SeylerSteady state creation of crust free lithosphere at cold spots in mid-ocean ridgesGeology, Vol. 29, No. 11, Nov. pp. 979-82.MantlePeridotites, flow
DS1993-0135
1993
Seyler, M.Bonnati, E., Seyler, M., Sushevskaya, N.A cold suboceanic mantle belt at the earth's equator #1Science, Vol. 261, July 16, pp. 315-320MantleGeophysics -gravity, Melting
DS1993-1429
1993
Seyler, M.Seyler, M., Mattson, P.H.Gabbroic and pyroxenite layers in the Tinaquillo peridotite: succession of melt intrusions in a rising mantle diapir.Journal of Geology, Vol. 101, pp. 501-11.VenezuelaPlumes, Peridotite - alpine type
DS1994-1571
1994
Seyler, M.Seyler, M., Bonatti, E.Sodium and Aluminum in clinopyroxenes of subcontinental, suboceanic ridge peridotites: aclue different melting processes in mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 122, pp. 281-289.Mantle, suboceanic ridgePeridotites
DS1998-1318
1998
Seyler, M.Seyler, M., Paquette, Jl, Ceuleneer, G., et al.Magmatic underplating, metamorphic evolution, and ductile shearing in aMesozoic Lower Crustal - unit.Journal of Geology, Vol. 106, No. 1, Jan. pp. 35-58Venezuela, TinaquilloMantle unit, metamorphism
DS2001-1055
2001
Seyler, M.Seyler, M., Toplis, M.J., Lorand, JP, Luquet, CannalClinopyroxene microtextures reveal incompletely extracted melts in abyssalperidotites.Geology, Vol. 29, No. 2, Feb. pp. 155-8.MantlePeridotites
DS1994-1140
1994
Seymour, D.B.McClenaghan, M.P., Seymour, D.B., Villa, I.M.Lamprophyre dike suites from western Tasmania, their radiometric dating And the age of thrust faulting in the Point Hibbs area.Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 41, No. 1, February pp. 47-54.Australia, TasmaniaMinettes, Lamprophyres
DS1990-1336
1990
Seymour, F.H.Seymour, F.H.Polygon set manipulations for interactive mine planningAmerican Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME) Preprint, No. 90-34, 5pNevadaMining, Ore reservess
DS2003-0444
2003
SgarbiGaspar, J.C., Araujo, A.L.N., Carlson, R.W., Sichel, S.E., Brod, J.A., SgarbiMantle xenoliths and new constraints on the origin of alkaline ultrapotassic rocks from8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 7, POSTER abstractBrazilBlank
DS200912-0687
2009
Sgarbi, G.B.C.Sgarbi, G.B.C., Karfunkel, J., De Albuquerque Sgarbi, P.B., Peregovich, B., Da Silva, F.P., Dias, S., MooreThe Paredao kimberlite, western Minas Gerais, Brazil: field relations, chemical dat a and host rocks.Neues Jahrbuch fur Geologie und Palaontologie , Vol. 253, 1, July, pp. 115-131/South America, BrazilDeposit - Paredao
DS201509-0407
2014
Sgarbi, G.M.C.Karfunkel, J., Hoover, D., Fernandes, A.F., Sgarbi, G.M.C., Kambrock, K., Oliviera, G.D.Diamonds from the Coromandel area, west Minas Gerais State, Brazil: an update and new dat a on surface sources and origin.Brazil Journal of Geology, Vol. 44, 2, pp. 325-338.South America, Brazil, Minas GeraisDeposit - Coromandel

Abstract: Important diamond deposits southeast of Coromandel and the local geology have been studied in an attempt to understand what surface source provided the stones. River gravels of Pleistocene to Recent age from this region have supplied most of Brazil’s large diamonds over 100 ct. The upper cretaceous Capacete Formation of the Mata da Corda Group, composed of mafic volcanoclastic, pyroclastic and epiclastic material, has been worked locally for diamonds, nevertheless considered non-economic. The authors present results of their study of a deactivated small mine, representing the first report with description and analyses of two gem diamonds washed from this material. Hundreds of kimberlites, discovered in the last half century in the region, are sterile or non-economic. We propose that the surface source of the diamonds is the Capacete “conglomerado”. The volume of this material is enormous representing a potential resource for large-scale mining. The authors suggest detailed studies of the volcanic facies of this unit focusing on the genesis, distribution and diamond content. As to the question concerning the origin of these diamondiferous pyroclastic rocks, the authors exclude the kimberlites and point towards the large Serra Negra and Salitre alkaline complexes which are considered the primary source for the pyroclastic units of the Mata da Corda Group. They propose that early eruptive phases of this alkaline complex brought diamonds from a mantle source to the surface, much as happens with traditional kimberlites, to explain the association of such huge carbonatite complexes and diamonds.
