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SDLRC - Scientific Articles all years by Author - Bl-Bq


The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation
The Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation is compiled by Patricia Sheahan who publishes on a monthly basis a list of new scientific articles related to diamonds as well as media coverage and corporate announcementscalled the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service that is distributed as a free pdf to a list of followers. Pat has kindly agreed to allow her work to be made available as an online digital resource at Kaiser Research Online so that a broader community interested in diamonds and related geology can benefit. The references are for personal use information purposes only; when available a link is provided to an online location where the full article can be accessed or purchased directly. Reproduction of this compilation in part or in whole without permission from the Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is strictly prohibited. Return to Diamond Resource Center
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Media/Corporate References by Name for all years
A B C D-Diam Diamonds Diamr+ E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Tips for Users
Posted/Published Reference CodesThe SDLRC provides 3 types of references identified in the reference code. DS for scientific article, DM for a media article, and DC for a corporate announcement. Consider DS0512-0001. The DS stands for "diamond scientific". 05 stands for 2005, the year the reference was posted. 12 represents the month the reference was posted. For all years prior to 2015 the default month is 12. -0001 is the reference's identifier and it does not mean anything. The number below the refence code, ie 2015, is the year the article was published. Note that the posted year may sometimes be later than the published year.
Sort OrderReferences are sorted by the "author" name and when the reference was posted to the compilation.
Most RecentIf the reference code is highlighted yellow, the reference was made available through the most recent monthly compilation of new literature. Use this to check out new references. When new references are posted, we make it our priority to track down an online link and obtain an abstract. With regard to older references, tracking down an abstract and an online link is a work in progress.
Link to external location of article: If the title has a link, it means we have found a location online where you can either retrieve the full article free, or purchase access to it. The Sheahan Diamond Literature Service is not a technical article procurement service; if you want a restricted article, you must deal directly with the vendor who controls the copyright to the article.
Searching this page for a specific term or authorIn your Firefox browser click Edit in the menu bar and then Find. In the Find box that shows up at the bottom of the web page enter your search term. Firefox will highlight all occurrences. This is particularly helpful when the author you are seeking was not the lead author by whom the compilation is sorted.
Sending or sharing a referenceThe left column (Posted/Published) has an embedded hyperlink for each reference. In Firefox, if you right click on it, you can obtain the link url for that reference's location within the page, which you can copy and paste into an email or any other document. You can also use the "share this link" option to tweet, facebook etc the link.
Author Index
A-An Ao+ B-Bd Be-Bk Bl-Bq Br+ C-Cg Ch-Ck Cl+ D-Dd De-Dn Do+ E F-Fn Fo+ G-Gh Gi-Gq Gr+ H-Hd He-Hn Ho+ I J K-Kg Kh-Kn Ko-Kq Kr+ L-Lh
Li+ M-Maq Mar-Mc Md-Mn Mo+ N O P-Pd Pe-Pn Po+ Q R-Rh Ri-Rn Ro+ S-Sd Se-Sh Si-Sm Sn-Ss St+ T-Th Ti+ U V W-Wg Wh+ X Y Z
Sheahan Diamond Literature Reference Compilation - Scientific Articles by Author for all years - Bl-Bq
Posted/
Published
AuthorTitleSourceRegionKeywords
DS1975-0947
1979
Blaauw, C.Blaauw, C., White, C.G., Leiper, W., Clarke, D.B.Mossbauer Analysis of Synthetic DjerfisheriteMineralogical Magazine., Vol. 43, No. 328, PP. 552-553.GlobalRelated Mineralogy, Techniques
DS1984-0492
1984
Blacic, J.D.Mathez, E.A., Blacic, J.D., Beery, J., Maggiore, C., Hollander.Carbon Abundances in Mantle Minerals Determined by Nuclear Reaction Analysis.Geophysical Research. LETTERS, Vol. 11, No. 10, OCTOBER, PP. 947-950.United States, Colorado Plateau, New MexicoXenolith, Crystallography
DS1986-0533
1986
Blacic, J.D.Mathez, E.A., Blacic, J.D., Beery, J., Maggiore, C., Hollander, M.Carbon in olivine by nuclear reaction analysisProceedings of the Fourth International Kimberlite Conference, Held Perth, Australia, No. 16, pp. 273-275GlobalBlank
DS1987-0444
1987
Blacic, J.D.Mathez, E.A., Blacic, J.D., Beery, J., Hollander, M., Maggiore, C.Carbon in olivine: results from nuclear reaction analysisJournal of Geophys., Res, Vol. 92, No. B5, April 10, pp. 3500-3506GlobalMantle genesis
DS1991-0125
1991
Blacic, J.D.Blacic, J.D., Mathez, E.A., Maggiore, C., Mitchell, T.E., Fogel, R.Oxygen in diamond by the nuclear microprobe: analytical technique and initial resultsProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 20-22GlobalMicroprobe, Oxygen analyses
DS1993-0980
1993
Blacic, J.D.Mathez, E.A., Blacic, J.D., Maggiore, C., Mitchell, T.E., Fogel, R.A.The determination of the O content of diamond by microactivationAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 78, No. 7-8, July-August pp. 753-761.South Africa, Botswana, ZaireKimberlites, Deposit -Monastery, Finsch, Orapa, Muji Mayi
DS2001-0712
2001
BlackMacdonald, R., Rogers, N., Fitton, J.G., Black, SmithPlume lithosphere interactions in the generation of the basalts of the Kenya rift, east Africa.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 42, No. 5, pp. 877-900.East Africa, KenyaTectonics - plume, mantle
DS202004-0512
2020
Black, B.Gales, E., Black, B., Elkins-Tanton, E.Carbonatites as a record of the carbon isotope composition of large igneous province outgassing.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 535, 116076 11p. PdfRussia, Siberiacarbonatite

Abstract: Large igneous province (LIP) eruptions have been linked in some cases to major perturbations of Earth's carbon cycle. However, few observations directly constrain the isotopic composition of carbon released by LIP magmas because carbon isotopes fractionate during degassing, which hampers understanding of the relative roles of mantle versus crustal carbon reservoirs. Carbonatite magmatism associated with LIPs provides a unique window into the isotopic systematics of LIP carbon because the majority of carbon in carbonatites crystalizes rather than degassing. Although the volume of such carbonatites is small, they offer one of the few available constraints on the mantle carbon originally hosted in other more voluminous magma types. Here, we present new data for the Guli carbonatites in the Siberian Traps. In addition, we compile ~260 published measurements of from carbonatites related to the Deccan Traps and the Paraná-Etendeka. We find no evidence for magmas with carbon isotope ratios lighter than depleted mantle values of ‰ from any of these LIPs, though some carbonatites range to heavier . We attribute relatively heavy in some carbonatites to either slightly 13C-enriched domains in the mantle lithosphere or carbon isotope fractionation in deep, carbon-saturated LIP magma reservoirs. The absence of a light component in LIP magmas supports the view that lithospheric carbon reservoirs must be tapped during cases of LIP magmatism linked with sharp negative carbon isotope excursions and mass extinctions.
DS201911-2512
2019
Black, B.A.Black, B.A., Gibson, S.A.Deep carbon and the life cycle of large igneous provinces.Elements, Vol. 15, pp. 319-324.Mantlecarbon

Abstract: Carbon is central to the formation and environmental impact of large igneous provinces (LIPs). These vast magmatic events occur over geologically short timescales and include voluminous flood basalts, along with silicic and low-volume alkaline magmas. Surface outgassing of CO2 from flood basalts may average up to 3,000 Mt per year during LIP emplacement and is subsidized by fractionating magmas deep in the crust. The large quantities of carbon mobilized in LIPs may be sourced from the convecting mantle, lithospheric mantle and crust. The relative significance of each potential carbon source is poorly known and probably varies between LIPs. Because LIPs draw on mantle reservoirs typically untapped during plate boundary magmatism, they are integral to Earth’s long-term carbon cycle.
DS1984-0382
1984
Black, C.P.Jaques, A.L., Webb, A.W., Fanning, C.M., Black, C.P., Pidgeon, R.The Age of the Diamond Bearing Pipes and Associated LeuciteB.m.r. Journal of Aust. Geol. Geophys., Vol. 9, PP.Australia, Western AustraliaGeochronology, Related Rocks
DS1989-0123
1989
Black, D.F.Black, D.F.Tectonic evolution in central and eastern Kentucky:a multidisciplinary study of surface and subsurfacestructureUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 89-0106, 151p. 12 maps, paper copy $ 86.00USKentuckyTectonics, Structure
DS1975-0741
1978
Black, L.P.Ferguson, J., Black, L.P.Tectonic Setting of Kimberlites in Southeast AustraliaB.m.r. Symposium, No. 7, PP. 28-29, (abstract.).Australia, New South Wales, VictoriaKimberlite
DS1975-0790
1978
Black, L.P.Langworthy, A.P., Black, L.P.The Mordor Complex: a Highly Differentiated Potassic Intrusion with Kimberlitic Affinities in Central Australia.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 67, PP. 51-62.AustraliaKimberlite, Carbonatite
DS1975-1235
1979
Black, L.P.Stracke, K.J., Ferguson, J., Black, L.P.Structural Setting of Kimberlites in Southeastern AustraliaProceedings of Second International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 1, PP. 71-91.Australia, New South Wales, VictoriaKimberlite, Geophysics, Lineaments, Nepheline Basanites
DS1989-1106
1989
Black, L.P.Nelson, D.R., Black, L.P., McCulloch, M.T.Neodymium-Palladium isotopic characteristics of the Mordor Complex, Northern Territory: Mid-Proterozoic potassic magmatism from an enriched mantle sourceAustralian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 36, No. 4, December pp. 541-551AustraliaPotassic rocks, Proterozoic, Mordor Complex, Rare Earth Elements
DS1990-1345
1990
Black, L.P.Sheraton, J.W., Black, L.P., McCulloch, M.T., Oliver, R.L.Age and origin of a compositionally varied mafic dyke swarm in the Bunger Hills ,East AntarcticaChemical Geology, Vol. 85, No. 3/4, July 30, pp. 215-246AntarcticaMafic dyke, Picrite
DS1992-1384
1992
Black, L.P.Sheraton, J.W., Black, L.P., Tindle, A.G.Petrogenesis of plutonic rocks in a Proterozoic granulite-facies terrane-the Bunger Hills, East AntarcticaChemical Geology, Vol. 97, No. 3-4, June 25, pp. 163-198AntarcticaBunger Hills
DS201605-0880
2016
Black, M.Neave, D.A., Black, M., Riley, T.R., Gibson, S.A., Ferrier, G., Wall, F., Broom-Fendley, S.On the feasibility of imaging carbonatite-hosted rare earth element deposits using remote sensing.Economic Geology, Vol. 111, pp. 641-665.China, United States, Europe, GreenlandDeposit - Bayan Obo, Mountain Pass, Motzfeldt, Ilimaussaq

Abstract: Rare earth elements (REEs) generate characteristic absorption features in visible to shortwave infrared (VNIR-SWIR) reflectance spectra. Neodymium (Nd) has among the most prominent absorption features of the REEs and thus represents a key pathfinder element for the REEs as a whole. Given that the world’s largest REE deposits are associated with carbonatites, we present spectral, petrographic, and geochemical data from a predominantly carbonatitic suite of rocks that we use to assess the feasibility of imaging REE deposits using remote sensing. Samples were selected to cover a wide range of extents and styles of REE mineralization, and encompass calcio-, ferro- and magnesio-carbonatites. REE ores from the Bayan Obo (China) and Mountain Pass (United States) mines, as well as REE-rich alkaline rocks from the Motzfeldt and Ilímaussaq intrusions in Greenland, were also included in the sample suite. The depth and area of Nd absorption features in spectra collected under laboratory conditions correlate positively with the Nd content of whole-rock samples. The wavelength of Nd absorption features is predominantly independent of sample lithology and mineralogy. Correlations are most reliable for the two absorption features centered at ~744 and ~802 nm that can be observed in samples containing as little as ~1,000 ppm Nd. By convolving laboratory spectra to the spectral response functions of a variety of remote sensing instruments we demonstrate that hyperspectral instruments with capabilities equivalent to the operational Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and planned Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program (EnMAP) systems have the spectral resolutions necessary to detect Nd absorption features, especially in high-grade samples with economically relevant REE accumulations (Nd > 30,000 ppm). Adding synthetic noise to convolved spectra indicates that correlations between Nd absorption area and whole-rock Nd content only remain robust when spectra have signal-to-noise ratios in excess of ~250:1. Although atmospheric interferences are modest across the wavelength intervals relevant for Nd detection, most REE-rich outcrops are too small to be detectable using satellite-based platforms with >30-m spatial resolutions. However, our results indicate that Nd absorption features should be identifiable in high-quality, airborne, hyperspectral datasets collected at meter-scale spatial resolutions. Future deployment of hyperspectral instruments on unmanned aerial vehicles could enable REE grade to be mapped at the centimeter scale across whole deposits.
DS1982-0102
1982
Black, P.Black, P.Diamonds 1982Mineral, Vol. 28, No. 2, JUNE, PP. 15-19.Australia, New South WalesDiamonds, Exploration
DS1975-0948
1979
Black, R.Black, R., Caby, R., et al.Evidence for Late Precambrian Plate Tectonics in West AfricaNature., Vol. 278, PP. 223-227.West Africa, GuineaStructure, Tectonics
DS1980-0064
1980
Black, R.Black, R.Precambrian of West AfricaEpisodes, Vol. 1980, No. 4, PP. 3-8.West Africa, Ivory Coast, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, NigeriaStructure, Tectonics
DS1985-0391
1985
Black, R.Liegeois, J.P., Black, R.Alkaline Magmatism Subsequent to Collision in the Pan African Belt of the Adar des Iforas (mali).Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 17, No. 3, P. 165. (abstract.).West Africa, MaliOccurrences
DS1989-0847
1989
Black, R.Lameyre, J., Black, R., Giret, A.Le magmatism alcalin: donnees geologiques sur quelques provinces oceaniques et continentales.(in French)Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting Program Abstracts, Vol. 14, p. A49. (abstract.)West Africa, NigeriaAlkaline rocks
DS1991-0989
1991
Black, R.Ligeois, J.P., Sauvage, J.F., Black, R.The Permo-Jurassic alkaline province of Tadhak, Mali: geology, geochronology and tectonic significanceLithos, Vol. 27, pp. 95-105GlobalAlkaline rocks, Craton
DS1993-0126
1993
Black, R.Black, R., Liegeois, J-P.Cratons, mobile belts, alkaline rocks and continental lithospheric mantle:the Pan-African testimonyJournal of the Geological Society of London, Vol. 150, pt. 1, January pp. 89-98AfricaOrogeny, Tectonics
DS1996-0723
1996
Black, R.Keiswetter, D., Black, R., Steeples, D.Seismic reflection analysis of the Manson Impact Structure, IowaJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 101, No. 3, March 10, pp. 5823-5834.IowaStructure, Impact structure
DS1998-0873
1998
Black, R.Liegeois, J.P., Navez, J., Hertogen, J., Black, R.Contrasting origin of post collisional high Potassium calc-alkaline and shoshonitic versus alkaline granitesLithos, Vol. 45, pp. 1-28.GlobalGeochemistry - sliding normalization, Shoshonites
DS1981-0008
1981
Black, R.A.Anderson, R.R., Black, R.A.Geophysical Interpretation of the Geology of the Central Segment of the Midcontinent.Eos, Vol. 63, No. 33, P. 615. (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent
DS1981-0085
1981
Black, R.A.Black, R.A.Geophysical Processing and Interpretation of Magsat Satellite Magnetic Anomaly Dat a Over the U.s. Midcontinent.Msc. Thesis, University Iowa., 116P.Wisconsin, KentuckyMid Continent
DS1983-0011
1983
Black, R.A.Anderson, R.R., Black, R.A.Early Proterozoic Development of the Southern Archean Boundary of the Superior Province in the Lake Superior Region.Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 15, No. 6, P. 515. (abstract.).GlobalMid Continent
DS1986-0126
1986
Black, R.A.Carmichael, R.S., Black, R.A.Analysis and use of Magsat satellite magnetic dat a for interpretation of crustal structure and character in the United States midcontinentPhys. Earth Planet. Science, Vol. 44, No. 4, December pp. 333-347United StatesGeophysics, Midcontinent
DS1992-0128
1992
Black, R.A.Black, R.A.Suppression of dominant topographic overprints in gravity dat a by adaptivefiltering: southern Wyoming ProvinceJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 97, No. B 10, September 10, pp. 14, 237-14243WyomingGeophysics -gravity, Tectonics
DS200612-1500
2006
Black, R.A.Walker, J.D., Bowers, T.D., Black, R.A., Glazner, A.F., Farmer, G.L., Carlson, R.W.A geochemical database for western North American volcanic and intrusive rocks. NAVDATIn: Sinha, A.K. Geoinformatics: data to knowledge, GSA Special Paper, 397, 397, pp.61-72United StatesGeochemistry - data
DS1998-0130
1998
Black, S.Black, S., Macdonald, R., Barreiro, Dunkley, SmithOpen system alkaline magmatism in northern Kenya: evidence from U seriesdisequilibration temperatures and radiogenic...Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 131, No. 4, May pp. 364-378.KenyaGeochronology - isotopes, Alkaline rocks
DS1990-0209
1990
Black, T.C.Black, T.C., Freyberg, D.L.Simulation of one dimensional correlated fields using a matrix factorization moving average approachMath. Geol, Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 39-62GlobalGeostatistics, Random field
DS1950-0200
1955
Black, W.A.Black, W.A.Study of Marked Positive Gravity Anomaly in the Northern Mid-continent Region of the United States.Geological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 66, No. 12, PT. 2, P. 1531, (abstract.).GlobalMid-continent, Geophysics
DS1960-0793
1967
Blackadar, R.G.Blackadar, R.G.Geological Reconnaissance, Southern Baffin Island, District of FranklinGeological Survey of Canada (GSC), Paper No. 66-47, 32p.Northwest Territories, Baffin IslandGeology - Bedrock, Structural
DS1970-0028
1970
Blackadar, R.G.Blackadar, R.G.Precambrian Geology Northwestern Baffin Island, District of FranklinGeological Survey of Canada (GSC), Bulletin. 191, 89p.Northwest Territories, Baffin IslandGeology - Precambrian
DS2001-0452
2001
BlackburnHarris, M.J., Symons, D.T.A., Peck, Blackburn, TurekDevelopments in the 2.1 to 1.7 Ga apparent polar wander path for the Trans-Hudson Orogen and Superior Craton.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting Abstracts, Vol. 26, p.59, abstract.Manitoba, SaskatchewanTrans Hudson Orogen, Tectonics
DS1910-0163
1911
Blackburn, D.Blackburn, D., Caddell, W.W.Secret Service in South AfricaLondon: Cassell, 380P. (CHAPTER 15, PP. 321-373.).South AfricaIdb, Kimberley
DS200512-1038
2004
Blackburn, L.Stachel, T., Blackburn, L., Kurszlaukis, S., Barton, E., Walker, E.C.Diamonds from the Cristal and genesis volcanics, Wawa Ontario.32nd Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, Nov. 16-18, p.74-75. (talk)Canada, Ontario, WawaDiamond inclusions
DS201112-0090
2011
Blackburn, T.Blackburn, T., Bowring, S., Perron, T., Mahan, K., Dudas, F.A long term record of continental lithosphere exhumation via U-Pb thermochronology of the lower crust.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.532.United States, MontanaCraton, keels
DS201112-0091
2011
Blackburn, T.Blackburn, T., Bowring, S.A., Schoene, B., Mahan, K., Dudas, F.U-Pb thermochronology: creating a temporal record of lithosphere thermal evolution.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, in press, availableMantleGeothermometry - xenoliths
DS200512-0092
2004
Blackburn, T.J.Blackburn, T.J., Stockli, D., Berendsen, P., Carlson, R.W., Macpherson, G.L.New (U-TH/He) age constraints on the emplacement of kimberlite pipes in north eastern Kansas.Geological Society of America Annual Meeting ABSTRACTS, Nov. 7-10, Paper 192-2, Vol. 36, 5, p. 447.United States, KansasGeochronology, Bala. Stockdale, Tuttle, Leonardville
DS200812-0116
2008
Blackburn, T.J.Blackburn, T.J., Stockli, D.F., Carlson, R.W., Berendsen, P.U Th /He dating of kimberlites - a case study from north eastern Kansas.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 175, 1-2, pp. 111-120.United States, KansasGeochronology - Riley
DS201112-0410
2011
Blackburn, T.J.Hanson, R.E., Rioux, M., Gose, W.A., Blackburn, T.J., Bowring, S.A., Mukwakwami, J., Jones, D.L.Paleomagnetic and geochronological evidence for large scale post 1.88 Ga displacement between Zimbabwe and Kaapvaal Cratons along the Limpopo belt.Geology, Vol.39, 5, pp. 487-490.Africa, South Africa, ZimbabweGeochronology
DS1998-0131
1998
Blackburn, W.H.Blackburn, W.H., Dennen, W.H.CD-ROM version of encyclopedia of mineral names for Macintosh and WindowusersCanadian Mineralogist Special Publ, No. 1, $ 100.00 United StatesGlobalBook - ad for CD-ROM version, Encyclopedia Mineral Names
DS201512-1898
2015
Blacklock, S.Blacklock, S.Ekati diamond mine UAVs.43rd Annual Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts, abstract p. 18.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Ekati

Abstract: Dominion Diamond Ekati Corporation (DDEC) purchased two unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV's) in 2014 to assist in surveying the active open pits and kimberlite stockpiles at the mine. UAV technology has allowed the team to survey various aspects of the mine in a safer and more accurate. manner. Along with making day to day work more efficient, DDEC surveying now has the ability to complete various other requests from departments at the mine. These include; large area photographs of lay downs, new road alignments, projects and environmental areas of interest.
DS1992-1087
1992
Blackman, D.K.Morgan, J.P., Blackman, D.K., Sinton, J.M.Mantle flow and melt generation at mid-Oceanic ridgesAmerican Geophysical Union (AGU) Monograph, Vol. 71, 361p. approx. $ 46.00MantleOphiolites, Basalts
DS1993-0127
1993
Blackman, D.K.Blackman, D.K., Orcutt, J.A., Forsyth, D.W., Kendall, J-M.Seismic anisotropy in the mantle beneath an oceanic spreading centreNature, Vol. 366, December 16, pp. 675-677MantleGeophysics -seismics, Mid ocean ridge
DS1994-1234
1994
Blackman, D.K.Morgan, J.P., Blackman, D.K., Sinton, J.M.Mantle flow and melt generation at mid-ocean ridgesAmerican Geophysical Union Publ, Monograph Vol. 71, 361p. $ 46.00GlobalMantle flow, Geophysics -magma
DS200612-0108
2006
Blackman, D.K.Becker, T.W., Chevrot, S., Schulte Pelkum, V., Blackman, D.K.Statistical properties of seismic anisotropy predicted by upper mantle geodynamic models.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 111, B 18, B 8309.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200612-0109
2006
Blackman, D.K.Becker, T.W., Chevrot, S., Schulte-Pelkum, V., Blackman, D.K.Statistical properties of seismic anisotropy predicted by upper mantle geodynamic models.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 111, No. B8, B08309.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS200612-0110
2006
Blackman, D.K.Becker, T.W., Schulte-Pelkum, V., Blackman, D.K., Kellogg, J.B., O'Connell, R.J.Mantle flow under the western United States from shear wave splitting.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, in press availableUnited StatesGeophysics - seismics, tectonics, convection
DS200612-0111
2006
Blackman, D.K.Becker, T.W., Sculte Pelkum, V., Blackman, D.K., Kellogg, J.B., O Connell, R.J.Mantle flow under the western United States from shear wave splitting.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 247, 3-4, pp. 235-251.United StatesGeodynamics
DS200712-0081
2007
Blackman, D.K.Blackman, D.K.Use of mineral physics, with geodynamic modelling and seismology to investigate flow in the Earth's mantle.Report on Progress in Physics, Institute of Physics Pub., Vol. 70, 5, pp. 659-689.MantleGeophysics - seismics
DS1999-0465
1999
BlackstoneMcMillan, M.E., Heller, P.L., Hoffower, BlackstoneIs there a northern boundary of the Colorado Plateau?Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 31, No. 7, p. 187. abstract.Alberta, WyomingTectonics
DS1987-0057
1987
Blackstone, D.L. Jr.Blackstone, D.L. Jr.Northern Medicine Bow Mountains, Wyoming: revision of structural northeast flankContrib. Geology, Vol. 25, No. 1, May pp. 1-9WyomingUSA, Structure
DS1970-0479
1972
Blackstone, D.L.Jr.Blackstone, D.L.Jr.Tectonic Analysis of Southwestern Wyoming from Erts-1 ImagerUniversity WYOMING REMOTE SENSING LAB. SPECIAL Report, NAS 5-21799, 4P.GlobalLeucite, Rocky Mountains, Leucite Hills
DS1983-0135
1983
Blackstone, D.L.Jr.Blackstone, D.L.Jr.Laramide Compressional Tectonics, Southeastern WyomingContrib. To Geology, Vol. 22, No. 1, PP. 1-38.United States, WyomingColorado Plateau, Rocky Mountains, Sweetwater Arch
DS1975-0242
1976
Blackstone, R.E.Blackstone, R.E.Contact Relationships of Laramie Anorthosite and Associated rocks Poe Mountain Area, Albany County, Wyoming.Msc. Thesis, University Wyoming, 164P.United States, Wyoming, Rocky MountainsRegional Studies
DS1910-0039
1910
Blackwelder, E.Darton, N.H., Blackwelder, E., Siebenthal, C.E.Laramie Sherman Folio, WyomingUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) ATLAS of THE UNITED STATES, 17P.United States, Wyoming, Rocky MountainsRegional Geology
DS1920-0273
1926
Blackwelder, E.Blackwelder, E.Precambrian Geology of the Medicine Bow MountainsGeological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 37, PP. 615-658.GlobalBlank
DS1930-0183
1935
Blackwelder, E.Blackwelder, E.Precambrian Rocks of Utah and WyomingUtah Academy of Science Arts And Letters, Vol. 22, PP. 153-157.GlobalBlank
DS1984-0139
1984
BlackwellBarnett, R.L., Arima, M., Blackwell, WINDER, Palmer.The Picton and Varty lake ultramafic dikes: Jurassic magmatism in the St.Lawrence platform near BellevilleCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 21, pp. 1460-72.OntarioLamprophyre, Kimberlite, Deposit - Varty, Picton
DS1989-1342
1989
Blackwell, D.D.Sass, J.H., Blackwell, D.D., Chapman, D.S., Costain, J.K., DeckerHeat flow from the crust of the United StatesPhysical Properties of Rocks and Minerals, Ed. Y.S. Touloukian, W.R., ISBN 0-89116-883-4 $ 95.00 548p. pp. 503-GlobalHeat flow, Mantle
DS1992-0129
1992
Blackwell, G.H.Blackwell, G.H., Sinclair, A.J.Geostatistical mineral inventory using personal computersThe Canadian Mining and Metallurgical Bulletin (CIM Bulletin), Vol. 85, No. 961, June pp. 65-70GlobalGeostatistics, Computer programs
DS1994-0168
1994
Blackwell, G.H.Blackwell, G.H.Computerized mine planning for medium size open pitsInstitute of Mining and Metallurgy (IMM) Bulletins, pp. A 83- A 88EnglandMining, Computer programs
DS1992-1064
1992
Blackwell, G.W.Miller, A.R., Blackwell, G.W.Petrology of alkaline rare earth element bearing plutonic rocks, EnekatchaLake, and Carey Lake map areas. 65E 15 and 65 L 7.Geological Survey Canada Open File: project summaries Canada-northwest Territories agreement, OF 2484, March pp. 129-134.Northwest TerritoriesAlkaline rocks, Rare earths
DS1984-0138
1984
Blackwell, J.D.Barnett, R.L., Arima, M., Blackwell, J.D., Winder, C.G., Palmer.The Picton and Varty Lake Ultramafic Dikes: Jurassic Magmatism in the St. Lawrence Platform Near Belleville, Ontario.Canadian Journal of EARTH. SCI., Vol. 21, No. 12, DECEMBER PP. 1460-1472.Canada, OntarioBlank
DS1993-0128
1993
Blacutt, W.P.Blacutt, W.P.Risk and reward for mining investment in BoliviaSociety for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME) Meeting held February 15-18, 1993 in Reno, Nevada, Reprint No. 93-245, 8pBoliviaEconomics, Polymetallics
DS1995-0156
1995
Blacutt, W.P.Blacutt, W.P.The investment worth model: concepts and methods of estimation of modelparametersNonRenewable Resources, Vol. 4, No. 3, Fall, pp. 262-272BoliviaEconomics -mining investment, Risk management
DS1950-0416
1958
Blade, L.V.Milton, C., Blade, L.V.Preliminary Note on Kimzeyite, a New Zirconian GarnetScience., Vol. 127, No. 3310, P. 1343.United States, Gulf Coast, ArkansasMineralogy
DS1950-0425
1958
Blade, L.V.Rose, H.J.JR., Blade, L.V., Ross, M.Earthy Monazite at Magnet Cove ArkansawAmerican MINERALOGIST., Vol. 43, No. 9-10, PP. 995-997.United States, Gulf Coast, Arkansas, Hot Spring CountyPetrography
DS1960-0338
1963
Blade, L.V.Erickson, R.L., Blade, L.V.Geochemistry and Petrology of the Alkalic Igneous Complex Of Magnet Cove, Arkansaw.United States Geological Survey (USGS) PROF. PAPER., No. 425, 95P.United States, Gulf Coast, Arkansas, Hot Spring CountyGeochemistry, Petrology
DS201705-0854
2017
Blades, M.L.Merdith, A.S., Collins, A.S., Williams, S.E., Pisarevsky, S., Foden, J.F., Archibald, D., Blades, M.L., Alessio, B.L., Armistead, S., Plavsa, D., Clark, C., Muller, R.D.A full plate global reconstruction of the Neoproterozoic.Gondwana Research, in press available 155p.Gondwana, RodiniaGeodynamics

Abstract: Neoproterozoic tectonic geography was dominated by the formation of the supercontinent Rodinia, its break-up and the subsequent amalgamation of Gondwana. The Neoproterozoic was a tumultuous time of Earth history, with large climatic variations, the emergence of complex life and a series of continent-building orogenies of a scale not repeated until the Cenozoic. Here we synthesise available geological and palaeomagnetic data and build the first full-plate, topological model of the Neoproterozoic that maps the evolution of the tectonic plate configurations during this time. Topological models trace evolving plate boundaries and facilitate the evaluation of “plate tectonic rules” such as subduction zone migration through time when building plate models. There is a rich history of subduction zone proxies preserved in the Neoproterozoic geological record, providing good evidence for the existence of continent-margin and intra-oceanic subduction zones through time. These are preserved either as volcanic arc protoliths accreted in continent-continent, or continent-arc collisions, or as the detritus of these volcanic arcs preserved in successor basins. Despite this, we find that the model presented here still predicts less subduction (ca. 90%) than on the modern earth, suggesting that we have produced a conservative model and are likely underestimating the amount of subduction, either due to a simplification of tectonically complex areas, or because of the absence of preservation in the geological record (e.g. ocean-ocean convergence). Furthermore, the reconstruction of plate boundary geometries provides constraints for global-scale earth system parameters, such as the role of volcanism or ridge production on the planet's icehouse climatic excursion during the Cryogenian. Besides modelling plate boundaries, our model presents some notable departures from previous Rodinia models. We omit India and South China from Rodinia completely, due to long-lived subduction preserved on margins of India and conflicting palaeomagnetic data for the Cryogenian, such that these two cratons act as ‘lonely wanderers’ for much of the Neoproterozoic. We also introduce a Tonian-Cryogenian aged rotation of the Congo-São Francisco Craton relative to Rodinia to better fit palaeomagnetic data and account for thick passive margin sediments along its southern margin during the Tonian. The GPlates files of the model are released to the public and it is our expectation that this model can act as a foundation for future model refinements, the testing of alternative models, as well as providing constraints for both geodynamic and palaeoclimate models.
DS201709-2032
2017
Blades, M.L.Meredith, A.S., Collins, A.S., Williams, S.E., Pisarevsky, S., Foden, J.D., Archibald, D.B., Blades, M.L., Alessio, B.L., Armistead, S., Plavsa, D., Clark, C., Muller, R.D.A full plate global reconstruction of the Neoproterozoic.Gondwana Research, Vol. 50, pp. 84-134.Globalneoproterozoic

Abstract: Neoproterozoic tectonic geography was dominated by the formation of the supercontinent Rodinia, its break-up and the subsequent amalgamation of Gondwana. The Neoproterozoic was a tumultuous time of Earth history, with large climatic variations, the emergence of complex life and a series of continent-building orogenies of a scale not repeated until the Cenozoic. Here we synthesise available geological and palaeomagnetic data and build the first full-plate, topological model of the Neoproterozoic that maps the evolution of the tectonic plate configurations during this time. Topological models trace evolving plate boundaries and facilitate the evaluation of “plate tectonic rules” such as subduction zone migration through time when building plate models. There is a rich history of subduction zone proxies preserved in the Neoproterozoic geological record, providing good evidence for the existence of continent-margin and intra-oceanic subduction zones through time. These are preserved either as volcanic arc protoliths accreted in continent-continent, or continent-arc collisions, or as the detritus of these volcanic arcs preserved in successor basins. Despite this, we find that the model presented here still predicts less subduction (ca. 90%) than on the modern earth, suggesting that we have produced a conservative model and are likely underestimating the amount of subduction, either due to a simplification of tectonically complex areas, or because of the absence of preservation in the geological record (e.g. ocean-ocean convergence). Furthermore, the reconstruction of plate boundary geometries provides constraints for global-scale earth system parameters, such as the role of volcanism or ridge production on the planet's icehouse climatic excursion during the Cryogenian. Besides modelling plate boundaries, our model presents some notable departures from previous Rodinia models. We omit India and South China from Rodinia completely, due to long-lived subduction preserved on margins of India and conflicting palaeomagnetic data for the Cryogenian, such that these two cratons act as ‘lonely wanderers’ for much of the Neoproterozoic. We also introduce a Tonian-Cryogenian aged rotation of the Congo-São Francisco Craton relative to Rodinia to better fit palaeomagnetic data and account for thick passive margin sediments along its southern margin during the Tonian. The GPlates files of the model are released to the public and it is our expectation that this model can act as a foundation for future model refinements, the testing of alternative models, as well as providing constraints for both geodynamic and palaeoclimate models.
DS201904-0715
2019
Blades, M.L.Armistead, S.E., Collins, A.S., Redaa, A., Gilbert, S., Jepson, G., Gillespie, J., Blades, M.L., Foden, J.D., Razakamana, T.Structural evolution and medium temperature thermochronology of central Madagascar: implications for Gondwana amalgamation.Journal of the Geological Society of London, in press available 25p.Africa, Madagascarthermochronology

Abstract: Madagascar occupied an important place in the amalgamation of Gondwana, and preserves a record of several Neoproterozoic events that can be linked to orogenesis of the East African Orogen. We integrate remote sensing and field data to unravel complex deformation in the Ikalamavony and Itremo domains of central Madagascar. The deformation sequence comprises a gneissic foliation (S1), followed by south to south-west directed, tight to isoclinal, recumbent folding (D2). These are overprinted by north-trending upright folds that formed during a ~E-W shortening event. Together these produced type 1 and type 2 fold interference patterns throughout the Itremo and Ikalamavony domains. Apatite U-Pb and muscovite and biotite Rb-Sr thermochronometers indicate that much of central Madagascar was thermally reset to at least ~500oC at c. 500 Ma. Deformation in west-central Madagascar occurred between c. 750 Ma and c. 550 Ma, and we suggest this deformation formed in response to the c. 650 Ma collision of Azania with Africa along the Vohibory Suture in southwestern Madagascar. In eastern Madagascar, deformation is syn- to post-550 Ma, which formed in response to the final closure of the Mozambique Ocean along the Betsimisaraka Suture that amalgamated Madagascar with the Dharwar Craton of India.
DS202010-1826
2020
Blades, M.L.Armistead, S.E., Collins, A.S., Redaa, A., Jepson, G., Gillespie, J., Gilbert, S., Blades, M.L., Foden, J.D., RazakMnN, T.Structural evolution and medium temperature thermochronology of central Madagascar: implications for Gondwana amalagamation.Journal of the Geological Society, Vol. 177, pp. 784-798.Africa, Madagascargeothermometry

Abstract: Madagascar occupied an important place in the amalgamation of Gondwana and preserves a record of several Neoproterozoic events that are linked to orogenesis of the East African Orogen. In this study, we integrate remote sensing, field data and thermochronology to unravel complex deformation in the Ikalamavony and Itremo domains of central Madagascar. The deformation sequence comprises a gneissic foliation (S1), followed by south- to SW-directed, tight to isoclinal, recumbent folding (D2). These are overprinted by north-trending upright folds that formed during an approximately east-west shortening event (D3). Together these produced type 1 and type 2 fold interference patterns throughout the Itremo and Ikalamavony domains. We show that the Itremo and Ikalamavony domains were deformed together in the same orogenic system, which we interpret as the c. 630 Ma collision of Azania with Africa along the Vohibory Suture in southwestern Madagascar. In eastern Madagascar, deformation is syn- to post-550 Ma, and probably formed in response to final closure of the Mozambique Ocean along the Betsimisaraka Suture that amalgamated Madagascar with the Dharwar Craton of India. Apatite U-Pb and novel laser ablation triple quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-QQQ-ICP-MS) muscovite and biotite Rb-Sr thermochronology indicates that much of central Madagascar cooled through c. 500°C at c. 500 Ma.
DS202103-0394
2021
Blades, M.L.Merdith, A.S., Williams, S.E., Collins, A.S., Tetley, M.G., Mulder, J.A., Blades, M.L., Young, A., Armistead, S.E., Cannon, J., Zahirovic, S., Muller, R.D.Extending full plate tectonic models into deep time: linking the Neoproterozoic and the Phanerozoic.Earth Science Reviews, Vol. 214, 44p. PdfMantleplate tectonics

Abstract: Recent progress in plate tectonic reconstructions has seen models move beyond the classical idea of continental drift by attempting to reconstruct the full evolving configuration of tectonic plates and plate boundaries. A particular problem for the Neoproterozoic and Cambrian is that many existing interpretations of geological and palaeomagnetic data have remained disconnected from younger, better-constrained periods in Earth history. An important test of deep time reconstructions is therefore to demonstrate the continuous kinematic viability of tectonic motions across multiple supercontinent cycles. We present, for the first time, a continuous full-plate model spanning 1 Ga to the present-day, that includes a revised and improved model for the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian (1000-520 Ma) that connects with models of the Phanerozoic, thereby opening up pre-Gondwana times for quantitative analysis and further regional refinements. In this contribution, we first summarise methodological approaches to full-plate modelling and review the existing full-plate models in order to select appropriate models that produce a single continuous model. Our model is presented in a palaeomagnetic reference frame, with a newly-derived apparent polar wander path for Gondwana from 540 to 320 Ma, and a global apparent polar wander path from 320 to 0 Ma. We stress, though while we have used palaeomagnetic data when available, the model is also geologically constrained, based on preserved data from past-plate boundaries. This study is intended as a first step in the direction of a detailed and self-consistent tectonic reconstruction for the last billion years of Earth history, and our model files are released to facilitate community development.
DS202109-1481
2021
Blades, M.L.Meredith, A.S., Williams, S.E., Collins, A.S., Tetley, M.G., Mulder, J.A., Blades, M.L., Young, A., Armistead, S.E., Cannon, J., Zahirovic, S., Muller, R.D.Extending full plate tectonic models into deep time: linking the Neoproterozoic and the Phanerozoic.Earth Science Reviews , Vol. 214, 103477, 44p. PdfMantleplate tectonics, Rodinia, Gondwana

Abstract: Recent progress in plate tectonic reconstructions has seen models move beyond the classical idea of continental drift by attempting to reconstruct the full evolving configuration of tectonic plates and plate boundaries. A particular problem for the Neoproterozoic and Cambrian is that many existing interpretations of geological and palaeomagnetic data have remained disconnected from younger, better-constrained periods in Earth history. An important test of deep time reconstructions is therefore to demonstrate the continuous kinematic viability of tectonic motions across multiple supercontinent cycles. We present, for the first time, a continuous full-plate model spanning 1 Ga to the present-day, that includes a revised and improved model for the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian (1000-520 Ma) that connects with models of the Phanerozoic, thereby opening up pre-Gondwana times for quantitative analysis and further regional refinements. In this contribution, we first summarise methodological approaches to full-plate modelling and review the existing full-plate models in order to select appropriate models that produce a single continuous model. Our model is presented in a palaeomagnetic reference frame, with a newly-derived apparent polar wander path for Gondwana from 540 to 320 Ma, and a global apparent polar wander path from 320 to 0 Ma. We stress, though while we have used palaeomagnetic data when available, the model is also geologically constrained, based on preserved data from past-plate boundaries. This study is intended as a first step in the direction of a detailed and self-consistent tectonic reconstruction for the last billion years of Earth history, and our model files are released to facilitate community development.
DS1995-0051
1995
BladhAnthony, Bideau, Bladh, NicholsHandbook of mineralogyMineral Data Publishing, Vol. II, 904p. $ 135.00 plusGlobalBook -ad, Mineralogy handbook
DS1984-0309
1984
Blagodareva, N.S.Govorov, I.N., Blagodareva, N.S., Kirykhina, N.I., Kharkiv, A.D.Primary Potassium Minerals in Deep Seated Eclogites of YakutiaInternational Geology Review, Vol. 26, No. 11, November pp. 1290-1294RussiaEclogites
DS1986-0299
1986
Blagodareva, N.S.Govorov, I.N., Blagodareva, N.S., Kiryukhina, N.I., Kharkiv, A.D.Primary potassium minerals in plutonic eclogite xenoliths from YakutiaDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 276, January pp. 123-RussiaMineralogy, eclogite
DS1960-0093
1960
Blagulkina, V.A.Sarsadskikh, N.N., Rovsha, V.S., Blagulkina, V.A.Minerals of Inclusions of Pyrope Peridotites in the Kimberlites of the Daldyn-alakit Diamond Bearing Region.Vsegei, No. 40, PP. 37-55.RussiaBlank
DS1960-0217
1962
Blagulkina, V.A.Blagulkina, V.A., Rosha, V.S., Sarsadskikh, N.N.The Mineralogy of Rocks Related to KimberlitesZap. Vses. Miner. Obshch., PT. 91, No. 2, PP. 236-241.RussiaBlank
DS1960-0419
1964
Blagulkina, V.A.Artsybasheva, T.F., Blagulkina, V.A., et al.The Problem of Classification of the Yakutia Kimberlites (based on Those of the Alakit-daldynsk Diamantiferous Region).International Geology Review, Vol. 6, No. 10, PP. 1773-1781.RussiaKimberlite
DS1960-0742
1966
Blagulkina, V.A.Sarsadskikh, N.N., Blagulkina, V.A., Silin, YU. I.The Absolute Age of the Yakutian KimberlitesDoklady Academy of Sciences Nauk SSSR, Vol. 168, No. 2, PP. 420-423., RussiaBlank
DS1960-1072
1969
Blagulkina, V.A.Blagulkina, V.A.Petrochemical Types of Siberian Kimberlites and Their Diamond Capacity.In: Proceedings of The Working Conference On Petrochemistry, Moscow., RussiaBlank
DS1960-1206
1969
Blagulkina, V.A.Sarsadskikh, N.N., Blagulkina, V.A.Petrographic and Petrogenic Differences between the Kimberlites and Rocks Similar to Them in Certain Features.Zap. Vses. Miner. Obshch., PT. 98, No. 4, PP. 415-421.RussiaBlank
DS1970-0244
1971
Blagulkina, V.A.Blagulkina, V.A.The Composition of Ilmenite from KimberlitesZap. Vses. Miner. Obshch., PT. 100, PP. 194-198.RussiaBlank
DS1970-0245
1971
Blagulkina, V.A.Blagulkina, V.A.Distribution of Disseminated and Trace Elements in Kimberlites of Various Petrochemical Types.Geochemistry International, Vol. 8, No. 3, PP. 459-.RussiaBlank
DS1970-0246
1971
Blagulkina, V.A.Blagulkina, V.A.Chemical Composition of Kimberlites. #2Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), Vol. 1971, No. 1-2, P. 152. (abstract.).Russia, YakutiaGeochemistry
DS1989-1627
1989
Blaha, J.E.Wilkinson, M.J., Blaha, J.E., Noli, D.A new lagoon on the Namibian coast of South Africa:sand spit growth documented from STS-29 shuttlephotographyGeocarto international, No. 4, pp. 63-66Southwest Africa, NamibiaRemote sensing, Geomorphology
DS201412-0056
2014
Blaikie, T.N.Blaikie, T.N., Ailleres, L., Betts, P.G., Cas, R.A.F.A geophysical comparison of the diatremes of simple and complex maar volcanoes, Newer Volcanics Province, south-eastern Australia.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, Vol. 276, pp. 64-81.AustraliaVolcanoes
DS201412-0057
2014
Blaikie, T.N.Blaikie, T.N., Ailleres, L., Betts, P.G., Cas, R.A.F.A geophysical comparison of the diatremes of simple and complex Maar volcanoes, Newer Volcanic Province, south-eastern Australia.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, Vol. 276, pp. 64-81.AustraliaGeophysics - volcanoes
DS1999-0072
1999
Blain, C.Blain, C., Wilde, A.Trends in discovery: commodity and ore type targetsNorth Atlantic Mineral Symposium, Sept., abstracts pp. 188-90.GlobalEconomics - BHP, discoveries, resources, costs, Trends, diamonds mentioned
DS1992-0130
1992
Blain, C.F.Blain, C.F.Is exploration becoming cost effective?Australian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (AusIMM) Bulletin, No. 7, December pp. 48-55AustraliaEconomics, Exploration
DS1993-0129
1993
Blain, L.Blain, L.The challenge of analytical method selectionSociety for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME) Meeting held February 15-18, 1993 in Reno, Nevada, Reprint No. 93-112, 7pGlobalGeochemistry, Assays, analyses
DS202012-2205
2020
Blaine, J.Blaine, J.Kalahari meanderings The Falcinbridge diamond exploration story Botswana 1975-1988. https://youtu.be /07lKCVFT7LE , Oct. ppt presentationAfrica, BotswanaFalconbridge history