DS201509-0408
2015
Sgarbi, G.M.C.Karfunkel, J., Hoover, D., Fernandes, A.F., Sgarbi, G.M.C., Oliviera, G.D., Walde, D., Michelfelder, G.Surface source of Coromandel diamonds ( Minas Gerais State) Brazil and their possible origin from the Serra Negra/Salitre Supervolcano.Neues Jahrbuch fur Geologie und Palaontologie , Vol. 277, 2, pp. 237-250.South America, Brazil, Minas GeraisDeposit - Coromandel

Abstract: The origin of diamonds in the Coromandel area has been an enigma for many years, in spite of high investment in conventional and high tech prospecting methods by major mining companies for over half a century. The authors review the history, and then discuss the two principal hypotheses to explain the source of these alluvial diamonds. After mapping the headwater region of one of the richest alluvial diamond rivers, the Santo Antônio do Bonito River, they reject both principal hypotheses and conclude that the surficial source can be only the Upper Cretaceous Capacete Formation, composed of pyroclastics and epiclastics. Based on geophysical data from the literature, combined with field observations the authors suggest that the largest alkaline complex, situated within the diamond producing area, the Serra Negra/Salitre Complex has been the primary source for those pyroclastics of the Capacete Formation and the diamonds. The plugs of this complex are 15-30 times deeper than average kimberlites and other alkaline complexes in the region, and its excess of volume of the intrusive is three orders of magnitude larger than a typical kimberlite. With an intrusive volume of over 1000 km3 the complex is suggested to be a possible supervolcano. This explains the vast areal distribution of the pyroclastics and diamonds. This new hypothesis has advantages and disadvantages, some of them discussed in the paper and leading to the conclusion that further research is needed.
DS2000-0881
2000
Sgarbi, G.N.Sgarbi, G.N.Cretaceous epiclastic rocks of western Minas Gerais State, Central BrasilIgc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.Brazil, Minas GeraisKamafugites, Carbonatite
DS2000-0882
2000
Sgarbi, G.N.Sgarbi, G.N., Heaman, L.M.uranium-lead (U-Pb) perovskite ages for Brazilian kamafugitesIgc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.Brazil, ParaguayKamafugites, Geochronology
DS200512-0962
2003
Sgarbi, G.N.C.Sgarbi De Albuquerque, P.B., Sgarbi, G.N.C.Kamafugitic volcanism in Brazil. Mat a da Corda, Santo Antonio da Barra.Periodico di Mineralogia, (in english), Vol. LXX11, 1. April, pp. 41-50.South America, Brazil, GoiasKamafugite, diamonds
DS201412-0244
2014
Sgarbi, G.N.C.Fernandes, A.F., Karfunkel, J., Hoover, D.B., Sgarbi, G.N.C., Walde, D., Gomes, J., Kambrock, K.O garimpo Canastrel, Coromandel-MG: ocorrencia de diamante no conglomerado cretaceo do grupo Mat a de Corda.6 Simposio Brasileiro de Geologia do Diamante, Aug. 3-7, 5p. AbstractSouth America, Brazil, Minas GeraisDeposit - Coromandel
DS201412-0442
2014
Sgarbi, G.N.C.Karfunkel, J., Hoover, D.B., Fernandes, A.F., Sgarbi, G.N.C., Kambrock, K., Walde, D., Michelfelder, G.Origin of diamonds southeast of Coromandel ( Minas Gerais Brazil): a different hypothesis.6 Simposio Brasileiro de Geologia do Diamante, Aug. 3-7, 5p. AbstractSouth America, Brazil, Minas GeraisDeposit - Coromandel
DS201510-1788
2015
Sgarbi, N.C.Michelfelder, G.S., Karfunkel, J., Fernandes, A.F., Sgarbi, N.C., Hoover, D.B., Krambrock, K., Walde, D.Surface source of Coromandel diamonds ( Minas Gerais State), Brazil) and their possible origin from the Serra Negra/Salitre supervolcano.GSA Annual Meeting, Paper 300-1, 1p. Abstract only BoothSouth America, Brazil, Minas GeraisDeposit - Coromandel

Abstract: The origin of diamonds in the Coromandel area has been an enigma for many years, in spite of high investment in conventional and high tech prospecting methods by major mining companies for over half a century. The authors review the history, and then discuss the two principal hypotheses to explain the source of these alluvial diamonds. After mapping the headwater region of one of the richest alluvial diamond rivers, the Santo Antônio do Bonito River, they reject both principal hypotheses and conclude that the surficial source can be only the Upper Cretaceous Capacete Formation, composed of pyroclastics and epiclastics. Based on geophysical data from the literature, combined with field observations the authors suggest that the largest alkaline complex, situated within the diamond producing area, the Serra Negra/Salitre Complex has been the primary source for those pyroclastics of the Capacete Formation and the diamonds. The plugs of this complex are 15-30 times deeper than average kimberlites and other alkaline complexes in the region, and its excess of volume of the intrusive is three orders of magnitude larger than a typical kimberlite. With an intrusive volume of over 1000 km3 the complex is suggested to be a possible supervolcano. This explains the vast areal distribution of the pyroclastics and diamonds. This new hypothesis has advantages and disadvantages, some of them discussed in the paper and leading to the conclusion that further research is needed.
DS200412-0612
2003
Sgarbi, P.B.Gaspar, J.C., Araujo, A.L.N., Carlson, R.W., Sichel, S.E., Brod, J.A., Sgarbi, P.B., Danni, J.C.M.Mantle xenoliths and new constraints on the origin of alkaline ultrapotassic rocks from the Alto Paranaiba and Goias igneous pro8 IKC Program, Session 7, POSTER abstractSouth America, BrazilKimberlite petrogenesis
DS200412-1791
2004
Sgarbi, P.B.Sgarbi, P.B., Heaman, L.M., Gaspar, J.C.U Pb perovskite for Brazialian kamafugitic rocks: further support for a temporal link to a mantle plume hotspot track.Journal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 16, 8, pp. 715-724.South America, Brazil, GoiasGeochemistry, geochronology, alkaline province
DS1991-1547
1991
Sgarbi, P.B.A.Sgarbi, P.B.A., Valenca, J.G.Petrography and general features of potassic mafic to ultramafic alkaline volcanic rocks of Mat a da Corda Formation, Minas Gerais State, BrasilProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 359-360BrazilKamafugitic lavas, Patos
DS1994-1572
1994
Sgarbi, P.B.A.Sgarbi, P.B.A., Valenca, J.G.Mineral and rock chemistry of the Mat a da Corda kamafugitic rocks Minas gerais State.International Symposium Upper Mantle, Aug. 14-19, 1994, Extended abstracts pp. 27-29.BrazilGeochemistry, Kamafugites