Abstract: 22 October 2020 Overberg Geoscientists Group talk by John Blaine
DS1991-0336
1991
Blaine, J.L.Daniels, L.R.M., Jennings, C.M.H., Lee, F.E., Blaine, J.L.The geology of the M1 kimberlite, southern BotswanaProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 58-59BotswanaExploration, Kimberlite
DS1994-0371
1994
Blaine, J.L.Daniels, L.R.M., Jennings, C.M.H., Lee, J.E., Blaine, J.L., Billington, F.R.The geology of crater volcanics and sediments associated with the M1kimberlite, southwest Botswana.Proceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 1, pp. 129-139.BotswanaKimberlite, Deposit -M1
DS200912-0431
2009
Blaine, J.L.Lee, J.E., Jennings, C.M.H., Blaine, J.L.The GOPE 25 kimberlite discovery, Botswana, predicated on four ilmenite grains from reconnaissance soil samples: a case history.Explore, No. 143, June pp. 1-7.Africa, BotswanaCase history - GOPE 25
DS1980-0065
1980
Blair, G.Blair, G.Diamonds of the Wyoming OutbackLapidary Journal, Vol. 34, No. 2, PP. 496-498.United States, Wyoming, Colorado Plateau, State Line, Rocky MountainsProspecting
DS1985-0060
1985
Blair, K.P.Berendsen, P., Blair, K.P.The Control of Basement Related Faults on the Localization Of Hydrocarbons and Minerals Central Kansas.6th. International Conference Basement Tectonics, Held Sante Fe Septemb, P. 9. (abstract.).United States, Central States, KansasGeotectonics, Rift
DS1988-0061
1988
Blair, K.P.Blair, K.P., Berendsen, P.Structures associated with the Rose and Silver Citydomes, Wilson and Woodson counties, KansasGeological Society of America (GSA) Guidebook Fieldtrip, Berendsen, P. ed. Cretaceous, pp. 11-15KansasLamproite, Structure
DS1989-0107
1989
Blair, K.P.Berendsen, P., Blair, K.P.Geology of the mid-continent rift, northern KansasGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstract Volume, Vol. 21, No. 4, p. 4. (abstract.)GlobalTectonics
DS1989-0124
1989
Blair, K.P.Blair, K.P., Berendsen, P.Subsurface structural geology of the Joplin QuadrangleUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open file, United States Geological Survey (USGS)-Missouri G.S. Symp: Mineral resource potential of, p. 3. (abstract.)KansasTectonics
DS1994-0169
1994
Blair, T.C.Blair, T.C., McPherson, J.G.Alluvial fans and their natural distinction from rivers based onmorphology, hydraulic, sedimentary and faciesJournal of Sedimentary Research, Vol. A64, No. 3, July, pp. 450-489GlobalAlluvial fans, rivers, Geomorphology, Sedimentology, hydraulic, facies
DS1997-0363
1997
Blais, A.Fulton, R.J., Sun, S., Blais, A.Southern Prairies NATMAP project: surficial geology of Virden map sheetGeological Survey of Canada Forum 1997 abstracts, p. 21. AbstractAlberta, Saskatchewan, ManitobaNATMAP, Till
DS1997-0364
1997
Blais, A.Fulton, R.J., Thorleifson, L.H., Blais, A., Matile, S.S.Southern Prairies NATMAP project: a summary reportGeological Survey of Canada Forum 1997 abstracts, p. 6. AbstractGlobalSurficial geology
DS1991-1742
1991
Blais, S.Tourpin, S., Gruau, G., Blais, S., Fourcade, S.Resetting of rare earth elements (REE) and neodymium and Strontium isotopes during carbonization of a komatiite flow from FinlandChemical Geology, Vol. 90, No. 1-2 March 25, pp. 15-30FinlandKomatiite, Alteration
DS1991-1743
1991
Blais, S.Tourpin, S., Gruau, G., Blais, S., Fourcade, S.Resetting of rare earth elements (REE) and neodymium and StrontiumChemical Geology, Vol. 90, No. 1-2 March 25, pp. 15-30FinlandKomatiite, Alteration
DS202012-2249
2020
Blake, A.R.Schmetzer, K., Martayan, G., Blake, A.R.History of the Chivor emerald mine, part 2 ( 1924-1970): between insolvency and viability.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 56, 2, summer pp. 230-257. pdfSouth America, Columbiadeposit - Chivor

Abstract: The history of the Chivor emerald mine in Colombia is a saga with countless twists and turns, involving parties from across the globe. Indigenous people initially exploited the property, followed by the Spanish in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, before abandonment set in for 200 years. The mine was rediscovered by Francisco Restrepo in the 1880s, and ownership over the ensuing decades passed through several Colombian owners and eventually to an American company, the Colombian Emerald Syndicate, Ltd., with an intervening but unsuccessful attempt by a German group organized by Fritz Klein to take control. With the Colombian Emerald Syndicate succumbing to bankruptcy in 1923, the property was sold and then transferred in 1924 to another American firm, the Colombia Emerald Development Corporation. Under the new ownership, stock market speculation played a far more prominent role in the story than actual mining. Nonetheless, periods of more productive mining operations did take place under managers Peter W. Rainier and Russell W. Anderton. Yet these were not enough to prevent the company, renamed Chivor Emerald Mines, Inc. in 1933, from entering insolvency in 1952 and being placed into receivership. Leadership by Willis Frederick Bronkie enabled the firm to regain independence in 1970 and shortly thereafter to be sold in a series of transactions, with Chivor gradually being returned to Colombian interests.
DS1988-0062
1988
Blake, D.F.Blake, D.F., Freund, F., et al.The nature and origin of interstellar diamondNature, Vol. 332, No. 6165, April 14, pp. 611-613GlobalBlank
DS1975-0374
1976
Blake, D.H.Page, R.W., Blake, D.H., Mahon, M.W.Geochronology and Related Aspects of Acid Volcanics Associated Granites, and Other Proterozoic Rocks of the Granites-tanami Region.B.m.r. Journal of Aust. Geol. Geophys., Vol. 1, PP. 1-13.AustraliaKimberlite, Regional Geology
DS1995-0157
1995
Blake, K.L.Blake, K.L., Duckworth, R.C.Mineralization styles in the Proterozoic of SwedenShort Course Metallogeny of Proterozoic Basins, 37pSwedenMetallogeny, Proterozoic
DS1970-0880
1974
Blake, M.C.Blake, M.C., Jones, D.L.Origin of Franciscan Melanges in Northern CaliforniaSoc. Econ. Paleontologists And Mineralogists Spec. Publishing, No. 19, PP. 345-357.CaliforniaKimberlite
DS1960-1069
1969
Blake, M.C.JR.Bailey, E.H., Blake, M.C.JR.Tectonic Development of Western California in the Late Mezozoic ; Article 2, Metamorphism and its Relationship with Regional Tectonics.Geotectonics, No. 4, PP. 225-230.CaliforniaKimberlite
DS1989-1047
1989
Blake, M.C.Jr.Moore, D.E., Blake, M.C.Jr.New evidence for polyphase metamorphism of glaucophane schist and eclogite exotic blocks in the FranciscanComplex, California and OregonJournal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 7, No. 2, March pp. 211-228California, OregonEclogite
DS1991-0177
1991
Blake, R.Brink, S., Saini-Eidukat, B., Earley, D.III, Blake, R.Application of petrographic techniques to assess in situ leaching miningpotentialUnited States Bureau of Mines I.C., No. IC 9295, 14pUnited StatesMining -in-situ, Petrography
DS1990-0883
1990
Blake, S.Koyaguchi, T., Blake, S.The dynamics of magma mixing in a rising magma batchBulletin. Volcanology, Vol. 52, No. 2, December pp. 127-137GlobalMagma, Dynamics -mixing magma
DS200812-1036
2008
Blake, S.Self, S., Blake, S.Consequences of explosive supereruptions.Elements, Vol. 4, 1, Feb. pp. 41-46.MantleMagmatism
DS1999-0043
1999
Blake, T.S.Barley, M.E., Blake, T.S., Groves, D.I.The Mount Bruce megasequence set and eastern Yilgarn Craton: examples of late Archean and Early ProterozoicPrecambrian Research, Vol. 58, pp. 55-70.AustraliaCraton - Pilbara
DS2003-1342
2003
Blake, T.S.Strik, G., Blake, T.S., Zegers, T.E., White, S.H., Langereis, C.G.Paleomagnetism of flood basalts in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia: Late ArcheanJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, No. B 12, Dec. 3, 10.1029/2003JB002475AustraliaGeophysics - paleomagnetics, tectonics
DS200412-1937
2003
Blake, T.S.Strik, G., Blake, T.S., Zegers, T.E., White, S.H., Langereis, C.G.Paleomagnetism of flood basalts in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia: Late Archean continental drift and the oldest known reJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, No. B 12, Dec. 3, 10.1029/2003 JB002475AustraliaGeophysics - paleomagnetics, tectonics
DS1960-0324
1963
Blake, W.Blake, W.Notes on Glacial Geology, Northeastern District of MackenzieGeological Survey of Canada (GSC) Paper, No. 63-23, 12p.Northwest TerritoriesGeomorphology
DS1859-0124
1858
Blake, W.P.Blake, W.P.Report on the Gold Placers of Lumpkin County, Georgia and The Practicality of Working Them by Hydraulic Method.New York: J.f. Trow Publishing, 39P.United States, Georgia, AppalachiaDiamond Occurrence
DS1859-0127
1859
Blake, W.P.Blake, W.P.The Gold Placers in the Vicinity of Dahlonega GeorgiaBoston:, 63P.United States, Georgia, AppalachiaDiamond Occurrence
DS1860-0026
1866
Blake, W.P.Blake, W.P.Annotated Catalogue of the Principal Mineral Species Hitherto Recognized in California.Sacramento: Private Publishing, 31P.United States, California, West Coast, MontanaGemology
DS1860-0587
1888
Blake, W.P.Blake, W.P.Diamond MinesEngineering and Mining Journal, Vol. 45, P. 473. JUNE 30TH.Africa, South AfricaDiamond recovery
DS2003-0583
2003
Blakely, R.Hildenbrand, T.G., Keller, R.G., Blakely, R., Hinze, W.J.Need for a U.S. high altitude magnetic surveyGeological Society of America, Annual Meeting Nov. 2-5, Abstracts p. 446.United StatesGeophysics
DS200412-0827
2003
Blakely, R.Hildenbrand, T.G., Keller, R.G., Blakely, R., Hinze, W.J.Need for a U.S. high altitude magnetic survey.Geological Society of America, Annual Meeting Nov. 2-5, Abstracts p. 446.United StatesGeophysics
DS1960-0595
1965
Blakely, R.F.Rudman, A.J., Blakely, R.F.A Geophysical Study of a Basement Anomaly in IndianaGeophysics, Vol. 30, No. 5, PP. 740-761.GlobalMid-continent, Geophysics
DS1993-1371
1993
Blakely, R.J.Saltus, R.W., Blakely, R.J.HYPERMAG: an interactive 2 and 1 1/2 dimensional gravity and magnetic modeling program, version 3.5United States Geological Survey (USGS) Open file, No. 93-0287, 39p. $ 6.00GlobalComputer, Program -HYPERMAG
DS1996-0629
1996
Blakely, R.J.Hildenbrand, T.G., Blakely, R.J., Hinze, W.J., et al.Aeromagnetic survey over the U.S. to advance geomagnetic researchEos, Vol. 77, No. 28, July 9, pp. 265, 268United StatesGeophysics -aeromagnetics, Brief overview
DS2001-0984
2001
Blakely, R.J.Romanyuk, T.V., Mooney, W.D., Blakely, R.J.Cascade subduction zone, North America: a tectono geophysical modelGeotectonics, Vol. 35, No. 3, pp. 224-44.OregonSubduction zones - not specific to diamonds
DS2002-1219
2002
Blakely, R.J.Parsons, T., Blakely, R.J., Brocher, T.M.A simple algorithm for sequentially incorporating gravity observations in seismic traveltime tomography.International Geology Review, Vol. 43,12,pp. 1073-86., Vol. 43,12,pp. 1073-86.Mantle, WashingtonTomography, Gardner's rule - not specific to diamonds
DS2002-1220
2002
Blakely, R.J.Parsons, T., Blakely, R.J., Brocher, T.M.A simple algorithm for sequentially incorporating gravity observations in seismic traveltime tomography.International Geology Review, Vol. 43,12,pp. 1073-86., Vol. 43,12,pp. 1073-86.Mantle, WashingtonTomography, Gardner's rule - not specific to diamonds
DS1975-0464
1977
Blakey, G.G.Blakey, G.G.The Diamond (1977)London: Paddington Press, 280P.GlobalKimberley, Mineralogy, Classification, Description
DS201112-0337
2011
Blakey, R.C.Frisch, W., Meschede, M., Blakey, R.C.Continental drift and mountain building.Springer, 180p. $ 79.95MantleBook - tectonics
DS1992-0131
1992
Blanc, A.Blanc, A., Bernard-Griffiths, J., Caby, R., Caruba, C., Caruba, R.uranium-lead (U-Pb) (U-Pb) dating and isotopic signature of the alkaline ring complexes of BouJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 14, No. 3, pp. 301-311GlobalAlkaline ring complexes, Geochronology
DS1997-1205
1997
Blanc, Ph.Verhulst, A., Demaiffe, D., Ohnenstetter, D., Blanc, Ph.Cathodluminescence petrography of carbonatites and associated alkaline silicate rocks from Kola Pen.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Abstracts, POSTER.Russia, Kola PeninsulaCarbonatite
DS1987-0619
1987
BlancaRodriquez, C.O., Casali, R.A., Blanca, ELPY, Cappanni, O.M.1st principle prediction of structural properties and pressure dependence of the charge density and energy gaps in diamondsPhys. St.-S-B., Vol. 143, No. 1, October pp. 539-548GlobalBlank
DS200712-0225
2006
Blancaert, M.De Corte, K., Anthonis, A., Van Royen, J., Blancaert, M., Barjon, J., Willems, B.Overview of dislocation networks in natural type IIa diamonds.Gems & Gemology, 4th International Symposium abstracts, Fall 2006, p.122-3. abstract onlyTechnologyDiamond Type IIa
DS1993-1558
1993
Blanchard, D.Sutton, S.R., Bajt, S., Rivers, M.L., Smith, J.V., Blanchard, D.X-ray microprobe determination of chromium oxidation state in olivine from lunar basalt and kimberlitic diamonds.Proceedings of the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, Vol. 24, pp. 1383-1384.GlobalGeochemistry, Microprobe
DS1987-0058
1987
Blanchard, D.P.Blanchard, D.P.Anorthosites show how crust formedGeotimes, Vol. 32, No. 6, June p. 21GlobalMantle genesis
DS1987-0343
1987
Blanchard, D.P.Kempton, P.D., Dungan, M.A., Blanchard, D.P.Petrology and geochemistry of xenolith bearing alkalic basalts from The geronimo Volcanic field, southeast Arizona, evidence for polybaric fractionation and implicatMantle metasomatism and alkaline magmatism, edited E. Mullen Morris and, No. 215, pp. 347-370ArizonaAnalyses p. 356-7-8
DS201810-2351
2018
Blanchard, I.Mahan, B., Siebert, J., Blanchard, I., Moynier, F.Investigating Earth's formation history through copper & sulfur metal silicate partitioning during core-mantle differentiation.Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, doi:10.1029/2018JB015991Mantlecore mantle boundary

Abstract: Experiments wherein molten metal and silicate (rock-building) phases un-mix themselves due to their physical properties, i.e. metal-silicate partitioning, can be conducted at the high temperatures and pressures (HP-HT) that characterized Earth's differentiation into a core and mantle. The redistribution of elements between the metal and silicate phases - their partitioning - during this process can be measured and mathematically described, then placed into numerical models to better understand Earth's formation history. Here, we have mathematically characterized the HP-HT partitioning of copper, combined this with results for sulfur from literature, and input these characterizations into numerical models that track their distribution between Earth's core and mantle as it grows to its present mass. Copper and sulfur were chosen because they display different sensitivities to the physical mechanisms that govern planetary formation, and we can leverage this to better understand Earth's formation and differentiation history. Our results indicate that ~75% of Earth's precursor materials grew incrementally from relatively small bits of material - on average ~0.1% of Earth's mass or less - that is most compositionally similar to meteorite classes that are made up of iron-rich metal and silicate solids (chondrules) that are depleted in easily vaporized (volatile) elements, especially sulfur.
DS201902-0258
2018
Blanchard, I.Badro, J., Aubert, J., Hirose, K., Nomura, R., Blanchard, I., Borensztajn, S., Siebert, J.Magnesium partitioning between Earth's mantle and core and its potential to drive an early exsolution geodynamo.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 45, 24, pp. 13,240-13,248.Mantlegeodynamics

Abstract: We measure the incorporation of magnesium oxide (one of the main components of Earth's mantle) into iron (the main constituent Earth's core), using extremely high pressure and temperature experiments that mimic the conditions of Earth's mantle and core. We find that magnesium oxide dissolution depends on temperature but not on pressure, and on metal (i.e., core) composition but not silicate (i.e., mantle) composition. Our findings support the idea that magnesium oxide dissolved in the core during its formation will precipitate out during subsequent core cooling. The precipitation should stir the entire core to produce a magnetic field in Earth's distant past, at least as intense as the present-day field.
DS202104-0585
2021
Blanchard, I.Kubik, E., Siebert, J., Blanchard, I., Agranier, A., Mahan, B., Moynier, F.Earth's volatile accretion as told by Cd, Bi, Sb and Ti core-mantle distribution.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, in press available, 35p. PdfMantlegeodynamics
DS201908-1776
2019
Blanchard, J.A.Ernst, R.E., Liikane, D.A., Jowitt, S.M., Buchan, K.L., Blanchard, J.A.A new plumbing system framework for mantle plume related continental large igneous provinces and their mafic ultramafic intrusions.Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, in press available 34p. PdfGlobalmantle plumes, hotspots

Abstract: The magmatic components of continental Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) include flood basalts and their plumbing system of giant mafic dyke swarms (radiating, linear, and the recently discovered circumferential type), mafic sill provinces, a lower crustal magmatic underplate, mafic-ultramafic (M-UM) intrusions, associated silicic magmatism, and associated carbonatites and kimberlites. This paper proposes a new plumbing system framework for mantle plume-related continental LIPs that incorporates all of these components, and provides a context for addressing key thematic aspects such as tracking magma batches "upstream" and "downstream" and their geochemical evolution, assessing the setting of M-UM intrusions and their economic potential, interpreting deep magmatic component identified by geophysical signatures, and estimating magnitudes of extrusive and intrusive components with climate change implications. This plumbing system model, and its associated implications, needs to be tested against the rapidly improving LIP record.
DS200412-0160
2004
Blanchard, M.Blanchard, M., Ingrin, J.Kinetics of deuteration in pyrope.European Journal of Mineralogy, Vol. 16, 4,pp. 567-576.TechnologyMineralogy
DS201910-2249
2019
Blanchard, M.Chasse, M., Blanchard, M., Cabareta, D., Juhin, A., Vantelon, D., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., Calas, G.Deciphering molecular-scale mechanisms covering scandium dynamics in the critical zone. Goldschmidt2019, in press available, 71 ppt.Australialaterites

Abstract: Scandium is often considered as immobile during chemical weathering, based on its low solubility. In contrast to other conservative (i.e. relatively immobile) elements incorporated into accessory minerals resistant to weathering (e.g. zirconium, thorium or niobium), the scarcity of scandium minerals indicates that the processes accounting for scandium's immobilisation are distinctive. However, the evolution of scandium speciation during weathering is unknown, limiting the understanding of the processes controlling its dynamics in the critical zone. Exceptional scandium concentrations in east Australian laterites provide the possibility of unravelling these mechanisms. We follow scandium speciation through thick lateritic profiles (> 30 m) using a multiscale mineralogical and spectroscopic approach involving electron microprobe, laser-ablation--inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, selective leaching and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, complemented by mass-transfer calculations. We show that the initial reservoir of scandium contained in the parent rock is preserved under reducing conditions occurring in the lowest horizons of the profiles. The dissolution of scandium-bearing clinopyroxene generates smectitic clays that immobilise and concentrate scandium. It is subsequently trapped in the lateritic duricrust by goethite. Scandium mobilisation appears in this horizon and increases upward as a result of the dissolution of goethite, possibly assisted by dissolved organic matter, and the precipitation of hematite. Molecular-scale analyses demonstrate that changes in speciation govern scandium dynamics, with substitution in smectitic clays and adsorption on iron oxyhydroxides playing a crucial role in scandium immobility in the saprolite and lower lateritic duricrust. The higher affinity of scandium for goethite relative to hematite drives scandium mobilisation in the upper lateritic duricrust, leading to its concentration downward in the lower lateritic duricrust. These successive mechanisms illustrate how the unique complexity of the critical zone leads to scandium concentrations that may form new types of world-class scandium deposits. Comparison with conservative elements and with rare-earth elements, expected to have similar geochemical properties, emphasizes the unique behaviour of scandium in the critical zone. While scandium remains immobile during the early stages of weathering, intense and long-term alteration processes, observed in lateritic contexts, lead to scandium mobilisation. This study highlights the dependence of scandium mobility on weathering conditions.
DS202004-0503
2020
Blanchard, M.Chasse, M., Blanchard, M., Cabaret, D., Vantelon, D., Juan, A., Calas, G.First principles modeling of X-ray absorption spectra enlightens the process of scandium sequestration by iron oxides.American Mineralogist, Vol. 105, 7, 10.2138/am-2020-730Globalscandium

Abstract: Scandium is often associated with iron oxides in the environment. Despite the use of scandium as a geochemical tracer and the existence of world-class supergene deposits, uncertainties on speciation obscure the processes governing its sequestration and concentration. Here, we use first-principles approaches to interpret experimental K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra of scandium either incorporated in or adsorbed on goethite and hematite, at concentrations relevant for the environment. This modeling helps to interpret the characteristic spectral features, providing key information to determine scandium speciation when associated with iron oxides. We show that scandium is substituted into iron oxides at low concentration without modifying the crystal structure. When scandium is adsorbed onto iron oxide surfaces, the process occurs through outer-sphere complexation with a reduction in the coordination number of the hydration shell. Considering available X-ray absorption spectra from laterites, the present results confirm that scandium adsorption onto iron oxides is the dominant mechanism of sequestration in these geochemical conditions. This speciation explains efficient scandium recovery through mild metallurgical treatments of supergene lateritic ores. The specificities of scandium sorption mechanisms are related to the preservation of adsorbed scandium in million-years old laterites. These results demonstrate the emerging ability to precisely model fine X-ray absorption spectral features of trace metals associated with mineral phases relevant to the environment. It opens new perspectives to accurately determine trace metals speciation from high-resolution spatially-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy in order to constrain the molecular mechanisms controlling their dynamics.
DS1960-0924
1968
Blanchard, R.Blanchard, R.Interpretation of Leached OutcropsNevada Bureau of Mines, Bulletin 66, 180pNevadaWeathering, Book -table Of Contents
DS1991-0599
1991
Blanchard, Y.B.Grasty, R.L., Holman, P.B., Blanchard, Y.B.Transportable calibration pads for ground and airborne gamma rayspectrometersGeological Survey of Canada Paper, No. 90-23, 25pCanadaSpectrometry, Program -PADWIN.
DS2001-0097
2001
BlanchiniBeccaluva, L., Blanchini, Coltori, Perkins, Siena, et al.Multistage evolution of the European lithospheric mantle: new evidence from Sardinian peridotite xenolithContribution Mineralogy Petrology, Vol. 142, No. 3, pp. 284-97.Sardinia, EuropePeridotite xenoliths
DS201708-1567
2017
Blanchini, G.Blanchini, G., Bodinier, J-L., Braga, R., Wilson, M.The crust mantle and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundaries: insights from xenoliths, orogenic deep sections, and geophysical studies. 2 Chapters citedGeological Society of London, book - cost approx. 43 lbsMantlexenoliths
DS1982-0319
1982
Bland, A.E.Keller, G.R., Bland, A.E., Greenberg, J.K.Evidence for a Major Late Precambrian Tectonic Event (rifting?) in the Eastern Midcontinent Region, United States.Tectonics, Vol. 1, No. 2, PP. 213-223.GlobalMid-continent, Peralkaline
DS201809-2046
2018
Bland, P.A.Johnson, T.E., Gardiner, N.J., Miljkovic, K., Spencer, C.J., Kirkland, C.L., Bland, P.A., Smithies, R.H.Are Earth's oldest felsic rocks impact melts? Acasta Gneiss ComplexGoldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractCanada, Northwest Territoriesmeteorite

Abstract: Earth’s oldest felsic rocks, the 4.02 billion-year-old Idiwhaa gneisses of the Acasta Gneiss Complex, northwest Canada, have compositions that are distinct from the felsic rocks that typify Earth’s ancient continental nuclei, implying they formed through a different process. Using phase equilibria and trace element modelling, we show that the Idiwhaa gneisses were produced by partial melting of ironrich amphibolite host rocks at very low pressures, equating to the uppermost ~3 km of mafic crust. The heat required for such shallow melting is most easily explained through meteorite impacts. Hydrodynamic impact modelling shows that, not only is this scenario physically plausible, but the region of shallow melting appropriate to formation of the Idiwhaa gneisses would have been widespread. Given the predicted high flux of meteorites during the late Hadean, impact melting may have been the predominant mechanism that generated Hadean felsic rocks.
DS201811-2561
2018
Bland, P.A.Cox, M.A., Cavosie, A.J., Bland, P.A., Miljkovic, K., Wingate, M.T.D.Microstructural dynamics of central uplifts: reidite offset by zircon twins at the Woodleigh impact structure, Australia.Geology, doi.org/10.1130/G45127.1 4p.Australiacrater

Abstract: Impact cratering is a dynamic process that is violent and fast. Quantifying processes that accommodate deformation at different scales during central uplift formation in complex impact structures is therefore a challenging task. The ability to correlate mineral deformation at the microscale with macroscale processes provides a critical link in helping to constrain extreme crustal behavior during meteorite impact. Here we describe the first high-pressure-phase-calibrated chronology of shock progression in zircon from a central uplift. We report both shock twins and reidite, the high-pressure ZrSiO4 polymorph, in zircon from shocked granitic gneiss drilled from the center of the >60-km-diameter Woodleigh impact structure in Western Australia. The key observation is that in zircon grains that contain reidite, which forms at >30 GPa during the crater compression stage, the reidite domains are systematically offset by later-formed shock deformation twins (~20 GPa) along extensional planar microstructures. The {112} twins are interpreted to record crustal extension and uplift caused by the rarefaction wave during crater excavation. These results provide the first physical evidence that relates the formation sequence of both a high-pressure phase and a diagnostic shock microstructure in zircon to different cratering stages with unique stress regimes that are predicted by theoretical and numerical models. These microstructural observations thus provide new insight into central uplift formation, one of the least-understood processes during complex impact crater formation, which can produce many kilometers of vertically uplifted bedrock in seconds.
DS201811-2582
2018
Bland, P.A.Johnson, T.E., Gardiner, N.J., Miljkovic, K., Spencer, C.J., Kirkland, C.L., Bland, P.A., Smithies, H.An impact melt origin for Earth's oldest known evolved rocks. Acasta GneissNature Geoscience, Vol. 11, pp. 795-799.Canada, Northwest Territoriesmelting

Abstract: Earth’s oldest evolved (felsic) rocks, the 4.02-billion-year-old Idiwhaa gneisses of the Acasta Gneiss Complex, northwest Canada, have compositions that are distinct from the felsic rocks that typify Earth’s ancient continental nuclei, implying that they formed through a different process. Using phase equilibria and trace element modelling, we show that the Idiwhaa gneisses were produced by partial melting of iron-rich hydrated basaltic rocks (amphibolites) at very low pressures, equating to the uppermost ~3?km of a Hadean crust that was dominantly mafic in composition. The heat required for partial melting at such shallow levels is most easily explained through meteorite impacts. Hydrodynamic impact modelling shows not only that this scenario is physically plausible, but also that the region of shallow partial melting appropriate to formation of the Idiwhaa gneisses would have been widespread. Given the predicted high flux of meteorites in the late Hadean, impact melting may have been the predominant mechanism that generated Hadean felsic rocks.
DS1860-0177
1872
Blanford, W.T.Blanford, W.T.Notes on the Sandstones of the Godavari Valley, GolapolIndia Geological Survey Records, Vol. 5, PT. 1. P. 27.India, GolcondaDiamond Occurrence
DS1860-0653
1890
Blanford, W.T.Blanford, W.T.The Anniversary Address of the PresidentQuarterly Journal of Geological Society, Vol. 46, PP. 43-110.Africa, South Africa, South America, BrazilTectonics
DS201212-0262
2012
Blangy, S.Grimwood, B.S.R., Doubleday, N.C., Ljubicic, G.J., Donaldson, S.G., Blangy, S.Engaged acclimatization: towards responsible community based participatory research in Nunavut.Canadian Geographer, in press availableCanada, NunavutCSR - neologism
DS201112-0811
2011
BlankPolyakov, S.N., Denisov, V.N., Kuzmin, N.V., Kuznetsov, M.S., Martyushov, S.Yu., Nosukhin, Terentiev, BlankCharacterization of top quality type IIa synthetic diamonds for new x-ray optics.Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 20, no. 5-6m pp. 726-728.TechnologyDiamond - synthesis applications
DS1920-0429
1929
Blank, E.W.Blank, E.W.Diamonds in the United States; 1929Rocks And Minerals, Vol. 4, PP. 37-40.United States, Great Lakes, Gulf Coast, West Coast, Rocky MountainsDiamond Occurrence
DS1930-0056
1931
Blank, E.W.Blank, E.W.Arkansaw Has Yielded Some Fine DiamondsNational Jeweller., Vol. 27, JANUARY PP. 44-46.United States, Gulf Coast, Arkansas, PennsylvaniaBlank
DS1930-0102
1932
Blank, E.W.Blank, E.W.The Synthesis of the DiamondRocks And Minerals, Vol. 7, P. 143.GlobalSynthetic Diamond
DS1930-0152
1934
Blank, E.W.Blank, E.W.Diamonds in KentuckyRocks And Minerals, Vol. 9, No. 11, PP. 163-164.Appalachia, KentuckyDiamond Occurrence
DS1930-0153
1934
Blank, E.W.Blank, E.W.Diamond Finds in the United States #1Rocks And Minerals, Vol. 9, PP. 10-12; PP. 23-26; PP. 29-40; PP. 147-150; PP. 16United States, Great Lakes, Appalachia, Kentucky, North Carolina, AlabamaDiamond Occurrences, History
DS1930-0184
1935
Blank, E.W.Blank, E.W.Diamond Finds in the United States #2Rocks And Minerals, Vol. 10, PP. 7-10; PP. 23-26; PP. 39-40.United States, Gulf Coast, Arkansas, Great LakesDiamond Occurrence
DS1990-0210
1990
Blank, H.R.Blank, H.R., Kucks, R.P.Preliminary aeromagnetic, gravity and generalized geologic maps of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Basin and Range-Colorado plateau transition zone study area in southwestUtah, NevadaUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 89-0432, 16p. 3 oversize sheets 1: 250, 000Colorado Plateau, UtahGeophysics -magnetics, gravity, Map
DS202103-0400
2021
Blank, V.Popov, M., Bondarenko, M., Kulnitskiy, B., Zholudev, S., Blank, V., Terentyev, S.Impulse laser cutting of diamond accompanied by phase transitions to fullerene -type onion.Diamond & Related Materials, Vol. 113, 108281, 6p. PdfGlobalraman spectroscopy
DS200712-0082
2007
Blank, V.D.Blank, V.D., Kuznetsov, M.S., Nosukhin, S.A., Terentiev, S.A., Denisov, V.N.The influence of crystallization temperature and boron concentration in growth environment on its distribution in growth sectors of type IIb diamond.Diamond and Related Materials, Vol. 16, 4-7, pp. 800-804.TechnologyType II diamond
DS200812-0725
2008
Blank, V.D.Mavrin, S.A., Denisov, V.N., Popova, D.M., Skryleva, Kuznetsov, Nosukhin, Terentiev, Blank,V.D.Boron distribution in the subsurface region of heavily doped IIb type diamond.Physics and Chemistry of the Earth Parts A,B,C, Vol. 372, 21, pp. 3914-3918.TechnologyType IIb diamonds
DS201901-0008
2018
Blank, V.D.Blank, V.D., Churkin, V.D., Kulnitsky, B.A., Perezhogin, I.A., Kirichenko, A.N., Erohin, S.V., Sorokin, P.B., Popov, M.Y.Pressure induced transformation of graphite and diamond to onions.Crystals MDPI, Vol. 8, 2, 8p. Doi.org/10.3390/cryst8020068Russiacarbon nanotubes

Abstract: In this study, we present a number of experiments on the transformation of graphite, diamond, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes under high pressure conditions. The analysis of our results testifies to the instability of diamond in the 55-115 GPa pressure range, at which onion-like structures are formed. The formation of interlayer sp3-bonds in carbon nanostructures with a decrease in their volume has been studied theoretically. It has been found that depending on the structure, the bonds between the layers can be preserved or broken during unloading.
DS1995-0392
1995
Blankenburg, F.Von.Davies, J.H., Blankenburg, F.Von.Slab breakoff: a model of lithosphere detachment and magmatism and deformation of collisional orogensEarth Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 129, No. 1-4, Jan. pp. 85-102MantleSudbduction, Tectonics, orogeny
DS202102-0175
2020
Blanks, D.E.Blanks, D.E., Holwell, D.A., Fiorentini, M.L., Moroni, M., Giuliani, A., Tassara, S., Gonzales-Jiminez, J.M., Boyce, A.J., Ferrari, E.Fluxing of mantle carbon as a physical agent for metallogenic fertilization of the crust.Nature Communications, doi.org/10.1038/ s41467-020-18157-6 11p. Pdf Mantlecarbon

Abstract: Magmatic systems play a crucial role in enriching the crust with volatiles and elements that reside primarily within the Earth’s mantle, including economically important metals like nickel, copper and platinum-group elements. However, transport of these metals within silicate magmas primarily occurs within dense sulfide liquids, which tend to coalesce, settle and not be efficiently transported in ascending magmas. Here we show textural observations, backed up with carbon and oxygen isotope data, which indicate an intimate association between mantle-derived carbonates and sulfides in some mafic-ultramafic magmatic systems emplaced at the base of the continental crust. We propose that carbon, as a buoyant supercritical CO2 fluid, might be a covert agent aiding and promoting the physical transport of sulfides across the mantle-crust transition. This may be a common but cryptic mechanism that facilitates cycling of volatiles and metals from the mantle to the lower-to-mid continental crust, which leaves little footprint behind by the time magmas reach the Earth’s surface.
DS1992-1427
1992
Blanpied, M.L.Sleep, N.H., Blanpied, M.L.Creep, compaction and the weak rheology of major faultsNature, Vol. 359, No. 6397, October 22, pp. 687-692GlobalStructure, Fault
DS1987-0442
1987
Blarez, E.Mascle, J., Blarez, E.Evidence for transform margin evolution from the Ivory Coast Ghanacontinental marginNature, Vol.326, No. 6111, March 26, pp. 378-380GhanaWest Africa, Craton
DS1988-0443
1988
Blarez, E.Mascle, J., Blarez, E., Marinho, M.The shallow structures of the Guinea and Ivory Coast-Ghana transformmargins: their bearing on the equatorial Atlantic Mesozoic evolutionTectonophysics, Vol. 155, No. 1-4, Dec. 1, pp. 193-210GhanaStructure
DS2002-1025
2002
Blass, U.McCammon, C.A., Beccero, A.I., Lauterbach, S., Blass, U., Marion, S.Oxygen vacancies in perovskite and related structures: implications for the lower mantle.Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, Vol. 718, pp. 109-114. Ingenta 1025440383MantlePerovskite
DS1920-0325
1927
Blatchford, T.Blatchford, T.The Geology of Portions of the Kimberley Division with Special Reference to the Fitzroy Basin and the Possibilities of The Occurrence of Minerals and Oil.Western Australia Geological Survey Bulletin, No. 93. PP. 20-21.Australia, Western AustraliaLeucite, Lamproite
DS1900-0053
1901
Blatchley, W.S.Blatchley, W.S.Diamond Reported in 1876-1877 Near MorgantownLetter To G.f. Kunz, APRIL 1ST.United States, Indiana, Great LakesDiamond Occurrence
DS1900-0309
1905
Blatchley, W.S.Blatchley, W.S.Diamond in Indiana. #1Letter To G.f. Kunz, JUNE 24TH.United States, Indiana, Great LakesDiamond Occurrence, Diamonds Notable
DS1960-0325
1963
Blatchley, W.S.Blatchley, W.S.Gold and Diamonds in IndianaIndiana Geological Survey Annual Report, No. 27, 51P.GlobalDiamond Occurrence
DS1982-0184
1982
Blatt, H.Ehlers, E.G., Blatt, H.Carbonatites, Kimberlites and Related RocksSan Francisco: W.h. Freeman, Petrology -igneous, Sedimentary, PP. 240-244.GlobalGenesis
DS1994-1049
1994
Blatt, H.Loomis, J., Weaver, B., Blatt, H.Geochemistry of Mississippian tuffs from the Ouachita Mountains, implications for tectonics Ouachita orogenGeological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 106, No. 9, Sept. pp. 1158-1171.Arkansas, OklahomaTectonics, Ouachita Orogen
DS201707-1377
2017
Blatter, D.Turner, M., Turner, S., Blatter, D., Maury, R., Perfit, M., Yogodzinski, G.Water contents of clinopyroxenes from sub-arc mantle peridotitesIsland Arc, in press available 2p.Europe, Francemassif

Abstract: One poorly constrained reservoir of the Earth's water budget is that of clinopyroxene in metasomatised, mantle peridotites. This study presents reconnaissance Sensitive High-Resolution, Ion Microprobe–Stable Isotope (SHRIMP–SI) determinations of the H2O contents of (dominantly) clinopyroxenes in rare mantle xenoliths from four different subduction zones, i.e. Mexico, Kamchatka, Philippines, and New Britain (Tabar-Feni island chain) as well as one intra-plate setting (western Victoria). All of the sub-arc xenoliths have been metasomatised and carry strong arc trace element signatures. Average measured H2O contents of the pyroxenes range from 70 ppm to 510?ppm whereas calculated bulk H2O contents range from 88 ppm to 3?737?ppm if the variable presence of amphibole is taken into account. In contrast, the intra-plate, continental mantle xenolith from western Victoria has higher water contents (3?447?ppm) but was metasomatised by alkali and/or carbonatitic melts and does not carry a subduction-related signature. Material similar to the sub-arc peridotites can either be accreted to the base of the lithosphere or potentially be transported by convection deeper into the mantle where it will lose water due to amphibole breakdown.
DS1998-0132
1998
Blatter, D.L.Blatter, D.L., Carmichael, S.E.Hornblende peridotite xenoliths from central Mexico reveal highly oxidized nature of subarc upper mantle.Geology, Vol. 26, No. 11, Nov. pp. 1035-38.MexicoXenoliths
DS201702-0196
2016
Blattler, C.L.Blattler, C.L., Kump, L.R., Fischer, W.W., Paris, G., Kasbohm, J.J.Constraints on ocean carbonate chemistry and pco2 in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 10, pp. 41-45.GlobalGeochemistry

Abstract: One of the great problems in the history of Earth’s climate is how to reconcile evidence for liquid water and habitable climates on early Earth with the Faint Young Sun predicted from stellar evolution models. Possible solutions include a wide range of atmospheric and oceanic chemistries, with large uncertainties in boundary conditions for the evolution and diversification of life and the role of the global carbon cycle in maintaining habitable climates. Increased atmospheric CO2 is a common component of many solutions, but its connection to the carbon chemistry of the ocean remains unknown. Here we present calcium isotope data spanning the period from 2.7 to 1.9 billion years ago from evaporitic sedimentary carbonates that can test this relationship. These data, from the Tumbiana Formation, the Campbellrand Platform and the Pethei Group, exhibit limited variability. Such limited variability occurs in marine environments with a high ratio of calcium to carbonate alkalinity. We are therefore able to rule out soda ocean conditions during this period of Earth history. We further interpret this and existing data to provide empirical constraints for carbonate chemistry of the ancient oceans and for the role of CO2 in compensating for the Faint Young Sun.
DS202109-1472
2021
Blattler, C.L.Hoffman, P.F., Halverson, G.P., Schrag, D.P., Higgins, J.A., Domack, E.W., Macdonald, F.A., Pruss, S.B., Blattler, C.L., Crockford, P.W., Hodgin, E.B., Bellefroid, E.J., Johnson, B.W., Hodgskiss, M.S.W., Lamothe, K.G., LoBianco, S.J.C., Busch, J.F., HowesSnowballs in Africa: sectioning a long-lived Neoproterozoic carbonate platform and its bathyal foreslope ( NW Namibia). (Octavi Group)Earth Science Reviews , Vol. 219, 103616 231p. PdfAfrica, NamibiaCraton - Congo