DS1995-1708
1995
Sgarbi, P.B.A.Sgarbi, P.B.A., Gaspar, J.C.Perovskites from the Mat a da Corda kamafugites, MG BrasilProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Abstracts, pp. 498-499.Brazil, Minas GeraisKamafugites, alkaline, Deposit -Mata da Corda
DS1998-1319
1998
Sgarbi, P.B.A.Sgarbi, P.B.A., Clayton, R.N., Mayeda, T.K., Gaspar, J.Oxygen isotope thermometry of Brazilian potassic volcanic rocks of kamafugitic affinities.Chemical Geology, Vol. 146, No. 3-4, May 5, pp. 115-126.BrazilGeochronology, Alkaline rocks
DS2000-0316
2000
Sgarbi, P.B.A.Gaspar, J.C., Brod, J.A., Sgarbi, P.B.A., Brod, T.C.J.A review of the Cretaceous alkaline magmatism in western Minas Gerais and southern Goias.Igc 30th. Brasil, Aug. abstract only 1p.Brazil, Minas GeraisAlkaline rocks
DS2000-0883
2000
Sgarbi, P.B.A.Sgarbi, P.B.A., Gaspar, J.C., Vaneca, J.G.Clinopyroxene from Brazilian kamafugitesLithos, Vol. 53, No. 2, Aug. pp. 101-16.BrazilKamafugites - Santo Antonia da Barra, Mata da Corda, Petrology
DS2002-1444
2002
Sgarbi, P.B.de A.Sgarbi, P.B.de A., Gaspar, J.C.Geochemistry of Santo Antonio da Barra kamafugites, Goias, BrasilJournal of South American Earth Sciences, Vol.14, 8, March pp. 889-901.Brazil, GoiasGeochemistry
DS201501-0008
2014
Sgarbi, P.B.De Al.Fernandes, A.F., Karfunkel, J., Hoover, D.B., Sgarbi, P.B.De Al., Sgarbo, G.N.C., Oliveira, G.D., Gomes, J.C.de S.P., Kambrock, K.The basal conglomerate of the Capacete Formation ( Mat a da Corda Group) and its relation to diamond distributions in Coromandel, Minas Gerais State, Brazil.Brazil Journal of Geology, Vol. 44, 1, pp. 91-103.South America, BrazilCoromandel district

Abstract: The diamond bearing district of Coromandel is located in the northwestern part of Minas Gerais, within the Alto Paranaíba Arch, famous for the discovery of most of Brazil's large diamonds above 100 ct. Detailed mapping, aimed at characterizing the Mata da Corda Group of Upper Cretaceous age of Coromandel, has been carried out. This Group was divided into the Patos Formation, composed of kimberlitic and kamafugitic rocks, and the Capacete Formation, presented by conglomerates, pyroclastic rocks, arenite and tuffs. Exposures of the latter Formation have been studied in detail at the small abandoned mine called Canastrel, as well as in the headwater of Santo Antônio do Bonito River. The results have been compared to studies of the kimberlite bodies in the nearby Douradinho River. Kimberlite indicator minerals from these localities show the same compositional trend. Moreover, in the basal conglomerate of the Garimpo Canastrel two diamonds diamonds have been recovered and described. The Garimpo Wilson, situated in the headwater of the river Santo Antônio do Bonito in paleo-alluvium, is composed of material exclusively derived from the erosion of the Capacete Formation and Precambrian (sterile) Canastra quartzites and schists. These detailed investigations suggest that the basal conglomerates of the Capacete Formation represent the main source rock of the alluvial diamond deposits in the Coromandel region.