Abstract: Otavi Group is a 1.5-3.5-km-thick epicontinental marine carbonate succession of Neoproterozoic age, exposed in an 800-km-long Ediacaran-Cambrian fold belt that rims the SW cape of Congo craton in northern Namibia. Along its southern margin, a contiguous distally tapered foreslope carbonate wedge of the same age is called Swakop Group. Swakop Group also occurs on the western cratonic margin, where a crustal-scale thrust cuts out the facies transition to the platformal Otavi Group. Subsidence accommodating Otavi Group resulted from S-N crustal stretching (770-655?Ma), followed by post-rift thermal subsidence (655-600?Ma). Rifting under southern Swakop Group continued until 650-635?Ma, culminating with breakup and a S-facing continental margin. No hint of a western margin is evident in Otavi Group, suggesting a transform margin to the west, kinematically consistent with S-N plate divergence. Rift-related peralkaline igneous activity in southern Swakop Group occurred around 760 and 746?Ma, with several rift-related igneous centres undated. By comparison, western Swakop Group is impoverished in rift-related igneous rocks. Despite low paleoelevation and paleolatitude, Otavi and Swakop groups are everywhere imprinted by early and late Cryogenian glaciations, enabling unequivocal stratigraphic division into five epochs (period divisions): (1) non-glacial late Tonian, 770-717?Ma; (2) glacial early Cryogenian/Sturtian, 717-661?Ma; (3) non-glacial middle Cryogenian, 661-646?±?5?Ma; (4) glacial late Cryogenian/Marinoan, 646?±?5-635?Ma; and (5) non-glacial early Ediacaran, 635-600?±?5?Ma. Odd numbered epochs lack evident glacioeustatic fluctuation; even numbered ones were the Sturtian and Marinoan snowball Earths. This study aimed to deconstruct the carbonate succession for insights on the nature of Cryogenian glaciations. It focuses on the well-exposed southwestern apex of the arcuate fold belt, incorporating 585?measured sections (totaling >190?km of strata) and?>?8764 pairs of d13C/d18Ocarb analyses (tabulated in Supplementary On-line Information). Each glaciation began and ended abruptly, and each was followed by anomalously thick ‘catch-up’ depositional sequences that filled accommodation space created by synglacial tectonic subsidence accompanied by very low average rates of sediment accumulation. Net subsidence was 38% larger on average for the younger glaciation, despite its 3.5-9.3-times shorter duration. Average accumulation rates were subequal, 4.0 vs 3.3-8.8?m Myr-1, despite syn-rift tectonics and topography during Sturtian glaciation, versus passive-margin subsidence during Marinoan. Sturtian deposits everywhere overlie an erosional disconformity or unconformity, with depocenters =1.6?km thick localized in subglacial rift basins, glacially carved bedrock troughs and moraine-like buildups. Sturtian deposits are dominated by massive diamictite, and the associated fine-grained laminated sediments appear to be local subglacial meltwater deposits, including a deep subglacial rift basin. No marine ice-grounding line is required in the 110 Sturtian measured sections in our survey. In contrast, the newly-opened southern foreslope was occupied by a Marinoan marine ice grounding zone, which became the dominant repository for glacial debris eroded from the upper foreslope and broad shallow troughs on the Otavi Group platform, which was glaciated but left nearly devoid of glacial deposits. On the distal foreslope, a distinct glacioeustatic falling-stand carbonate wedge is truncated upslope by a glacial disconformity that underlies the main lowstand grounding-zone wedge, which includes a proximal 0.60-km-high grounding-line moraine. Marinoan deposits are recessional overall, since all but the most distal overlie a glacial disconformity. The Marinoan glacial record is that of an early ice maximum and subsequent slow recession and aggradation, due to tectonic subsidence. Terminal deglaciation is recorded by a ferruginous drape of stratified diamictite, choked with ice-rafted debris, abruptly followed by a syndeglacial-postglacial cap-carbonate depositional sequence. Unlike its Sturtian counterpart, the post-Marinoan sequence has a well-developed basal transgressive (i.e., deepening-upward) cap dolomite (16.9?m regional average thickness, n?=?140) with idiosyncratic sedimentary features including sheet-crack marine cements, tubestone stromatolites and giant wave ripples. The overlying deeper-water calci-rhythmite includes crystal-fans of former aragonite benthic cement =90?m thick, localized in areas of steep sea-floor topography. Marinoan sequence stratigraphy is laid out over =0.6?km of paleobathymetric relief. Late Tonian shallow-neritic d13Ccarb records were obtained from the 0.4-km-thick Devede Fm (~770-760?Ma) in Otavi Group and the 0.7-km-thick Ugab Subgroup (~737-717?Ma) in Swakop Group. Devede Fm is isotopically heavy, +4-8‰ VPDB, and could be correlative with Backlundtoppen Fm (NE Svalbard). Ugab Subgroup post-dates 746?Ma volcanics and shows two negative excursions bridged by heavy d13C values. The negative excursions could be correlative with Russøya and Garvellach CIEs (carbon isotope excursions) in NE Laurentia. Middle Cryogenian neritic d13C records from Otavi Group inner platform feature two heavy plateaus bracketed by three negative excursions, correlated with Twitya (NW Canada), Taishir (Mongolia) and Trezona (South Australia) CIEs. The same pattern is observed in carbonate turbidites in distal Swakop Group, with the sub-Marinoan falling-stand wedge hosting the Trezona CIE recovery. Proximal Swakop Group strata equivalent to Taishir CIE and its subsequent heavy plateau are shifted bidirectionally to uniform values of +3.0-3.5‰. Early Ediacaran neritic d13C records from Otavi Group inner platform display a deep negative excursion associated with the post-Marinoan depositional sequence and heavy values (=?+?11‰) with extreme point-to-point variability (=10‰) in the youngest Otavi Group formation. Distal Swakop Group mimics older parts of the early Ediacaran inner platform d13C records, but after the post-Marinoan negative excursion, proximal Swakop Group values are shifted bidirectionally to +0.9?±?1.5‰. Destruction of positive and negative CIEs in proximal Swakop Group is tentatively attributed to early seawater-buffered diagenesis (dolomitization), driven by geothermal porewater convection that sucks seawater into the proximal foreslope of the platform. This hypothesis provocatively implies that CIEs originating in epi-platform waters and shed far downslope as turbidites are decoupled from open-ocean DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon), which is recorded by the altered proximal Swakop Group values closer to DIC of modern seawater. Carbonate sedimentation ended when the cratonic margins collided with and were overridden by the Atlantic coast-normal Northern Damara and coast-parallel Kaoko orogens at 0.60-0.58?Ga. A forebulge disconformity separates Otavi/Swakop Group from overlying foredeep clastics. In the cratonic cusp, where the orogens meet at a right angle, the forebulge disconformity has an astounding =1.85?km of megakarstic relief, and km-thick mass slides were displaced gravitationally toward both trenches, prior to orogenic shortening responsible for the craton-rimming fold belt.
DS200412-0161
2003
Blauer, E.Blauer, E.Mining at any cost.New York Diamonds, January pp. 40-47.Africa, NamibiaMining - abstract in Gems and Gemology Spring p. 75.
DS200412-0162
2003
Blauer, E.Blauer, E.One hundred years of digging. Premier mine.New York Diamonds, Vol. 76, May pp. 61-66.Africa, South AfricaHistory
DS1960-0425
1964
Bleackley, D.Bleackley, D., Workman, D.R.Reconnaissance Mineral Survey of BasutolandOverseas Geol. Institute Report, No. 3.LesothoDiamonds, Geology
DS1860-0017
1865
Bleasdale, J.J.Bleasdale, J.J.On Precious Stones in Victoria. Beechworth, CollingwoodTransactions of the Royal Society , Vol. 6, PP. 99-100.Australia, VictoriaDiamond Occurrence
DS1860-0027
1866
Bleasdale, J.J.Bleasdale, J.J.A Report on the Results of an Exhibition of Gems BeechwoodTransactions of the Royal Society , Vol. 7, PP. 67-68.Australia, VictoriaDiamond Occurrence
DS1860-0047
1867
Bleasdale, J.J.Bleasdale, J.J.Notes sur Les Gemmes et Les Pierres Precieuses Trouvees Dans Victoria.Melbourne: Masterman., 15P.Australia, VictoriaDiamond Occurrence
DS1960-0519
1965
Blecha, M.Blecha, M.Geology of the Tribag MineThe Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) Bulletin., Vol. 68, PP. 321-326.GlobalBreccia
DS200812-0898
2008
BleekerPietranik, A.B, Hawkesworth, C.J., Storey, C.D., Kemp, T.I.S., Sircombe, Whitehouse, BleekerEpisodic, mafic crust formation in the Slave Craton, Canada.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A748.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMantle zircons
DS1995-0158
1995
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W., Beaumont-Smith, C.Thermal structural studies in Slave Province: preliminaryresults, implications Yellowknife domain.Geological Survey of Canada, Paper 1995-C, pp. 87-96.Northwest TerritoriesStructure, Yellowknife domain
DS1998-0899
1998
Bleeker, W.Lucas, S., Hajnal, Z., White, D., Bleeker, W., AnsdellCrustal growth and continental collisions in the 1.9-1.8 Ga Trans HudsonOrogen, Manitoba and SaskatchewanGeological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting, abstract. only, p.A46.Manitoba, SaskatchewanTectonic, Trans Hudson Orogen
DS1998-1408
1998
Bleeker, W.Stern, R.A., Bleeker, W.Age of the world's oldest rocks refined using Canada's SHRIMP: the Acasta Gneiss Complex, northwest Territories.Geoscience Canada, Vol. 25, No. 1, March pp. 27-32Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology - SHRIMP, Acasta Gneiss
DS1999-0073
1999
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W., Davis, W.J.Archean terrane boundaries: the view from the Slave ProvinceGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Geological Association of Canada (GAC)/Mineralogical Association of Canada (MAC)., Vol. 24, p. 11. abstractNorthwest TerritoriesCraton, Structure
DS1999-0074
1999
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W., Davis, W.J.The 1991-96 NATMAP Slave Province Project: introductionCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 36, No.7, July pp. 1033-42.Northwest TerritoriesMapping, structure
DS1999-0075
1999
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W., Ketchum, J.W.J., Davis, W.J.The Central Basement Complex Part II: age and tectonic significance of high strain zones along basement-coverCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 36, No.7, July pp. 1111-39.Northwest TerritoriesMapping, structure
DS2001-0113
2001
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W.Evolution of the Slave Craton and the search for supercratonsGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting Abstracts, Vol. 26, p.14, abstract.Northwest TerritoriesCraton - Dharwar Zimbabwe, Wyoming, Yilgarn
DS2001-0114
2001
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W.Archean cratons of Laurentia and the search for early supercratonsSlave-Kaapvaal Workshop, Sept. Ottawa, 7p. abstractNorthwest Territories, OntarioCraton - geodynamics, Slave
DS2001-0591
2001
Bleeker, W.Ketchum, J., Bleeker, W.4.03-2.85 Ga growth and modification of the Slave proto craton northwesternCanada.Slave-Kaapvaal Workshop, Sept. Ottawa, 4p. abstractNorthwest TerritoriesGeochronology, Craton
DS2001-0593
2001
Bleeker, W.Ketchum, J.W.F., Bleeker, W.Crustal recycling and growth in the Slave Protocraton, northwest Canada: 4.03-2.80 Ga.Geological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting Abstracts, Vol. 26, p.77, abstract.Northwest TerritoriesTectonics, Archean Slave Craton - Acasta gneisses
DS2001-1083
2001
Bleeker, W.Sircombe, K.N., Bleeker, W., Stern, R.A.Detrital zircon geochronology and grain size analysis a 2800 Ma Mesoarchean proto-cratonic cover successionEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 189, No. 3-4, July 15, pp. 207-220.Northwest TerritoriesCraton - Slave, Geochronology
DS2002-0165
2002
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W.From Kenorland to Laurentia? a review of evidenceGac/mac Annual Meeting, Saskatoon, Abstract Volume, P.11., p.11.GlobalTectonics
DS2002-0166
2002
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W.From Kenorland to Laurentia? a review of evidenceGac/mac Annual Meeting, Saskatoon, Abstract Volume, P.11., p.11.GlobalTectonics
DS2002-0167
2002
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W.Archean tectonics: a review, with illustrations from the Slave CratonGeological Society of London Special Publication, No. 199, pp. 151-182.Northwest TerritoriesTectonics
DS2002-1706
2002
Bleeker, W.White, D.J., Lucas, S.B., Bleeker, W., Hajnal, Z., Lewry, J.F., Zwanzig, H.V.Suture zone geometry along an irregular Paleoproterozoic margin: the Superior boundary zone, Manitoba, Canada.Geology, Vol.30,8,Aug.pp.735-8.ManitobaTectonics
DS2003-0119
2003
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W.The Late Archean record: a puzzle in ca. 35 piecesLithos, Vol. 71, 2-4, pp. 99-134.Globalgeochronology
DS2003-0320
2003
Bleeker, W.Davis, W.J., Jones, A.G., Bleeker, W., Grutter, H.Lithosphere development in the Slave Craton: a linked crustal and mantle perspectiveLithos, Vol. 71, 2-4, pp. 575-589.Northwest Territories, NunavutTectonics
DS2003-1070
2003
Bleeker, W.Peter, J., Bleeker, W., Hulbert, J., Kerr, D., Ernst, R., Knight, R., Wright, D.Slave Province minerals and geosciemce compilation and synthesis project31st Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 79. (abst.)Nunavut, Northwest TerritoriesOverview
DS200412-0163
2003
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W.The Late Archean record: a puzzle in ca. 35 pieces.Lithos, Vol. 71, 2-4, pp. 99-134.Globalgeochronology
DS200412-0421
2003
Bleeker, W.Davis, W.J., Jones, A.G., Bleeker, W., Grutter, H.Lithosphere development in the Slave Craton: a linked crustal and mantle perspective.Lithos, Vol. 71, 2-4, pp. 575-589.Canada, NunavutTectonics
DS200412-1524
2004
Bleeker, W.Percival, J.A., Bleeker, W., Cook, E.A., Rivers, T., Ross, G., Van Staal, C.PanLithoprobe Workshop IV: intra orogen correlations and comparative orogenic anatomy.Geoscience Canada, Vol. 31, 1, pp. 23-39.Canada, United StatesTectonics, Precambrian, geochronology, orogens
DS200412-1533
2003
Bleeker, W.Peter, J., Bleeker, W., Hulbert, J., Kerr, D., Ernst, R., Knight, R., Wright, D., Anglin, L.Slave Province minerals and geosciemce compilation and synthesis project.31st Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 79. (abst.)Canada, Nunavut, Northwest TerritoriesOverview
DS200512-0093
2004
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W.Taking the pulse of the Earth: a proposal for a new multidisciplinary flagship project in Canadian Solid Earth Sciences.Geoscience Canada, Vol. 31, 4, Dec, pp. 190.Lithoprobe, magmatism, paleo-continental, Superior
DS200512-0094
2005
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W.In the beginning: Canadian shield and early continental crust.GAC Annual Meeting Halifax May 15-19, Abstract 1p.CanadaLaurentia, tectonics, Rodinia
DS200512-0095
2004
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W.Slave bedrock compilation.32nd Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, Nov. 16-18, p.6-7. (talk)Canada, Northwest TerritoriesStructure - not specific to diamonds
DS200512-0519
2004
Bleeker, W.Ketchum, J.W.F., Bleeker, W., Stern, R.A.Evolution of an Archean basement complex and its autochthonous cover, southern Slave Province, Canada.Precambrian Research, Vol. 135, 3, Nov. 30, pp. 149-176.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMagmatism, geochronology
DS200812-0899
2008
Bleeker, W.Pietranik, A.B., Hawkesworth, C.J., Storey, C.D., Kemp, A.I.S., Sircombe, K.N., Whitehouse, M.J., Bleeker, W.Episodic mafic crust formation from 4.5 to 2.8 Ga: new evidence from detrital zircons, Slave craton, Canada.Geology, Vol. 36, 11, pp. 875-878.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeochronology
DS201012-0056
2010
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W.The use of hand held magnetic susceptibility meters in the field: an invaluable tool in regional studies of dyke swarms.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractTechnologyGeophysics - magnetics
DS201012-0057
2010
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W., Ernst, R.E.The anatomy of large dyke swarms: geometrical constraints on ancient break-up events.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractGlobalLIP
DS201012-0077
2010
Bleeker, W.Buchan, K.L., Ernst, R.E., Bleeker, W., Davis, W.J., Villeneuve, M., Van Breeman, O., Hamilton, SoderlundMap of Proterozoic magmatic events in the Slave Craton, Wopmay Orogen and environs, Canadian Shield.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesMagmatism
DS201012-0184
2010
Bleeker, W.Ernst, R.E, Bleeker, W.Large igneous provinces LIPS, giant dyke swarms, and mantle plumes: significance for breakup events within Canada and adjacent regions from 2.5 Ga.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 47, 5, pp. 695-739.GlobalHotspots
DS201012-0185
2010
Bleeker, W.Ernst, R.E., Bleeker, W., Soderlund, U., Hamilton, M.A., Sylvester, P.J., Chamberlain, K.R.Using the global dolerite dyke swarm record to reconstruct supercontinents back to 2.7 Ga.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractGlobalPangea
DS201012-0387
2010
Bleeker, W.Kilian, T.M., Mitchell, R.N., Bleeker, W., Le Cheminant, A.N., Chamberlain, K.R., Evans, D.A.D.Paleomagnetism of mafic dykes from the Wyoming craton, USA.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractUnited StatesCraton, connections
DS201012-0511
2010
Bleeker, W.Mitchell, R.N., Van Breeman, O., Buchan, K.L., Le Cheminant, T.N., Bleeker, W., Evans, D.A.D.Supercratons at the ends of Early Proterozoic Earth: reconstruction of Slave, Superior, and Kaapvaal cratons at 2200-2000 Ma.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractCanada, Africa, South AfricaKenorland
DS201112-0092
2011
Bleeker, W.Bleeker, W.The Slave Craton of North America: an overview.Geological Society of America, Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, Oct. 9-12, abstractCanada, United StatesGeochronology, petrology
DS201312-0248
2013
Bleeker, W.Ernst, R.E., Bleeker, W., Soderlund, U., Kerr, A.C.Large igneous provinces and supercontinents: toward completing the plate tectonic revolution.Lithos, Vol. 174, pp. 1-14.PangeaLIP
DS201606-1099
2016
Bleeker, W.Kilian, T.M., Bleeker, W., Chamberlain. K., Evans, D.A.D., Cousens, B.Paleomagnetism, geochronology and geochemistry of the Paleoproterozoic Rabbit Creek and Powder River dyke swarms: implications for Wyoming in supercraton Superia.Geological Society of London Special Publication Supercontinent Cycles through Earth History., Vol. 424, pp. 15-45.United States, Wyoming, Colorado PlateauSupercontinents
DS201607-1295
2016
Bleeker, W.Ernst, R.E., Hamilton, M.A., Soderlund, U., Hanes, J.A., Gladkochub, D.P., Okrugin, A.V., Kolotilina, T., Mekhonoshin, A.S., Bleeker, W., LeCheminant, A.N., Buchan, K.L., Chamberlain, K.R., Didenko, A.N.Long lived connection between southern Siberia and northern Laurentia in the Proterozoic.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 9, 6, pp. 464-469.Canada, RussiaProterozoic

Abstract: Precambrian supercontinents Nuna-Columbia (1.7 to 1.3 billion years ago) and Rodinia (1.1 to 0.7 billion years ago) have been proposed. However, the arrangements of crustal blocks within these supercontinents are poorly known. Huge, dominantly basaltic magmatic outpourings and intrusions, covering up to millions of square kilometres, termed Large Igneous Provinces, typically accompany (super) continent breakup, or attempted breakup and offer an important tool for reconstructing supercontinents. Here we focus on the Large Igneous Province record for Siberia and Laurentia, whose relative position in Nuna-Columbia and Rodinia reconstructions is highly controversial. We present precise geochronology—nine U -Pb and six Ar -Ar ages—on dolerite dykes and sills, along with existing dates from the literature, that constrain the timing of emplacement of Large Igneous Province magmatism in southern Siberia and northern Laurentia between 1,900 and 720 million years ago. We identify four robust age matches between the continents 1,870, 1,750, 1,350 and 720 million years ago, as well as several additional approximate age correlations that indicate southern Siberia and northern Laurentia were probably near neighbours for this 1.2-billion-year interval. Our reconstructions provide a framework for evaluating the shared geological, tectonic and metallogenic histories of these continental blocks.
DS201610-1878
2016
Bleeker, W.Kilian, T.M., Chamberlain, K.R., Evans, D.A.D., Bleeker, W., Cousens, B.L.Wyoming on the run - toward final Paleoproterozoic assembly of Laurentia.Geology, Vol. 44, 10, pp. 863-866.United States, Wyoming, Colorado PlateauCraton, Nuna, Slave, Superior

Abstract: Paleoproterozoic suture zones mark the formation of supercontinent Nuna and provide a record of North America's assembly. Conspicuously young ages (ca. 1.715 Ga) associated with deformation in southeast Wyoming craton argue for a more protracted consolidation of Laurentia, long after peak metamorphism in the Trans-Hudson orogen. Using paleomagnetic data from the newly dated 1899 ± 5 Ma Sourdough mafic dike swarm (Wyoming craton), we compare the relative positions of Wyoming, Superior, and Slave cratons before, during, and after peak metamorphism in the Trans-Hudson orogen. With these constraints, we refine a collisional model for Laurentia that incorporates Wyoming craton after Superior and Slave cratons united, redefining the Paleoproterozoic sutures that bind southern Laurentia.
DS201706-1066
2017
Bleeker, W.Chamberlain, K.R., Killian, T.M., Evans, D.A.D., Bleeker, W., Cousens, B.L.Wyoming on the run - toward final Paleoproterozoic assembly of Laurentia. Geology Forum Comment, April 1p.United Statescraton

Abstract: Paleoproterozoic suture zones mark the formation of supercontinent Nuna and provide a record of North America's assembly. Conspicuously young ages (ca. 1.715 Ga) associated with deformation in southeast Wyoming craton argue for a more protracted consolidation of Laurentia, long after peak metamorphism in the Trans-Hudson orogen. Using paleomagnetic data from the newly dated 1899 ± 5 Ma Sourdough mafic dike swarm (Wyoming craton), we compare the relative positions of Wyoming, Superior, and Slave cratons before, during, and after peak metamorphism in the Trans-Hudson orogen. With these constraints, we refine a collisional model for Laurentia that incorporates Wyoming craton after Superior and Slave cratons united, redefining the Paleoproterozoic sutures that bind southern Laurentia.
DS201706-1085
2016
Bleeker, W.Kilian, T.M., Chamberlain, K.R., Evans, D.A.D., Bleeker, W., Cousens, B.L.Wyoming on the run - toward final Paleoproterozoic assembly of Laurentia. Geology, Vol. 44, pp. 863-866.United Statescraton

Abstract: Paleoproterozoic suture zones mark the formation of supercontinent Nuna and provide a record of North America’s assembly. Conspicuously young ages (ca. 1.715 Ga) associated with deformation in southeast Wyoming craton argue for a more protracted consolidation of Laurentia, long after peak metamorphism in the Trans-Hudson orogen. Using paleomagnetic data from the newly dated 1899 ± 5 Ma Sourdough mafic dike swarm (Wyoming craton), we compare the relative positions of Wyoming, Superior, and Slave cratons before, during, and after peak metamorphism in the Trans-Hudson orogen. With these constraints, we refine a collisional model for Laurentia that incorporates Wyoming craton after Superior and Slave cratons united, redefining the Paleoproterozoic sutures that bind southern Laurentia.
DS201809-2028
2018
Bleeker, W.Gong, Z., Xu, X., Evans, D.A.D., Hoffman, P.F., Mitchell, R.N., Bleeker, W.Paleomagnetism and rock magnetism of the ca. 1.87 Ga Pearson Formation, Northwest Territories, Canada: a test of vertical axis rotation within the Great Slave Basin.Precambrian Research , Vol. 305C, pp. 295-309.Canada, Northwest Territoriesgeophysics

Abstract: A geometrically quantitative plate-kinematic model, based on paleomagnetism, for the initial assembly of Laurentia has taken form in the past few decades. Within this framework, there remains but one problematic interval of data predominantly from the Slave craton, which is the 1.96-1.87?Ga Coronation apparent polar wander path (APWP). The Coronation APWP shows large (~110°) back-and-forth oscillations that are difficult to explain in terms of plate motion. Nonetheless, poles from the Coronation APWP have been incorporated in various paleogeographic reconstructions of Laurentia and the supercontinent Nuna, pointing to the importance of testing its veracity. In this study, we conducted a detailed paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of the ca. 1.87?Ga Pearson Formation, East Arm of Great Slave Lake, Northwest Territories, Canada. Our results show that Pearson Formation yields a characteristic remanent magnetization carried by single-domain or small pseudo-single-domain magnetite. The age of the magnetization is constrained to be older than Paleoproterozoic deformation and is interpreted as primary. Paleomagnetic declinations reveal a one-to-one correlation with local structural attitudes, indicating that some small blocks in the fold belt likely experienced significant (~60°) vertical-axis rotations, presumably related to large dextral displacements along the McDonald Fault system. Alternative explanations, such as true polar wander or a non-dipole magnetic field, are considered less parsimonious for the data presented here. It is suspected that some existing Christie Bay Group poles (the Stark and Tochatwi Formations), which were sampled in areas with anomalous structural attitudes and differ from time-equivalent poles obtained from areas of the Slave craton far from major transcurrent faults, may similarly suffer from vertical-axis rotation. We suggest further study before using possibly rotated Christie Bay Group poles for paleogeographic reconstructions.
DS201812-2828
2018
Bleeker, W.Kastek, N., Ernst, R.E., Cousens, B.L., Kamo, S.L., Bleeker, W., Soderlund, U., Baragar, W.R.A., Sylvester, P.U-Pb geochronology and geochemistry of the Povungnituk Group of the Cape Smith Belt: part of a craton scale circa 2.0 Ga Minto-Povungnituk Large Igneous Province, northern Superior craton. Lithos, Vol. 320-321, pp. 315-331.Canada, Quebeccarbonatite

Abstract: Magmatism of the Povungnituk Group of the Cape Smith Belt, northern Superior craton, was formed in three stages: (i)early alkaline magmatism and associated carbonatites (undated), (ii) a main flood basalt sequence (Beauparlant Formation) (constrained between 2040 and 1991?Ma), and (iii) a late stage alkaline pulse (Cecilia Formation) (ca. 1959?Ma). We suggest that the main stage of magmatic activity (middle pulse) was of short duration. A new UPb baddeleyite age of 1998?±?6?Ma is obtained from a dolerite sill intruding the uppermost section of the Beauparlant Formation. This age has regional significance because it matches the previously obtained 1998?±?2?Ma age for the Watts Group (Purtuniq) ophiolite of the northern Cape Smith Belt and the 1998?±?2?Ma?U-Pb age of the Minto dykes intruding the craton to the south. These coeval units, along with additional units correlated on paleomagnetic grounds (Eskimo Formation), are interpreted to define a large igneous province (LIP), extending over an area of >400,000?km2, which we herein define as the Minto-Povungnituk LIP. Geochemical comparison between the Watts Group ophiolite, Minto dykes and the mafic Povungnituk Group shows significant differences allowing these data to be divided into two groups and domains within the LIP. A northern domain, comprising the Povungnituk and Watts groups, shows mixing between a depleted mantle source and a more enriched mantle plume-sourced melt. A southern domain comprising the Minto dykes and the paleomagnetically linked Eskimo Formation shows signs of an even more enriched source, while these magmas also show the effect of crustal contamination. Two distinct source mechanisms can be responsible for the observed geochemical differences between the two domains. First, a difference in lithospheric sources, where melting of different portions of Superior craton lithosphere caused the different melt signatures in the interior of the craton. In this case magmatism in the two domains is only related by having the same heat source (e.g.,a mantle plume) interpreted to be located on the northwestern side of the northern Superior craton. Second, two distinct deep mantle sources that remained separated within the ascending plume. This is analogous to some current hotspots interpreted to sample both large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVP) and adjacent ambient deep mantle. This latter interpretation would allow for the use of bilateral chemistry in LIPs as a potential tool for the recognition and mapping of the LLSVP boundaries throughout Earth's history.
DS201905-1077
2018
Bleeker, W.Soderlund, U., Bleeker, W., Demirer, K., Srivastava, R.K., Hamilton, M., Nilsson, M., Personen, L.J., Samal, A.K., Jayananda, M., Ernst, R.E., Srinivas, M.Emplacement ages of Paleoproterozoic mafic dyke swarms in eastern Dharwar craton, India: implications for paleoreconstructions and support for a ~30 degree change in dyke trends from south to north.Precambrian Research, doi.org/10.1016/ j.precamres.2018.12.017Indiacraton

Abstract: Large igneous provinces (LIPs) and especially their dyke swarms are pivotal to reconstruction of ancient supercontinents. The Dharwar craton of southern Peninsular India represents a substantial portion of Archean crust and has been considered to be a principal constituent of Superia, Sclavia, Nuna/Columbia and Rodinia supercontinents. The craton is intruded by numerous regional-scale mafic dyke swarms of which only a few have robustly constrained emplacement ages. Through this study, the LIP record of the Dharwar craton has been improved by U-Pb geochronology of 18 dykes, which together comprise seven generations of Paleoproterozoic dyke swarms with emplacement ages within the 2.37-1.79 Ga age interval. From oldest to youngest, the new ages (integrated with U-Pb ages previously reported for the Hampi swarm) define the following eight swarms with their currently recommended names: NE-SW to ESE-WNW trending ca. 2.37 Ga Bangalore-Karimnagar swarm. N-S to NNE-SSW trending ca. 2.25 Ga Ippaguda-Dhiburahalli swarm. N-S to NNW-SSE trending ca. 2.22 Ga Kandlamadugu swarm. NW-SE to WNW-ESE trending ca. 2.21 Ga Anantapur-Kunigal swarm. NW-SE to WNW-ESE trending ca. 2.18 Ga Mahbubnagar-Dandeli swarm. N-S, NW-SE, and ENE-WSW trending ca. 2.08 Ga Devarabanda swarm. E-W trending 1.88-1.89 Ga Hampi swarm. NW-SE ca. 1.79 Ga Pebbair swarm. Comparison of the arcuate trends of some swarms along with an apparent oroclinal bend of ancient geological features, such as regional Dharwar greenstone belts and the late Archean (ca. 2.5 Ga) Closepet Granite batholith, have led to the hypothesis that the northern Dharwar block has rotated relative to the southern block. By restoring a 30° counter clockwise rotation of the northern Dharwar block relative to the southern block, we show that pre-2.08 Ga arcuate and fanning dyke swarms consistently become approximately linear. Two possible tectonic models for this apparent bending, and concomitant dyke rotations, are discussed. Regardless of which deformation mechanisms applies, these findings reinforce previous suggestions that the radial patterns of the giant ca. 2.37 Ga Bangalore-Karimnagar dyke swarm, and probably also the ca. 2.21 Ga Anantapur-Kunigal swarm, may not be primary features.
DS202006-0916
2020
Bleeker, W.Davey, S.C., Bleeker, W., Kamo, S.L., Vuollo, J., Ernst, R.E., Cousens, B.L.Archean block rotation in western Karelia: resolving dyke swarm patterns in metacraton Karelia-Kola for a refined paleogeographic reconstruction of supercraton Superia.Lithos, in press available 95p. PdfRussia, Kola Peninsulacraton

Abstract: Rifting, breakup, and subsequent collision related to the ca. 1.92-1.79?Ga Svecofennian orogeny fragmented and deformed the western margin of the Archean Karelia-Kola craton into four crustal blocks: Pudasjärvi, Iisalmi, Kuhmo, and Taivalkoski. Detailed quantification of Svecofennian deformation is limited due to poorly exposed basement geology and an as yet incomplete dyke swarm record. New U-Pb ID-TIMS geochronological results on baddeleyite and zircon are presented for three key mafic dykes from the Pudasjärvi block, namely the Uolevinlehto, Myllykangas, and Sipojuntti dykes. The age of the 325°-trending Uolevinlehto dyke is estimated at ca. 2400?±?12?Ma from discordant multigrain baddeleyite fractions, showing it to be younger than ca. 2450?Ma dykes across Karelia. The 350°-trending Myllykangas dyke has a minimum age of 2135.2?+?3.6/-3.7?Ma based on chemically abraded zircon. Results from single baddeleyite grains provide a precise upper intercept age of 2128.9?±?1.2?Ma for the 320°-trending Sipojuntti dyke. Our new U-Pb ages are integrated with those from the literature to define six major dyke swarms in the Pudasjärvi block: the WNW-trending ca. 2.45?Ga Pääjärvi, NW-trending ca. 2.40?Ga Uolevinlehto, NW-trending ca. 2.13-2.10?Ga Tohmajärvi, WNW-trending ca. 2.07?Ga Palomaa, NNW-trending ca. 1.98?Ga Paukkajanvaara and undated"East-West" dykes. Trends of contemporaneous dyke swarms in the Taivalkoski and Kuhmo blocks, however, are systematically offset by 35°. With subvertical dips, offset dyke swarms record 35° clockwise vertical-axis rotation of the Pudasjärvi block relative to the interior of Karelia, consistent with dextral transpression during the Svecofennian orogeny. Structural restoration of the Pudasjärvi blocks improves the constraints on regional dyke swarm patterns, and these are used to revise the position of the Karelia-Kola craton within the context of the paleogeographic reconstruction of supercraton Superia.
DS1996-0138
1996
Bleichert-Toft, J.Bleichert-Toft, J., Arndt, N.T., Ludden, J.N.Precambrian alkaline magmatismLithos, Vol. 37, No. 2-3, April 1, pp. 97-112.GlobalMagmatism -alkaline
DS200812-0117
2008
Bleischwitz, R.Bleischwitz, R., Bringezu, S.Global governance for sustainable resource management.Minerals & Energy - Raw Materials Report, Vol. 28, 2, pp. 84-101.GlobalGovernance
DS2003-0474
2003
Bleisteiner, B.Glinnemann, J., Kusaka, K., Harris, J., Bleisteiner, B., Winkler, B.Oriented graphite single crystal inclusions in diamond8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, POSTER abstractNorthwest TerritoriesDiamonds - inclusions, Deposit - Panda
DS1900-0054
1901
Bleloch, W.E.Bleloch, W.E.The New South Africa, Its Value and DevelopmentNew York: Doubleday, Page And Co., 435P.Africa, South AfricaMineral Resources, Mining Engineering
DS1900-0535
1907
Bleloch, W.E.Bleloch, W.E.The Pniel Estate. Geology and Possibilities DescribedSouth Africa Mines, FEBRUARY 9TH. 3P.Africa, South AfricaGeology
DS200612-0528
2006
BlenkinsopHanson, R.E., Harmer,Blenkinsop, Bullen, Dalziel, Gose, Hall, Kampunzu, Key, Mukwakwami, Munyaniwa, Pancake, Seidel, WardMesoproterozoic intraplate magmatism in the Kalahari Craton: a review.Journal of African Earth Sciences, In press available,Africa, South AfricaAlkaline rocks, carbonatite, Premier kimberlite cluster
DS1985-0056
1985
Blenkinsop, J.Bell, K., Blenkinsop, J.Carbonatites- Clues to Mantle EvolutionGeological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 17, No. 3, FEBRUARY P. 151. (abstract.).Canada, OntarioSuperior Crust, Isotope
DS1985-0721
1985
Blenkinsop, J.Wen, J., Bell, K., Blenkinsop, J.Strontium and Neodymium Isotopic Relationships in the Oka Carbonatite comp Lex, Canada.Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 17, No. 7, P. 747. (abstract.).Canada, QuebecGeochronology
DS1986-0063
1986
Blenkinsop, J.Bell, K., Blenkinsop, J.Carbonatites and the sub continental upper mantleGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting, Vol. 11, p. 44. (abstract.)East AfricaGeochronology, Carbonatite
DS1986-0313
1986
Blenkinsop, J.Grunenfelder, M.H., Tilton, G.R., Bell, K., Blenkinsop, J.Lead and strontium isotope relationship in the Oka carbonatitecomplex, QuebecGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 50, pp. 461-468Quebec, UgandaMelilite, Carbonatite
DS1987-0044
1987
Blenkinsop, J.Bell, K., Blenkinsop, J.Neodynium and strontium isotopic compositions of East African carbonatites:implications for mantle heterogeneityGeology, Vol. 15, No. 2, pp. 99-102East AfricaCarbonatite, Geochronology
DS1987-0045
1987
Blenkinsop, J.Bell, K., Blenkinsop, J., Kwon, Tlton, SageAge and radiogenic isotopic systematics of the Border carbonatite complexOntario, canada.Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 24, pp. 24-30.OntarioGeochronology, deposit - Borden
DS1987-0787
1987
Blenkinsop, J.Wen, J., Bell, K., Blenkinsop, J.neodymium and Strontium isotope systematics of the Oka complex, Quebec and their bearing on the evolution of the sub-continental upper mantleContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 97, No. 4, pp. 433-437QuebecCarbonatite
DS1989-0102
1989
Blenkinsop, J.Bell, K., Blenkinsop, J.Neodynium and strontium isotope geochemistry of carbonatitesCarbonatites -Genesis and Evolution, Ed. K. Bell Unwin Hyman Publ, pp. 278-300East AfricaGeochemistry, Geochronology, Kimberlite
DS1993-0727
1993
Blenkinsop, T.Jackson, J., Blenkinsop, T.The Malawi Earthquake of March 10, 1989: deep faulting within the East African Rift systemTectonics, Vol. 12, No. 5, Oct. pp. 1131-39.East Africa, MalawiTectonics, Rifting
DS1995-0159
1995
Blenkinsop, T.Blenkinsop, T., et al.The north Limpopo Thrust Zone: the northern boundary of the Limpopo Belt in Zimbabwe and Botswana.Centennial Geocongress (1995) Extended abstracts, Vol. 1, p. 174-177. abstractZimbabwe, BotswanaCraton, Limpopo Thrust Zone
DS1995-1596
1995
Blenkinsop, T.Rollinson, H., Blenkinsop, T.The magmatic metamorphic and tectonic evolution of the northern Marginal Zone of the Limpopo Belt in Zimbabwe.Journal of the Geological Society of London, Vol. 152, No. 1, Jan. pp. 65-76.ZimbabweTectonics, Limpopo Belt
DS2002-1169
2002
Blenkinsop, T.Oberthur, T., Davis, D.W., Blenkinsop, T., Hohdorf, A.Precise U Pb mineral ages, Rb Sr and Sm Nd systematics for the Great Dyke, constraints on late Archean eventsPrecambrian Research, Vol. 113, No. 3-4, pp. 293-305.ZimbabweGeochronology, Craton, uranium, lead, rubidium, strontium, Limpopo Belt
DS200812-0762
2008
Blenkinsop, T.Moore, A., Blenkinsop, T., Cotterill, F.Controls on post-Gondwana alkaline volcanism in southern Africa.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 268, 1-2, April 15, pp. 151-164.Africa, southern AfricaAlkalic
DS200912-0513
2009
Blenkinsop, T.Moore, A., Blenkinsop, T., Cotterill, F.Southern Africa topography and erosion history: plumes or plate tectonics?Terra Nova, Vol. 21, pp. 310-315.Africa, South AfricaPaleodrainage
DS202003-0352
2020
Blenkinsop, T.Moore, A.,Yudovskaya, M., Prover, A., Blenkinsop, T.Evidence for olivine deformation in kimberlites and other mantle derived magmas during crustal emplacement. LemphaneContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 175, 9p. PdfAfrica, Lesothoolivine

Abstract: This paper highlights published and new field and petrographic observations for late-stage (crustal level) deformation associated with the emplacement of kimberlites and other mantle-derived magmas. Thus, radial and tangential joint sets in the competent 183 Ma Karoo basalt wall rocks to the 5 ha. Lemphane kimberlite blow in northern Lesotho have been ascribed to stresses linked to eruption of the kimberlite magma. Further examples of emplacement-related stresses in kimberlites are brittle fractures and close-spaced parallel shears which disrupt olivine macrocrysts. In each of these examples, there is no evidence of post-kimberlite regional tectonism which might explain these features, indicating that they reflect auto-deformation in the kimberlite during or immediately post-emplacement. On a microscopic scale, these inferred late-stage stresses are reflected by fractures and domains of undulose extinction which traverse core and margins of some euhedral and anhedral olivines in kimberlites and olivine melilitites. Undulose extinction and kink bands have also been documented in olivines in cumulates from layered igneous intrusions. Our observations thus indicate that these deformation features can form at shallow levels (crustal pressures), which is supported by experimental evidence. Undulose extinction and kink bands have previously been presented as conclusive evidence for a mantle provenance of the olivines—i.e. that they are xenocrysts. The observation that these deformation textures can form in both mantle and crustal environments implies that they do not provide reliable constraints on the provenance of the olivines. An understanding of the processes responsible for crustal deformation of kimberlites could potentially refine our understanding of kimberlite emplacement processes.
DS1994-1254
1994
Blenkinsop, T.G.Munyanyiwa, H., Blenkinsop, T.G.Pan-African stuctures and metamorphism in the Makuti Group, north-westZimbabweJournal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 19, No. 3, Oct. pp. 185-189ZimbabweTectonics, Structure
DS1995-0160
1995
Blenkinsop, T.G.Blenkinsop, T.G., Tromp, P.L.Sub-Saharan economic geologyBalkema Publishing, Geological Society Zimbabwe, Spec. Publishing No. 3, 320pSouthern Africa, Zimbabwe, Botswana, TanzaniaUltramafics, geophysics, diamonds, gold, Table of contents
DS1995-0524
1995
Blenkinsop, T.G.Fedo, C.M., Eriksson, K.A., Blenkinsop, T.G.Geologic history of the Archean Buhwa greenstone belt and surrounding gneiss terrane, evolution Limpopo beltCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 32, No. 11, Nov. pp. 1977-1990ZimbabweGreenstone belt, Archean, Limpopo Belt
DS1995-0906
1995
Blenkinsop, T.G.Kamber, B.S., Blenkinsop, T.G., Villa, I.M., Dahl, P.S.Proterozoic transpressive deformation in the northern marginal zone, Limpopo Belt, ZimbabweJournal of Geology, Vol. 103, No. 5, Sept. pp. 493-508ZimbabweTectonics,, Limpopo Belt
DS1999-0225
1999
Blenkinsop, T.G.Frei, R., Blenkinsop, T.G., Schonberg, R.Geochronology of the late Archean Razi and Chilimanzi suites of granites in Zimbabwe - tectonicsSouth African Journal of Geology, Vol. 102, No. 1, Jan. pp. 55-64.ZimbabweCraton, Limpopo Belt, Archean tectonics
DS2003-0551
2003
Blenkinsop, T.G.Hargrove, U.S., Hanson, R.E., Martin, M.W., Blenkinsop, T.G., Bowring, S.A.Tectonic evolution of the Zambesi orogenic belt: geochronological, structural andPrecambrian Research, Vol. 123, 2-4, pp. 159-186.ZimbabweBlank
DS200412-0790
2003
Blenkinsop, T.G.Hargrove, U.S., Hanson, R.E., Martin, M.W., Blenkinsop, T.G., Bowring, S.A., Walker, N., Munyanyiwa, H.Tectonic evolution of the Zambesi orogenic belt: geochronological, structural and petrological constraints from northern ZimbabwPrecambrian Research, Vol. 123, 2-4, pp. 159-186.Africa, ZimbabweTectonics
DS200612-0527
2006
Blenkinsop, T.G.Hanson, R.E., Harmer, R.E., Blenkinsop, T.G., Bullen, D.S., Dalziel, Gose, Hall, Kampunzu, Key, MukwakwamiMesoproterozoic intraplate magmatism in the Kalahari Craton: a review.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol. 46, 1-2, pp. 141-167.Africa, South AfricaMagmatism
DS201612-2291
2016
Blenkinsop, T.G.Cook, Y.A., Sanislav, I.V., Hammerli, J., Blenkinsop, T.G., Dirks, P.H.G.M.A primitive mantle source for the Neoarchean mafic rocks from the Tanzania Craton.Geoscience Frontiers, Vol. 7, pp. 911-926.Africa, TanzaniaMantle

Abstract: Mafic rocks comprising tholeiitic pillow basalt, dolerite and minor gabbro form the basal stratigraphic unit in the ca. 2.8 to 2.6 Ga Geita Greenstone Belt situated in the NW Tanzania Craton. They outcrop mainly along the southern margin of the belt, and are at least 50 million years older than the supracrustal assemblages against which they have been juxtaposed. Geochemical analyses indicate that parts of the assemblage approach high Mg-tholeiite (more than 8 wt.% MgO). This suite of samples has a restricted compositional range suggesting derivation from a chemically homogenous reservoir. Trace element modeling suggests that the mafic rocks were derived by partial melting within the spinel peridotite field from a source rock with a primitive mantle composition. That is, trace elements maintain primitive mantle ratios (Zr/Hf = 32-35, Ti/Zr = 107-147), producing flat REE and HFSE profiles [(La/Yb)pm = 0.9-1.3], with abundances of 3-10 times primitive mantle and with minor negative anomalies of Nb [(Nb/La)pm = 0.6-0.8] and Th [(Th/La)pm = 0.6-0.9]. Initial isotope compositions (?Nd) range from 1.6 to 2.9 at 2.8 Ga and plot below the depleted mantle line suggesting derivation from a more enriched source compared to present day MORB mantle. The trace element composition and Nd isotopic ratios are similar to the mafic rocks outcropping ~50 km south. The mafic rocks outcropping in the Geita area were erupted through oceanic crust over a short time period, between ~2830 and ~2820 Ma; are compositionally homogenous, contain little to no associated terrigenous sediments, and their trace element composition and short emplacement time resemble oceanic plateau basalts. They have been interpreted to be derived from a plume head with a primitive mantle composition.
DS201804-0733
2017
Blenkinsop, T.G.Sanislav, I.V., Blenkinsop, T.G., Dirks, P.H.G.M.Archean crustal growth through successive partial melting events in an oceanic plateau like setting in the Tanzanian craton.Terra Nova, pp. 1-10.Africa, Tanzaniacraton - geochronology

Abstract: The detrital zircon population in quartzitic conglomerates from the northern Tanzania Craton yield ages between 2640 Ma and 2790 Ma which includes most of the igneous history from this part of the craton. The igneous evolution is characterised by mafic volcanism with an oceanic plateau-like geochemical signature at ~2800 Ma followed by diorite and tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite dominated magmatism between 2790 and 2700 Ma, which transitioned into more evolved high-K magmatism between 2700 and 2620 Ma. The eHf values of the detrital zircons range from +2.4 to -1.4 and change with time from radiogenic Hf pre-2700 Ma (98% positive eHf) to unradiogenic Hf post-2700 Ma (41% positive eHf). The petrological progression from mafic to felsic crust is reflected in the detrital age distribution and Hf isotopes and is consistent with juvenile mafic crust slowly maturing into more evolved felsic crust through a series of successive partial melting events in an oceanic-plateau-like environment.
DS2002-1082
2002
Blenkisnop, T.Moore, A., Blenkisnop, T.The role of mantle plumes in the development of continental scale drainage patterns: the southern African example revisited.South African Journal of Geology, Vol. 105, No. 4, pp. 353-60.South AfricaPlumes - geomorphology
DS201012-0036
2010
Bleoch, A.L.Bangert, U., Barnes, R., Gass, M.H., Bleoch, A.L., Godfrey, I.S.Vacancy clusters, dislocations and brown coloration in diamond.Journal of Physics Condensed Matter, Vol. 21, 36, pp. 364208-213..TechnologyDiamond crystallography
DS202009-1673
2020
Blereau, E.Volante, S., Pouteau, A., Collins, W.J., Blereau, E., Li, Z-X., Smit, M., Evans, N.J., Nordsvan, A.R., Spencer, C.J., McDonald, B.J., Li, J., Gunter, C.Multiple P-T-d-t paths reveal the evolution of the final Nuna assembly in northeast Australia. Georgetown InlierJournal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 38, pp. 593-627.Australiageochronology

Abstract: The final assembly of the Mesoproterozoic supercontinent Nuna was marked by the collision of Laurentia and Australia at 1.60 Ga, which is recorded in the Georgetown Inlier of NE Australia. Here, we decipher the metamorphic evolution of this final Nuna collisional event using petrostructural analysis, major and trace element compositions of key minerals, thermodynamic modelling, and multi-method geochronology. The Georgetown Inlier is characterised by deformed and metamorphosed 1.70-1.62 Ga sedimentary and mafic rocks, which were intruded by c. 1.56 Ga old S-type granites. Garnet Lu-Hf and monazite U-Pb isotopic analyses distinguish two major metamorphic events (M1 at c. 1.60 Ga and M2 at c. 1.55 Ga), which allows at least two composite fabrics to be identified at the regional scale—c. 1.60 Ga S1 (consisting in fabrics S1a and S1b) and c. 1.55 Ga S2 (including fabrics S2a and S2b). Also, three tectono-metamorphic domains are distinguished: (a) the western domain, with S1 defined by low-P (LP) greenschist facies assemblages; (b) the central domain, where S1 fabric is preserved as medium-P (MP) amphibolite facies relicts, and locally as inclusion trails in garnet wrapped by the regionally dominant low-P amphibolite facies S2 fabric; and (c) the eastern domain dominated by upper amphibolite to granulite facies S2 foliation. In the central domain, 1.60 Ga MP-medium-T (MT) metamorphism (M1) developed within the staurolite-garnet stability field, with conditions ranging from 530-550°C at 6-7 kbar (garnet cores) to 620-650°C at 8-9 kbar (garnet rims), and it is associated with S1 fabric. The onset of 1.55 Ga LP-high-T (HT) metamorphism (M2) is marked by replacement of staurolite by andalusite (M2a/D2a), which was subsequently pseudomorphed by sillimanite (M2b/D2b) where granite and migmatite are abundant. P-T conditions ranged from 600 to 680°C and 4-6 kbar for the M2b sillimanite stage. 1.60 Ga garnet relicts within the S2 foliation highlight the progressive obliteration of the S1 fabric by regional S2 in the central zone during peak M2 metamorphism. In the eastern migmatitic complex, partial melting of paragneiss and amphibolite occurred syn- to post- S2, at 730-770°C and 6-8 kbar, and at 750-790°C and 6 kbar, respectively. The pressure-temperature-deformation-time paths reconstructed for the Georgetown Inlier suggest a c. 1.60 Ga M1/D1 event recorded under greenschist facies conditions in the western domain and under medium-P and medium-T conditions in the central domain. This event was followed by the regional 1.56-1.54 Ga low-P and high-T phase (M2/D2), extensively recorded in the central and eastern domains. Decompression between these two metamorphic events is ascribed to an episode of exhumation. The two-stage evolution supports the previous hypothesis that the Georgetown Inlier preserves continental collisional and subsequent thermal perturbation associated with granite emplacement.
DS201312-0083
2013
Blessington, M.Blessington, M., Kettler, R., Verplanck, P., Farmer, G.L.Niobium mineralization in a magnetite rich carbonatite, Elk Creek Nebraska, USA.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractUnited States, NebraskaCarbonatite
DS201412-0947
2014
Blessington, M.J.Verplank, P.L., Kettler, R.M., Blessington, M.J., Lowers, H.A., Koenig, A.E., Farmer, G.L.Rare earth element and niobium enrichments in the Elk Creek carbonatite, USA.30th. International Conference on Ore Potential of alkaline, kimberlite and carbonatite magmatism. Sept. 29-, http://alkaline2014.comUnited States, NebraskaCarbonatite
DS1996-0139
1996
Blevin, P.L.Blevin, P.L., Chappell, B.W.Controls on the distribution and character of the intrusive metallogenic provinces of eastern AustraliaGeological Society of Australia 13th. held Feb, No. 41, abstracts p. 42AustraliaMetallogeny, Granites
DS1996-0619
1996
Blewett, R.Hazell, M., Blewett, R., Bailey, J.If only Newton had had AGSO's FieldPadAgso Research Newsletter, No. 25, Nov. pp. 3-5GlobalComputer, Digitized version of field notebook
DS2002-0168
2002
Blewett, R.S.Blewett, R.S.Archean tectonic processes: a case for horizontal shortening North Pilbara granite greenstone terranePrecambrian Research, Vol. 113, No. 1-2, Jan. pp. 87-120.AustraliaTectonics - Pilbara - not specific to diamonds
DS200512-0350
2004
Blewett, R.S.Goleby, B.R., Blewett, R.S., Korsch, R.J., Champion, D.C., Cassidy, K.F., Jones, L.E., Groenewald, P.B., Henson, P.Deep seismic reflection profiling in the Archean northeastern Yilgarn Craton: implications for crustal architecture and mineral potential.Tectonophysics, Vol. 388, 1-4, pp. 119-133.AustraliaGeophysics - seismics, not specific to diamonds
DS1991-0126
1991
Bley de Brito Neves, B.Bley de Brito Neves , B., Cordani, U.G.Tectonic evolution of South America during the Late ProterozoicPrecambrian Research, Vol. 53, pp. 23-40BrazilTectonics, Proterozoic
DS2002-0169
2002
Bley de Brito Neves, B.Bley de Brito Neves, B., Van Schmus, W.R., Fetter, A.Northwestern Africa North eastern Brasil. Major tectonic links and correlation problems.Journal of African Earth Sciences, Vol.34, No.3-4,April-May pp. 275-8.Brazil, AfricaTectonics
DS201312-0084
2013
Bley de Brito Neves, B.Bley de Brito Neves, B., Fuck, R.A.The Neoproterozoic evolution of the basement of the South Americam platform.Journal South American Earth Sciences, Vol. 47, pp. 72-89.South AmericaCraton - Amazon
DS1999-0076
1999
Blichert Toft, J.Blichert Toft, J., Albarede, F., Kornprobst, J.Lutetium - Hafnium isotope systematics of garnet pyroxenites from Beni Bousera: implications for basalt origin.Science, Vol. 285, No. 5406, Feb. 26, pp. 1303-5.MoroccoGeochronology, Deposit - Beni Bousera
DS2001-0174
2001
Blichert Toft, J.Chauvel, C., Blichert Toft, J.A hafnium isotope and trace element perspective on melting of the depletedmantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 190, No. 3-4, pp. 137-51.MantleMelting
DS2003-0446
2003
Blichert Toft, J.Gasperini, D., Blichert Toft, J., Bosch, D., Del Moro, A., Macera, P., Albaraede, F.Upwelling of deep mantle material through a plate window: evidence from theJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 107, 12, Dec. 6, pp. DO1 10.1029/2001JB000418MantleGeophysics - seismics, Tectonics
DS200412-0614
2003
Blichert Toft, J.Gasperini, D., Blichert Toft, J., Bosch, D., Del Moro, A., Macera, P., Albaraede, F.Upwelling of deep mantle material through a plate window: evidence from the geochemistry of Italian basaltic volcanics.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 107, 12, Dec. 6, pp. DO1 10.1029/2001 JB000418MantleGeophysics - seismics Tectonics
DS200512-0396
2004
Blichert Toft, J.Hanan, B.B., Blichert Toft, J., Pyle, D.G., Christie, D.M.Contrasting origins of the upper mantle revealed by hafnium and lead isotopes from southeast Indian Ridge ( corrigendum).Nature, No. 7017, Dec. 2, pp. 653-654.Mantle, IndiaGeochronology
DS200512-0397
2004
Blichert Toft, J.Hanan, N.B., Blichert Toft, J., Pyle, D.G., Christie, D.M.Contrasting origins of the upper mantle revealed by hafnium and lead isotopes from the southeast Indian Ridge.Nature, No. 7613, Nov. 4, pp. 91-93.Indian RidgeGeochronology
DS200512-0464
2005
Blichert Toft, J.Ionov, D.A.,Blichert Toft, J., Weiss, D.Hf isotope compositions and HREE variations in off craton garnet and spinel peridotite xenoliths from central Asia.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 69, 9, pp. 2399-2418.AsiaGeochemistry
DS200612-0486
2006
Blichert Toft, J.Graham, D.W., Blichert Toft, J., Russo, C.J., Rubin, K.H., Albarede, F.Cryptic striations in the upper mantle revealed by hafnium isotopes in southeast Indian Ridge basalts.Nature, Vol. 440, 7081, pp. 199-202.Asia, IndiaGeochronology, tectonics
DS200612-1209
2006
Blichert Toft, V.J.Salters, V.J., Blichert Toft, V.J., Fekiacova, J., Sachikocher, A., Bizimis, M.Isotope and trace element evidence for depleted lithosphere in the source of enriched Kolau basalts.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 151, 3, pp. 297-312.RussiaGeochronology
DS2001-0916
2001
BlichertoftPhilippot, P., Blichertoft, Perchuk, Costa, GerasimovLutetium(Lu)- Hafnium(Hf) and Argon- Argon chronology supports extreme rate of subduction zone metamorphism deduced geospeedometryTectonophysics, Vol. 342, No. 2, pp. 23-38.MantleGeochronology, Argon, Lutetium, Hafnium, Subduction
DS1994-0170
1994
Blichert-ToftBlichert-Toft, Luais, B.The life times of ancient chemical heterogeneities in mantle and their implications evolution of convection.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 58A, pp. 99-100. AbstractMantleGeochemistry, Geochronology
DS1998-1540
1998
Blichert-ToftVervoort, J., Patchett, P.J., Blichert-Toft, AlbaredeHafnium neodymium isotopic covariance in the crust and mantle and constraints on the evolution of the depleted mantle.Mineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 1595-6.GreenlandGeochronology
DS2000-0215
2000
Blichert-ToftDe Sigoyer, J., Chavagnac, Blichert-Toft, Villa, LuaisDating the Indian continental subduction and collisional thickening in northwest Himalaya: eclogitesGeology, Vol. 28, No. 6, June pp. 487-90.IndiaSubduction - multichronology, Geochronology - Tso Morari eclogites
DS1996-0140
1996
Blichert-Toft, J.Blichert-Toft, J., Arndt, N.T., Ludden, J.N.Precambrian alkaline magmatismLithos, Vol. 37, No. 2/3, April pp. 97-112GlobalMagmatism, Alkaline rocks
DS1997-0104
1997
Blichert-Toft, J.Blichert-Toft, J., Albarede, F.The Lutetium - Hafnium isotope geochemistry of chondrite and the evolution of mantle crust systemEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 148, No. 1-2, Apr. 1, pp. 243-258MantleChondite, Geochemistry
DS1999-0770
1999
Blichert-Toft, J.Vervoort, J.D., Blichert-Toft, J.Evolution of the depleted mantle: Hafnium isotope evidence from juvenile rocks through time.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 63, No. 3-4, Feb. 1, pp. 533-56.MantleGeochronology
DS2000-0865
2000
Blichert-Toft, J.Scherer, E.E., Cameron, K.L., Blichert-Toft, J.Lutetium - Hafnium garnet geochronology: closure temperature relative to the Sm neodymium system - effects trace inclusionsGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 64, No. 19, Oct. 1, pp. 3413-32.GlobalGarnet - geochronology
DS200412-0123
2004
Blichert-Toft, J.Bedini, R.M., Blichert-Toft, J., Boyet, M., Albarede, F.Isotopic constraints on the cooling of the continental lithosphere.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 223, 1-2, June, 30, pp. 99-111.Africa, South AfricaGarnet peridotite xenoliths, radiometric ages, geotherm
DS200412-0164
2004
Blichert-Toft, J.Blichert-Toft, J., Arndt, N.T., Gruau, G.Hf isotopic measurements on Barberton komatiites: effects of incomplete sample dissolution and importance for primary and secondChemical Geology, Vol. 207, 3-4, July 16, pp. 261-275.Africa, South AfricaGeochronology - not specific to diamonds
DS200412-0777
2004
Blichert-Toft, J.Hanan, B., Blichert-Toft, J., Pyle, D., Christie, D.Contrasting origins of the upper mantle MORB source revealed by Hf and Pb isotopes from the Australian Antarctic discordance.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 13th Goldschmidt Conference held Copenhagen Denmark, Vol. 68, 11 Supp. July, ABSTRACT p.A553.India, Australia, AntarcticaSubduction
DS200512-1110
2005
Blichert-Toft, J.Upton, B.G.J., Ramo, O.T., Heaman, L.M., Blichert-Toft, J., Kalsbeek, F., Barry, T.L., Jepsen, H.F.The Mesoproterozoic Zig-Zag Dal basalts and associated intrusions of eastern North Greenland: mantle plume lithosphere interaction.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 149, 1, pp. 40-56.Europe, GreenlandTectonics
DS200612-0012
2006
Blichert-Toft, J.Albarede, F., Blichert-Toft, J.Reading old mantle tea leaves: the survival of plate material in the source of MORB and OIB.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 7, abstract only.MantleGeochronology
DS200612-0540
2005
Blichert-Toft, J.Harrison, T.M., Blichert-Toft, J., Muller, W., Albarede, F., Holden, P., Mojzsis, S.J.Heterogeneous Hadean hafnium: evidence of continental crust 4.4 to 4.5 Ga.Science, Vol. 310, 5736 Dec. 23, pp. 1947-1949.MantleGeochronology
DS200612-0541
2006
Blichert-Toft, J.Harrison, T.M., McCulloch, M.T., Blichert-Toft, J., Albarede, F., Holden, P., Mojzsis, S.J.Further Hf isotope evidence for Hadean continental crust.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, 1, p. 14, abstract only.MantleGeochronology
DS200712-0083
2007
Blichert-Toft, J.Blichert-Toft, J., Harrison, T.M., Albarede, F.The age of the earliest continental crust and onset of plate tectonics.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A98.AustraliaGeochronology
DS200712-0339
2007
Blichert-Toft, J.Gaffney, A.M., Blichert-Toft, J., Nelson, B.K., Bizzarro, M., Rosing, M., Albarec, F.Constraints on source forming processes of West Greenland kimberlites inferred from Hf Nd isotope systematics.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 71, 11, June 1, pp. 2820-2836.Europe, GreenlandGeochronology
DS200712-0340
2007
Blichert-Toft, J.Gaffney, A.M., Blichert-Toft, J., Nelson, B.K., Bizzarro, M., Rosing, M., Albarede, F.Constraints on source forming processes of West Greenland kimberlites inferred from Hf Nd isotope systematics.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 71, 11, pp. 2820-2836.Europe, GreenlandDiamond genesis
DS200712-0408
2007
Blichert-Toft, J.Hana, B.B., Blichert-Toft, J., Kingsley, R.H., Schilling, J-G.Source origin of the ultrapotassic lavas from the Leucite Hills, Wyoming: Hf isotope constraints.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A375.United States, Wyoming, Colorado PlateauLamproite
DS200712-0496
2007
Blichert-Toft, J.Jourdan,F., Bertrand, H., Scharer, U., Blichert-Toft, J., Feraud, G., Kampunzu, A.B.Major and trace element and Sr Nd, Hf, and Pb isotope compositions of the Karoo large igneous province, Botswana and Zimbabwe: lithosphere vs mantle plume...Journal of Petrology, Vol. 48, 6, pp. 1043-1078.Africa, Botswana, ZimbabweGeochemistry, geochronology
DS200712-0721
2007
Blichert-Toft, J.Meyzen, C.M., Blichert-Toft, J., Ludden, J.N., Humler, E., Mevel, C., Albaraede, F.Isotopic portrayal of the Earth's upper mantle flow field.Nature, Vol. 447, June 28, pp.1069-1074.MantleGeochronology - subduction
DS200712-0722
2007
Blichert-Toft, J.Meyzen, C.M., Blichert-Toft, J., Ludden, J.N., Humler, E., Mevel, C., Albaraede, F.Isotopic portrayal of the Earth's upper mantle flow field.Nature, Vol. 447, June 28, pp.1069-1074.MantleGeochronology - subduction
DS200812-0118
2008
Blichert-Toft, J.Blichert-Toft, J., Albarede, F.Hafnium isotopes in Jack Hills zircons and the formation of the Hafnium crust.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 265, 3-4, Jan. 30, pp. 686-702.AustraliaGeochronology
DS200812-0586
2008
Blichert-Toft, J.Konter, J.C., Hanan, B.B., Blichert-Toft, J., Koppers, A.A.P., Plank, T., Staudigel, H.One hundred million years of mantle geochemical history suggest the retiring of mantle plumes is premature.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 275, 3-4, pp. 285-295.MantleMagmatism
DS201012-0058
2010
Blichert-Toft, J.Blichert-Toft, J., Puchtel, I.S.Depleted mantle sources through time: evidence from Lu Hf and Sm Nd isotope systematics of Archean komatiites.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 297, 3-4, pp. 598-606.MantleGeochronology
DS201112-0011
2011
Blichert-Toft, J.Albaraede, F., Ballhaus, C., Lee, C.T.A., Yin, Q-Z., Blichert-Toft, J.The great volatile delivery to Earth.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.420.MantleGeochronology - Pb
DS201112-0088
2011
Blichert-Toft, J.Bianchini,G., Bryce, J.G., Blichert-Toft, J., Beccaluca, L., Natali, C.Pb Hf Nd isotopic decoupling in peridotite xenoliths from Mega ( Ethiopia): insights into multistage evolution of the East African lithosphere.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.528.Africa, EthiopiaTanzanian Craton
DS201112-0854
2011
Blichert-Toft, J.Reid, M.R., Bouchet, R.A., Blichert-Toft, J.Melting conditions associated with the Colorado Plateau, USA.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1704.United States, Colorado PlateauThermobarometry
DS201412-0310
2014
Blichert-Toft, J.Graham, D.W., Hanan, B.B., Hemond, C., Blichert-Toft, J., Albarede, F.Helium isotopic textures in Earth's upper mantle.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 2048-2074.MantleHelium
DS201505-0243
2015
Blichert-Toft, J.Katzir, Y., Anenburg, M., Kaminchik, J., Segev, A., Blichert-Toft, J., Spicuzza, M.J., Valley, J.W.Garnet pyroxenites as markers of recurring extension and magmatism at the rifted margins of the Levant basin.Israel Geological Society, Abstracts 1p.Europe, Israel, Mt. CarmelPyroxenite
DS201612-2332
2016
Blichert-Toft, J.Rudzitis, S., Reid, M.R., Blichert-Toft, J.On edge melting under the Colorado Plateau margin.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems: G3, Vol. 17, 10, 1002/ 2016GC006349.United States, Colorado PlateauMelting

Abstract: Asthenosphere beneath the relatively thin lithosphere of the Basin and Range province appears to be juxtaposed in step-like fashion against the Colorado Plateau's thick lithospheric keel. Primary to near-primary basalts are found above this edge, in the San Francisco-Morman Mountain volcanic fields, north central Arizona, western USA. We show that at least two distinct peridotite-dominated mantle end-members contributed to the origin of the basalts. One has paired Nd and Hf isotopic characteristics that cluster near the mantle array and trace element patterns as expected for melts generated in the asthenosphere, possibly in the presence of garnet. The second has isotopic compositions displaced above the eHf - eNd mantle array which, together with its particular trace element characteristics, indicate contributions from hydrogenous sediments and/or melt (carbonatite or silicate)-related metasomatism. Melt equilibration temperatures obtained from Si- and Mg-thermobarometry are mostly 1340-1425°C and account for the effects of water (assumed to be 2 wt.%) and estimated CO2 (variable). Melt equilibration depths cluster at the inferred location of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary at ~70-75 km beneath the southwestern margin of the Colorado Plateau but scatter to somewhat greater values (~100 km). Melt generation may have initiated in or below the garnet-spinel facies transition zone by edge-driven convection and continued as mantle and/or melts upwelled, assimilating and sometimes equilibrating with shallower contaminated mantle, until melts were finally extracted.
DS201905-1018
2019
Blichert-Toft, J.Bohm, C.O., Hartlaub, R.P., Heaman, L.M., Cates, N., Guitreau, M., Bourdon, B., Roth, A.S.G., Mojzsis, S.J., Blichert-Toft, J.The Assean Lake Complex: ancient crust at the northwestern margin of the Superior Craton, Manitoba, Canada.Earths Oldest Rocks, researchgate.com Chapter 28, 20p. Pdf availableCanada, Manitobacraton

Abstract: This chapter describes the Assean Lake Complex (ALC) at ancient crust at the Northwestern margin of the Superior Craton, Manitoba, and Canada. An initial tectonic model for the Assean Lake area indicated that a regionally extensive high-strain zone running through the lake marks the suture between Archean high-grade crustal terranes of the Superior Craton to the southeast and Paleoproterozoic rocks of the Trans-Hudson Orogen to the northwest. Detailed geologic remapping combined with isotopic and geochemical studies led to a re-interpretation of the crust immediately north of the Assean Lake high-strain zone as Mesoarchean. The study area straddles the boundary between the Archean Superior Craton and the ca.1.90-1.84 Ga arc and marginal basin rocks of the Trans-Hudson Orogen, which represent the remains of ca. 1.83-1.76 Ga ocean closure and orogeny. It is indicated that the gneisses of the Split Lake Block consist primarily of meta-igneous protoliths of gabbroic to granitic composition. Tonalite and granodiorite are the most volumetrically dominant, but an anorthosite dome is also present in the northeast. Mapping, isotopic, and age data combined with high-resolution aero-magnetic data indicate that the Mesoarchean ALC is a crustal slice up to 10 km wide, and has a strike length of at least 50 km.
DS202002-0167
2019
Blichert-Toft, J.Bohm, C.O., Hartlaub, R.P., Heaman, L.M., Cates, N., Guitreau, M., Bourdon, B., Roth, A.S.G., Mojzsis, S.J., Blichert-Toft, J.The Assean Lake Complex: ancient crust at the northwestern margin of the Superior craton, Manitoba, Canada. ( not specific to diamonds)Earth's Oldest Rocks, Chapter 28, 20p. Pdf.Canada, Manitobacraton
DS200812-0014
2008
Blichert-Tor, J.Albarede, F., Blichert-Tor, J.The Earth accredited dry and its ocean rains into the mantle.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A15.MantleWater
DS1993-1442
1993
Blinchik, T.M.Shatsky, V.S., Jagoutz, E., Kozmenko, O.A., Blinchik, T.M., Sobolev, N.V.Age and genesis of eclogites from the Kokchetav massif (northernKazakhstan).Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 34, No. 12, pp. 40-50.Russia, KazakhstanGeochronology, Eclogites
DS1860-0541
1887
Blink, H.Blink, H.Door Natal in Het Hart Van Zuid-afrikaAmsterdam: Brinkman., Africa, South AfricaTravelogue
DS1900-0055
1901
Blink, H.Blink, H.Het Vraagstuk der Nederlandsche Emigratie Naar Zuid AfrikaUnknown., PP. 53-72.Africa, South AfricaDiamond Occurrence
DS201312-0761
2013
Blinova, A.I.Rukhlov, A.S., Blinova, A.I., Pawlowicz, J.G.Geochemistry, mineralogy and petrology of the Eocene potassic magmatism from the Milk River area, southern Alberta and Sweet Grass Hills, northern Montana.Chemical Geology, Vol. 353, pp. 280-302.Canada, Alberta, United States, MontanaMilk River area
DS1985-0066
1985
Blinova, G.K.Blinova, G.K.Distribution of Nitrogen Centers from Kimberlites Yakutia.(russian)Geologii i Geofiziki, (Russian), No. 3, pp. 116-119RussiaRef. Fleischer United States Geological Survey (usgs) Of 88-689.mineralogical Refs. 198, Mineralogy
DS1985-0067
1985
Blinova, G.K.Blinova, G.K., Gurkina, G.A., Frolova, L.N.A Study of Polycrystalline Aggregates of Diamond With lonsdaleite Using the Methods of X-ray Radiography And infrared Spectroscopy.(russian)Mineral. Sbornik., (Russian), Vol. 39, No. 2, pp. 18-21RussiaBlank
DS1985-0324
1985
Blinova, G.K.Kaminsky, F.V., Blinova, G.K., et al.Polycrystalline Aggregates of Diamond with Lonsdalaeite From Placers in Yakutia.Mineral. Zhurn., Vol. 7, No. 1, PP. 27-36.Russia, YakutiaMineralogy
DS1987-0059
1987
Blinova, G.K.Blinova, G.K.Structural impurities as indicators of the mechanism of natural diamondgrowth.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR (Russian), Vol. 294, No. 4, pp. 868-871RussiaNatural diamond, Crystallography Morpholog
DS1988-0063
1988
Blinova, G.K.Blinova, G.K.Some peculiarities of chemical environment of naturaldiamondcrystallization.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 300, No. 4, pp. 950-952RussiaDiamond morphology
DS1988-0064
1988
Blinova, G.K.Blinova, G.K., Gurkina, G.A., Simakov, S.K.Some chemical properties of the medium from which natural diamondscrystallizeDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 301, No. 4, July-Aug, pp. 207-209RussiaDiamond morphology, Crystallography
DS1989-0125
1989
Blinova, G.K.Blinova, G.K.Distribution of structural impurities in diamonds ofdifferentgenesis.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 304, No. 1, Jan-Feb. pp. 156-158RussiaDiamond inclusions, Diamond genesis
DS1989-0126
1989
Blinova, G.K.Blinova, G.K.Distribution of structural impurities in diamonds of different originsDoklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 304, No. 1, pp. 184-186RussiaDiamond morphology
DS1989-0127
1989
Blinova, G.K.Blinova, G.K., Verzhak, V.V., Zakharchenko, O.D., Medvedeva, M.S.Impurity centers in diamonds from two kimberlite pipes in the Arkhangel diamond provinceSoviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 30, No. 8, pp. 122-125RussiaDiamond inclusions, Arkhangel
DS1990-0211
1990
Blinova, G.K.Blinova, G.K.Distribution of structural impurities in diamonds of different originDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 304 No. 1-6, pp. 156-158RussiaDiamond morphology, Impurities
DS1991-0127
1991
Blinova, G.K.Blinova, G.K., Ilupin, I.P., Frolova, L.N.Impurity centers in diamonds from two regions of Siberian PlatformSoviet Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 32, No. 8, pp. 76-78RussiaDiamond morphology, Nitrogen
DS1991-1666
1991
Blisniuk, P.Strecker, M.R., Blisniuk, P., Bosworth, W.The kinematic evolution of the central Kenya rift in the light of the East African stress field historyGeological Society of America Annual Meeting Abstract Volume, Vol. 23, No. 5, San Diego, p. A 134KenyaTectonics, Rifting
DS1990-1424
1990
Blisniuk, P.M.Strecker, M.R., Blisniuk, P.M.Rotation of extension direction in the central Kenya rift (Lat 1 20 s to 0Terra, Abstracts of Crustal Dynamics: Pathways and Records held Bochum FRG, Vol. 2, December p. 20KenyaTectonics, Kenya rift
DS1990-1425
1990
Blisniuk, P.M.Strecker, M.R., Blisniuk, P.M., Eisbacher, G.H.Rotation of extension direction in the central Kenya rift (Lat 120 s to 020 n)Geology, Vol. 18, No. 4, April pp. 299-302KenyaTectonics, Rifting
DS1982-0103
1982
Bliss, J.D.Bliss, J.D.Stratigraphic, Structural and Tectonic References Index For the Navajo Indian Reservation Arizona, New Mexico and Utah.United States Geological Survey (USGS) OPEN FILE., No. 82-731, 48P.GlobalKimberlite, Tectonic, Colorado Plateau Rocky Mountains
DS1990-0212
1990
Bliss, J.D.Bliss, J.D., McKelvey, G.E., Allen, M.S.Application of grade and tonnage deposit models: the search for ore deposits possible amenable to small scale miningUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 90-0412, 24p. $ 3.75GlobalReserves -Models -grade and tonnage, Mining applications
DS1991-1271
1991
Bliss, J.D.Orris, G.J., Bliss, J.D.Some industrial mineral deposit models: descriptive deposit modelsUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 91-0011-A, 73pGlobalDeposit -models, Industrials
DS1992-0132
1992
Bliss, J.D.Bliss, J.D.Grade and tonnage and other models for diamond kimberlite pipesNonrenewable Resources, Vol. 1, No. 3, fall pp. 214-230GlobalEconomic evaluation, Grade and tonnage
DS1992-0133
1992
Bliss, J.D.Bliss, J.D.Developments in mineral deposit modelingUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Bulletin, No. 2004, 168p. $ 9.50United StatesMineral deposit modeling, abstracts
DS1992-0134
1992
Bliss, J.D.Bliss, J.D., Sutphin, D.M., Mosier, D.L., Allen, M.S.Grade and tonnage and target area models of Au-Ag-Te veins associated with alkalic rocksUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open File, No. 92-0208, $ 2.25United StatesAlkaline rocks, Mineralization -not specific to kimberlites
DS1992-1152
1992
Bliss, J.D.Orris, G.J., Bliss, J.D.Industrial minerals deposit models: grade and tonnageUnited States Geological Survey (USGS) Open file, 92-0437, 84p. $ 13.25United StatesModels, grade and tonnage, Industrial minerals
DS1995-1597
1995
Blmkinsop, T.Rollinson, H., Blmkinsop, T.The magmatic, metamorphic and tectonic evolution of the northern Marginal Zone of the Limpopo Belt in ZimababweJournal of the Geological Society of London, Vol. 152, No. 1, Jan. pp. 65-76ZimbabweTectonics, Limpopo Belt
DS201312-0513
2013
Block, D.L.Kramers, J.D., Andreoli, M.A.G., Atanasova, M., Belyanin, G.A., Block, D.L., Franklyn, C., Harris, C., Lekgoathi, M., Montross, C.S., Ntsoane, T., Pischedda, V., Segonyane, P., Viljoen, K.S., Westraadt, J.E.Unique chemistry of a diamond bearing pebble from the Libyan desert glass strewnfield, SW Egypt: evidence for a shocked comet fragment.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.382, pp. 21-31.Africa, EgyptShock diamonds
DS1997-0662
1997
Block, J.Leckie, D.A., Kjarsgaard, B.A., Block, J., McIntyreEmplacement and reworking of Cretaceous diamond bearing crater facies kimberlite of central Saskatchewan.Geological Society of America (GSA) Bulletin., Vol. 109, No. 8, pp. 1000-20.SaskatchewanDiamond - genesis, structure, tectonics, Petrography
DS201504-0185
2015
Block, S.Block, S., Ganne, J., Baratoux, A.Z., Parra-Avila, L.A., Jessell, M., Ailleres, L., Siebenaller, L.Petrological and geochronological constraints on lower crust exhumation during Paleoproterozoic (Eburnean) Orogeny, NW Ghana, West African craton.Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 33, 5, pp. 463-494.Africa, GhanaGeochronology

Abstract: New petrological and geochronological data are presented on high-grade ortho- and paragneisses from northwestern Ghana, forming part of the Paleoproterozoic (2.25-2.00 Ga) West African Craton. The study area is located in the interference zone between N-S and NE--SW-trending craton-scale shear zones, formed during the Eburnean orogeny (2.15-2.00 Ga). High-grade metamorphic domains are separated from low-grade greenstone belts by high-strain zones, including early thrusts, extensional detachments and late-stage strike-slip shear zones. Paragneisses sporadically preserve high-pressure, low-temperature (HP-LT) relicts, formed at the transition between the blueschist facies and the epidote-amphibolite sub-facies (10.0-14.0 kbar, 520-600 °C), and represent a low (~15 °C km-1) apparent geothermal gradient. Migmatites record metamorphic conditions at the amphibolite-granulite facies transition. They reveal a clockwise pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) path characterized by melting at pressures over 10.0 kbar, followed by decompression and heating to peak temperatures of 750 °C at 5.0-8.0 kbar, which fit a 30 °C km-1 apparent geotherm. A regional amphibolite facies metamorphic overprint is recorded by rocks that followed a clockwise P-T-t path, characterized by peak metamorphic conditions of 7.0-10.0 kbar at 550-680 °C, which match a 20-25 °C km-1 apparent geotherm. These P-T conditions were reached after prograde burial and heating for some rock units, and after decompression and heating for others. The timing of anatexis and of the amphibolite facies metamorphic overprint is constrained by in-situ U-Pb dating of monazite crystallization at 2138 ± 7 and 2130 ± 7 Ma respectively. The new data set challenges the interpretation that metamorphic breaks in the West African Craton are due to diachronous Birimian ‘basins’ overlying a gneissic basement. It suggests that the lower crust was exhumed along reverse, normal and transcurrent shear zones and juxtaposed against shallow crustal slices during the Eburnean orogeny. The craton in NW Ghana is made of distinct fragments with contrasting tectono-metamorphic histories. The range of metamorphic conditions and the sharp lateral metamorphic gradients are inconsistent with ‘hot orogeny’ models proposed for many Precambrian provinces. These findings shed new light on the geodynamic setting of craton assembly and stabilization in the Paleoproterozoic. It is suggested that the metamorphic record of the West African Craton is characteristic of Paleoproterozoic plate tectonics and illustrates a transition between Archean and Phanerozoic orogens.
DS1989-1513
1989
Blockley, J.G.Trendall, A.F., Blockley, J.G., Middleton, M.F., Myers, J.S.The tectonic evolution of western Australia and its control ofmineralizationPreprint from IGC Washington July 1989, 3pAustraliaBrief mention diamonds, Tectonics
DS1993-0868
1993
BlodgetKusky, T.M., Lowman, Masuoka, BlodgetAnalysis of Seasat L Band Radar imagery of the West Bay Indin Lake faultsystemJournal of Geology, Vol. 101, pp. 623-32.Northwest TerritoriesRemote Sensing, Slave Province
DS1993-0869
1993
Blodget, H.W.Kusky, T.M., Lowman, P.D.Jr., Masuoka, P., Blodget, H.W.Analysis of Seasat L-Band radar imagery of the West Bay-Indin Lake FaultSystem, Northwest TerritoriesJournal of Geology, Vol. 101, No. 5, September pp. 623-632Northwest TerritoriesRemote Sensing
DS200512-0751
2004
BlodgettMoses, T.M., Johnson, M.L., Green, B., Blodgett, Cino, Geurts, Gilbertson, hemphill, King, Kornylak, ReinitzA foundation for grading the overall cut quality of round brilliant cut diamonds.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 40, 3, Fall, pp. 202-228.Diamond cutting
DS1991-0509
1991
Blodgett, C.F.Franklin, S.E., Peddle, D.R., Wilson, B.A., Blodgett, C.F.Pixel sampling of remotely sensed digital imageryComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 17, No. 6, pp. 759-776GlobalComputers, Remote sensing
DS201112-0093
2011
Blodgett, T.Blodgett, T.Application of discriminant analysis in gemology: country of origin separation in colored stones and distingishing HPHT treated diamonds.Gems & Gemology, Summer issue ... abstracts from GIA p. 145.TechnologyHPHT treatment
DS201112-0094
2011
Blodgett, T.Blodgett, T.Length to width ratios among fancy shape diamonds.GIA International Symposium 2011, Gems & Gemology summer issue Poster session abs. p.129.TechnologyDiamond crystallography
DS201312-0307
2011
Blodgett, T.Geurts, R.H., Reinitz, I.M., Blodgett, T., Gilbertson, A.M.GIA's symmetry grading boundaries for round brilliant cut diamonds.Gems & Gemology, Vol. 47, winter pp. 286-295.TechnologyDiamond cutting
DS201412-0037
2013
Bloem, A.Barnett, W., Jelsma, H., Watkeys, M., Freeman, L., Bloem, A.How structure and stress influence kimberlite emplacement.Proceedings of the 10th. International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 2, pp. 51-66.Africa, South AfricaKimberley District - dyke modeling
DS1997-0105
1997
Bloem, E.J.M.Bloem, E.J.M., Dalstra, H.J., Groves, D.I.Granitoid diapirism during protracted tectonism in an Archean granitoid greenstone belt, Yilgarn BlockPrecambrian Research, Vol. 85, No. 3-4, Dec. 1, pp. 147-AustraliaTectonics, Yilgarn greenstone belt
DS1860-0136
1871
Bloemhof CommissionBloemhof CommissionEvidence Taken at Bloemhof Before the Commission Vaal RiverUnknown, APRIL 4TH.Africa, South Africa, Griqualand WestHistory, Politics
DS201808-1726
2018
Blom, E.Blom, E.Presentation by World Federation of Diamond Bourses President Ernie Blom.SAIMM Diamonds - source to use 2018 Conference 'thriving in changing times'. June 11-13., 20 ppts.Globaldiamond bourse
DS1989-1456
1989
Blom, M.P.Stettler, E.H., De Beer, J.H., Blom, M.P.Crustal domains in the Northern Kaapvaal craton as defined by magneticlineamentsPrecambrian Research, Vol. 45, pp. 263-276South AfricaCraton, Geophysics -magnetics
DS1991-0128
1991
Blonda, P.N.Blonda, P.N., Pasquariello, G., Losito, S., Mori, A., PosaAn experiment for the interpretation of multitemporal remotely sensed images based on a fuzzy logic approachInternational Journal of Remote Sensing, Vol. 12, No. 3, March pp. 463-476GlobalRemote sensing, Fuzzy logic
DS201710-2222
2017
Blondes, M.S.Craddock, W.H., Blondes, M.S., DeVera, C.A., Hunt, A.G.Mantle and crustal gases of the Colorado Plateau: geochemistry, sources, and migration pathways.Geochimica et Cosmochinica Acta, Vol. 213, pp. 346-374.United States, Coloradovolatiles