DS200512-0962
2003
Sgarbi De Albuquerque, P.B.Sgarbi De Albuquerque, P.B., Sgarbi, G.N.C.Kamafugitic volcanism in Brazil. Mat a da Corda, Santo Antonio da Barra.Periodico di Mineralogia, (in english), Vol. LXX11, 1. April, pp. 41-50.South America, Brazil, GoiasKamafugite, diamonds
DS201501-0008
2014
Sgarbo, G.N.C.Fernandes, A.F., Karfunkel, J., Hoover, D.B., Sgarbi, P.B.De Al., Sgarbo, G.N.C., Oliveira, G.D., Gomes, J.C.de S.P., Kambrock, K.The basal conglomerate of the Capacete Formation ( Mat a da Corda Group) and its relation to diamond distributions in Coromandel, Minas Gerais State, Brazil.Brazil Journal of Geology, Vol. 44, 1, pp. 91-103.South America, BrazilCoromandel district

Abstract: The diamond bearing district of Coromandel is located in the northwestern part of Minas Gerais, within the Alto Paranaíba Arch, famous for the discovery of most of Brazil's large diamonds above 100 ct. Detailed mapping, aimed at characterizing the Mata da Corda Group of Upper Cretaceous age of Coromandel, has been carried out. This Group was divided into the Patos Formation, composed of kimberlitic and kamafugitic rocks, and the Capacete Formation, presented by conglomerates, pyroclastic rocks, arenite and tuffs. Exposures of the latter Formation have been studied in detail at the small abandoned mine called Canastrel, as well as in the headwater of Santo Antônio do Bonito River. The results have been compared to studies of the kimberlite bodies in the nearby Douradinho River. Kimberlite indicator minerals from these localities show the same compositional trend. Moreover, in the basal conglomerate of the Garimpo Canastrel two diamonds diamonds have been recovered and described. The Garimpo Wilson, situated in the headwater of the river Santo Antônio do Bonito in paleo-alluvium, is composed of material exclusively derived from the erosion of the Capacete Formation and Precambrian (sterile) Canastra quartzites and schists. These detailed investigations suggest that the basal conglomerates of the Capacete Formation represent the main source rock of the alluvial diamond deposits in the Coromandel region.
DS201905-1062
2019
Sgreva, N.Nestola, F., Jacob, D.E., Pamato, M.G., Pasqualatto, L., Oliveira, B., Greene, S., Perritt, S., Chinn, I., Milani, S., Kueter, N., Sgreva, N., Nimis, P., Secco, L., Harris, J.W.Protogenetic garnet inclusions and the age of diamonds.Geology, doi.10.1130/G45781.1Mantlediamond inclusions

Abstract: Diamonds are the deepest accessible “fragments” of Earth, providing records of deep geological processes. Absolute ages for diamond formation are crucial to place these records in the correct time context. Diamond ages are typically determined by dating inclusions, assuming that they were formed simultaneously with their hosts. One of the most widely used mineral inclusions for dating diamond is garnet, which is amenable to Sm-Nd geochronology and is common in lithospheric diamonds. By investigating worldwide garnet-bearing diamonds, we provide crystallographic evidence that garnet inclusions that were previously considered to be syngenetic may instead be protogenetic, i.e., they were formed before the host diamond, raising doubts about the real significance of many reported diamond “ages.” Diffusion modeling at relevant pressures and temperatures, however, demonstrates that isotopic resetting would generally occur over geologically short time scales. Therefore, despite protogenicity, the majority of garnet-based ages should effectively correspond to the time of diamond formation. On the other hand, our results indicate that use of large garnet inclusions (e.g., >100 µm) and diamond hosts formed at temperatures lower than ~1000 °C is not recommended for diamond age determinations.
DS2002-1445
2002
Sgrigna, V.Sgrigna, V., D'Ambrosio, C., Yabovskaya, T.B.Numerical modeling of preseismic slow movements crustal blocks caused by quasi-horizontal tectonic forcesPhysics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol.129, 3-4, pp.313-24.MantleTectonics
DS2002-1446
2002
SGUSGUDiamond exploration.... Poplar Resources Ltd... Sundsvall diamond projectSgu Newsletter, 1/8p.SwedenNews item - Poplar Resources Ltd.
DS1994-1573
1994
SGU Geological Survey of SwedenSGU Geological Survey of SwedenBulletins eye targeting... airborne magnetic dat a in Sweden.. example near Palstrask w of Lulea in northern Sweden.Sgu Mineral Resources Information Office, GVR 94003, 4p.SwedenGeophysics -magnetics
DS201312-0800
2013
Sgualdo, P.Sgualdo, P., Beccaluva, L., Bianchini, G., Siena, F.Mantle xenoliths from Bir Ali ( Yemen).Goldschmidt 2013, 1p. AbstractAfrica, YemenXenoliths
DS1995-1709
1995
Sha, L.-K.Sha, L.-K.Genesis of zoned hydrous ultramafic/ mafic-silicate intrusive complexes: an MHFC hypothesisEarth Science Reviews, Vol. 39 No. 1-2, Sept. pp. 59-90GlobalUltramafics, MHFC hypothesis
DS1995-1710
1995
Sha, L-K.Sha, L-K.Genesis of zone hydrous ultramafic mafic silicic intrusive complexes: an MHFC hypothesisEarth Science Reviews, Vol. 39, pp. 59-90GlobalZonation, magma mixing, hydration reactions, Fractional crystallisation
DS202003-0362
2020
Sha, X.Sha, X., Yue, W., Zhang, H., Qin, W., She, D., Wang, C.Thermal stability of polycrystalline diamond compact sintered with boron coated diamond particles.Diamond & Related Materials, in press available, 34p. PdfGlobalboron

Abstract: The polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC), which consists of a polycrystalline diamond layer on a tungsten carbide (WC)/cobalt (Co) substrate, is extensively utilized as drilling bits. However, the poor thermal stability due to the graphitization and oxygen susceptibility of diamond severely limits the application of PDCs to high-temperature drilling work. In this study, a new PDC with improved thermal stability is successfully synthesized with boron (B)-coated diamond particles, which forms a uniform boron carbide (B4C) barrier. The as-received B4C phase acts as a protective barrier, which enhances the initial graphitization and oxidizing temperatures to 800 °C and 780 °C, respectively, which are ~100 °C and ~30 °C higher than those (700 °C and 750 °C) of the PDC sintered with uncoated diamond particles. The B4C barrier protects diamond grains from direct contact with the Co phase, prohibiting the cobalt-catalytic graphitization. In addition, the oxidation of the B4C barrier occurs prior to that of the diamond grains, which inhibits the PDC from oxidation.
DS1994-1574
1994
Shabaldin, G.P.Shabaldin, G.P.Petrochemical analysis and Diamondiferous factors of ultramafites10th. Prospecting In Areas Of Glaciated Terrain, p. 190-191. AbstractRussiaGeochemistry, Exploration prospecting
DS1988-0629
1988
Shabalin, B.G.Shabalin, B.G., Matsyuk, S.S.IR spectroscopic study of characteristics of isomorphism of R(2+ )cations in garnets of eclogite paragenesis from kimberlites. (Russian)Ontogeniya Mineralov I Teknol Mineral Kiev.(Russian), pp. 176-182RussiaEclogite, Spectroscopy
DS1986-0726
1986
Shabayev, Yu.N.Shabayev, Yu.N.Rock fissuring kimberlite pipes.(Russian)Izvest. Vyssh. Uchn. Zaved., (Russian), No. 12, pp. 91-95RussiaPetrology, Kimberlite
DS200912-0688
2009
Shaben, C.Shaben, C.Fly at your own risk.The Walrus, November pp.CanadaExploration - regulations
DS1970-0414
1971
Shablinskaya, N.V.Shablinskaya, N.V., Smirnov, L.S.Formation of the Globe Network of Platform FaultsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 201, No. 1-6, PP. 128-130.RussiaKimberlite
DS1988-0350
1988
Shabo, Z.V.Kharkiv, A.D., Boris, Ye.I., Shabo, Z.V., Mamchur, G.P., SheremeyevThe occurrence of oil in the eruptive pipes of theSiberianPlatform*(in Russian)Geologii i Geofiziki, (Russian), No. 4, pp. 60-70RussiaStructural geology, Tectonics
DS1989-1372
1989
Shackleton, N.J.Shackleton,