Abstract: The Colorado Plateau hosts several large accumulations of naturally occurring, non-hydrocarbon gases, including CO2, N2, and the noble gases, making it a good field location to study the fluxes of these gases within the crust and to the atmosphere. In this study, we present a compilation of 1252 published gas-composition measurements. The data reveal at least three natural gas associations in the field area, which are dominated by hydrocarbons, CO2, and N2 + He + Ar, respectively. Most gas accumulations of the region exhibit compositions that are intermediate between the three end members. The first non-hydrocarbon gas association is characterized by very high-purity CO2, in excess of 75 mol% (hereafter, %). Many of these high-purity CO2 fields have recently been well described and interpreted as magmatic in origin. The second non-hydrocarbon gas association is less well described on the Colorado Plateau. It exhibits He concentrations on the order of 1-10%, and centered log ratio biplots show that He occurs proportionally to both N2 and Ar. Overall ratios of N2 to He to Ar are ˜100:10:1 and correlation in concentrations of these gases suggests that they have been sourced from the same reservoir and/or by a common process. To complement the analysis of the gas-composition data, stable isotope and noble-gas isotope measurements are compiled or newly reported from 11 representative fields (previously published data from 4 fields and new data from 7 fields). Gas sampled from the Harley Dome gas field in Utah contains nearly pure N2 + He + Ar. The various compositional and stable and noble gas isotopic data for this gas indicate that noble gas molecule/isotope ratios are near crustal radiogenic production values and also suggest a crustal N2 source. Across the field area, most of the high-purity N2 + He + Ar gas accumulations are associated with the mapped surface trace of structures or sutures in the Precambrian basement and are often accumulated in lower parts of the overlying Phanerozoic sedimentary cover. The high-purity gas association mostly occurs in areas interior to the plateau that are characterized by a narrow range of elevated, moderate heat flow values (53-74 mW/m2) in the ancient (1.8-1.6 Ga) basement terranes of the region. Collectively, the geochemical and geological data suggest that (1) the N2 + He + Ar gas association is sourced from a crustal reservoir, (2) the gas association migrates preferentially along structures in the Precambrian basement, and (3) the sourcing process relates to heating of the crust. Prospecting for noble-gas accumulations may target areas with elevated Cenozoic heat flow, ancient crust, and deep crustal structures that focus gas migration. High-purity CO2 gas may also migrate through regional basement structures, however, there is not always a clear spatial association. Rather, CO2 accumulations are more clearly associated with zones of high heat flow (>63 mW/m2) that sit above hot upper mantle and are proximal to Cenozoic volcanic rocks near the plateau margins. These observations are consistent with previous interpretations of a magmatic gas source, which were based on geochemical measurements.
DS202011-2028
2020
Blondes, M.S.Apen, F.E., Rudnick, R.L., Cottle, J.M., Kylander-Clark, A.R.C., Blondes, M.S., Piccoli, P.M., Seward, G.Four dimensional thermal evolution of the East African Orogen: accessory phase petrochronology of crustal profiles through the Tanzanian Craton and Mozambique belt, northeastern Tanzania.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 175, 97, 30p. PdfAfrica, Tanzaniacraton

Abstract: U-Pb petrochronology of deep crustal xenoliths and outcrops across northeastern Tanzania track the thermal evolution of the Mozambique Belt and Tanzanian Craton following the Neoproterozoic East African Orogeny (EAO) and subsequent Neogene rifting. At the craton margin, the upper-middle crust record thermal quiescence since the Archean (2.8-2.5 Ga zircon, rutile, and apatite in granite and amphibolite xenoliths). The lower crust of the craton documents thermal pulses associated with Neoarchean ultra-high temperature metamorphism (ca. 2.64 Ga,?>?900 °C zircon), the EAO (600-500 Ma rutile), and fluid influx during rifting (?650 °C (above Pb closure of rutile and apatite) at the time of eruption. Zoned titanite records growth during cooling of the lower crust at 550 Ma, followed by fluid influx during slow cooling and exhumation (0.1-1 °C/Myr after 450 Ma). Permissible lower-crustal temperatures for the craton and orogen suggest variable mantle heat flow through the crust and reflect differences in mantle lithosphere thickness rather than advective heating from rifting.
DS1994-0171
1994
Bloodworth, A.Bloodworth, A.Minerals for development: improved industrial mineral resource evaluationin developing countriesInstitute of Mining and Metallurgy (IMM) Minerals Industry International, No. 1018, May pp. 19-22Zimbabwe, TanzaniaEconomics
DS201502-0042
2015
Bloodworth, A.Bloodworth, A.The high stakes race to satisfy our need for the scarcest metals on Earth. Book by K. Veronese Publ. PrometheusNature, Vol. 517, 7533, Jan. 8, pp. 142-143.GlobalBook review - REE
DS201708-1600
2017
Bloom, A.Bloom, A.Density measurement within the context of the rock mass characterization program of the Kelvin and Faraday kimberlites and surrounding country rock in the Northwest Territories of Canada.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, PosterCanada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Kelvin, Faraday
DS1991-0129
1991
Bloom, L.Bloom, L.Business opportunities in the Soviet UnionEngineering and Mining Journal, Vol. 192, No. 8, August pp. 20 U-V. 3pagesRussiaBrief -overview written six months ago, Legal
DS1993-0130
1993
Bloom, L.Bloom, L.Improving your ability to interpret the dataProspectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC) Meeting Preprint, 9pCanadaGeochemistry, Chemical analysis, sampling
DS1997-0106
1997
Bloom, L.Bloom, L., Titaro, D.Building confidence in assaysSociety for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME) Preprint, No. 97-109, 3pGlobalSampling, assaying, Check assays
DS1998-0026
1998
Bloom, L.Amor, S., Bloom, L.Practical application of exploration geochemistryPros. Developers Assoc, Short course approx. 200pGlobalBook - table of contents, Geochemistry - technology
DS2002-0170
2002
Bloom, L.Bloom, L., Leaver, M.Using the correct control limits. Certified Reference MaterialsExplore, No. 115, April, pp. 3,4.GlobalGeochemistry - CRM
DS1996-0141
1996
Bloom, L.M.Bloom, L.M., Pedler, P.J., Wragg, G.E.Implementation of enhanced areal interpretation using MapinfoComputers and Geosciences, Vol. 22, No. 5, pp. 459-466GlobalComputer, Program -Mapinfo remote sensing
DS200612-0140
2006
BloombergBloombergDiamonds to outpace metals as scarcity, Asia sales boost prices.Bloomberg.com, August 7, 3p.GlobalDiamond - economics
DS200812-0119
2008
BloombergBloombergNamdeb to cut gem production and fire some workers.Bloomberg.com, Dec. 12, 1/4p.Africa, NamibiaNews item - Namdeb
DS1970-0632
1973
Bloomer, A.G.Bloomer, A.G., Nixon, P.H.The Geology of the Letseng la Terae Kimberlite PipesMaseru: Lesotho Nat. Dev. Corp. Lesotho Kimberlites, Editor, PP. 20-38.LesothoGeology
DS1990-0213
1990
Bloomer, S.Bloomer, S., Stern, R.Tectonic originsNature, Vol. 346, No. 6284, August 9, p. 518GlobalTectonics, Volcanics
DS1987-0060
1987
Bloomer, S.H.Bloomer, S.H.Geochemical characteristics of boninite and tholeiite series volcanic rocks of the Mariana forearc and the role of an incompatible element enrichedfluidMantle metasomatism and alkaline magmatism, edited E. Mullen Morris and, No. 215, pp. 151-164GlobalGeochemistry, Analyses Volcanics p. 154
DS1988-0668
1988
Bloomer, S.H.Stern, R.J., Bloomer, S.H., Ping Nan Lin, Ito, E., Morris, J.Shoshonitic magmas in nascent arcs: new evidence from submarine volcanoes in the northern MarianasGeology, Vol. 16, No. 5, May pp. 426-430OceanBlank
DS1990-1027
1990
Bloomer, S.H.Meen, J.K., Bloomer, S.H., Stern, R.J.Contemporaneous alkaline shoshonite and island arcbasalt-dacite magmatism in the Mariana arc systemV.m. Goldschmidt Conference Held May 2-4, 1990, Program And Abstract, p. 65. Abstract onlyGlobalShoshonite, Alkaline rocks
DS1990-1416
1990
Bloomer, S.H.Stern, R.J., Bloomer, S.H.Mariana boninites: trace element and Strontium, neodymium, and lead isotopic constraints on the origin of LIL enriched fluids at convergent marginsV.m. Goldschmidt Conference Held May 2-4, 1990, Program And Abstract, p. 84. Abstract onlyGlobalBoninites, Geochemistry
DS2002-0171
2002
Bloomfield, C.Bloomfield, C.The development and application of health, safety, environment and community, management standards BHP Billiton.Australian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, No. 3/2002, pp.79-82.AustraliaHSEC - management standards
DS200712-0440
2007
Bloomfield, M.Hird, J.R., Bloomfield, M., Hayward, I.P.Investigating the mechanisms of diamond polishing using Raman spectroscopy.Philosophical Magazine, Vol. 87, 2, Jan. 11, pp. 267-280.TechnologyDiamond polishing
DS201112-0095
2011
Blore, S.Blore, S., Smilie, I.Taming the resource curse: implementing the ICGLR certification mechanism for conflict prone minerals. Lessons from KPPartnership Africa Canada, March 54p.GlobalLegal outline of ICGLR principles
DS201212-0074
2012
Blott, S.J.Blott, S.J., Pye, K.Particle size scales and classification of sediment types based on particle size distributions: review and recommended procedures.Sedimentology, in press availableTechnologyClassification of sediments
DS201904-0723
2017
Blouin, M.Cate, A., Perozzi, L., Gloaguen, E., Blouin, M.Machine learning as a tool for geologists. Not specific to diamondsThe leading Edge, https://dx.doi.org/10.1190/tle36030064.1Globaldata sets

Abstract: Machine learning is becoming an appealing tool in various fields of earth sciences, especially in resources estimation. Six machine learning algorithms have been used to predict the presence of gold mineralization in drill core from geophysical logs acquired at the Lalor deposit, Manitoba, Canada. Results show that the integration of a set of rock physical properties — measured at closely spaced intervals along the drill core — with ensemble machine learning algorithms allows the detection of gold-bearing intervals with an adequate rate of success. Since the resulting prediction is continuous along the drill core, the use of this type of tool in the future will help geologists in selecting sound intervals for assay sampling and in modeling more continuous ore bodies during the entire life of a mine.
DS1970-0828
1973
Blouse, R.S.Slettene, R.L., Wilcox, L.E., Blouse, R.S., Sanders, J.R.A Bouger Gravity Anomaly Map of AfricaDefense Mapping Agency Aerospace Centre Tech. Paper., No. 73-3Africa, South Africa, BotswanaGeophysics
DS2001-0115
2001
Blower, J.D.Blower, J.D., Mader, H.M., Wilson, S.D.R.Coupling of viscous and diffusive controls on bubble growth during explosive volcanic eruptions.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 193, No. 1-2, Nov. 30, pp. 47-56.MantlePhreatomagmatism
DS1991-0130
1991
Blowes, D.Blowes, D., Cherry, J.Mill tailings impoundments. Geochemistry and hydrologyHazardous Material Management, June pp. 6-11GlobalMining, Mill tailings ponds
DS200712-0084
2006
Blowes, D.Blowes, D.,Moncur, M., Smith, L., Sego, D., Klassen, Neuner, Gravie, Gould, ReinsonMining in the continuous permafrost: construction and instrumentation of two large scale waste rock piles.34th Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, p. 6. abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - Diavik
DS200812-1034
2008
Blowes, D.Sego,D.C., Pham, N., Blowes, D., Smith, L.Heat transfer in waste rock piles at Diavik diamond mine.Northwest Territories Geoscience Office, p. 55. abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS200812-1085
2008
Blowes, D.Smith, L., Neuner, M., Gupton, M., Bailey, B.L., Blowes, D., Smith, L., Sego, D.Diavik test piles project: design and construction of large scale research waste rock piles in the Canadian Arctic.Northwest Territories Geoscience Office, p. 57-58. abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS201709-2072
2017
Blowes, D.Wilson, D., Amos, R., Blowes, D., Langman, J., Smith, L., Sego, D.Diavik waste rock project: scale up of a reactive transport conceptual model for temperature and sulfide dependent geochemical evolution.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Canada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit, Diavik
DS1994-0172
1994
Blowes, D.W.Blowes, D.W., Jambor, J.L.The environmental geochemistry of sulfide mine wastesMineralogical Association of Canada Short Course, Vol. 22, 110p. $ 30.00GlobalEnvironmental geochemistry, Table of contents, Mine wastes
DS2003-0063
2003
Blowes, D.W.Baker, M.J., Blowes, D.W., Logsdon, M.J., Jambor, J.L.Environmental geochemistry of kimberlite materials: Diavik diamonds project, Lac deExploration Mining Geology ( C.I.M.), Vol. 10, 3, pp. 155-63.Northwest TerritoriesGeochemistry - whole rock analyses, ABA results, Deposit - Diavik
DS200412-0086
2003
Blowes, D.W.Baker, M.J., Blowes, D.W., Logsdon, M.J., Jambor, J.L.Environmental geochemistry of kimberlite materials: Diavik diamonds project, Lac de Gras, Northwest Territories, Canada.Exploration Mining Geology , Vol. 10, 3, pp. 155-63.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesGeochemistry - whole rock analyses, ABA results Deposit - Diavik
DS200812-0073
2008
Blowes, D.W.Bailey, B.L., Smith, L., Neuner, M., Gupton, M., Blowes, D.W., Smith, L., Sego, D.C., Gould, D.Diavik waste rock project: early stage geochemistry and microbiology of effluent from low sulfide content waste rock piles.Northwest Territories Geoscience Office, p. 11-12. abstractCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS200812-0763
2008
Blowes, D.W.Moore, M.L., Blowes, D.W., Ptacek, C.J., Gould, W.D., Smith, L.,Sego, D.Humidity cell analysis of waste rock from the Diavik diamond mine NWT, Canada.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A647.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS201012-0031
2010
Blowes, D.W.Bailey, B.L., Smith, L.J.D., Blowes, D.W., Ptacek, C.J., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.Diavik waste rock project: blasting residuals in waste rock piles.38th. Geoscience Forum Northwest Territories, Abstract p. 30.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDiavik
DS201112-0409
2011
Blowes, D.W.Hannam, S., Bailey, B.L., Lindsay, M.B.J., Gibson, B., Blowes, D.W., Paktunc, A.D., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.Diavik waste rock project: geochemical and mineralogical characterization of waste rock weathering at the Diavik diamond mine.Yellowknife Geoscience Forum Abstracts for 2011, abstract p. 43-44.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - waste rock
DS201212-0046
2012
Blowes, D.W.Bailey, B.L., Smith, L.J.D., Blowes, D.W.,Ptacek, C.J., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.The Diavik waste rock project: persistence of contaminants from blasting agents in waste rock effluent.Applied Geochemistry, in press availableCanada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik mining
DS201312-0157
2012
Blowes, D.W.Chi, X., Amos, R.T., Stastna, M., Blowes, D.W., Sego, D.C., Smith, L.The Diavik waste rock project: implications of wind-induced gas transport.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 246-255.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik, environmental
DS201312-0644
2013
Blowes, D.W.Neuner, M., Smith, L., Blowes, D.W., Sego, D.C., Smith, L.J.D., Fretz, N., Gupton, M.The Diavik waste rock project: water flow through mine waste rock in a permafrost terrain.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 222-233.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - Diavik
DS201312-0705
2013
Blowes, D.W.Pham, N.H., Sego, D.C., Arenson, L.U., Blowes, D.W., Amos, R.T., Smith, L.The Diavik waste rock project: measurement of the thermal regime of a waste rock test pile in a permafrost environment.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 234-245.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - Diavik
DS201312-0849
2013
Blowes, D.W.Smith, L.J.D., Blowes, D.W., Jambor, J.L., Smith, L., Sego, D.C., Neuner, M.The Diavik waste rock project: initial geochemical response from a low sulfide waste rock pile.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 200-209.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - Diavik
DS201312-0850
2013
Blowes, D.W.Bailey, B.L., Smith, L.J.D., Blowes, D.W., Ptacek, C.J., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.The Diavik waste rock project: persistence of contaminants from blasting agents in waste rock effluent.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 256-270.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - Diavik
DS201312-0852
2013
Blowes, D.W.Smith, L.J.D., Moncur, M.C., Neuner, M., Gupton, M., Blowes, D.W., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.The Diavik waste rock project: particle size distribution and sulfur characteristics of low- sulfide waste rock.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 187-199.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesMining - Diavik
DS201507-0303
2015
Blowes, D.W.Bailey, B.L., Blowes, D.W., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.The Diavik waste rock project: geochemical and microbiological characterization of drainage from low sulfide waste rock: active zone field experiments.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 36, pp. 187-199.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik
DS201510-1804
2015
Blowes, D.W.Smith, L.j.D., Ptacek, C.J., Blowes, D.W., Groza, L.G., Moncur, M.C.Perchlorate in lake water from an operating mine. DiavikEnvironmental Science and Technology, Vol. 49, 13, pp. 7589-7596.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik

Abstract: Mining-related perchlorate [ClO4(-)] in the receiving environment was investigated at the operating open-pit and underground Diavik diamond mine, Northwest Territories, Canada. Samples were collected over four years and ClO4(-) was measured in various mine waters, the 560 km(2) ultraoligotrophic receiving lake, background lake water and snow distal from the mine. Groundwaters from the underground mine had variable ClO4(-) concentrations, up to 157 µg L(-1), and were typically an order of magnitude higher than concentrations in combined mine waters prior to treatment and discharge to the lake. Snow core samples had a mean ClO4(-) concentration of 0.021 µg L(-1) (n=16). Snow and lake water Cl(-)/ClO4(-) ratios suggest evapoconcentration was not an important process affecting lake ClO4(-) concentrations. The multiyear mean ClO4(-) concentrations in the lake were 0.30 µg L(-1) (n = 114) in open water and 0.24 µg L(-1) (n = 107) under ice, much below the Canadian drinking water guideline of 6 µg L(-1). Receiving lake concentrations of ClO4(-) generally decreased year over year and ClO4(-) was not likely [biogeo]chemically attenuated within the receiving lake. The discharge of treated mine water was shown to contribute mining-related ClO4(-) to the lake and the low concentrations after 12 years of mining were attributed to the large volume of the receiving lake.
DS201512-1896
2015
Blowes, D.W.Bailey, B.L., Blowes, D.W., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.The Diavik waste rock project: geochemical and microbiological characterization of low sulfide content large-scale waste rock test piles.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 62, pp. 18-34.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik

Abstract: Two experimental waste-rock piles (test piles), each 15 m in height × 60 m × 50 m, were constructed at the Diavik diamond mine in Northern Canada to study the behavior of low-sulfide content waste rock, with a similarly low acid-neutralization potential, in a continuous permafrost region. One test pile with an average of 0.035 wt.% S (<50 mm fraction; referred to as Type I) and a second test pile with an average of 0.053 wt.% S (<50 mm fraction; referred to as Type III) were constructed in 2006. The average carbon content in the <50 mm fraction of waste rock in the Type I test pile was 0.031 wt.% as C and in the Type III test pile was 0.030 wt.% as C. The NP:AP ratio, based on the arithmetic mean of particle-size weighted NP and AP values, for the Type I test pile was 12.2, suggesting this test pile was non-acid generating and for the Type III test pile was 2.2, suggesting an uncertain acid-generating potential. The Type I test pile maintained near-neutral pH for the 4-year duration of the study. Sulfate and dissolved metal concentrations were low, with the exception of Ni, Zn, Cd, and Co in the fourth year following construction. The pore water in the Type III test pile contained higher concentrations of SO42- and dissolved metals, with a decrease in pH to <4.7 and an annual depletion of alkalinity. Maximum concentrations of dissolved metals (20 mg L-1 Ni, 2.3 mg L-1 Cu, 3.7 mg L-1 Zn, 35 µg L-1 Cd, and 3.8 mg L-1 Co) corresponded to decreases in flow rate, which were observed at the end of each field season when the contribution of the total outflow from the central portion of the test pile was greatest. Bacteria were present each year in spite of annual freeze/thaw cycles. The microbial community within the Type I test pile included a population of neutrophilic S-oxidizing bacteria. Each year, changes in the water quality of the Type III test-pile effluent were accompanied by changes in the microbial populations. Populations of acidophilic S-oxidizing bacteria and Fe-oxidizing bacteria became more abundant as the pH decreased and internal test pile temperatures increased. Irrespective of the cold-climate conditions and low S content of the waste rock, the geochemical and microbiological results of this study are consistent with other acid mine drainage studies; indicating that a series of mineral dissolution-precipitation reactions controls pH and metal mobility, and transport is controlled by matrix-dominated flow and internal temperatures.
DS201601-0002
2016
Blowes, D.W.Bailey, B.L., Blowes, D.W., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.The Diavik waste rock project: geochemical and microbiological characterization of low sulfide content large-scale waste rock test piles.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 65, pp. 54-72.Canada, Northwest TerritoriesDeposit - Diavik

Abstract: Two experimental waste-rock piles (test piles), each 15 m in height × 60 m × 50 m, were constructed at the Diavik diamond mine in Northern Canada to study the behavior of low-sulfide content waste rock, with a similarly low acid-neutralization potential, in a continuous permafrost region. One test pile with an average of 0.035 wt.% S (<50 mm fraction; referred to as Type I) and a second test pile with an average of 0.053 wt.% S (<50 mm fraction; referred to as Type III) were constructed in 2006. The average carbon content in the <50 mm fraction of waste rock in the Type I test pile was 0.031 wt.% as C and in the Type III test pile was 0.030 wt.% as C. The NP:AP ratio, based on the arithmetic mean of particle-size weighted NP and AP values, for the Type I test pile was 12.2, suggesting this test pile was non-acid generating and for the Type III test pile was 2.2, suggesting an uncertain acid-generating potential. The Type I test pile maintained near-neutral pH for the 4-year duration of the study. Sulfate and dissolved metal concentrations were low, with the exception of Ni, Zn, Cd, and Co in the fourth year following construction. The pore water in the Type III test pile contained higher concentrations of SO42- and dissolved metals, with a decrease in pH to <4.7 and an annual depletion of alkalinity. Maximum concentrations of dissolved metals (20 mg L-1 Ni, 2.3 mg L-1 Cu, 3.7 mg L-1 Zn, 35 µg L-1 Cd, and 3.8 mg L-1 Co) corresponded to decreases in flow rate, which were observed at the end of each field season when the contribution of the total outflow from the central portion of the test pile was greatest. Bacteria were present each year in spite of annual freeze/thaw cycles. The microbial community within the Type I test pile included a population of neutrophilic S-oxidizing bacteria. Each year, changes in the water quality of the Type III test-pile effluent were accompanied by changes in the microbial populations. Populations of acidophilic S-oxidizing bacteria and Fe-oxidizing bacteria became more abundant as the pH decreased and internal test pile temperatures increased. Irrespective of the cold-climate conditions and low S content of the waste rock, the geochemical and microbiological results of this study are consistent with other acid mine drainage studies; indicating that a series of mineral dissolution-precipitation reactions controls pH and metal mobility, and transport is controlled by matrix-dominated flow and internal temperatures.
DS201801-0081
2018
Blowes, D.W.Wilson, D., Amos, R.T., Blowes, D.W., Langman, J.B., Ptacek, C.J., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.Diavik waste rock project: a conceptual model for temperature and sulfide content dependent geochemical evolution of waste rock - Laboratory scale.Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 89, pp. 160-172.Canada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Diavik

Abstract: The Diavik Waste Rock Project consists of laboratory and field experiments developed for the investigation and scale-up of the geochemical evolution of sulfidic mine wastes. As part of this project, humidity cell experiments were conducted to assess the long-term geochemical evolution of a low-sulfide waste rock. Reactive transport modelling was used to assess the significant geochemical processes controlling oxidation of sulfide minerals and their dependence on temperature and sulfide mineral content. The geochemical evolution of effluent from waste rock with a sulfide content of 0.16 wt.% and 0.02 wt.% in humidity cells was simulated with the reactive transport model MIN3P, based on a conceptual model that included constant water flow, sulfide mineral content, sulfide oxidation controlled by the availability of oxidants, and subsequent neutralization reactions with carbonate and aluminosilicate minerals. Concentrations of Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, and SO4 in the humidity cell effluent were simulated using the shrinking core model, which represented the control of oxidant diffusion to the unreacted particle surface in the sulfide oxidation process. The influence of temperature was accounted for using the Arrhenius relation and appropriate activation energy values. Comparison of the experiment results, consisting of waste rock differentiated by sulfide mineral content and temperature, indicated surface area and temperature play important roles in rates of sulfide oxidation and release of sulfate and metals. After the model was calibrated to fit the effluent data from the higher sulfide content cells, subsequent simulations were conducted by adjusting only measured parameters, including sulfide mineral content and surface area.
DS201809-2115
2018
Blowes, D.W.Wilson, D., Amos, R.T., Blowes, D.W., Langman, J.B., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.Diavik waste rock project: Scale up of a reactive transport model for temperature and sulfide content dependent geochemical evolution of waste rock.Applied Geochemisty, Vol. 96, pp. 177-190.Canada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Diavik

Abstract: The Diavik Waste Rock Project, located in a region of continuous permafrost in northern Canada, includes complementary field and laboratory experiments with the purpose of investigating scale-up techniques for the assessment of the geochemical evolution of mine waste rock at a large scale. As part of the Diavik project, medium-scale field experiments (~1.5?m high active zone lysimeters) were conducted to assess the long term geochemical evolution and drainage of a low-sulfide waste rock under a relatively simple (i.e. constrained by the container) flow regime while exposed to atmospheric conditions. A conceptual model, including the most significant processes controlling the sulfide-mineral oxidation and weathering of the associated host minerals as observed in a laboratory humidity cell experiment, was developed as part of a previous modelling study. The current study investigated the efficacy of scaling the calibrated humidity cell model to simulate the geochemical evolution of the active zone lysimeter experiments. The humidity cell model was used to simulate the geochemical evolution of low-sulfide waste rock with S content of 0.053?wt.% and 0.035?wt.% (primarily pyrrhotite) in the active zone lysimeter experiments using the reactive transport code MIN3P. Water flow through the lysimeters was simulated using temporally variable infiltration estimated from precipitation measurements made within 200?m of the lysimeters. Flow parameters and physical properties determined during previous studies at Diavik were incorporated into the simulations to reproduce the flow regime. The geochemical evolution of the waste-rock system was simulated by adjustment of the sulfide-mineral content to reflect the values measured at the lysimeters. The temperature dependence of the geochemical system was considered using temperature measurements taken daily, adjacent to the lysimeters, to correct weathering rates according to the Arrhenius equation. The lysimeter simulations indicated that a model developed from simulations of laboratory humidity cell experiments, incorporating detailed representations of temporally variable temperature and water infiltration, can be scaled to provide a reasonable assessment of geochemical evolution of the medium-scale field experiments.
DS201809-2116
2018
Blowes, D.W.Wilson, D., Sinclair, S.A., Blowes, D.W., Amos,R.T., Smith, L., Sego, D.C.Diavik waste rock project: analysis of measured and simulated acid neutralization processes within a large scale field experiment.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractCanada, Northwest Territoriesdeposit - Diavik

Abstract: The geochemical evolution of mine-waste rock often includes concurrent acid generation and neutralization processes. Deposition of mine-waste rock in large, oxygenated, and partially saturated piles can result in release of metals and decreased pH from weathering of sulfide minerals. Acid neutralization processes can often mitigate metals and pH impacts associated with sulfide oxidation. The Diavik Waste Rock Project included large field experiments (test piles built in 2006) conducted to characterize weathering of sulfide waste rock at a scale representative of full size waste-rock piles. Water samples from the unsaturated interior of one of the test piles, constructed of waste rock with ~0.05 wt.% S, were collected using soil water solution samplers and drains at the base of the pile. Field observations indicated pH decreased throughout the depth of the pile during 2008 and 2009 and that carbonate mineral buffering was entirely depleted by 2011 or 2012. Carbonate mineral exhaustion was accompanied by increased concentrations of dissolved Al and Fe in effluent samples collected at the basal drains. These results suggest that dissolution of Al and Fe(oxy)hydroxides occurred after the depletion of carbonate minerals following an acid neutralization sequence that is similar to observations made by previous researchers. A conceptual model of acid neutralization proceses within the pile, developed using physical and geochemical measurements conducted from 2008 to 2012, was used to inform reactive transport simulations conducted in 2017 to quantify the dominant acid neutralization processes within the test pile interior. Reactive transport simulations indicate that the conceptual model developed using the results of field samples provides a reasonable assessment of the evolution of the acid neutralization sequence.
DS1950-0457
1959
Bloxam, T.W.Bloxam, T.W.Glaucophane Schists and Associated Rocks Near Valley Ford, CaliforniaAmerican Journal of Science, Vol. 257, PP. 95-112.GlobalKimberlite
DS1950-0458
1959
Bloxam, T.W.Bloxam, T.W., Allen, J.B.Glaucophane Schist, Eclogite and Associated Rocks from Knock normal in the Girvan Ballantrae Complex, South Ayrshire.Royal Society. EDINBURGH Transactions, Vol. 64, PP. 1-28.ScotlandRelated Rocks
DS1989-0128
1989
Bloxham, J.Bloxham, J., Gubbins, D.The evolution of the earth's magnetic fieldScientific American, Vol. 261, No. 6, December pp. 68-75GlobalGeophysics, Overview - magnetic fields
DS1991-0131
1991
Bloxham, J.Bloxham, J., Jackson, A.Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer coreReviews of Geophysics, Vol. 29, No. 1, February pp. 97-120GlobalEarth's core, Core/mantle
DS1993-0131
1993
Bloxham, J.Bloxham, J.Mapping the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary: constraints on thegeodyanamoGsa Today, Vol. 3, No. 9, September pp. 1, 224, 225, 229-233MantleGeophysics -seismics, Geotectonics
DS1994-1055
1994
Bloxham, J.Love, J.J., Bloxham, J.Electromagnetic coupling and the toroidal magnetic field at the core-mantleboundary.Geophys. Journal of International, Vol. 117, No. 1, April pp. 235-256.MantleGeophysics -magnetics, Boundary -experimental
DS1997-1292
1997
Bloxham, J.Zatman, S., Bloxham, J.Torsional oscillations and the magnetic field within the Earth's coreNature, Vol. 388, Aug. 21, pp. 760-763.MantleGeophysics - magnetics
DS2002-0172
2002
Bloxham, J.Bloxham, J.Time independent and time dependent behaviour of high latitude flux bundles at the core-mantle boundary.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 29, 18, 10.1029/2001GLO14543MantleGeophysics
DS1991-0369
1991
Bluck, B.J.Dempster, T.J., Bluck, B.J.Xenoliths in the lamprophyre dykes of Lomondside: constraints on the nature of the crust beneath the southern DalradianScottish Journal of Geology, Vol. 27, pt. 2, pp. 157-166ScotlandLamprophyres, Xenoliths
DS1999-0329
1999
Bluck, B.J.Jacob, R.J., Bluck, B.J., Ward, J.D.Tertiary age Diamondiferous fluvial deposits of the Lower Orange RiverValley, southwestern Africa.Economic Geology, Vol. 94, No. 5, Aug. pp. 749-58.South AfricaDiamond alluvials, Orange River area
DS2002-0054
2002
Bluck, B.J.Apollis, L., Bluck, B.J., Ward, J.D.The distribution of diamonds on a Late Cenzoic gravel beach, sw Namibia.( Orange River mouth).11th. Quadrennial Iagod Symposium And Geocongress 2002 Held Windhoek, Abstract p. 18.NamibiaGeomorphology, alluvials
DS2003-0120
2003
Bluck, B.J.Bluck, B.J., Ward, J.D., De Wit, M.J.The making of a diamond mega-placer on the margin of the Kalahari craton: guidelinesTransactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 112, August p. 199. (1p.)South AfricaPlacers, alluvials
DS200412-0165
2003
Bluck, B.J.Bluck, B.J., Ward, J.D., De Wit, M.J.The making of a diamond mega-placer on the margin of the Kalahari craton: guidelines for future prospecting.Transactions of the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy, Vol. 112, August p. 199. (1p.)Africa, South AfricaPlacers, alluvials
DS200612-0141
2005
Bluck, B.J.Bluck, B.J., Ward, D.J., De Wit, M.C.J.Diamond megaplacers, southern Africa and the Kaapvaal Craton in a global context.Geological Society of London Special Paper, No. 248, pp. 213-246.Africa, South AfricaPlacers, alluvials
DS200612-0632
2006
Bluck, B.J.Jacob, J., Ward, J.D., Bluck, B.J., Scholz, R.A., Frimmel, H.E.Some observations on Diamondiferous bedrock gully trapsites on Late Cainozoic, marine cut platforms of the Sperrgebiet, Namibia.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 28, 4, pp. 493-506.Africa, NamibiaGeomorphology, alluvials, placers
DS200612-1339
2006
Bluck, B.J.Spaggiari, R.I., Bluck, B.J., Ward, J.D.Characteristics of Diamondiferous Plio PLeistocene littoral deposits within the palaeo Orange River mouth, Namibia.Ore Geology Reviews, Vol. 28, 4, pp. 475-492.Africa, NamibiaGeomorphology, alluvials, placers, marine
DS201012-0059
2010
Bluck, B.J.Bluck, B.J.Structure of gravel beaches and their relationship to tidal range.Sedimentology, in press availableNot specific to diamonds but of interest
DS1900-0013
1900
Blue, A.Blue, A.Are There Diamonds in Ontario?Ontario Bureau of Mines Annual Report, Vol. 9, PP. 119-124. ALSO: Canadian Mining Journal, Vol. 3, PP. 149-Canada, Ontario, Great LakesDiamond Occurrence
DS1900-0056
1901
Blue, A.Blue, A.Diamond Mining. #3Australia Mining Standard., Vol. 20, PP. 46-47.Africa, South AfricaMining
DS1900-0057
1901
Blue, A.Blue, A.Source of Diamonds in Glacial MoraineMineral Resources of The United States For 1899, P. 8.United States, Wisconsin, Ohio, Great Lakes, CanadaDiamond Occurrence
DS200412-0166
2003
Blue Diamond Mining CorporationBlue Diamond Mining CorporationBlue Diamond has started work on its Lac Joubert and Schmidt properties.Blue Diamond Mining Corporation, Dec. 4, 1p.Canada, Quebec, Otish MountainsNews item - press release
DS1981-0086
1981
Bluechel, K.Bluechel, K., Medenbach, O.The Wonder of Minerals; Crystals, Gold and Precious StonesDokumente., 287P.GlobalDiamonds, Kimberlite, Kimberley
DS201512-1899
2015
Bluemel, B.Bluemel, B., Dunn, C., Hart, C., Leijd, M.Biogeochemical expressions of buried REE mineralization at Norra Karr, southern Sweden.Symposium on critical and strategic materials, British Columbia Geological Survey Paper 2015-3, held Nov. 13-14, pp. 231-240.TechnologyRare earths

Abstract: Biogeochemical exploration is an effective but underutilized method for delineating covered mineralization. Plants are capable of accumulating rare earth elements (REEs) in their tissue, and ferns (pteridophytes) are especially adept because they are one of the most primitive land plants, therefore lack the barrier mechanisms developed by more evolved plants. The Norra Kärr Alkaline Complex, located in southern Sweden approximately 300km southwest of Stockholm, is a peralkaline nepheline syenite enriched in heavy rare earth elements (HREEs). The deposit, roughly 300m wide, 1300m long, and overlain by up to 4 m of Quaternary sediments, has been well-defined by diamond drilling. The inferred REE mineral resource, over 60 million tonnes averaging 0.54% Total Rare Earth Oxide (TREO), is dominantly hosted within the pegmatitic “grennaite” unit, a eudialyte-catapleiite-aegerine nepheline syenite. Vegetation and soil samples were collected from the surficial environment above Norra Kärr to address four key questions: which plant species is the most effective biogeochemical exploration medium; what are the annual and seasonal REE variations in that plant; how do the REEs move through the soil profile; and into which part of the plant are they concentrated. Athyrium filix-femina (lady fern) has the highest concentration of LREEs and HREEs (up to 125.17ppm Ce and 1.03ppm Dy) in its dry leaves; however, there is better contrast between background and anomalous areas in Dryopteris filix-mas (wood fern), which makes it the preferred biogeochemical sampling medium. The REE content in all fern species was shown to decrease from root > frond > stem, and chondrite normalized REE patterns within the plant displayed preferential fractionation of the LREEs in the fronds relative to the roots. Samples collected from an area directly overlying the deposit had up to five times greater HREE content (0.74ppm Dy) in August than the same plants did in June (0.14ppm Dy). The elevated REE content and distinct contrast to background demonstrate that biogeochemical sampling is an effective method for REE exploration in this environment.
DS1985-0068
1985
Bluemel, G.Bluemel, G., Lahner, L.Minas Gerais, Brasil; Myths and Realities.(in German)Geologische Blaetter Fuer Nordost Bayern Und Angrenzende Gebiete, Vol. 34-35, pp. 735-754BrazilDiamonds Discussed, Overview
DS1995-0004
1995
Bluemle, J.P.Aber, J.S., Bluemle, J.P., Brighton-Grette, J., et al.Glaciotectonic map of North AmericaGeological Society of America (GSA) Map, No. MCHO79, 1: 6, 500, 000 $ 21.00Canada, United StatesMap, Glaciology, glacial, structures
DS1984-0158
1984
Blum, A.E.Blum, A.E.Chemical weathering and controls on the chemistry of infiltrating solutions in a forested watershed, Medicine BowMountains, WyomingMsc. Thesis, University of Wyoming, 89pWyomingBlank
DS2003-1263
2003
Blum, J.Shen, Y., Blum, J.Seismic evidence for accumulated oceanic crust above the 660 km discontinuityGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 18, 1925 DOI.1029/2003GLO17991South AfricaMantle, subductioon, geophysics - seismics, Ca-perovski
DS200412-0167
2004
Blum, J.Blum, J., Shen, Y.Thermal, hydrous and mechanical states of the mantle transition zone beneath southern Africa.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 217, 3-4, pp. 367-378.Africa, South AfricaGeophysics - seismics, geothermometry. discontinuity, c
DS200412-1802
2003
Blum, J.Shen, Y., Blum, J.Seismic evidence for accumulated oceanic crust above the 660 km discontinuity beneath southern Africa.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, 18, 1925 DOI.1029/2003 GLO17991Africa, South AfricaMantle, subductioon, geophysics - seismics, Ca-perovski
DS1860-0542
1887
Blum, J.R.Blum, J.R.Taschenbuch der EdelsteinkundeLeipzig:, GlobalGemology
DS1940-0092
1945
Blum, V.J.Blum, V.J.The Magnetic Field over Igneous PipesGeophysics, Vol. 10, PP. 368-375.GlobalKimberlite, Geophysics
DS1998-0905
1998
Blume, J.Lutjen, H., Blume, J., Pretorius, C.C.Geophysical survey over the Elizabeth Bay mine, Namibia. ( aeoliandeposits).7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 518-20.NamibiaGeophysics - seismics, resistivity, borehole, Deposit - Elizabeth Bay
DS1998-1186
1998
Blume, J.Pretorius, C.C., Blume, J., Lutjen, TrofimczykResults of geophysical trials to profile the kimberlite/host rock contacts at Venetia and BK-9 pipe.7th. Kimberlite Conference abstract, pp. 708-9.South Africa, BotswanaGeophysics - resistivity imaging, Deposit - Venetia, BK-9
DS1999-0636
1999
Blumel, P.Schulte, B.A., Blumel, P.Metamorphic evolution of eclogite and associated garnet mica schist in the high pressure metamorphic Maksyutov.Geologische Rundschau, Vol. 87, No. 4, pp. 561-76.Russia, UralsComplex - Maksyutov, Eclogite, metamorphic
DS200612-0082
2006
Blumenau, A.T.Bangert, U., Barnes, R., Hounsome, L.S., Jones, R., Blumenau, A.T., Briddon, P.R., Shaw, M.J., Oberg, S.Electron energy loss spectroscopic studies of brown diamonds.Philosophical Magazine, Vol. 86, no. 29/31, pp. 4757-4780.TechnologyBrown diamonds
DS1996-0585
1996
Blundell, D.Hall, R., Blundell, D.Tectonic evolution of southeast AsiaGeological Society of London, Special Publication No. 106, 600p. approx. 175.00 UnitedPhilippines, Indonesia, Laos, Thailand, Papua New Guinea, ChinaBook -table of contents, Tectonics, ophiolites, Banda arc, orogeny, Bacan
DS1998-0133
1998
Blundell, D.Blundell, D., Scott, A.C.Lyell: the past is the key to the presentGeological Society of London Spec. Pub, No. 143, 376p. $ 132.00GlobalBook - ad, History of science
DS1975-0243
1976
Blundell, D.J.Blundell, D.J.Active Faults in West AfricaEarth Planet. Sci. Letters, Vol. 31, PP. 287-290.West Africa, GuineaStructure, Tectonics
DS1990-0214
1990
Blundell, D.J.Blundell, D.J.Seismic images of continental lithosphereJournal of Geological Society of London, Vol. 147, pp. 895-913.MantleGeophysics - seismics, Moho, lithosphere
DS1990-0215
1990
Blundell, D.J.Blundell, D.J., Gibbs, A.D.Tectonic evolution of the North Sea riftsClarendon Press, Oxford, 272p. Cost?North SeaTectonics, Rifting
DS1996-0586
1996
Blundell, D.J.Hall, R., Blundell, D.J.Tectonic evolution of southeast Asia: introductionGeological Society of London Special Paper, No. 106, pp. Vii-XiiiGlobalTectonics
DS2002-0173
2002
Blundell, D.J.Blundell, D.J., Neubauer, F., Von Quadt, A.The timing and location of major ore deposits in an evolving orogenGeological Society of London (U.K.), 368p.$ 142.00 http://bookshop.geolsoc.org.ukGlobalBook - metallogeny, GEODE conference papers
DS2003-0121
2003
Blundell, D.J.Blundell, D.J., Neubauer, F., Von Quadt, A.The timing and location of major ore deposits in an evolving orogenGeological Society of London Special Paper, No. 204, 368p. $200. www.geolsoc.orgGlobalGeodynamic processes, metallogeny, Book - not specific to diamonds
DS1998-1518
1998
BlundyVan Westerenen, W., Blundy, Purton, WoodTowards a predictive model for garnet melt trace element partitioning:experimental and computational..Mineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 1580-1.MantleGeochemistry, Garnets, grossular
DS200912-0805
2009
BlundyWalter, M.J., Bulanova, G.P., Armstrong, L.S., Keshav, S., Blundy, Gudfinnsson, Lord, Lennie, Clark, GobboPrimary carbonatite melt from deeply subducted oceanic crust.Nature, Vol. 459, July 31, pp. 622-626.South America, Brazil, MantleMelting, geochemistry
DS2000-0091
2000
Blundy, J.Blundy, J., Dalton, J.Experimental comparison of trace element partitioning between clinopyroxene and melt in carbonate silicate..Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 139, No. 3, pp. 356-MantleMetasomatism
DS2000-0092
2000
Blundy, J.Blundy, J., Dalton, J.Experimental comparison of trace element partioning between clinopyroxene and melt in carbonate, silicate..Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 139, No. 3, pp. 356-71.MantlePetrogenesis, Mantle Metasomatism
DS2001-0653
2001
Blundy, J.Landwehr, D., Blundy, J., Chamorro-Perez, Hill, E., WoodU series disequilibration temperatures generated by partial melting of spinel lherzoliteEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 188, No. 3-4, pp. 329-48.MantleMelting, lherzolite
DS2003-0122
2003
Blundy, J.Blundy, J., Wood, B.Partitioning of trace elements between crystals and meltsEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 210, 3-4, pp. 383-397.GlobalBlank
DS200412-0168
2004
Blundy, J.Blundy, J., Brooker, R.Chemical discrimination between melts from the lower crust and slab.Lithos, ABSTRACTS only, Vol. 73, p. S10. abstractMantleSubduction
DS200412-0169
2003
Blundy, J.Blundy, J., Wood, B.Partitioning of trace elements between crystals and melts.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 210, 3-4, pp. 383-397.TechnologyMineral chemistry
DS201012-0079
2010
Blundy, J.Bulanova, G.P., Walter, M.J., Smith, C.B.,Kohn, C.C.,Armstrong, L.S., Blundy, J.,Gobbo, L.Mineral inclusions in sublithospheric diamonds from Collier 4 kimberlite pipe, Juina, Brazil: subducted protoliths, carbonated melts and primary kimberlite ..Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 160, 4, pp. 489-50.South America, BrazilMagmatism
DS201412-0099
2014
Blundy, J.Caricchi, L., Annen, C., Blundy, J., Simpson, G., Pinel, V.Supervolcanoes erupt by their own rules. Mega-eruptions and smaller volcanoes are triggered by different mechanisms.Nature Geoscience, Jan. 5, 2p.MantleVolcanoes
DS201901-0042
2018
Blundy, J.Jackson, M.D., Blundy, J., Sparks, R.S.J. Chemical differentiation, cold storage and remobilization of magma in the Earth's crust.Nature, Vol. 564, pp. 405-409.Mantlemagmatism

Abstract: The formation, storage and chemical differentiation of magma in the Earth’s crust is of fundamental importance in igneous geology and volcanology. Recent data are challenging the high-melt-fraction ‘magma chamber’ paradigm that has underpinned models of crustal magmatism for over a century, suggesting instead that magma is normally stored in low-melt-fraction "mush reservoirs". A mush reservoir comprises a porous and permeable framework of closely packed crystals with melt present in the pore space1,10. However, many common features of crustal magmatism have not yet been explained by either the ‘chamber’ or ‘mush reservoir’ concepts. Here we show that reactive melt flow is a critical, but hitherto neglected, process in crustal mush reservoirs, caused by buoyant melt percolating upwards through, and reacting with, the crystals. Reactive melt flow in mush reservoirs produces the low-crystallinity, chemically differentiated (silicic) magmas that ascend to form shallower intrusions or erupt to the surface. These magmas can host much older crystals, stored at low and even sub-solidus temperatures, consistent with crystal chemistry data. Changes in local bulk composition caused by reactive melt flow, rather than large increases in temperature, produce the rapid increase in melt fraction that remobilizes these cool- or cold-stored crystals. Reactive flow can also produce bimodality in magma compositions sourced from mid- to lower-crustal reservoirs. Trace-element profiles generated by reactive flow are similar to those observed in a well studied reservoir now exposed at the surface. We propose that magma storage and differentiation primarily occurs by reactive melt flow in long-lived mush reservoirs, rather than by the commonly invoked process of fractional crystallization in magma chambers.
DS202002-0166
2019
Blundy, J.Blundy, J.Carbon - beautiful, essential, deadly.Elements, Vol. 15, p. 367 1p.Globalcarbon
DS1991-0132
1991
Blundy, J.D.Blundy, J.D., Brodholt, J.P., Wood, B.J.Carbon-fluid equilibration temperatures and the oxidation state of the upper mantleNature, Vol. 349, No. 6307, January 24, pp. 321-323GlobalMantle, Geochemistry
DS1998-1592
1998
Blundy, J.D.Wood, B.J., Blundy, J.D., Robinson, J.A.C.Crystal chemical constraints on the partitioning of U series elements during mantle melting.Mineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 1664.MantlePetrology - experimental
DS1999-0806
1999
Blundy, J.D.Wood, B.J., Blundy, J.D., Robinson, J.A.C.The role of clinopyroxene in generating U series disequilibrium during mantle melting.Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 63, No. 10, May 1, pp. 1613-20.MantleMelting - clinopyroxenes
DS2000-0359
2000
Blundy, J.D.Green, T.H., Blundy, J.D., Adam, J., Yaxley, G.M.SIMS determination of trace element partition coefficients between clinopyroxene and basaltsLithos, Vol. 53, No. 3-4, Sept. 1, pp. 165-87.GlobalPetrology - experimental, Garnet
DS2000-0360
2000
Blundy, J.D.Green, T.H., Blundy, J.D., Adam, J., Yaxley, G.M.SIMS determination of trace element partion coefficients between garnet, clinopyroxene and basalticLithos, Vol. 53, No. 3-4, Sept. pp. 165-87.GlobalPetrology - experimental, Gpa and Temp
DS2000-0410
2000
Blundy, J.D.Hill, E., Wood, B.J., Blundy, J.D.The effect of Ca Tschermaks component on trace element partitioning between clinopyroxene and silicate melt.Lithos, Vol. 53, No. 3-4, Sept. 1, pp. 203-15.GlobalPetrology - experimental, Clinopyroxene
DS2000-0411
2000
Blundy, J.D.Hill, E., Wood, B.J., Blundy, J.D.The effect of Ca Tschermaks component on trace element partioning between clinopyroxene and silicate melt.Lithos, Vol. 53, No. 3-4, Sept. pp. 203-15.GlobalPetrology - experimental, Mineralogy - clinopyroxene
DS2000-0554
2000
Blundy, J.D.Law, K.M., Blundy, J.D., Wood, B.J., Ragnarsdottir, K.Trace element partioning between wollastonite and silicate carbonate meltMineralogical Magazine, Vol. 64, No. 4, Aug. pp. 651-62.GlobalGeochemistry, Carbonatite
DS2000-0972
2000
Blundy, J.D.Van Westeren, W., Blundy, J.D., Wood, B.J.Effect of Fe2 on garnet melt trace element partioning: experiments in FCMAS crystal chemical controls naturalLithos, Vol. 53, No. 3-4, Sept. pp. 189-201.GlobalPetrology - experimental, Mineralogy - garnet
DS2001-1189
2001
Blundy, J.D.Van Westrenen, W., Wood, B.J., Blundy, J.D.A predictive thermodynamic model of garnet melt trace element partitioningContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 142, No. 2, Nov. pp. 219-234.GlobalGarnet - mineralogy
DS2002-1734
2002
Blundy, J.D.Wood, B.J., Blundy, J.D.The effect of H2O on crystal melt partitiioning of trace elementsGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 66, 20, pp. 3647-56.GlobalGeochemistry - melting, water
DS2003-0170
2003
Blundy, J.D.Brooker, R.A., Du, Z., Blundy, J.D., Kelley, S.P., Allan, N.L., Wood, B.J.The zero charge partitioning behaviour of noble gases during mantle meltingNature, No. 6941, June 12, pp. 738-41.MantleBlank
DS2003-0908
2003
Blundy, J.D.McDade, P., Blundy, J.D., Wood, B.J.Trace element partitioning between mantle wedge peridotite and hydrous MgO richAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 88, pp. 1825-31.Mantle, AntillesSlab, subduction, LILE
DS200412-0220
2003
Blundy, J.D.Brooker, R.A., Du, Z., Blundy, J.D., Kelley, S.P., Allan, N.L., Wood, B.J., Chamorro, E.M., Wartho, J.A., PurtThe zero charge partitioning behaviour of noble gases during mantle melting.Nature, No. 6941, June 12, pp. 738-41.MantleMelt, geochemistry
DS200412-1266
2003
Blundy, J.D.McDade, P., Blundy, J.D., Wood, B.J.Trace element partitioning between mantle wedge peridotite and hydrous MgO rich melt.American Mineralogist, Vol. 88, pp. 1825-31.Mantle, AntillesSlab, subduction, LILE
DS200512-0115
2004
Blundy, J.D.Brooker, R.A., James, R.H., Blundy, J.D.Trace elements and Li isotope systematics in Zabargad peridotites: evidence of ancient subduction processes in the Red Sea mantle.Chemical Geology, Vol. 212, 1-2, pp. 179-204.Mantle, EuropeSubduction
DS200612-0029
2006
Blundy, J.D.Annen, C., Blundy, J.D., Sparks, R.S.J.The genesis of intermediate and silicic magmas in deep crustal hot zones.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 47, 3, pp. 505-539.MantleMagmatism - not specific to diamonds
DS201112-0795
2011
Blundy, J.D.Pickles, J., Blundy, J.D., Sweeney, R., Smith, C.B.Experimental investigation of garnet cpx geobarometers in eclogites.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1640.TechnologyGeothermometry
DS201212-0556
2012
Blundy, J.D.Pinilla, C., Davis, S.E., Scott, T.B., Allan, N.L., Blundy, J.D.Interfacial storage of noble gases and oher trace elements in magmatic systems.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 319-320, pp. 287-294.MantleBulk silicates
DS201212-0687
2012
Blundy, J.D.Solano, J.M.S., Jackson, M.D., Sparks, R.S.J., Blundy, J.D., Annen, C.Melt segregation in deep crustal hot zones: a mechanism for chemical differentiation, crustal assimilation and the formation of evolved magmas.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 53, 10, pp. 1999-2026.MantleHotspots, magmatism
DS201605-0812
2016
Blundy, J.D.Blundy, J.D., Annen, C.J.Enigmatic relationship between silicic volcanic and plutonic rocks: crustal magmatic systems from the perspective of heat transfer.Elements, Vol. 12, pp. 115-120.TechnologyMagmatism
DS201607-1311
2016
Blundy, J.D.Pickels, J.R., Blundy, J.D., Brroker, R.A.Trace element thermometry of garnet-clinopyroxene pairs. ( diamond formation)American Mineralogist, Vol. 101, pp. 1438-1450.MantleGeothermometry

Abstract: We present major and trace element data on coexisting garnet and clinopyroxene from experiments carried out between 1.3 and 10 GPa and 970 and 1400 °C. We demonstrate that the lattice strain model, which was developed for applications to mineral-melt partitioning, can be adapted to garnet-clinopyroxene partitioning. Using new and published experimental data we develop a geothermometer for coexisting garnet and clinopyroxene using the concentration of rare earth elements (REE). The thermometer, which is based on an extension of the lattice strain model, exploits the tendency of minerals at elevated temperatures to be less discriminating against cations that are too large or too small for lattice sites. The extent of discrimination against misfit cations is also related to the apparent elasticity of the lattice site on which substitution occurs, in this case the greater stiffness of the dodecahedral X-site in garnet compared with the eightfold M2-site in clinopyroxene. We demonstrate that the ratio of REE in clinopyroxene to that in coexisting garnet is particularly sensitive to temperature. We present a method whereby knowledge of the major and REE chemistry of garnet and clinopyroxene can be used to solve for the equilibrium temperature. The method is applicable to any scenario in which the two minerals are in equilibrium, both above and below the solidus, and where the mole fraction of grossular in garnet is less than 0.4. Our method, which can be widely applied to both peridotitic and eclogitic paragenesis with particular potential for diamond exploration studies, has the advantage over commonly used Fe-Mg exchange thermometers in having a higher closure temperature because of slow interdiffusion of REE. The uncertainty in the calculated temperatures, based on the experimental data set, is less than ±80 °C.
DS2002-0863
2002
Blundym J.D.Klemme, S., Blundym J.D., Wood, B.J.Experimental constraints on major and trace element partitioning during partial melting of eclogite.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 66, 17, pp. 3109-23.MantleEclogites
DS2001-1165
2001
BlushanTorsvik, T.H., Carter, L.M., Ashwal, Blushan, PanditRodinia refined or obscured; paleomagnetism of the Malani igneous suitePrecambrian Research, Vol. 108, No. 3, June 1, pp. 319-33.IndiaGeophysics - paleomagnetics
DS1987-0168
1987
Blusson, S.L.Dummett, H.T., Fipke, C.E., Blusson, S.L.Diamond exploration in the North American Cordillerain: Geoexpo/86, A.E.G. publ, pp. 168-176British ColumbiaDiatremes
DS1998-0134
1998
Blusson, S.L.Blusson, S.L.Key steps to discovery of the Slave Craton diamond field, Northwest TerritoriesPathways '98 extended abstracts, p. 25. abstractNorthwest TerritoriesExploration - brief
DS2001-1086
2001
BlusztajnSkovgaard, A.C., Storey, M., Baker, Blusztajn, HartOsmium oxygen isotopic evidence for a recycled and strongly depleted component in the Iceland mantle plumeEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 194, No. 1-2, pp. 259-75.IcelandPlume, Geochronology
DS1994-0173
1994
Blusztajn, J.Blusztajn, J., Shimizu, N.The trace element variations in clinopyroxenes from spinel peridotite xenoliths from Western Victoria.Chemical Geology, Vol. 111, No. 1-4, January 5, pp. 227-244.GlobalXenoliths
DS1995-0766
1995
Blusztajn, J.Hart, S.R., Blusztajn, J., Craddock, C.Cenozoic volcanism in Antarctica: Jones Mountains and Peter I IslandGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 59, No. 16, August 1, pp. 3379-88.Antarcticavolcanism., Alkaline rocks
DS2002-0174
2002
Blusztajn, J.Blusztajn, J., Hegner, E.Osmium isotope systematics of melilitites from the Tertiary Central European Volcanic province in SW Germany.Chemical geology, Vol. 189, 1-2, pp. 91-103.GermanyMelilitites, Geochronology
DS2003-0974
2003
Blusztajn, J.Moreira, M., Blusztajn, J., Curtice, J., Hart, S., Dick, H., KurzHe and Ne isotopes in oceanic crust: implications for noble gas recycling in the mantleEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 216, 4, pp. 635-43.MantleGeochronology
DS200412-1365
2003
Blusztajn, J.Moreira, M., Blusztajn, J., Curtice, J., Hart, S., Dick, H., KurzHe and Ne isotopes in oceanic crust: implications for noble gas recycling in the mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 216, 4, pp. 635-43.MantleGeochronology
DS200612-1557
2006
Blusztajn, J.Xu, Y.G., Blusztajn, J., Ma, J.L., Hart, S.R.In searching for old lithospheric relict beneath North Chin a Craton: Sr Nd Os isotopic composition of peridotite xenoliths from Yangyuan.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 3. abstract only.ChinaGeochronology
DS200812-1284
2008
Blusztajn, J.Xu, Y-G., Blusztajn, J., Ma, J-L., Suzuki, K., Liu, J.F., Hart, S.R.Late Archean to Early Proterozoic lithospheric mantle beneath the western North Chin a craton: Sr Nd Os isotopes of peridotite xenoliths from Yangyuan and FansiLithos, Vol. 102, 3-4, pp.25-42.ChinaGeochronology
DS201112-0510
2011
Blusztajn, J.Kelemen, P.B., Maiter, J., Sireil, E.E., Rudge, J.F., Curry, W.B., Blusztajn, J.Rates and mechanisms of mineral carbonation in peridotite: natural processes and recipes for enhanced, in situ CO2 capture and storage.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 39, pp. 545-576.MantleMineral carbonation
DS1991-0133
1991
Bluth, G.J.Bluth, G.J., Kump, L.R.Phanerozoic paleogeologyAmerican Journal of Science, Vol. 291, March pp. 284-308GlobalGeochemical cycles, Paleogeography
DS2002-0175
2002
Blyuman, B.A.Blyuman, B.A.Possibility of the impact paragenesis of diamond bearing eclogites with gray gneiss and basalt komatiite complexes.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 384,4,pp.409-11.GlobalPetrology - eclogites
DS2003-0123
2003
Blyuman, B.A.Blyuman, B.A.Solar helium and neon in diamonds and basalts of plumes and hot spots: possible timingGeochemistry International, Vol. 41, 3, pp. 305-8.MantleGenesis
DS200412-0170
2004
Blyuman, B.A.Blyuman, B.A.Lithosphere and geodynamics at the 2.5 Ga boundary.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 394, 1, Jan-Feb. pp. 1-4.MantleTectonics
DS200412-0171
2003
Blyuman, B.A.Blyuman, B.A.Solar helium and neon in diamonds and basalts of plumes and hot spots: possible timing and genesis of heterogeneity in the lowerGeochemistry International, Vol. 41, 3, pp. 305-8.MantleGenesis
DS201212-0460
2012
Bmbi, A.C.J.M.Melgarejo, J.C., Costanzo, A., Bmbi, A.C.J.M., Goncalves, A.O., Neto, A.B.Subsolidus processes as a key factor on the distribution of Nb species in plutonic carbonatites: the Tchivira case, Angola.Lithos, Vol. 152, pp. 187-201.Africa, AngolaCarbonatite
DS1991-0134
1991
BMR AustraliaBMR AustraliaKalimantan geological mapBmr Geology And Geophysics, 1: 1 million full colour $ 50.00 plus $ 15.00 airmailGlobalGeology, Map
DS1991-0135
1991
BMR.BMR.Regolith database handbookBmr., $45.00 inc. overseas chargesAustraliaComputer, Program -RTMAP regolith database
DS200412-1891
2004
BNayak, S.S.Sridhar, M., Chowdhary, V.S., BNayak, S.S., Augustine, P.F.Discovery of kimberlite pipes in Gadwal area, Mahbubnagar District, Andhra Pradesh.Journal of Geological Society of India, Vol. 63, 1, pp. 95-99.India, Andhra PradeshKimberlite
DS2002-0894
2002
BnyKouzmanov, K., Bailly, L., Ramboz, C., Rouer, O., BnyMorphology, origin and infrared microthermometry of fluid inclusions in pyrite from Radka epithermal copperMineralium deposita, BulgariaCopper, gold, geochronology, Deposit - Radka, Srednogorie zone
DS201902-0262
2018
Bo, T.Bo, T., Katz, R.F., Shorttle, O., Rudge, J.F.The melting column as a filter of mantle trace element heterogeneity.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, Vol. 19, 12, pp. 4694-4721.Mantlemelting

Abstract: Basaltic lavas, created by melting the convecting mantle, show variability of concentration of trace element that are correlated with their affinity for the liquid phase during melting. The observed variability in lavas and melt inclusions carries information about heterogeneity in the mantle. The difficulty is to disentangle the contributions of source heterogeneity (i.e., spatial variability of mantle composition before melting) and process heterogeneity (i.e., spatial and temporal variability in melt transport). Here we develop an end-member model of the source heterogeneity and show that it is inadequate to explain observations.
DS1960-0794
1967
Boadu, M.K.Boadu, M.K.The Diamond Industry of Oda District with Special Reference to its Socio-economic Effects.Thesis, Winneba Advanced Teacher Training College., Ghana, West AfricaSociology, History
DS1988-0185
1988
Boak, J.L.Dymek, R.F., Boak, J.L., Brothers, S.C.Titanium chondrite- and titaium clinohumite-bearing metadunite from the3800 Ma Usua supracrustal belt, west Greenland:chemistry, petrology andoriginAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 73, No. 5-6, May-June pp. 547-558GreenlandBlank
DS201809-2083
2018
Boallaran, T.B.Schulze, K., Marquardt, H., Kawazoe, T., Boallaran, T.B., McCammon, C., Koch-Muller, M., Kurnosov, A., Marquardt, K.Seismically invisable water in Earth's transition zone?Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 498, pp. 9-16.Mantlewater

Abstract: Ringwoodite, the dominant mineral at depths between 520 km and 660 km, can store up to 2-3 wt.% of water in its crystal structure, making the Earth's transition zone a plausible water reservoir that plays a central role in Earth's deep water cycle. Experiments show that hydration of ringwoodite significantly reduces elastic wave velocities at room pressure, but the effect of pressure remains poorly constrained. Here, a novel experimental setup enables a direct quantification of the effect of hydration on ringwoodite single-crystal elasticity and density at pressures of the Earth's transition zone and high temperatures. Our data show that the hydration-induced reduction of seismic velocities almost vanishes at conditions of the transition zone. Seismic data thus agree with a wide range of water contents in the transition zone.
DS201012-0021
2010
Boamah, D.Asiedu, D.K., Dampare, S.B., Samoah Sakyi, P., Boamah, D.Major and trace element geochemistry of kimberlitic rocks in the Akwatia area of the Birim Diamondiferous field, southwest Ghana.African Journal of Science and Technology, Science and Engineering series, Vol. 8, 2, pp. 81-91.Africa, GhanaDeposit - Akwatia
DS200812-0120
2008
Boanadiman, C.Boanadiman, C., Coltari, M., Duggen, S., Paludetti, L., Siena,F.,Thirwall, M.F., Upton, BGJ.Paleozoic subduction related and kimberlite or carbonatite metasomatism in the Scottish lithospheric mantle.Geological Society of London, Special Publications no. 293, pp. 303-334.Europe, ScotlandSubduction
DS1997-0639
1997
Boardman, J.W.Kruse, F.A., Boardman, J.W.Characterization and mapping of kimberlites and related diatremes using airborne visible/ Infrared imaging...Twelfth Geologic Remote Sensing, Nov. 17th., AbstractsUtah, Colorado, WyomingGeophysics - remote sensing, Spectrometer
DS201903-0524
2000
Boardman, J.W.Kruse, F.A., Boardman, J.W.Characterization and mapping of kimberlites and related diatremes using hyperspectral remote sensing.IEEE.org * note date , pp. 299-304.United States, Colorado, Wyomingdeposit - Kelsey Lake

Abstract: Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and commercially-available HyMap hyperspectral data were used to study the occurrence and mineralogical characteristics of limberlite diatremes in the State-Line district of Colorado/Wyoming. A mosaic of five flightlines of AVIRIS data acquired during 1996 with 20-m resolution is being used to locate and characterize the kimberlite diatremes. Higher spatial resolution data (1.6 m AVIRIS and 4m HyMap acquired in 1998 and 1999, respectively) are being used to map additional detail. Poor exposures, vegetation cover, and weathering, however, make identification of characteristic kimberlite minerals difficult except where exposed by mining. Minerals identified in the district using the hyperspectral data include calcite, dolomite, illite/muscovite, and serpentine (principally antigorite), however, most spectral signatures are dominated by both green and dry vegetation. The goal of this work is to determine methods for characterizing subtle mineralogic changes associated with kimberlites as a guide to exploration in a variety of geologic terrains.
DS200912-0057
2009
Boari, E.Boari, E., Tommasini, S., Laurenzi, M.A., Conticelli, S.Transition from ultrapotassic kamafugitic to sub-alkaline magmas: Sr Nd and Pb isotope, trace element and 40Ar 39Ar age dat a from the Middle LatinJournal of Petrology, Vol. 50,no. 7,. pp. 1327-1357.Europe, ItalyKamafugite
DS1993-0890
1993
Boatikov, D.A.Lazko, E.E., Sharkov, E.V., Boatikov, D.A.Mantle substrates, their geochemical typization and role in the subcrust magma formation. (Russian)Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), No. 2, February pp. 165-188Russia, Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)Geochemistry, Mantle, crust
DS1992-0135
1992
Boberg, B.Boberg, B.Diamond and gold exploration in Liberia, West AfricaBoberg Geotech International Ltd. November 1992, 1p. abstract talk given at Colorado School of MinesGlobalBrief overview, Geochemistry
DS1996-0142
1996
Boberg, B.Boberg, B.Tanzania: restructured and rebornProspectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC) Annual Meeting, p. 68. abstract.TanzaniaOverview, Political, legal, resources
DS200612-0142
2006
Boberg, B.Boberg, B.Depository of country databases.... maps and reports, files.africaminerals.com, AfricaMaps, reports, information sources
DS1989-0129
1989
Bobervich, B.Bobervich, B.Plotting trends: industry OEMs key in on electrostatic plotting optionsGeobyte, Vol. 4, No. 6, December pp. 8, 10-11GlobalComputer, Plotting trends
DS1975-0656
1977
Bobolev, N.V.Yefimova, E.S., Bobolev, N.V.Abundance of Crystalline Inclusions in Yakutian DiamondsDoklady Academy of Sciences, Vol. 237, No. 6, pp. 231-4.Russia, Yakutia, SiberiaDiamond Morphology
DS1960-0122
1961
Bobrievich, A P.Bobrievich, A P.Certain Dat a on the Geological Status of Siberian KimberliteAkad. Nauk Sssr Trudy Yakut. Fil., No. 6RussiaBlank
DS1950-0317
1957
Bobrievich, A.P.Bobrievich, A.P.The Petrography of the Ultrabasic Inclusions in the Kimberlites of Eastern Siberia.Razv. I Okhr. Nedr., No. 1, PP. 6-12.RussiaBlank
DS1950-0318
1957
Bobrievich, A.P.Bobrievich, A.P.Moissanite in the Kimberlite of Eastern Siberian PlatformDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. LL5, No. 6, PP. LL73-LL76.RussiaBlank
DS1950-0319
1957
Bobrievich, A.P.Bobrievich, A.P., Khar'kiv, A.D., Pozidaeva, V.F.The Geological Features of the Mir KimberliteNauchNo. Tetch. Info. Bulletin., No. 3.RussiaBlank
DS1950-0320
1957
Bobrievich, A.P.Bobrievich, A.P., Kuryleva, N.A.Petrography of the Siberian KimberlitesAkad. Nauk Sssr Ser. Geol., No. 4.RussiaBlank
DS1950-0459
1959
Bobrievich, A.P.Bobrievich, A.P., et al.A Monographic Description of Deposits of Yakutia; Includes Section on Geology and Placer Occurrences, Mineralogy of Diamondiferous Kimberlite Analyses.Min. Geol. I Okhr. Nedr., 527P.RussiaBlank
DS1960-0018
1960
Bobrievich, A.P.Bobrievich, A.P., et al.The Petrography of the Kimberlites in the Basins of the Rivers Olenek and Muna on the Siberian Platform with Iron Ore In the Zone Angara-ilim.Mater. Po Geol. I Polez. Iskop. Sssr., No. 3, PP. 54-L24.RussiaBlank
DS1960-0019
1960
Bobrievich, A.P.Bobrievich, A.P., Kryativ, B.M., Shchukin, V.N.Certain Dat a on the Geology and Petrography of the Siberiankimberlite.Akad. Nauk Sssr Ser. Geol., No. 6.RussiaBlank
DS1960-0020
1960
Bobrievich, A.P.Bobrievich, A.P., Smirnov, G.I., Sobolev, V.S.The Mineralogy of Xenoliths of a Grossularite Pyroxene Kyanite Rock from the Kimberlites of Yakutia.Geol. Series, Ussr, American Geological Institute Translation., No. 3, PP. 18-24.RussiaKimberlite
DS1960-0021
1960
Bobrievich, A.P.Bobrievich, A.P., Smirnov, G.I., Sobolev, V.S.Eclogite Xenoliths With Diamond InclusionsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 126, No. 1-6, PP. 581-583.RussiaKimberlite
DS1960-0123
1961
Bobrievich, A.P.Bobrievich, A.P.Kimberlite Formation of the Northern Part of the Siberian Platform.Petrografiya Votochnoi Sibtri, No. 1.RussiaBlank
DS1960-0218
1962
Bobrievich, A.P.Bobrievich, A.P., Sobolev, V.S.Kimberlite Formations of the North Part of the Siberian Platform.In: The Petrography of The Ussr, PT. L, PP. 3L4-3L6.RussiaBlank
DS1960-0426
1964
Bobrievich, A.P.Bobrievich, A.P., Ilupin, P., et al.Petrography and Mineralogy of the Kimberlitic Rocks of Yakutia.Moscow: Nedra., 190P. International GEOL. CONGRES., DOKL. SOV. GEOL., No. 7, PP. 8RussiaBlank
DS1985-0369
1985
Bobrievich, A.P.Krivoshlyk, I.N., Bobrievich, A.P.Secondary (binary) Liquifaction of Kimberlitic Magma.(russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 280, No. 6, pp. 1414-1418RussiaPetrology
DS1985-0370
1985
Bobrievich, A.P.Krivoshlyk, I.N., Bobrievich, A.P.The Repeated (double) Liquation in Kimberlite MagmaDoklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 280, No. 6, PP. 1414-1418.RussiaBlank
DS1995-0292
1995
Bobrievich, A.P.Chaska, A.I., Bobrievich, A.P., Zaritski, A.I., et al.Kimberlite magmatism of the UkraineProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 104-105.UKrainePriazovski Near Azov, North Volyn, Petrovskoe, Nadiya, Yuzhnaya, Novolaspinskaya
DS1950-0321
1957
Bobrievitch, A.P.Bobrievitch, A.P., Burov, A.P.Diamonds of Siberia. Translation of Almazy Siberii, 1957London: Industrial Diamond Information Bureau, 219P.Russia, Siberia, YakutiaGeology
DS1960-0427
1964
Bobrievitch, A.P.Bobrievitch, A.P., et al.Petrology and Mineralogy of Kimberlite Rocks in YakutiaMoscow: Nedra., RussiaJanlib, Kimberlite, Kimberley
DS1960-1073
1969
Bobriyevich, A.P.Bobriyevich, A.P.General Problems of the Petrology of KimberlitesGeologii i Geofiziki, No. , PP. 208-215.RussiaBlank
DS1975-0034
1975
Bobriyevich, A.P.Bobriyevich, A.P., Golovko, M.M., et al.Diamond Find in Upper Carboniferous Clastic Rocks of the Northwestern Donbas.Doklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section., Vol. 222, No. 1-6, PP. 118-120.RussiaKimberlite
DS1983-0379
1983
Bobriyevich, A.P.Krivoshlyk, I.N., Bobriyevich, A.P.Spherules of Immiscible Carbonatite in KimberliteDoklady Academy of Sciences ACAD. NAUK USSR EARTH SCI. SECTION., Vol. 261, No. 1-6, PP. 121-123.RussiaPetrography
DS1984-0433
1984
Bobriyevich, A.P.Krivoshlyk, I.N., Bobriyevich, A.P.Typomorphic pecularities of carbonate serpentine paragenesis in kimberliterocks.(Russian)Mineral Sbornik (L'Vov), (Russian), Vol. 38, No. 1, pp. 7-11RussiaCarbonate
DS1985-0371
1985
Bobriyevich, A.P.Krivoshlyk, I.N., Bobriyevich, A.P.A Possible Mode of Kimberlite Pipe Formation.(russian)Mineral. Sbornik (L'Vov), (Russian), Vol. 39, No. 1, pp. 3-7RussiaBlank
DS1986-0465
1986
Bobriyevich, A.P.Krivoshlyk, I.N., Bobriyevich, A.P.Repeated seperation of kimberlite magma into immiscible meltsDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 280, No. 1-6, pp. 122-125RussiaMagma
DS1987-0377
1987
Bobriyevich, A.P.Krivoshlyk, I.N., Bobriyevich, A.P.Some conceptson the hydraulic hammer hypothesis inkimberlitepipes.(Russian)Mineral. Sbornik (L'Vov), (Russian), Vol. 41, No. 2, pp. 48-54RussiaPetrology, Diatremes
DS1989-0130
1989
Bobriyevich, A.P.Bobriyevich, A.P.General problems of the petrology of kimberlite.(Russian)In: Problems of Petrology and Genetic Mineralogy, IZD. Nauka, Vol. 1, pp. 208-215RussiaPetrology, Kimberlites
DS200712-0079
2007
Bobrov, A.Bindi, L., Bobrov, A., Litvin, Y.A.in corporation of Fe3+ in phase -X, A2xM2Si207Hx, a potential high pressure K-rich hydrous silicate in the mantle.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 71, 3, pp. 265-272.MantleUHP
DS201012-0060
2010
Bobrov, A.Bobrov, A., Dymshits, A., Litvin, Yu., Litasov, K., Shatskiy, A., Ohtani, E.Sodium bearing majorite garnet: nature and experimental aspects.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 148.Russia, Timan, South America, Brazil, ChinaUHP
DS201012-0815
2010
Bobrov, A.Vasiliev, P., Okoemova, V., Litvin, Y., Bobrov, A.Experimental study of syngenetic relations of diamond and its inclusions in the heterogeneous system eclogite carbonatite sulfide diamond at 7.0 GPa.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 179.TechnologyDiamond genesis
DS201312-0545
2012
Bobrov, A.Litvin, Yu., Vasilev, P., Bobrov, A., Okoemova, V., Kuzyura, A.Parental media of natural diamonds and primary mineral inclusions in them: evidence from physicochemical experiment.Geochemistry International, Vol. 50, 9, pp. 726-759.TechnologyDiamonds inclusions
DS200812-1083
2008
Bobrov, A.A.Smininsky, K.Zh., Gladkov, A.S., Radziminovich, Ya.B., Cheremnykh, A.V., Bobrov, A.A.Regularities of manifestation of active faults and seismicity in the southern part of the Siberian craton.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 422, 1, October pp. 1068-1972.Russia, SiberiaGeophysics - seismics
DS201806-1211
2018
Bobrov, A.M.Baranov, A.A., Bobrov, A.M.Crustal structure and properties of Archean cratons of Gondwanaland: similarity and difference.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 59, pp. 512-524.Africa, Australia, South America, Indiacraton

Abstract: This is a synopsis of available data the on crustal structure and properties of thirteen Archean cratons of Gondwanaland (the cratons of Africa, Australia, Antarctica, South America, and the Indian subcontinent). The data include estimates of surface area, rock age and lithology, Moho depth, thickness of lithosphere and sediments, as well as elevations, all summarized in a table. The cratons differ in size from 0.05 x 106 km2 (Napier craton) to 4 x 106 km2 (Congo craton) and span almost the entire Archean period from 3.8 to 2.5 Ga. Sediments are mostly thin, though reach 7 km in the Congo and West African cratons. Elevations above sea level are from 0 to 2 km; some relatively highland cratons (Kaapvaal, Zimbabwe, and Tanzanian) rise to more than 1 km. On the basis of regional seismic data, the Moho map for cratons has been improved. The Moho diagrams for each craton are constructed. The analysis of the available new data shows that the average Moho depth varies from 33 to 44 km: Pilbara (33 km), Grunehogna (35 km), Sao Francisco (36 km), Yilgarn (37 km), Dharwar (38 km), Tanzanian (39 km), Zimbabwe (39 km), Kaapvaal (40 km), Gawler (40 km), Napier (40 km), West Africa (40 km), Congo (42 km), and Amazon (44 km) cratons. The Moho depth within the cratons is less uniform than it was assumed before: from 28 to 52 km. The new results differ significantly from the earlier inference of a relatively flat Moho geometry beneath Archean cratons. According to the new data, early and middle Archean undeformed crust is characterized by a shallow Moho depth (28-38 km), while late Archean or deformed crust may be as thick as 52 km.
DS1996-0143
1996
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V.Mineral associations of inclusions in garnets from the kimberlitic pipesMir and Sytykanskaya (Yakutia).International Geological Congress 30th Session Beijing, Abstracts, Vol. 2, p. 382.Russia, YakutiaGarnet inclusions, Deposit -Mir, Sytykanskaya
DS1996-0144
1996
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Garanin, V.K.Mineralogy and genesis of pyrope peridotite zonal modulesMoscow University of Geol. Bulletin., Vol. 51, No. 1, pp. 27-36.RussiaPeridotite
DS1998-0937
1998
Bobrov, A.V.Marakushev, A.A., Bobrov, A.V.Specific features of crystallization of eclogite magmas at the diamond facies depths.Doklady Academy of Sciences, ol. 358, No. 1, pp. 142-5.RussiaEclogite, Crystallography
DS1998-0938
1998
Bobrov, A.V.Marakushev, A.A., Bobrov, A.V.Crystallization of eclogite and pyroxenite magmas in diamond depth facies:evidence from garnet-clinopyrox.7th International Kimberlite Conference Abstract, pp. 546-8.Russia, YakutiaDiamond inclusions, Deposit - Udachnaya
DS2002-0176
2002
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Litvin, Y.A., Divaev, F.K.Phase relations in carbonate silicate rocks from diatremes of the Chagatai ComplexDoklady, Vol.383A,3,March-April,pp. 267-70.RussiaPetrology, Deposit - Chagatai complex
DS2002-0953
2002
Bobrov, A.V.Litvin, Y.A., Butvina, V.G., Bobrov, A.V., Zharikov, V.The first synthesis of diamond in sulphide carbon systems: the role of sulphides in diamond genesis.Doklady, Vol.382, 1, Jan-Feb.pp. 40-3.GlobalDiamond - petrology
DS2002-0954
2002
Bobrov, A.V.Litvin, Y.A., Butvina, V.G., Bobrov, A.V., Zharikov, V.A.The first synthesis of diamond in sulphide carbon systems: the role of sulphides inDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol.382,1,pp.40-43.GlobalDiamond - morphology
DS2003-0124
2003
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Litvin, Yu., Butvina, V.Diamond synthesis in sulfide medium at 6-8 Gpa: application to natural data8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 3, POSTER abstractGlobalDiamonds - inclusions
DS2003-0125
2003
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Verichev, E.M., Garanin, V.K., Garanin, K.V., Kudryavtseva, G.P.Xenoliths of mantle metamorphic rocks from the Diamondiferous V. Grib pipe (8 Ikc Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 6, POSTER abstractRussia, ArkangelskDeposit - Grib
DS2003-1014
2003
Bobrov, A.V.Nikiforava, A., Bobrov, A.V., Spetsius, V.Z.Garnet clinopyroxene assemblage of mantle rocks from the Obnazhennaya kimberlite8ikc, Www.venuewest.com/8ikc/program.htm, Session 2, POSTER abstractRussia, YakutiaEclogites and Diamonds, Deposit - Obnazhennaya
DS200412-0172
2004
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Litvin, Y.A., Divaev, F.K.Phase relations and diamond synthesis in the carbonate silicate rocks of the Chagatai Complex, western Uzbekistan: results of exGeochemistry International, Vol. 42, 1, pp. 39-48.Russia, UzbekistanDiamond genesis
DS200412-0173
2003
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Verichev, E.M., Garanin, V.K., Garanin, K.V., Kudryavtseva, G.P.Xenoliths of mantle metamorphic rocks from the Diamondiferous V. Grib pipe ( Arkangelsk province): petrology and genetic aspects8 IKC Program, Session 6, POSTER abstractRussia, Kola Peninsula, ArchangelMantle petrology Deposit - Grib
DS200512-0096
2005
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Verichev, E.M., Garanin, V.K., Kudryavtseva, G.P.The first find of kyanite eclogite in the V. Grib kimberlite pipe ( Arkangelsk Province).Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 402, 4, pp. 628-631.Russia, Kola Peninsula, ArchangelEclogite
DS200512-0685
2003
Bobrov, A.V.Marakushev, A.A., Lonkan, S., Bobrov, A.V., Hengweng, Z., Fu, L.Evolution of the SuLu eclogite ultramafic foldbelt in East China.Moscow University Geology Bulletin, Vol. 58, 6, pp. 33-46.ChinaUHP
DS200612-0864
2005
Bobrov, A.V.Marakushev, A.A., Bobrov, A.V.Problems of primary magma and the depths of Diamondiferous magmatism.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 403A, 6, pp. 901-904.MantleMagmatism
DS200812-0671
2008
Bobrov, A.V.Litvin, Yu.A., Bobrov, A.V.Experimental study of diamond crystallization in carbonate peridotite melts at 8.5 GPa.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 422, 1 Oct. pp. 1167-1171.TechnologyMelting
DS200912-0058
2009
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Spivak, A.V., Divaev, F.K., Dymshits, A.M., Litvin, Yu.A.High pressure melting relations of diamond forming carbonatites: formation of syngenetic peridotitic and eclogitic minerals ( experiments at 7.0 and 8.5 GPa).alkaline09.narod.ru ENGLISH, May 10, 2p. abstractTechnologyMelting
DS200912-0195
2009
Bobrov, A.V.Dymshits, A.M., Bobrov, A.V., Litvin, Yu.A.Experimental study of formation of Na rich majorite garnet in the context of diamond deep mantle genesis.alkaline09.narod.ru ENGLISH, May 10, 2p. abstractTechnologyDiamond stability
DS200912-0443
2009
Bobrov, A.V.Litvin, Yu.A., Bobrov, A.V., Kuzyura, A.V., Spivak, A.V., Litvin, Y.Yu., Butvina, V.G.Mantle carbonatite magma in diamond genesis.Goldschmidt Conference 2009, p. A774 Abstract.MantleMelting
DS200912-0448
2009
Bobrov, A.V.Livin, Yu.AQ., Spivak, A.V., Solopova, N.A., Litvin, V.Yu., Bobrov, A.V.Physicochemical factors of diamond and graphite formation in carbonatite melts on experimental grounds.alkaline09.narod.ru ENGLISH, May 10, 2p. abstractTechnologyExperimental melt
DS201012-0061
2009
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Dymshits, A.M., Litvin, Yu.Conditions of magmatic crystallization of Na bearing majoritic garnets in the Earth mantle: evidence from experimental and natural data.Geochemistry International, Vol. 47, 10, Oct. pp. 951-965.MantleMagmatism
DS201012-0062
2009
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Litvin, Yu.A.Peridotite eclogite carbonatite systems at 7.0-8.5 GPa: concentration barrier of diamond nucleation and syngenesis of the silicate and carbonate inclusions.Russian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 50, 12, pp. 1221-1233.MantleDiamond genesis
DS201112-0096
2011
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Litvin, Yu.A., Dymshits, A.M.Experimental studies of carbonatite silicate systems and problem of the diamond formation.Moscow, GEOS, IN RUSSIAN, 208p. IN RUSSIANTechnologyBook - reference only
DS201112-0610
2011
Bobrov, A.V.Litvin, Yu.A., Vasiliev, P.G., Bobrov, A.V., Okoyomova, V.Yu., Kuzyura, A.V.Parental media for diamonds and primary inclusions by evidence of physicochemical experiment.Vestnik ONZ RAN *** in english, 4p. IN ENGLISHMantleMantle melting - carbonatite genesis of diamond
DS201112-0970
2011
Bobrov, A.V.Sirotkina, E.A., Bobrov, A.V., Garanin, V.K., Bovkun, A.V., Shkurskii, B.B., Korost, D.V.Pyroxene and olivine exsolution textures in majoritic garnets from the Mir kimberlitic pipe, Yakutia.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1885.RussiaMir
DS201212-0075
2011
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Litvin, Yu.A.Mineral equilibration temperatures of diamond forming carbonatite silicate systems.Geochemistry International, Vol. 49, 13, pp. 1267-1363.TechnologyMelting
DS201212-0076
2012
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Llitvin, Y.A., Ismalilova, L.S.Diamond forming efficiency of chloride-silicate carbonate melts: the role of chlorides,10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractTechnologyDiamond genesis
DS201212-0077
2012
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Sirotkina, E.A., Garanin, V.K., Bovkun, A.V., Korost, D.V., Shkurski, B.B.Majoritic garnets with exsolution textures from the Mir kimberlitic pipe ( Yakutia)Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 444, 1, pp. 574-578.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Mir
DS201212-0178
2012
Bobrov, A.V.Dymshits, A.M., Bindi, L., Bobrov, A.V., Litasov, K.D., Shatskiy, A.F., Ohtani, E., Litvin, Yu.A.Sodium majorite and its pyrope solid solutions high pressure experiment and crystal chemical implications.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Feb. 6-11, Bangalore India, AbstractTechnologyMineral Chemistry
DS201212-0659
2012
Bobrov, A.V.Sirotkina, E.A., Bobrov, A.V., Garanin, V.K., Bovkin, A.V., Shkurski, B.B., Korost, D.V.Exsolution textures in majoritic garnets from the Mir kimberlite pipe, Yakutia, Russia.10th. International Kimberlite Conference Held Bangalore India Feb. 6-11, Poster abstractRussia, YakutiaDeposit - Mir
DS201603-0366
2016
Bobrov, A.V.Bindi, L., Tamarova, A., Bobrov, A.V., Sirotkina, E.A., Tschauner, O., Walter, M.J., Irifune, T.in corporation of high amounts of Na in ringwoodite: possible implications for transport of alkali into lower mantle.American Mineralogist, Vol. 101, pp. 483-486.MantleRingwoodite
DS201708-1601
2017
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V.Sodium-bearing phases in the transition zone and uppermost lower mantle: experimental and natural data.11th. International Kimberlite Conference, PosterMantlemineralogy
DS201709-2053
2017
Bobrov, A.V.Sirotina, E.A., Bobrov, A.V.Minerals of chromium in the Earth's mantle. ***RUSSGeos Moscow, 159.p pdf availableMantlechromium
DS201711-2529
2017
Bobrov, A.V.Tamarova, A.P., Bobrov, A.V., Sirotkina, E.A., Bindi, L., Irifune, T.Melting of model pyrolite under the conditions of the transition zone.Proceedings of XXXIV held Aug. 4-9. Perchuk International School of Earth Sciences, At Miass, Russia, 1p. AbstractMantlemelting
DS201802-0222
2017
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V.Crystal inclusions in diamond - a key to understanding of the Earth's mantle mineralogy. ***IN RUSStarosin, V.I. (ed) Problems of the mineralogy, economic geology and mineral resources. MAKS Press, Moscow *** IN RUS, pp. 175-196.Mantlediamond inclusions
DS201802-0265
2018
Bobrov, A.V.Sirotkina, E.A., Bobrov, A.V., Bindi, L., Irifune, T.Chromium bearing phases in the Earth's mantle: experiments in the Mg2SiO4 MgCr2O4 system at 10-24 Gpa and 1600C.American Mineralogist, Vol. 103, pp. 151-160.Mantlechromites

Abstract: Phase relations in the system Mg2SiO4-MgCr2O4 were studied at 10-24 GPa and 1600°C using a high-pressure Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus. We investigated the full range of starting compositions for the forsterite-magnesiochromite system to derive a P-X phase diagram and synthesize chromium-bearing phases, such as garnet, wadsleyite, ringwoodite, and bridgmanite of a wide compositional range. Samples synthesized at 10 GPa contain olivine with small chromium content and magnesiochromite. Mg2SiO4 wadsleyite is characterized by the pressure-dependent higher chromium solubility (up to 7.4 wt% Cr2O3). The maximal solubility of chromium in ringwoodite in the studied system (~18.5 wt% Cr2O3) was detected at P = 23 GPa, which is close to the upper boundary of the ringwoodite stability. Addition of chromium to the system moves the boundaries of olivine/wadsleyite and wadsleyite/ring-woodite phase transformations to lower pressures. Our experiments simulate Cr-rich phase assemblages found as inclusions in diamonds, mantle xenoliths, and UHP podiform chromitites.
DS201809-1996
2018
Bobrov, A.V.Bobrov, A.V., Tamarova, A.P., Sirotkina, E.A., Zhang, G.S., Irifune, T.Interphase partitioning of minor elements in the transition zone and uppermost lower mantle.Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractMantlediamond inclusions

Abstract: Interphase partitioning of minor elements was studied experimentally upon partial melting of model pyrolite [1] with addition of 2 wt % H2O, 10, and 15 wt % of multicomponent carbonate at 22-24 GPa and 1300-2200°C. The concentrations of minor elements were analyzed on an Agilent 7500a mass spectrometer. Phase associations included quenched melt (L), bridgmanite (Brd), CaSiO3- perovskite (CaPrv), ringwoodite (Rwd), ferropericlase (Fp), and majoritic garnet (Maj). The sequence of phase assemblages in our runs is consistent to that reported in [2] for melting of anhydrous pyrolite at 24 GPa: Fp+L, Fp+Maj+Brd(Rwd)+L, Fp+Maj+Brd(Rwd)+CaPrv. Most of minor elements, except for Sc, Cr, and Ni, are incompatible for Brd and show slight increase in partitioning coefficients from LREEs to HREEs in the H2O-bearing system. Pyrolite with carbonate is characterized by slightly higher LREE partitioning coefficients. Monovalent elements (Li, K, Cs, Rb), as well as Sr and Pb, are strongly incompatible for Brd in all systems. The similar features are observed for Fp enriched in HREEs and depleted in LREEs; all minor elements show redistribution into Fp with pressure. CaPrv is enriched in LREEs and depleted in HREEs. We applied the lattice strain model [3] for interpretation of the analytical data, which allowed us to study the behavior of minor elements as a function of P-T parameters. Our data and some previous results [4] were used for estimation of the composition of melts in equilibrium with inclusions in diamonds from the transition zone and lower mantle.
DS201809-2041
2018
Bobrov, A.V.Iskrina, A.V., Bobrov, A.V., Kriulina, G.Y., Zedgenizov, D.A., Garanin, V.K.Melt/fluid inclusions in diamonds from the Lomonosov deposit ( Arkangelsk kimberlite province).Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractRussia, Kola Peninsuladeposit - Lomonosov

Abstract: Melt/fluid inclusions in diamonds provide important evidence for mantle diamond-forming fluids or melts. By now, the major characteristics of the composition of microinclusions have been analyzed in diamonds from several kimberlite provinces and pipes worldwide [1-4]. Here we report the first data on the composition of parent diamondforming melts for diamonds from the Arkhangelsk kimberlite province. After the study of morphology, specialty of the internal structure, and distribution of microinclusions in diamonds, 10 single crystals were selected from the 31 diamonds of the representative collection. The studied crystals may be divided into two groups: cuboids and coated diamonds. The crystals have grayish yellow or dark gray colors and are almost nontransparent due to the high content of microinclusions. Polished slices of these diamonds were studied by IR-spectroscopy, which allowed us to calculate the content of nitrogen defects, as well as the content of water and carbonates in microinclusions. X-ray spectral analyses allowed to study the composition of fluid/melt microinclusions and showed that they were essentially carbonate-silicate with significant variations between these two end-members. All inclusions contain water, with the highest H2O/CO2 in highly siliceous inclusions. Unlike diamonds from Canada and South Africa [1, 2], the studied inclusions in diamionds from the Arkhangelsk province are almost free of chlorides. Comparison of the data obtained with the database on fliud/melt inclusions in diamonds worldwide shows similar of Arkhangelsk diamonds to some diamonds from Yakutia [3, 4], and the data obtained are the most similar to the composition of microinclusions in diamonds from the Internatsionalnaya pipe (Yakutia).
DS201910-2275
2019
Bobrov, A.V.Kriulina, G.Yu., Iskrina, A.V., Zedgenizov, D.A., Bobrov, A.V., Garanin, V.K.The compositional pecularities of microinclusions in diamonds from the Lomonosov deposit ( Arkangelsk Province).Geochemistry International, Vol. 57, 9, pp. 963-980.Russiadeposit - Lomonosov

Abstract: The data on the composition of microinclusions in diamonds from the Lomonosov deposits are reported for the first time. The studied diamonds include “coated” (n = 5) and cubic (n = 5) crystals. The estimated range of the degree of nitrogen aggregation in diamonds (4-39% B1) does not support their direct links with kimberlite magmatism; however, their short occurrence in the mantle at higher temperatures is probable as well. The composition of melt/fluid microinclusions in these samples varies from essentially carbonatitic to significantly silicate. It is shown that the contents of MgO, CaO, Na2O, Cl, and P2O5 decrease with increasing content of silicates and water. Different mechanisms of the generation and evolution of diamond-forming media are discussed to explain the observed variations.
DS202004-0537
2020
Bobrov, A.V.Tamarova, A.P., Marchenko, E.I., Bobrov, A.V., Eremin, N.N., Zinovera, N.G., Irifune, T., Hirata, T., Makino, Y.Interphase REE partitioning at the boundary between the Earth's transition zone and lower mantle: evidence from experiments and atomistic modeling.Minerals MDPI, Vol. 10, 10030262 14p. PdfMantleREE

Abstract: Trace elements play a significant role in interpretation of different processes in the deep Earth. However, the systematics of interphase rare-earth element (REE) partitioning under the conditions of the uppermost lower mantle are poorly understood. We performed high-pressure experiments to study the phase relations in key solid-phase reactions CaMgSi2O6 = CaSiO3-perovskite + MgSiO3-bridgmanite and (Mg,Fe)2SiO4-ringwoodite = (Mg,Fe)SiO3-bridgmanite + (Mg,Fe)O with addition of 1 wt % of REE oxides. Atomistic modeling was used to obtain more accurate quantitative estimates of the interphase REE partitioning and displayed the ideal model for the high-pressure minerals. HREE (Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu) are mostly accumulated in bridgmanite, while LREE are predominantly redistributed into CaSiO3. On the basis of the results of experiments and atomistic modeling, REE in bridgmanite are clearly divided into two groups (from La to Gd and from Gd to Lu). Interphase REE partition coefficients in solid-state reactions were calculated at 21.5 and 24 GPa for the first time. The new data are applicable for interpretation of the trace-element composition of the lower mantle inclusions in natural diamonds from kimberlite; the experimentally determined effect of pressure on the interphase (bridgmanite/CaSiO3-perovskite) REE partition coefficients can be a potential qualitative geobarometer for mineral inclusions in super-deep diamonds.
DS202006-0935
2020
Bobrov, A.V.Matrosova, E.A., Bobrov, A.V., Bindi, L., Pushcharovsky, D.Yu., Irifune, T.Titanium-rich phases in the Earth's transition zone and lower mantle: evidence from experiments in the system Mg)-Si)2-TiO2(+- Al2O3Lithos, Vol. 366-367, 14p. PdfMantlewebsterite, bridgmanite

Abstract: Phase relations in the MgSiO3-MgTiO3 and Mg3Al2Si3O12-MgTiO3 systems were studied at 10-24 GPa and 1600 °C using a high-pressure Kawai-type multianvil apparatus. We investigated the full range of starting compositions for the enstatite-geikielite system to derive a P-X phase diagram and synthesize titanium-bearing phases, such as olivine/wadsleyite, rutile, pyroxene, MgTiSi2O7 weberite, bridgmanite and MST-bridgmanite in a wide pressure range. Olivine and pyroxene in run products are characterized by a low titanium content (<0.6 and <0.3 wt% TiO2, respectively) whereas the content of TiO2 in wadsleyite reaches 2 wt% at 12 GPa. The concentration of Ti in MgTiSi2O7 weberite decreases with pressure from 52 wt% TiO2 at 14 GPa to 43 wt% TiO2 at 18 GPa. Two perovskite-type structures (MgSiO3 bridgmanite and Mg(Si,Ti)O3 bridgmanite) were detected in the studied system. MgSiO3 bridgmanite (Brd) is formed at a pressure of >20 GPa and characterized by significant titanium solubility (up to 13 wt% TiO2 at 24 GPa). Mg(Si,Ti)O3 perovskite is formed at a pressure of >17 GPa. The concentration of TiO2 in this phase varies from 29 wt% to 49 wt%. It was found that addition of Ti to the system moves the boundaries of Ol/Wad phase transformations to lower pressures. Addition of Al to the starting material allows us to simulate the composition of natural Ti-rich garnets and bridgmanites. It is important to note that garnet in the Prp-Gkl system is stable throughout a wide pressure range (10-24 GPa). Al incorporation does not affect the distribution of titanium between two types of bridgmanite. It is shown that high contents of Ti stabilize bridgmanite-like compounds at considerably lower pressure than that at the lower mantle/transition zone boundary. Our experiments simulate the composition of natural Ti-rich primary garnet found in eclogite from the Sulu ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) terrane.
DS202008-1420
2020
Bobrov, A.V.Matrosova, E.M., Bobrov, A.V., Bindi, L., Pushcharovsky, D.Yu., Irifune, T.Titanium rich phases in the Earth's transition zone and lower mantle: evidence from experiments in the system MgO-SiO2-TiO2(+-Al2O3) at 10-24 Gpa and 1600 C.Lithos, Vol. 366-367 1055539 14 p. pdfMantlebridgemanite

Abstract: Phase relations in the MgSiO3-MgTiO3 and Mg3Al2Si3O12-MgTiO3 systems were studied at 10-24 GPa and 1600 °C using a high-pressure Kawai-type multianvil apparatus. We investigated the full range of starting compositions for the enstatite-geikielite system to derive a P-X phase diagram and synthesize titanium-bearing phases, such as olivine/wadsleyite, rutile, pyroxene, MgTiSi2O7 weberite, bridgmanite and MST-bridgmanite in a wide pressure range. Olivine and pyroxene in run products are characterized by a low titanium content (<0.6 and <0.3 wt% TiO2, respectively) whereas the content of TiO2 in wadsleyite reaches 2 wt% at 12 GPa. The concentration of Ti in MgTiSi2O7 weberite decreases with pressure from 52 wt% TiO2 at 14 GPa to 43 wt% TiO2 at 18 GPa. Two perovskite-type structures (MgSiO3 bridgmanite and Mg(Si,Ti)O3 bridgmanite) were detected in the studied system. MgSiO3 bridgmanite (Brd) is formed at a pressure of >20 GPa and characterized by significant titanium solubility (up to 13 wt% TiO2 at 24 GPa). Mg(Si,Ti)O3 perovskite is formed at a pressure of >17 GPa. The concentration of TiO2 in this phase varies from 29 wt% to 49 wt%. It was found that addition of Ti to the system moves the boundaries of Ol/Wad phase transformations to lower pressures. Addition of Al to the starting material allows us to simulate the composition of natural Ti-rich garnets and bridgmanites. It is important to note that garnet in the Prp-Gkl system is stable throughout a wide pressure range (10-24 GPa). Al incorporation does not affect the distribution of titanium between two types of bridgmanite. It is shown that high contents of Ti stabilize bridgmanite-like compounds at considerably lower pressure than that at the lower mantle/transition zone boundary. Our experiments simulate the composition of natural Ti-rich primary garnet found in eclogite from the Sulu ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) terrane.
DS202009-1632
2020
Bobrov, A.V.Iskrina, A., Spivak, A.V., Bobrov, A.V., Eremin, N.N., Marchenko, E.I., Dubrovinsky, L.S.Synthesis and crystal structures of new high-pressure phases CaAl2O4 and Ca2Al6O11.Lithos, Vol. 374-375, 6p. PdfMantlegarnet

Abstract: The phases of CaAl2O4 and Ca2Al6O11 were synthesized at 15 GPa and 1600 °C. Microprobe data gave formulae Ca1.003Al1.998O4 and Ca2.05Al5.97O11, on the basis of 4 and 11 oxygen atoms. The crystal structures have been refined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Orthorhombic unitcell parameters for CaAl2O4 are a = 8.8569(10) Å; b = 2.8561(4) Å; c = 10.2521(11) Å; V = 259.34(5) Å3; Z = 8 (space group Pnma). The Ca2Al6O11 phase was obtained for the first time. It crystallizes with a space group P42/mnm and has lattice parameters a = b = 11.1675(4) Å; c = 2.83180(10) Å; V = 353.16(2) Å3; Z = 2. A Raman spectrum was obtained for a new phase for the first time. Our results suggest that both studied phases are stable under the condition of the transition zone and can be considered as potential aluminum concentrators in the Earth's deep geospheres.
DS1983-0494
1983
Bobrov, B.A.Orlov, YU.A., Gik, L.D., Bobrov, B.A., Kolobova, S.E.Modelling of the Effect of a Kimberlite Pipe on a Seismic Wave Field.Soviet Geology And Geophysics, Vol. 24, No. 3, PP. 88-94.RussiaKimberlite, Geophysics
DS1990-1525
1990
Bobrov, I.D.Vorontosov, A.E., Polozov, A.G., Kostrovitskii, S.I., Bobrov, I.D.On the geochemistry of nickel and Co in post magmatic magnetites fromkimberlites.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 311, No. 1, pp. 179-182RussiaGeochemistry, Magnetites-kimberlites
DS1993-1211
1993
Bobrov, V.A.Pechnikov, V.A., Bobrov, V.A., Podkuyko, A.Isotopic compositions of diamond and accompanying graphite in north Kazakstan metamorphic rocks.Geochemistry International, Vol. 30, No. 8, pp. 153-157.Russia, KazakhstanGeochronology, Diamond morphology
DS1993-1212
1993
Bobrov, V.A.Pechnikov, V.A., Bobrov, V.A., Popdkuyko, Yu.A.Isotope composition of diamond and accompanying graphite from metamorphic rocks of northern Kazakhstan.(Russian)Geochemistry International (Geokhimiya), (Russian), Vol. 1993, No. 1, pp. 150-154.Russia, Kazakhstan, Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)Geochronology, Diamond
DS2003-1022
2003
Bobrov, V.A.Nozhkin, A.D., Turkina, O.M., Bobrov, V.A.Radioactive and rare earth elements in metapelites as indicators of composition andDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 391, 5, pp. 718-22.Russia, SiberiaGeochemistry - not specific to diamonds
DS200412-1451
2003
Bobrov, V.A.Nozhkin, A.D., Turkina, O.M., Bobrov, V.A.Radioactive and rare earth elements in metapelites as indicators of composition and evolution of the Precambrian continental cruDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 391, 5, pp. 718-22.Russia, SiberiaGeochemistry - not specific to diamonds
DS1991-1919
1991
Bobrov, Yu.D.Zakharov, M.N., Bobrov, Yu.D.First find of potassic basalt in volcanic rocks in the Magadan region Of the Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanic beltDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 308, No. 5, pp. 216-219RussiaPotassic basalt, Alkaline rocks
DS200412-1606
2004
Bobrovsky, P.T.Quattara, T., Couture, R., Bobrovsky, P.T., Moore, A.Remote Sensing and geosciences.Geological Survey of Canada Open File, No. 4542, 1 CD $ 26. 109p.GlobalRemote sensing - overview
DS1995-0161
1995
Bobrowksy, P.T.Bobrowksy, P.T., Sibbick, S.J., Newell, J.N., Matysek, P.Drift exploration in the Canadian CordilleraBritish Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines, Paper 1995-2, 304p. $ 40.00British ColumbiaGeochemistry, Drift exploration- review
DS1995-0162
1995
Bobrowsky, P.T.Bobrowsky, P.T., Sibbick, S.J., Newell, J.M., Matysek, P.F.Drift exploration in the Canadian CordilleraBritish Columbia Energy Mines Resources, Paper, 1995-2, 290p.British Columbia, YukonGeomorphology, Drift prospecting - applicable to gold
DS1999-0077
1999
Bobrowsky, P.T.Bobrowsky, P.T.Cordilleran glaciers and Quaternary stratigraphyAssocation of Exploration Geologists (AEG) 19th. Drift Exploration Glaciated, S.C., pp. 32-66.Cordillera, British ColumbiaGeomorphology, glacial, geochemistry, Drift prospecting - not specific to diamonds
DS2001-0116
2001
Bobrowsky, P.T.Bobrowsky, P.T.Geoenvironmental mapping... method, theory and practiceBalkema Publishing, 750p. approx. $ 140.00GlobalBook - ad, Geoenvironment
DS1987-0174
1987
Bobylev, I.B.Dymkin, A.M., Bobylev, I.B., Anfilogov, V.N.Study of low temperature immiscibility of melts in the systemleucite-fayalite-anorthite-silicaDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 284, No. 5, Publishing July 1987, pp. 120-122RussiaLeucite
DS200512-0956
2006
Boccaletti, D.Scoppola, B., Boccaletti, D., Bevis, M., Carminati, E., Doglioni, C.The westward drift of the lithosphere: a rotational drag?Geological Society of America Bulletin, Vol. 118, 1, pp. 199-209.MantleGeophysics
DS201904-0719
2019
Boccato, S.Boulard, E., Harmand, M., Guyot, F., Lelong, G., Morard, D., Cabaret, D., Boccato, S., Rosa, A.D., Briggs, R., Pascarelli, S., Fiquet, G.Ferrous iron under oxygen rich conditions in the deep mantle.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 46, 3, pp. 1348-1356.MantleUHP

Abstract: Iron oxides are important end-members of the complex materials that constitute the Earth's interior. Among them, FeO and Fe2O3 have long been considered as the main end-members of the ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) states of iron, respectively. All geochemical models assume that high oxygen concentrations are systematically associated to the formation of ferric iron in minerals. The recent discovery of O22- peroxide ions in a phase of chemical formula FeO2Hx stable under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions challenges this general concept. However, up to now, the valences of iron and oxygen in FeO2Hx have only been indirectly inferred from a structural analogy with pyrite FeS2. Here we compressed goethite (FeOOH), an Fe3+-bearing mineral, at lower mantle pressure and temperature conditions by using laser-heated diamond-anvil cells, and we probed the iron oxidation state upon transformation of FeOOH in the pressure-temperature stability field of FeO2Hx using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The data demonstrate that upon this transformation iron has transformed into ferrous Fe2+. Such reduced iron despite high oxygen concentrations suggests that our current views of oxidized and reduced species in the lower mantle of the Earth should be reconsidered.
DS1990-0216
1990
Bocchio, R.Bocchio, R., De Capitani, L., Liborio, G., Maresch, W.V., MottanaThe eclogite bearing series of Isla Margarita, Venezuela: geochemistry of metabasic lithologies in the la Rinconada and Juan Griego GroupsLithos, Vol. 25, No. 1-3, November pp. 55-70VenezuelaEclogites, Geochemistry
DS1992-0136
1992
Bochariv, G.V.Bochariv, G.V., et al.Horizontal movements and tectonophysical geodectic zonation of the South-Yakutian geodynamic polygonJournal of Geodynamics, Vol. 15, No. 3-4, August pp. 163-168Russia, YakutiaTectonics, Geophysics
DS1992-0137
1992
Bocharov, G.V.Bocharov, G.V., et al.Horizontal movements and tectonophysical geodetic zonation of the south Yakutian geodynamic polygon.Journal of Geodynamics, Vol. 15, No. 3-4, pp. 163-67.Russia, YakutiaGeodynamics, Tectonics
DS1986-0079
1986
Bocharov, V.I.Bocharov, V.I., Bagdasarova, V.V., Belykh, V.I.The apatite content of the Kursk magnetic anomaly carbonatite complexInternational Geology Review, Vol. 28, No. 11, November pp. 1327=1335RussiaGeophysics, Carbonatite
DS1989-0131
1989
Bocharov, V.L.Bocharov, V.L., Kantersov, V.A., Gurvich, M.Yu., Chesko, V.M.Radio element distributions in the Precambrian Alkaline rocks of a dikecomplexGeochemistry International, Vol. 26, No. 9, pp. 79-84RussiaAlkaline rocks, UraniuM.
DS1989-1227
1989
Bocharov, V.L.Plaksenko, A.N., Girnis, A.V., Bocharov, V.L.Crystallization conditions of the gabbro-norite of the Yelan nickel bearing plutonInternational Geology Review, Vol. 31, No. 5, May pp. 502-505RussiaPseudobrookite-lamproite association
DS201803-0487
2018
Bocharov, V.N.Yakovenchuk, V.N., Yu, G., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Panikorovskii, T.L., Britvin, S.N., Krivivichev, S.V., Shilovskikh, V.V., Bocharov, V.N.Kampelite, Ba3Mg1.5,Sc4(PO4)6(OH)3.4H2O, a new very complex Ba-Sc phosphate mineral from the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite complex ( Kola Peninsula) Russia.Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 112, pp. 111-121.Russia, Kola Peninsulacarbonatite - Kovdor
DS201905-1046
2019
Bocharov, V.N.Ivanyuk, G.Y., Yakovenchuk, V.N., Panikorovskii, T.L., Konoplyova, N., Pakhomovsky, Y.A., Bazai, A.V., Bocharov, V.N., Krivovichev, S.V.Hydroxynatropyrochlore, ( Na, Ca, Ce)2 Nb2O6(OH), a new member of the pyrochlore group from the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite pipe, Kola Peninsula, Russia.Mineralogical Magazine, Vol. 83, pp. 107-113.Russia, Kola Peninsulacarbonatite

Abstract: Hydroxynatropyrochlore, (Na,?a,Ce)2Nb2O6(OH), is a new Na-Nb-OH-dominant member of the pyrochlore supergroup from the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite pipe (Kola Peninsula, Russia). It is cubic, Fd-3m, a = 10.3211(3) Å, V = 1099.46 (8) Å3, Z = 8 (from powder diffraction data) or a = 10.3276(5) Å, V = 1101.5(2) Å3, Z = 8 (from single-crystal diffraction data). Hydroxynatropyrochlore is a characteristic accessory mineral of low-carbonate phoscorite of the contact zone of the phoscorite-carbonatite pipe with host foidolite as well as of carbonate-rich phoscorite and carbonatite of the pipe axial zone. It usually forms zonal cubic or cubooctahedral crystals (up to 0.5 mm in diameter) with irregularly shaped relics of amorphous U-Ta-rich hydroxykenopyrochlore inside. Characteristic associated minerals include rockforming calcite, dolomite, forsterite, hydroxylapatite, magnetite,and phlogopite, accessory baddeleyite, baryte, barytocalcite, chalcopyrite, chamosite-clinochlore, galena, gladiusite, juonniite, ilmenite, magnesite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, quintinite, spinel, strontianite, valleriite, and zirconolite. Hydroxynatropyrochlore is pale-brown, with an adamantine to greasy lustre and a white streak. The cleavage is average on {111}, the fracture is conchoidal. Mohs hardness is about 5. In transmitted light, the mineral is light brown, isotropic, n = 2.10(5) (??= 589 nm). The calculated and measured densities are 4.77 and 4.60(5) g•cm-3, respectively. The mean chemical composition determined by electron microprobe is: F 0.05, Na2O 7.97, CaO 10.38, TiO2 4.71, FeO 0.42, Nb2O5 56.44, Ce2O3 3.56, Ta2O5 4.73, ThO2 5.73, UO2 3.66, total 97.65 wt. %. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of Nb+Ta+Ti = 2 apfu is (Na1.02Ca0.73Ce0.09Th0.09 U0.05Fe2+0.02)?2.00 (Nb1.68Ti0.23Ta0.09)?2.00O6.03(OH1.04F0.01)?1.05. The simplified formula is (Na, Ca,Ce)2Nb2O6(OH). The mineral slowly dissolves in hot HCl. The strongest X-ray powderdiffraction lines [listed as (d in Å)(I)(hkl)] are as follows: 5.96(47)(111), 3.110(30)(311), 2.580(100)(222), 2.368(19)(400), 1.9875(6)(333), 1.8257(25)(440) and 1.5561(14)(622). The crystal structure of hydroxynatropyrochlore was refined to R1 = 0.026 on the basis of 1819 unique observed reflections. The mineral belongs to the pyrochlore structure type A2B2O6Y1 with octahedral framework of corner-sharing BO6 octahedra with A cations and OH groups in the interstices. The Raman spectrum of hydroxynatropyrochlore contains characteristic bands of the lattice, BO6, B-O and O-H vibrations and no characteristic bands of the H2O vibrations. Within the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite pipe, hydroxynatropyrochlore is the latest hydrothermal mineral of the pyrochlore supergroup, which forms external rims around grains of earlier U-rich hydroxykenopyrochlore and separated crystals in voids of dolomite carbonatite veins. The mineral is named in accordance with the pyrochlore supergroup nomenclature.
DS1975-0694
1978
Bocharova, G.I.Bocharova, G.I., Garanin, V.K., Jilyaeva, V.A., Kudryavtseva, G.New Dat a on Exolution Lamellae in Picroilmenites from Jakutia Kimberlite Pipes.Jeol. News, Vol. 16E, No. 1, PP. 18-24.Russia, YakutiaMineralogy, Genesis, Kimberlite
DS1984-0595
1984
Bocharova, G.I.Posukhova, T.V., Bocharova, G.I., Kudryavtseva, G.P., Soshkina.Features of Morphology and Internal Structure of Ilmenite from kimberlites of the Malo Botuobinskii Region of Yakutia.Moscow University Geol. Bulletin., Vol. 39, No. 6, PP. 36-44.Russia, YakutiaMicroscopy, Mineralogy, Amaka Pipe, Taezhnyi
DS1986-0080
1986
Bocharova, G.I.Bocharova, G.I., Garanin, V.K., Kudryavtseva, G.P.Sulfide mineralization in the kimberlite of YakutiaInternational Mineralogical Association Meeting, held Bulgaria Sept. 1982, Publishing in:, Vol. 13, pp. 107-119RussiaSulphides, Kimberlite
DS1984-0159
1984
Bochek, L.I.Bochek, L.I., et al.Reflection Spectra and Refractive Index of Lonsdaleite Containing Diamonds.Doklady Academy of Sciences AKAD. NAUK SSSR., Vol. 279, No. 1, PP. 186-188.RussiaGenesis
DS1984-0160
1984
Bochek, L.I.Bochek, L.I., Nadezhdina, YE.D., Rumyantsev, G.S.Reflection spectra and refractive index of lonsdaleite-containingdiamonds.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 279, No. 1, pp. 186-188RussiaDiamond Morphology
DS201805-0936
2018
Bocher, M.Bocher, M., Fournier, A., Coltice, N.Ensemble Kalman filter for the reconstruction of the Earth's mantle circulation.Nonlinear Processes Geophysics, Vol. 25, pp. 99-123. pdfMantleconvection

Abstract: Recent advances in mantle convection modeling led to the release of a new generation of convection codes, able to self-consistently generate plate-like tectonics at their surface. Those models physically link mantle dynamics to surface tectonics. Combined with plate tectonic reconstructions, they have the potential to produce a new generation of mantle circulation models that use data assimilation methods and where uncertainties in plate tectonic reconstructions are taken into account. We provided a proof of this concept by applying a suboptimal Kalman filter to the reconstruction of mantle circulation (Bocher et al., 2016). Here, we propose to go one step further and apply the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to this problem. The EnKF is a sequential Monte Carlo method particularly adapted to solve high-dimensional data assimilation problems with nonlinear dynamics. We tested the EnKF using synthetic observations consisting of surface velocity and heat flow measurements on a 2-D-spherical annulus model and compared it with the method developed previously. The EnKF performs on average better and is more stable than the former method. Less than 300 ensemble members are sufficient to reconstruct an evolution. We use covariance adaptive inflation and localization to correct for sampling errors. We show that the EnKF results are robust over a wide range of covariance localization parameters. The reconstruction is associated with an estimation of the error, and provides valuable information on where the reconstruction is to be trusted or not.
DS2000-0093
2000
Bock, B.Bock, B., Bahlburg, H., Worner, G., Zimmermann, U.Tracing crustal evolution in the Southern Central Andes from late Precambrian to Permian geochemical isotopeJournal of Geology, Vol. 108, pp. 515-35.Argentina, Chile, Andes, South AmericaGeochemistry, geochronology, craton, Paleotectonics
DS1860-0360
1881
Bock, C.A.Bock, C.A.The Head Hunters of Borneo: a Narrative of Travels Up the Mahakkam and Down the Barito; Also Journeyings in Sumatra.London: S. Low, Marston, Searle And Rivington., 344P.Asia, Borneo, SumatraTravelogue
DS201212-0835
2012
Bock, E.Zurba, M., Ross, H., Izurieta, A., Rist, P., Bock, E., Berkes, F.Melt inclusions in olivines from early Iceland plume picrites support high 3He/4He in both enriched and depleted mantle.Chemical Geology, Vol. 306-307, pp. 54-62.Europe, IcelandPicrite
DS200612-1501
2005
Bock, G.Walker, K.T., Bokelmann, G.H., Klemperer, S.L., Bock, G.Shear wave splitting around the Eifel hotspot: evidence for a mantle upwelling.Geophysical Journal International, Vol. 163, 3,Dec. pp. 962-980.Europe, GermanyGeophysics - seismics
DS200512-0097
2004
Bockrath, C.Bockrath, C., Ballhaus, C., Holzheid, A.Fractionation of the platinum group elements during mantle melting.Science, No. 5692, Sept. 24, pp. 1951-1952.MantleGeochemistry
DS1975-0137
1975
Boctor, N.Z.Meyer, H.O.A., Boctor, N.Z.Sulfide Oxide Minerals in Eclogite from Stockdale Kimberlite,kansas.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 52, PP. 57-68.KansasKimberlite, Central States, Xenoliths
DS1975-0465
1977
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Meyer, H.O.A.Oxide and Sulfide Minerals in Kimberlite from Green Mountain Colorado #1International Kimberlite Conference SECOND, EXTENDED ABSTRACT VOLUME., United States, Colorado, Rocky Mountains, VermontBlank
DS1975-0695
1978
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Boyd, F.R.Oxide Minerals in Liqhobong KimberliteCarnegie Institute Yearbook, FOR 1977, PP. 870-876.LesothoMineral Chemistry
DS1975-0696
1978
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Svisero, D.P.Iron Titanium Oxide and Sulfide Minerals in Carbonatite From Jacupiranga Brasil.Carnegie Institute Yearbook, FOR 1977, PP. 876-880.BrazilRelated Rocks, Mineralogy
DS1975-0949
1979
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Boyd, F.R.Oxide Minerals in Layered Kimberlite Carbonate Sills from Benfontein.Carnegie Institute Yearbook, FOR 1978, PP. 493-496.South AfricaMineral Chemistry
DS1975-0950
1979
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Boyd, F.R.Petrology of Kimberlite from the de Bruyn and Martin Mine Bellsbank #2Carnegie Institute Yearbook, FOR 1978, PP. 496-498.South AfricaPetrology
DS1975-0951
1979
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Boyd, F.R.Petrology of Kimberlite from the de Bruyn and Martin Mine Bellsbank #1Eos, Vol. 60, No. 18, P. 418. (abstract.).South AfricaPetrology
DS1975-0952
1979
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Boyd, F.R.Distribution of Rare Earth Elements in Perovskite from Kimberlites.Carnegie Institute Yearbook, FOR 1978, PP. 572-574.South AfricaRare Earth Elements (ree), Isotope
DS1975-0953
1979
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Meyer, H.A.O.Oxide and Sulfide Minerals in Kimberlite from Green Mountain Colorado #2International Kimberlite Conference Proceedings, Vol. 1, PP. 217-278.ColoradoKimberlite, Diatreme, Rocky Mountains
DS1980-0066
1980
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Boyd, F.R.Oxide Minerals in the Liqhobong Kimberlite , LesothoAmerican MINERALOGIST., Vol. 65, No. 7-8, PP. 631-638.LesothoMineralogy
DS1980-0067
1980
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Yoder, H.S. Jr.Distribution of Rare Earth Elements in Perovskite from Oka Carbonatite, quebec.Carnegie Institute Yearbook, FOR 1979 PP. 304-306.Canada, QuebecRelated Rocks, Mineralogy, Analyses
DS1981-0087
1981
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Boyd, F.R.Oxide Minerals in a Layered Kimberlite Carbonate Sill from Benfontein South Africa.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 76, No. 3, PP. 253-259.South AfricaMineral Chemistry
DS1981-0096
1981
Boctor, N.Z.Boyd, F.R., Nixon, P.H., Boctor, N.Z.Quenched Rocks of Mantle Origin from the Mzongwana Kimberlite Dike, Transkei, Southern Africa.Carnegie Institute Yearbook, FOR 1980, PP. 328-336.South Africa, BotswanaXenoliths, Petrography
DS1982-0104
1982
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Boyd, F.R.Petrology of Kimberlite from the Debruyn and Martin Mine, Bellsbank, South Africa.American MINERALOGIST., Vol. 67, PP. 917-925.South AfricaBlank
DS1982-0105
1982
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Boyd, F.R., Nixon, P.H.Carbonate Tuff from Melkfontein, East Griqualand, South Africa.Proceedings of Third International Kimberlite Conference, TERRA COGNITA, ABSTRACT VOLUME., Vol. 2, No. 3, P. 211, (abstract.).South AfricaKimberlite, Mineralogy
DS1982-0106
1982
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Yoder, H.S. Jr.Distribution of Rare Earth Elements in Perovskite from Melilite Bearing Rocks.Carnegie Institute Yearbook, FOR 1981 PP. 369-371.South AfricaRare Earth Elements (ree), Mineral Chemistry
DS1983-0136
1983
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Boyd, F.R., Nixon, P.H.Pyroxenites, Eclogites, and Megacrysts in Kimberlite from The de Bruyn and Martin Mine, Bellsbank, South Africa.Carnegie Institute Yearbook, FOR 1982, PP. 346-349.South AfricaPetrology
DS1983-0137
1983
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Yoder, H.S. Jr.Petrology of Olivine Melilitites from Saltpetre Kop and Sutherland Commage Cape Province, South Africa.Carnegie Institute Yearbook, FOR 1982, PP. 264-267.South AfricaPetrology
DS1983-0483
1983
Boctor, N.Z.Nixon, P.H., Boyd, F.R., Boctor, N.Z.East Griqualand KimberlitesGeological Society STH, AFR. Transactions, Vol. 86, No. 3, PP. 221-236.South AfricaTectonics, Chemical Composition, Genesis
DS1983-0643
1983
Boctor, N.Z.Yoder, H.S.JR., Boctor, N.Z.Olivine Melilitite from Saltpetre Kop, South AfricaEos, Vol. 64, No. 18, MAY 3RD. P. 341. (abstract.).South AfricaBlank
DS1984-0161
1984
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Nixon, P.H., Buckley, F., Boyd, F.R.Petrology of Carbonate Tuff from Melkfontein, East Griqualand, Southern Africa.Proceedings of Third International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 1, PP. 75-82.South Africa, LesothoGenesis, Rare Earth Elements (ree), Mineral Chemistry
DS1984-0170
1984
Boctor, N.Z.Boyd, F.R., Nixon, P.H., Boctor, N.Z.Rapidly Crystallized Garnet Pyroxenite Xenoliths Possibly Related to Discrete Nodules.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 86, PP. 119-130.South AfricaMzongwana, Kimberlite, Mineral Chemistry, Textures, Analyses
DS1986-0081
1986
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Yoder, H.S. Jr.Petrology of some melilite bearing rocks from Cape Province Republic of South Africa: relationship to kimberlitesAmerican Journal of Science, Vol. 286, September pp. 513-539South AfricaMelilite
DS1987-0061
1987
Boctor, N.Z.Boctor, N.Z., Tera, F., Carlson, R.W., Svisero, D.P.Petrologic and isotopic investigation of carbonatite from the Jacupiranga alkaline complex, BrasilEos, abstractBrazilCarbonatite
DS1987-0823
1987
Boctor, N.Z.Yoder, H.S. Jr., Boctor, N.Z., Hofmeister, A.Barium and titanium micas from olivine melilitite: a potential new endmember micaEos, abstractSouth AfricaSaltpetre Kop
DS1994-0174
1994
Boden, D.R.Boden, D.R.Mid-Tertiary magmatism of Toquima caldera complex and vicinity: development explosive high -k, calc alkaline magmas central Great BasinContrib. Mineral Petrology, Vol. 116, pp. 247-276NevadaAlkaline rocks, Magmatism
DS201512-1991
2015
Bodeving, S.Williams-Jones, A.E., Wollenberg, R., Bodeving, S.Hydrothermal fractionaction of the rare earth elements and the genesis of the Lofdal REE deposit, Namibia.Symposium on critical and strategic materials, British Columbia Geological Survey Paper 2015-3, held Nov. 13-14, pp. 125-130.Africa, NamibiaRare earths
DS200412-0968
2004
Bodgan, D.J.Keller, G.R., Bodgan, D.J., Matile, G.L.D.Manitoba kimberlite indicator mineral database Version 2.0.Manitoba Geological Survey, Canada, ManitobaGeochemistry - database
DS2002-0177
2002
Bodgen, G.J.Bodgen, G.J.Mergers and amp; acquisitions: where do we go from here?Minerals & Energy Raw Materials Report, Vol. 17, 3, Oct. 1, pp. 32-44.GlobalEconomics
DS201312-0916
2013
Bodin, T.Tkalcic, H., Young, M.K., Bodin, T., Ngo, S., Sambridge, M.The shuffling rotation of the Earth's inner core.Nature Geoscience, Vol. 6, pp. 497-502.MantleGeodynamics
DS201412-1011
2013
Bodin, T.Young, M.K., Tkalcic, H., Bodin, T., Sambridge, M.Global P wave tomography of Earth's lowermost mantle from partition modeling.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 118, 10, pp. 5467-5486.MantleGeophysics - tomography
DS201607-1289
2016
Bodin, T.Calo, M., Bodin, T., Romanowicz, B.Layered structure in the upper mantle across North America from joint inversion of long and short period seismic data.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 449, pp. 164-175.United States, CanadaGeophysics - seismics

Abstract: We estimate crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure beneath 30 stations in North America by jointly inverting the high frequency scattered wavefield observed in the P wave coda, together with long period surface wave phase and group dispersion data. Several features distinguish our approach from previous such joint inversions. 1) We apply a cross-convolution method, rather than more standard deconvolution approaches used in receiver function studies, and consider both Love and Rayleigh wave dispersion, allowing us to infer profiles of radial anisotropy. 2) We generate probabilistic 1D radially anisotropic depth profiles across the whole uppermost mantle, down to ~350 km depth. 3) The inverse problem is cast in a trans-dimensional Bayesian formalism, where the number of isotropic and anisotropic layers is treated as unknown, allowing us to obtain models described with the least number of parameters. Results show that the tectonically active region west of the Rocky Mountain Front is marked by a Lithospheric Asthenosphere Boundary and a Lehmann Discontinuity occurring at relatively shallow depths (60-150 km and 100-200 km, respectively), whereas further east, in the stable craton, these discontinuities are deeper (170-200 km and 200-250 km, respectively). In addition, in the stable part of the continent, at least two Mid-Lithospheric Discontinuities are present at intermediate depths, suggesting the existence of strong lithospheric layering, and a mechanism for lithospheric thickening by underplating of additional layers as cratonic age increases. The Moho across the continent as well as mid-crustal discontinuities in the craton are also imaged, in agreement with independent studies.
DS201807-1539
2018
Bodin, T.Yuan, H., Bodin, T.A probabilistic shear wave velocity model of the crust in the central west Australian craton constrained by transdimensional inversion of ambient noise dispersion.Tectonics, June 12, DOI: 10.129/ 2017TC004834Australiageophysics - seismic

Abstract: The Capricorn Orogen in central Western Australia played important roles in initializing and finalizing the West Australian craton. Surface geological mapping and isotopic studies show that the crust has recorded over a billion years of tectonic history spanning from its crustal formation in the Archean to episodes of tectono-thermal events during the Proterozoic cratonization processes. The region therefore provides us with an ideal laboratory to characterize the seismic signature associated with tectonic processes. We constructed a crustal shear-wave velocity model of the core region of the orogen, the Glenburgh Terrane and its north boundary, by inverting the array group velocity dispersion data measured from a high density temporary array. A modified Bayesian Transdimensional tomography technique, which incorporates a smooth-varying regional reference velocity model and Moho topography, was used to invert for the crustal velocity variations. The inverted velocity model adds great detail to the intra-crustal structure, and provides complementary seismic velocity information to refine the regional tectonic processes. Distinct patterns in the velocity structure support that the Glenburgh Terrane is a microcontinent originated in the Archean, and favor the operation of Paleoproterozoic subduction/accretion leading to the 2.2 Ga Ophthalmian orogeny that initiated the assembly of the West Australian craton.
DS202004-0529
2020
Bodin, T.Petrescu, L., Bastow, I.D., Darbyshire, F.A., Gilligan, A., Bodin, T., Menke, W., Levin, V.Three billion years of crustal evolution in eastern Canada: constraints from receiver functions.Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, in press available, 24p. PdfCanadageophysics - seismics

Abstract: The geological record of SE Canada spans more than 2.5Ga, making it a natural laboratory for the study of crustal formation and evolution over time. We estimate the crustal thickness, Poisson's ratio, a proxy for bulk crustal composition, and shear velocity (Vs) structure from receiver functions at a network of seismograph stations recently deployed across the Archean Superior craton, the Proterozoic Grenville and the Phanerozoic Appalachian provinces. The bulk seismic crustal properties and shear velocity structure reveal a correlation with tectonic provinces of different ages: the post-Archean crust becomes thicker, faster, more heterogenous and more compositionally evolved. This secular variation pattern is consistent with a growing consensus that crustal growth efficiency increased at the end of the Archean. A lack of correlation among elevation, Moho topography, and gravity anomalies within the Proterozoic belt is better explained by buoyant mantle support rather than by compositional variations driven by lower crustal metamorphic reactions. A ubiquitous ~20km thick high-Vs lower-crustal layer is imaged beneath the Proterozoic belt. The strong discontinuity at 20km may represent the signature of extensional collapse of an orogenic plateau, accommodated by lateral crustal flow. Wide anorthosite massifs inferred to fractionate from a mafic mantle source are abundant in Proterozoic geology and are underlain by high Vs lower crust and a gradational Moho. Mafic underplating may have provided a source for these intrusions and could have been an important post-Archean process stimulating mafic crustal growth in a vertical sense.
DS202102-0227
2021
Bodin, T.Vilella, K., Bodin, T., Boukare, C-E.,Deschamp, F., Badro, J., Ballmer, M.D. Li, Y.Constraints on the composition and temperature of LLSVPs from seismic properties of lower mantle minerals.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 554, doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2020.116685Mantlegeophysics - seismic

Abstract: Here, we provide a reappraisal of potential LLSVPs compositions based on an improved mineralogical model including, for instance, the effects of alumina. We also systematically investigate the effects of six parameters: FeO and Al2O3 content, proportion of CaSiO3 and bridgmanite (so that the proportion of ferropericlase is implicitly investigated), Fe3+/?Fe and temperature contrast between far-field mantle and LLSVPs. From the 81 millions cases studied, only 79000 cases explain the seismic observations. Nevertheless, these successful cases involve a large range of parameters with, for instance, FeO content between 12--25~wt\% and Al2O3 content between 3--17~wt\%. We then apply a principal component analysis (PCA) to these cases and find two robust results: (i) the proportion of ferropericlase should be low (<6vol\%); (ii) the formation of Fe3+-bearing bridgmanite is much more favored than other iron-bearing phases. Following these results, we identify two end-member compositions, Bm-rich and CaPv-rich, and discuss their characteristics. Finally, we discuss different scenarios for the formation of LLSVPs and propose that investigating the mineral proportion produced by each scenario is the best way to evaluate their relevance. For instance, the solidification of a primitive magma ocean may produce FeO and Al2O3 content similar to those suggested by our analysis. However, the mineral proportion of such reservoirs is not well-constrained and may contain a larger proportion of ferropericlase than what is allowed by our results.
DS1991-0413
1991
BodinierDupuy, C., Mevel, C., Bodinier, J-L, Savoyant, L.Zabargad peridotite: evidence for multistage metasomatism during Red SeariftingGeology, Vol. 19, No. 7, July pp. 722-725GlobalMantle Metasomatism, Peridotites
DS1998-0826
1998
BodinierLambert, D.D., Alard, O., Costa, S., Frick, BodinierEvidence for interaction of Proterozoic (2 Ga) sub-continental mantle wit han enriched mantle plume...Mineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 848-9.FranceMelt depletion, peridotite xenoliths, Franch Massif Central
DS1987-0062
1987
Bodinier, J.L.Bodinier, J.L., DupuyDistribution of trace transition elements in olivine and pyroxenes from ultramafic xenoliths: application of microprobe analysisAmerican Mineralogist, Vol. 72, pp. 902-913LesothoAnalyses
DS1990-0218
1990
Bodinier, J.L.Bodinier, J.L., Vasseur, G., Vernieres, J., Dupuy, C., Fabries, J.Mechanisms of mantle metasomatism: geochemical evidence from the Lherzorogenic peridotiteJournal of Petrology, Vol. 31, No. 3, June pp. 597-628GermanyMantle Metasomatism, Geochemistry
DS1991-1130
1991
Bodinier, J.L.Menzie, M.A., Bodinier, J.L., Thirlwall, M., Downes, H.Asthenosphere-lithosphere relationships within orogenic massifsProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 281-284ItalyThermal boundary layer, hydrofracturing, xenoliths, Proterozoic, classification, characteristics
DS1992-1694
1992
Bodinier, J.L.Woodland, A., Bussod, G., Kornprobst, J., Bodinier, J.L.The effect of mafic dike emplacement on surrounding peridotite: evidence from spinel compositions and estimated redox statesGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstracts with programs, 1992 Annual, Vol. 24, No. 7, abstract p. A85France, PyreneesPeridotite, Mantle Metasomatism
DS1993-0928
1993
Bodinier, J.L.Lorand, J.P., Keays, R.R., Bodinier, J.L.Copper and noble metal enrichments across the lithosphere asthenosphere boundary of mantle diapirs: evidence from the Lanzo lherzolite massifJournal of Petrology, Vol. 34, No. 4 and 6, December pp. 1111-1140GlobalCopper, Boundary, Mantle diapirs
DS1993-1019
1993
Bodinier, J.L.Menzies, M.A., Bodinier, J.L.Growth of the European lithospheric mantle-dependence of upper mantle peridotite facies and chemical heterogeneity on tectonics and age.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 79, pp. 219-240.EuropeMantle, Peridotites
DS1993-1020
1993
Bodinier, J.L.Menzies, M.A., Bodinier, J.L.Growth of the European lithospheric mantle- dependence of upper mantle peridotite facies and chemical heterogeneity on tectonics and age.Physics and Earth Planetary Sciences, Vol. 79, No. 1-2, August pp. 219-240.Europe, MantleTectonics, Peridotite
DS1994-1170
1994
Bodinier, J.L.Menzies, M.A., Bodinier, J.L., Downes, H., Thirlwall, M.Temporal and spatial relationships organic lherzolite massifs -a key understanding depleted and shallow mantle xenoliths.Proceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference, Vol. 1, pp. 423-433.MantleXenoliths, Lherzolites
DS1995-0131
1995
Bodinier, J.L.Bedini, R.M., Bodinier, J.L., Dautria, J.M., Morten, L.Superimposed metasomatic processes in lithospheric mantle beneath East African Rift: a single melt sourceProceedings of the Sixth International Kimberlite Conference Extended Abstracts, p. 44-46.GlobalMetasomatism, Xenoliths
DS1996-0145
1996
Bodinier, J.L.Bodinier, J.L., Merlet, C., Bedini, R.M., et al.Distribution of niobium, tantalum - highly incompatible trace elements lithospheric mantle: spinel paradox.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 60, No. 3, Feb. pp. 545-550.MantleSpinels, Lithosphere
DS1998-0098
1998
Bodinier, J.L.Bedini, R.M., Bodinier, J.L.Distribution of incompatible trace elements between the constituents of mantle spinel peridotites: inversionMineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 135-6.MantlePeridotites, Lithophile trace elements
DS1998-0099
1998
Bodinier, J.L.Bedini, R.M., Bodinier, J.L., Dautria, J.M., Morten, L.Evolution of large-ion lithophile elements (LILE) enriched small melt fractions in the lithospheric mantle:case study from East African Rift.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 153, No. 1-2, pp. 67-83.GlobalEast African Rift, Tectonics, Mantle peridotites
DS1998-0475
1998
Bodinier, J.L.Garrido, C.J., Bodinier, J.L.Distribution of trace elements in minerals from anhydorus spinel peridotites and websterites...RondaMineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 498-9.GlobalMelt-peridotite, large-ion lithophile elements (LILE) rare earth elements (REE) HFSE reservoirs in subcontinental lithosphere
DS1998-1607
1998
Bodinier, J.L.Xu, Y.G., Bodinier, J.L., Bedini, R.M., Menzies, M.A.Xenolith evidence for melt rock reaction at the lithosphere plumeboundary.Mineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 1671-2.FrancePetrography, geochemistry, Harzburgites, Boree P type
DS1999-0238
1999
Bodinier, J.L.Garrido, C.J., Bodinier, J.L.Diversity of mafic rocks in the Ronda peridotite: evidence - pervasive melt rock reaction during heatingJournal of Petrology, Vol. 40, No. 5, May, pp. 729-54.MantleSubcontinental lithosphere, Upwelling asthenosphere
DS2000-0314
2000
Bodinier, J.L.Garrido, C.J., Bodinier, J.L., Alard, O.Incompatible trace element partioning and residence in anhydrous spinel peridotites and websterites from RondaEarth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.181, No.3, Sept.15, pp.327-40.GlobalPeridotites, Deposit - Ronda
DS2000-0567
2000
Bodinier, J.L.Lenoir, X., Garrido, C.J., Bodinier, J.L., Dautria, J-M.Contrasting lithospheric mantle domains beneath the Massif Central revealed by geochemistry peridotite...Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol.181, No.3, Sept.15, pp.359-75.FranceXenoliths - geochemistry
DS2002-0400
2002
Bodinier, J.L.Downes, H., Kostoula, T., Jones, A.P., Beard, A.D., Thirwall, M.F., Bodinier, J.L.Geochemistry and Sr Nd isotopic compositions of mantle xenoliths from the MonteContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 144, 1, Oct. pp. 78-92.ItalyMelilite - carbonatite - not specific to diamonds
DS2002-0749
2002
Bodinier, J.L.Ionov, D.A., Mukasa, S.B., Bodinier, J.L.Sr Nd Pb isotopic compositions of peridotite xenoliths from Spitsbergen: numericalJournal of Petrology, Vol. 43, 12, pp. 2261-78.Mantle, NorwayMetasomatism, Geochronology
DS2003-0620
2003
Bodinier, J.L.Ionov, D., Spetsius, Z., Weiss, D., Bodinier, J.L.Hf Nd Sr isotope and trace element evidence for a diversity of origins of rutile bearingGeological Association of Canada Annual Meeting, Abstract onlyRussia, SiberiaGeochronology, Eclogite
DS200412-0872
2003
Bodinier, J.L.Ionov, D., Spetsius, Z., Weiss, D., Bodinier, J.L.Hf Nd Sr isotope and trace element evidence for a diversity of origins of rutile bearing eclogite xenoliths from the Siberian CrGeological Association of Canada Annual Meeting, Abstract onlyRussia, SiberiaGeochronology Eclogite
DS200512-0461
2005
Bodinier, J.L.Ionov, D., Prikhodko, V.S., Bodinier, J.L., Sobolev, A.V., Weis, D.Lithospheric mantle beneath the south eastern Siberian Craton: petrology of peridotite xenoliths in basalts from the Tokinsky Stanovik.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 149, no. 6, pp. 647-665.Russia, SiberiaXenoliths
DS200612-0118
2006
Bodinier, J.L.Ben Othman, D., Luck, J.M., Bodinier, J.L., Arndt, N.T., Albarede, F.Cu Zn isotopic variations in the Earth's mantle.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 1, abstract only.MantleGeochemistry
DS200612-0621
2005
Bodinier, J.L.Ionov, D.A., Chanefo, I., Bodinier, J.L.Origin of Fe rich lherzolites and wehrlites from Tok, SE Siberia by reactive melt percolation in refractory mantle peridotites.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 150, 3, pp. 335-353.RussiaLherzolite
DS200612-0622
2006
Bodinier, J.L.Ionov, D.A., Chazot, G., Chauvel, C., Merlet, C., Bodinier, J.L.Trace element distribution in peridotite xenoliths from Tok, SE Siberian craton: a record of pervasive, multi stage metasomatism in shallow refractory mantle.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 5, pp. 1231-1260.RussiaMetasomatism - Tok
DS200812-0011
2008
Bodinier, J.L.Alard, O., Le Roux, V., Bodinier, J.L., Lorand, J.P., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y.How primitive is the 'primitive' mantle?Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A13.MantleGeochemistry, structure
DS201312-0265
2013
Bodinier, J.L.Fernandez, L., Bosch, D., Elmessbahi, H., Bodinier, J.L., Dautra, J.M., Verdoux, P.Lithosphere-asthenosphere interactions (Middle Atlas (Morocco): geochemical highlights.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractAfrica, MoroccoXenoliths
DS201709-1979
2017
Bodinier, J.L.Djeddi, A., Parat, F., Ouzegane, K., Bodinier, J.L.Ree enrichment in apatite Britholite exsolutions in carbonatite in Quezal terrane, Hoggar, South Algeria.Goldschmidt Conference, abstract 1p.Africa, Algeriacarbonatite, Ouzzal

Abstract: Ihouhaouene area in In Ouzzal terrane (Hoggar, South Algeria) is exceptional by numerous carbonatite complexes systematically associated to syenites. They constitute one of the oldest carbonatite emplaced at 2 Ga. Various types of carbonatites are distinguished by their successive placement and pegmatitic to brecciated appearance. The first-generation of carbonatites are always brecciated with elements of syenite and carbonate cement with calcite, apatite, alkali feldspar, wollastonite, clinopyroxene +/- sphene, allanite, quartz and garnet. Late carbonatite intrusions appear in small pegmatitic veins rich in apatite (3-50 mm). All carbonatites are calciocarbonatites (38-50 wt% CaO) with silica content ranging from 5 to 21 wt% SiO2. The high silica content is interpreted as assimilation of syenite material during emplacement. Carbonatites have high Rare Earth Element (REE) concentrations with high Ligh REE/Heavy REE fractionation (e.g. 1088 ppm La, La/Yb= 144-198) and variable concentrations in Th (26.5-197 ppm). The REE concentrations are mainly controlled by apatite phenocrysts (30-40 vol.%) with 4-9 wt% REE. In late pegmatitic carbonatite, REE-rich apatites are green-yellow phenocrysts with britholite exsolution (up to 40 vol.%, Ca4(REE)6 (SiO4,PO4)6 (OH,F,Cl)2). Britholites are hexagonal and occur as fine lamellar exsolutions (<10 um) in the same crystallographic axis (001) than apatites or as irregularshaped grains (10-200 um). All britholites contain 8-16 wt% La, 21-43 wt% Ce and 7-12 wt% Nd. The apatite-britholite exsolutions correspond to a substitution of the trivalent rareearth elements (REE3+) and Si4+ for Ca2+ and P5+. The REE substitution is accompanied by a change in volatile composition with F-rich apatite and Cl-rich britholite indicating that Si and Cl-rich hydrothermal fluids are present at the late stage of carbonatite evolution leading to REEenrichment and the crystallization of REE minerals.
DS1990-0217
1990
Bodinier, J.-L.Bodinier, J.-L., Menzies, M.A., Thirwall, M.Elemental and isotopic geochemistry of the Lanzo Lherzolite Massif:implications for the temporal evolution of the Morb sourceTerra, Abstracts of International Workshop Orogenic Lherzolites and Mantle Processes, Vol. 2, December abstracts p. 126ItalyLherzolite, Geochemistry
DS200412-0477
2004
Bodinier, J-L.Downes, H., Macdonald, R., Upton, B.G.J., Cox, K.G., Bodinier, J-L., Mason, P.R.D., James, D., Hill, P.G., HeaUltramafic xenoliths from the Bearpaw Mountains, Montana: USA: evidence for multiple metasomatic events in the lithospheric mantJournal of Petrology, Vol. 45, 8, pp. 1631-1662.United States, MontanaMetasomatism
DS200712-0603
2007
Bodinier, J-L.Le Roux, V., Bodinier, J-L., Alard, O., Wieland, P., O'Reilly, S.Y.Insights into refertilization processes in lithospheric mantle from integrated isotopic studies in the Lherz Massif.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A563.Europe, FranceMelting
DS200712-0604
2007
Bodinier, J-L.Le Roux, V., Bodinier, J-L., Tommasi, A., Alard, O., Dautria, J-M., Vauchez, A., Riches, A.J.V.The lherz spinel lherzolite: refertilized rather than pristine mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 259, 3-4, pp. 599-612.MantleLherzolite chemistry
DS200712-0605
2007
Bodinier, J-L.Le Roux, V., Bodinier, J-L., Tommasi, A., Alard, O., Dautria, J-M., Vauchez, A., Riches, A.J.V.The lherz spinel lherzolite: refertilized rather than pristine mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 259, 3-4, pp. 599-612.MantleLherzolite chemistry
DS200712-0895
2007
Bodinier, J-L.Riches, A.J.V., Rogers, N.W., Charlier, B.L.A., Bodinier, J-L.A reappraisal of the petrology and origins of the Lherz peridotite.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A838.EuropeMantle composition
DS200912-0429
2009
Bodinier, J-L.Le Roux, V., Bodinier, J-L., Allard, O., O'Reilly, S.Y., Griffin, W.L.Isotopic decoupling during porous melt flow: a case study in the Lherz peridotite.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 279, 1-2, pp.76-85.Europe, FranceGeochronology
DS201012-0473
2010
Bodinier, J-L.Marchesi, C., Griffin, W.L., Garrido, C.J., Bodinier, J-L., O'Reilly, S.Y., Pearson, N.J.Persistence of mantle lithospheric Re-Os signature during asthenospherization of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle: insights in situ sulphides....Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 159, 3, pp. 315-330.Europe, SpainRonda peridotite
DS201312-0574
2013
Bodinier, J-L.Marchesi, C., Garrido, C.J., Bosch, D., Bodinier, J-L., Gervilla, F., Hidas, K.Mantle refertilization by melts of crustal derived garnet pyroxenite: evidence from the Ronda Peridotite massif, southern Spain.Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 362, pp. 66-75.Europe, SpainRonda - pyroxenite. Melts
DS201412-0478
2014
Bodinier, J-L.Kourim, F., Bodinier, J-L., Alard, O., Bendaoud, A., Vauchez, A., Dautria, J-M.Nature and evolution of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Hoggar Swell ( Algeria): a record from mantle xenoliths.Journal of Petrology, Vol. 55, pp. 2249-2280.Africa, AlgeriaXenoliths
DS201412-0548
2014
Bodinier, J-L.Marchesi, C., Dale, C.W., Garrdo, C.J., Pearson, D.G., Bosch, D., Bodinier, J-L., Gervilla, F., Hidas, K.Fractionation of highly siderophile elements in refertilized mantle: implications for the Os isotope composition of basalts.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 400, pp. 33-44.MantleRonda peridotite
DS201704-0650
2016
Bodinier, J-L.Varas-Reu, M.I., Garrido, C.J., Marchesi, C., Bodinier, J-L., Frets, E., Bosch, D., Tommasi, A., Hidas, K., Targuisti, K.Refertilization processes of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle: the record of the Beni Bousera orogenic peridotite ( Rif Belt, northern Morocco).Journal of Petrology, Vol. 57, 11-12, pp. 2251-2270.Africa, MoroccoDeposit - Beni Bousera

Abstract: Correlations between major and minor transition elements in tectonically emplaced orogenic peridotites have been ascribed to variable degrees of melt extraction and melt-rock reaction processes, leading to depletion or refertilization. To elucidate how such processes are recorded in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle, we processed a large geochemical dataset for peridotites from the four tectono-metamorphic domains of the Beni Bousera orogenic massif (Rif Belt, northern Morocco). Our study reveals that variations in bulk-rock major and minor elements, Mg-number and modal mineralogy of lherzolites, as well as their clinopyroxene trace element compositions, are inconsistent with simple partial melting and mainly resulted from different reactions between melts and depleted peridotites. Up to 30% melting at <3 GPa and cryptic metasomatism can account for the geochemical variations of most harzburgites. In Grt-Sp mylonites, melting and melt-rock reactions are masked by tectonic mixing with garnet pyroxenites and subsolidus re-equilibration. In the rest of the massif, lherzolites were mostly produced by refertilization of a refractory protolith (Mg-number = 91, Ol = 70%, Cpx/Opx = 0.4) via two distinct near-solidus, melt- rock reactions: (1) clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene precipitation and olivine consumption at melt/rock ratios <0.75 and variable mass ratio between crystallized minerals and infiltrated melt ®, which are recorded fairly homogeneously throughout the massif; (2) dissolution of orthopyroxene and precipitation of clinopyroxene and olivine at melt/rock ratios <1 and R = 0.2-0.3, which affected mainly the Arie` gite-Seiland and Seiland domains. The distribution of secondary lherzolites in the massif suggests that the first refertilization reaction occurred prior to the differentiation of the Beni Bousera mantle section into petro-structural zones, whereas the second reaction was associated with the development of the tectono-metamorphic domains. Our data support a secondary, refertilization-related origin for most lherzolites in orogenic peridotite massifs.
DS201706-1063
2017
Bodinier, J-L.Bianchini, G., Bodinier, J-L., Braga, R., Wilson, M.Crust-mantle and lithosphere-Asthenosphere boundaries.Geological Society of America, SPE 526, 200p.Mantlebook
DS201707-1314
2016
Bodinier, J-L.Chetouani, K., Bodinier, J-L., Garrido, C.J., Marchesi, C., Amri, I., Targuisti, K.Spatial variability of pyroxenite layers in the Beni Bousera orogenic peridotite ( Morocco) and implications for their origin.Comptes Rendus Geoscience, Vol. 348, pp. 619-629.Africa, Moroccoperidotite

Abstract: The Beni Bousera peridotite contains a diversity of pyroxenite layers. Several studies have postulated that at least some of them represent elongated strips of oceanic lithosphere recycled in the convective mantle. Some pyroxenites were, however, ascribed to igneous crystal segregation or melt–rock reactions. To further constrain the origin of these rocks, we collected 171 samples throughout the massif and examined their variability in relation with the tectono-metamorphic domains. A major finding is that all facies showing clear evidence for a crustal origin are concentrated in a narrow corridor of mylonitized peridotites, along the contact with granulitic country rocks. These peculiar facies were most likely incorporated at the mantle–crust boundary during the orogenic events that culminated in the peridotite exhumation. The other pyroxenites derive from a distinct protolith that was ubiquitous in the massif before its exhumation. They were deeply modified by partial melting and melt–rock reactions associated with lithospheric thinning.
DS201708-1567
2017
Bodinier, J-L.Blanchini, G., Bodinier, J-L., Braga, R., Wilson, M.The crust mantle and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundaries: insights from xenoliths, orogenic deep sections, and geophysical studies. 2 Chapters citedGeological Society of London, book - cost approx. 43 lbsMantlexenoliths
DS201904-0744
2019
Bodinier, J-L.Hidas, K., Garrido, C.J., Booth-Rea, G., Marchesi, C., Bodinier, J-L., Dautria, J-M., Louni-Hacini, A., Azzouni-Sekkal, A.Lithosphere tearing along STEP faults and synkenetic formation of lherzolite and wehrlite in the shallow subcontinental mantle. OranSolid Earth, https://doi.org/10.5194 /se-2019-32 36p.Mantle, Africa, Algeriasubduction

Abstract: Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator (STEP) faults are the locus of continual lithospheric tearing at slab edges, resulting in sharp changes in the lithospheric and crustal thickness and triggering lateral and/or near-vertical mantle flow. However, the mechanisms at the lithospheric mantle scale are still poorly understood. Here, we present the microstructural study of olivine-rich lherzolite, harzburgite and wehrlite mantle xenoliths from the Oran volcanic field (Tell Atlas, NW Algeria). This alkali volcanic field occurs along a major STEP fault responsible for the Miocene westward slab retreat in the westernmost Mediterranean. Mantle xenoliths provide a unique opportunity to investigate the microstructures in the mantle section of a STEP fault system. The microstructures of mantle xenoliths show a variable grain size ranging from coarse granular to fine-grained equigranular textures uncorrelated with modal variations. The major element composition of the mantle peridotites provides temperature estimates in a wide range (790-1165?°C) but in general, the coarse-grained and fine-grained peridotites suggest deeper and shallower provenance depth, respectively. Olivine grain size in the fine-grained peridotites depends on the size and volume fraction of the pyroxene grains, which is consistent with pinning of olivine grain growth by pyroxenes as second phase particles. In the coarse-grained peridotites, well-developed olivine crystal preferred orientation (CPO) is characterized by orthorhombic and [100]-fiber symmetries, and orthopyroxene has a coherent CPO with that of olivine, suggesting their coeval deformation by dislocation creep at high-temperature. In the fine-grained microstructures, along with the weakening of the fabric strength, olivine CPO symmetry exhibits a shift towards [010]-fiber and the [010]- and [001]-axes of orthopyroxene are generally distributed subparallel to those of olivine. These data are consistent with deformation of olivine in the presence of low amounts of melts and the precipitation of orthopyroxenes from a melt phase. The bulk CPO of clinopyroxene mimics that of orthopyroxene via a topotaxial relationship of the two pyroxenes. This observation points to a melt-related origin of most clinopyroxenes in the Oran mantle xenoliths. The textural and geochemical record of the peridotites are consistent with interaction of a refractory harzburgite protolith with a high-Mg# melt at depth (resulting in the formation of coarse-grained clinopyroxene-rich lherzolite and wehrlite), and with a low-Mg# evolved melt in the shallow subcontinental lithospheric mantle (forming fine-grained harzburgite). We propose that pervasive melt-peridotite reaction - promoted by lateral and/or near-vertical mantle flow associated with lithospheric tearing - resulted in the synkinematic crystallization of secondary lherzolite and wehrlite and played a key effect on grain size reduction during the operation of the Rif-Tell STEP fault. Melt-rock reaction and secondary formation of lherzolite and wehrlite may be widespread in other STEP fault systems worldwide.
DS201909-2034
2019
Bodinier, J-L.Djeddi, A., Parat, F., Bodinier, J-L., Ouzegane, K. Immiscibility and hybridization during progressive cooling of carbonatite and alkaline magmas ( in Oussal Terrane, western Hoggar).Goldschmidt2019, 1p. AbstractAfrica, Algeriacarbonatite

Abstract: Carbonatites and syenites from Ihouhaouene (2 Ga; In Ouzzal terrane, Hoggar, South of Algeria) have close spatial relationships. Their analogous mineral assemblages with diopside/hedenbergite (cpx), apatite, wollastonite +/- calcite and alkali-feldspar suggest that they were emplaced from a common igneous parental event. Carbonatites from In Ouzzal terrane are calciocarbonatites and form a continuous range of whole-rock major and trace element composition from Sipoor carbonatite (<20 wt.% SiO2; 24-36 wt.% CO2) to Si-rich carbonatite (20-35 wt.% SiO2; 11-24 wt.% CO2) then white syenite (52-58 wt.% SiO2; 0.1-6.5 wt.% CO2) and red syenite (57-65 wt.% SiO2; 0.1-0.4 wt.% CO2). Equilibrium calculations reveal that apatite (Ce/Lu= 1690-6182; Nb/Ta >50) and cpx (Ce/Lu= 49-234; Nb/Ta<10) from Si-rich carbonatites and white syenites crystallized from a REEenriched carbonate melt and an evolved silicate melt, respectively. Likewise, Si-poor carbonatites have a higher REE contents in calculated apatite equilibrium melts than in their cpx and a wide range of Nb/Ta ratios with a majority of subchondritic value (<10) that reflects the segregation of the carbonate fraction from an evolved parental melt. Otherwise, red syenites have similar REE contents in apatite and clinopyroxene equilibrium melts (Nb/Ta>10) suggesting an origin from homogeneous evolved melt batches. Both mineralogical and geochemical features reveal the intimate link between carbonatites and syenites and their cogenetic signature. Immiscibility and fractional crystallization processes modelling explain the trace element contents and low Nb/Ta ratio in minerals. These processes were partly counterbalanced by intermingling of partially crystallized melt fractions and hybridization of segregated minerals during the progressive cooling of a silico-carbonated mantle melt.
DS200512-0463
2005
Bodinier, J-L.et.al.Ionov, D.A., Prikhodko, V.S., Bodinier, J-L.et.al.Lithospheric mantle beneath the south eastern Siberian Craton: petrology of peridotite xenoliths in basalts from the Tokinsky Stanovik.'Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Online AccessRussiaXenoliths, Aldan Shield, Siberian Craton, metasomatism
DS1991-0136
1991
Bodnar, R.J.Bodnar, R.J., Costain, J.K.Effect of varying fluid composition on mass and energy transport in theearth's crustGeophysical Research Letters, Vol. 18, No. 5, May pp. 983-986GlobalMantle, Fluid composition
DS1994-1862
1994
Bodnar, R.J.Vityk, M.O., Bodnar, R.J., Schmidt, C.S.Fluid inclusions as tectonothermomobarometers: relation between P-T history and reequilibrium morphologyGeology, Vol. 22, No. 8, August pp. 731-734GlobalGeothermometry, Crustal thickening
DS1995-1864
1995
Bodnar, R.J.Szabo, C., Bodnar, R.J.Silicate rich metasomatic melt in the Upper Mantle beneath the Nograd-Gomor volcanic field.Eos, Abstracts, Vol. 76, No. 17, Apr 25, p. S 268.Hungary, SlovakiaMelt inclusions, Mantle xenoliths
DS1995-2003
1995
Bodnar, R.J.Vityk, M.O., Bodnar, R.J., Dudok, I.V.Natural and synthetic re-equilibration textures of fluid inclusions in quartz (Marmarosh diamonds)refill-European Journ. of Mineralogy, No. 5, pp. 1071-1088.GlobalQuartz - imitation diamonds
DS1996-1395
1996
Bodnar, R.J.Szabo, Cs., Bodnar, R.J.Changing magma ascent rates in the Nograd Gomor volcanic field... mantlexenoliths.Petrology, Vol. 4, No. 3, pp. 221-230.Hungary, SlovakiaMantle xenoliths, Geochronology -magma
DS1996-1396
1996
Bodnar, R.J.Szabo, Cs., Bodnar, R.J.Changing magma ascent rates in the Nograd Gomor volcanic field northernHungary/Slovakia... xenolithsPetrology, Vol. 4, No. 3, pp. 221-230Hungary, SlovakiaXenoliths, Magma
DS1996-1486
1996
Bodnar, R.J.Vityk, M.O., Bodnar, R.J., Dudok, I.V.Fluid inclusions in Marmarosh diamonds: evidence for tectonic history Of the folded Carpathian Mountains.Tectonophysics, Vol. 255, No. 1-2, April 20, pp. 163-UKraineMarmarosh - not diamonds, Tectonics
DS1998-1437
1998
Bodnar, R.J.Szabo, C., Bodnar, R.J.Fluid inclusion evidence for an upper mantle origin for green clinopyroxenes in late Cenozooic basanites....International Geology Review, Vol. 40, No. 9, Sept. pp. 765-74.Hungary, SlovakiaGeochronology, Nograd Gomor volcanic field
DS2000-0944
2000
Bodnar, R.J.Szabo, Cs., Bodnar, R.J.Fluid inclusion evidence for an upper mantle origin for green clinopyroxene in Late Cenozoic basanites....Snyder, Neal, Ernst, Plan. Petrology and Geochemistry, pp. 83-91.Hungary, SlovakiaBasanite
DS2003-0326
2003
Bodnar, R.J.De Vivo, B., Bodnar, R.J.Melt inclusions in volcanic systemshttp://www.elsevier.com/inca/publications/store/6/7/2/8/0/7/672807.pub.htt, 272p. approx. $ 115.GlobalBook - liquid to glass, magma degassing, melt inclusion
DS2003-0327
2003
Bodnar, R.J.De Vivo, B., Bodnar, R.J.Melt inclusions in volcanic systemsElsevier Developments in Volcanology, 5, 272p. $ 115. www.elsevier.com/inca/publications/store/MantleBook
DS200412-0428
2003
Bodnar, R.J.De Vivo, B., Bodnar, R.J.Melt inclusions in volcanic systems.Elsevier, 272p. approx. $ 115.TechnologyBook - liquid to glass, magma degassing, melt inclusion
DS200512-0098
2005
Bodnar, R.J.Bodnar, R.J.Fluids in planetary systems.Elements, Vol. 1, 1, Jan. pp. 9-12.MantleFluid inclusions, deformation, volcanoes
DS200612-0143
2006
Bodnar, R.J.Bodnar, R.J.Fluid and melt inclusion evidence for immiscibility in nature.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 70, 18, p. 29, abstract only.MantleMelting
DS200712-0043
2006
Bodnar, R.J.Azbej, T., Szabo, C., Bodnar, R.J., Dobosi, G.Genesis of carbonate aggregates in lamprophyres from the northeastern Transnubian central range, Hungary: magmatic or hydrothermal origin?Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 88, 3-4, pp. 479-497.Europe, HungaryLamprophyre - not specific to diamonds
DS200812-0121
2008
Bodnar, R.J.Bodnar, R.J., Azbej, T., Becker, S., Cannatelli, C., Fall, A., Hole, J., Severs, M.The whole Earth geohydrologic cycle.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A91.MantleWater
DS201312-0401
2014
Bodnar, R.J.Howarth, G.H., Barry, P.H., Pernet-Fisher, J.F., Baziotis, I.P., Pokhilenko, N.P., Pokhilenko, L.N., Bodnar, R.J., Taylor, L.A.Superplume metasomatism: evidence from Siberian mantle xenoliths.Lithos, Vol. 184-187, pp. 209-224.Russia, SiberiaMetasomatism
DS201412-0101
2014
Bodnar, R.J.Carmody, L., Taylor, L.A., Thaisen, K.G., Tychkov, N., Bodnar, R.J., Sobolev, N.V., Poikhilenko, L.N., Poikilenko, N.P.Ilmenite as a diamond indicator mineral in the Siberian craton: a tool to predict diamond potential.Economic Geology, Vol. 109, no. 3, pp. 775-783.RussiaIlmenite, chemistry
DS201412-0676
2014
Bodnar, R.J.Pernet-Fisher, J.F., Howarth, G.H., Liu, Y., Barry, P.H., Carmody, L., Valley, J.W., Bodnar, R.J., Spetsius, Z.V., Taylor, L.A.Komsomolskaya Diamondiferous eclogites: evidence for oceanic crustal protoliths.Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology, Vol. 167, pp. 1-17.Russia, SiberiaDeposit - Komsomolskaya
DS201412-1004
2014
Bodnar, R.J.Yardley, B.W.D., Bodnar, R.J.Fluids in the continental crustGeochemical Perspectives Letters, Vol. 3, 1, pp. 1-127.MantleChemistry
DS201610-1874
2016
Bodnar, R.J.Jean, M.M., Taylor, L.A., Howarth, G.H., Peslier, A.H., Fedele, L., Bodnar, R.J., Guan, Y., Doucet, L.S., Ionov, D.A., Logvinova, A.M., Golovin, A.V., Sobolev, N.V.Olivine inclusions in Siberian diamonds and mantle xenoliths: contrasting water and trace -element contents.Lithos, in press available 11p.Russia, SiberiaDiamond inclusions
DS201904-0759
2018
Bodnar, R.J.Moore, L.R., Bodnar, R.J.A pedagogical approach to estimating the CO2 budget of magmas.Journal of the Geological Society of London, Vol. 176, pp. 398-407.Mantlecarbon

Abstract: On a planetary scale, the carbon cycle describes the movement of carbon between the atmosphere and the deep earth, which affects petrologic processes in a range of geologic settings and the long-term viability of life at the surface. In this context, volcanoes and their associated magmatic systems represent the interface through which carbon is transferred from the deep earth to the atmosphere. Thus, describing the CO2 budget of volcanic systems is necessary for understanding the deep carbon cycle. In this review, Kilauea volcano (Hawaii) is used as a case study, and we present several simple calculations that can be used to account for processes that affect the amount and distribution of CO2 in this relatively well-studied volcanic system. These processes include estimating the concentration of CO2 in a melt derived by partial melting of a source material, enrichment of CO2 in the melt during fractional crystallization, exsolution of CO2 from a fluid-saturated melt, trapping and post-entrapment modification of melt inclusions, and degassing from the volcanic edifice. Our goal in this review is to provide straightforward example calculations that can be used to derive first-order estimates regarding processes that control the CO2 budgets of magmas.
DS201905-1038
2019
Bodnar, R.J.Guzmics, T., Berkesi, M., Bodnar, R.J., Fall, A., Bali, E., Milke, R., Vetlenyi, E., Szabo, C.Natrocarbonatites: a hidden product of three phase immiscibility. ( Oldoinyo Lengai)Geology, https://doi.org/ 10.1130/G46125.1 Africa, Tanzaniacarbonatite

Abstract: Earth’s only active natrocarbonatite volcanism, occurring at Oldoinyo Lengai (OL), Tanzania, suggests that natrocarbonatite melts are formed through a unique geological process. In the East African Rift, the extinct Kerimasi (KER) volcano is a neighbor of OL and also contains nephelinites hosting melt and fluid inclusions that preserve the igneous processes associated with formation of natrocarbonatite melts. Here, we present evidence for the presence of coexisting nephelinite melt, fluorine-rich carbonate melt, and alkali carbonate fluid. The compositions of these phases differ from the composition of OL natrocarbonatites; therefore, it is unlikely that natrocarbonatites formed directly from one of these phases. Instead, mixing of the outgassing alkali carbonate fluid and the fluorine-rich carbonate melt can yield natrocarbonatite compositions at temperatures close to subsolidus temperatures of nephelinite (<630-650 °C). Moreover, the high halogen content (6-16 wt%) in the carbonate melt precludes saturation of calcite (i.e., formation of calciocarbonatite) and maintains the carbonate melt in the liquid state with 28-41 wt% CaO at temperatures =600 °C. Our study suggests that alkali carbonate fluids and melts could have commonly formed in the geological past, but it is unlikely they precipitated calcite that facilitates fossilization. Instead, alkali carbonates likely precipitated that were not preserved in the fossil nephelinite rocks. Thus, alkali carbonate fluids and melts have been so far overlooked in the geological record because of the lack of previous detailed inclusion studies.
DS201906-1298
2019
Bodnar, R.J.Guzmics, T., Berkesi, M, Bodnar, R.J., Fall, A., Bali, E., Milke, R., Vetlenyi, E., Szabo, C.Natrocarbonatites: a hidden product of three phase immiscibility.Geology, Vol. 47, 6, pp. 527-530.Africa, Tanzaniadeposit - Oldoinyo Lengai

Abstract: Earth’s only active natrocarbonatite volcanism, occurring at Oldoinyo Lengai (OL), Tanzania, suggests that natrocarbonatite melts are formed through a unique geological process. In the East African Rift, the extinct Kerimasi (KER) volcano is a neighbor of OL and also contains nephelinites hosting melt and fluid inclusions that preserve the igneous processes associated with formation of natrocarbonatite melts. Here, we present evidence for the presence of coexisting nephelinite melt, fluorine-rich carbonate melt, and alkali carbonate fluid. The compositions of these phases differ from the composition of OL natrocarbonatites; therefore, it is unlikely that natrocarbonatites formed directly from one of these phases. Instead, mixing of the outgassing alkali carbonate fluid and the fluorine-rich carbonate melt can yield natrocarbonatite compositions at temperatures close to subsolidus temperatures of nephelinite (<630-650 °C). Moreover, the high halogen content (6-16 wt%) in the carbonate melt precludes saturation of calcite (i.e., formation of calciocarbonatite) and maintains the carbonate melt in the liquid state with 28-41 wt% CaO at temperatures =600 °C. Our study suggests that alkali carbonate fluids and melts could have commonly formed in the geological past, but it is unlikely they precipitated calcite that facilitates fossilization. Instead, alkali carbonates likely precipitated that were not preserved in the fossil nephelinite rocks. Thus, alkali carbonate fluids and melts have been so far overlooked in the geological record because of the lack of previous detailed inclusion studies.
DS201907-1546
2019
Bodnar, R.J.Gorce, J.S., Caddick, M.J., Bodnar, R.J.Thermodynamic contraints on carbonate stability and carbon volatility during subduction.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 519, pp. 213-222.Mantlecarbon cycle

Abstract: The breakdown of carbonate minerals at high pressure is frequently cited as an important mechanism that leads to carbon release from subducted rocks. However, carbonate minerals in the subducting slab are predicted to be stable to depths that are greater than arc-generating magma depths of approximately 150 km, implying that breakdown of carbonate phases in dehydrated MORB may not be a major contributor to arc volcano carbon budgets. To account for this discrepancy, previous studies have suggested that addition of H2O-rich fluids promotes the breakdown of carbonate-rich lithologies, thus generating volatile C species that could be incorporated into arc magmas. Here, we explore the feasibility of H2O-mediated decarbonation with a simple thermodynamic model. We calculate equilibrium mineral assemblages and accompanying fluid H2O/CO2 ratios for typical subducted lithologies, assuming a range of subduction zone geotherms, and explore the implications of addition of external fluids that are generated from deserpentinization of ultramafic lithologies at various stages. Results suggest that the liberation of C along volcanic arcs is facilitated by either the breakdown of carbonate minerals due to thermodynamically favorable conditions in hotter subduction systems, or by the breakdown of carbonate minerals during periods of higher fluid productivity associated with deserpentinization at appropriate depths along colder subduction geotherms. A comparison of C fluxes measured at volcanic arcs shows that colder subduction zones generate higher C fluxes, implying that the depth at which deserpentinization reactions occur strongly controls the availability of aqueous fluids for slab decarbonation, and that fluid availability represents the dominant control on carbon volatility during subduction.
DS202006-0912
2020
Bodnar, R.J.Bodnar, R.J., Frezzotti, M.L.Microscale chemistry: raman analysis of fluid and melt inclusions.Elements, Vol. 16, pp. 93-98.Mantlemelt inclusions

Abstract: Raman spectroscopy is a commonly applied nondestructive analytical technique for characterizing fluid and melt inclusions. The exceptional spatial resolution (~1 µm) and excellent spectral resolution (=1 cm-1) permits the characterization of micrometer-scale phases and allows quantitative analyses based on Raman spectral features. Data provided by Raman analysis of fluid and melt inclusions has significantly advanced our understanding of complex geologic processes, including preeruptive volatile contents of magmas, the nature of fluids in the deep crust and upper mantle, the generation and evolution of methane-bearing fluids in unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs. Anticipated future advances include the development of Raman mass spectroscopy and the use of Raman to monitor reaction progress in synthetic and natural fluid inclusion microreactors.
DS202007-1125
2020
Bodnar, R.J.Berkesi, M., Bali, E., Bodnar, R.J., Szabo, A., Guzmics, T.Carbonatite and highly peralkaline nephelinitie melts from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania: the role of natrite-normative fluid degassing.Gondwana Research, Vol. 85, pp. 76-83. pdfAfrica, Tanzaniadeposit - Oldoinyo Lengai

Abstract: Oldoinyo Lengai, located in the Gregory Rift in Tanzania, is a world-famous volcano owing to its uniqueness in producing natrocarbonatite melts and because of its extremely high CO2 flux. The volcano is constructed of highly peralkaline [PI = molar (Na2O + K2O)/Al2O3 > 2-3] nephelinite and phonolites, both of which likely coexisted with carbonate melt and a CO2-rich fluid before eruption. Results of a detailed melt inclusion study of the Oldoinyo Lengai nephelinite provide insights into the important role of degassing of CO2-rich vapor in the formation of natrocarbonatite and highly peralkaline nephelinites. Nepheline phenocrysts trapped primary melt inclusions at 750-800 °C, representing an evolved state of the magmas beneath Oldoinyo Lengai. Raman spectroscopy, heating-quenching experiments, low current EDS and EPMA analyses of quenched melt inclusions suggest that at this temperature, a dominantly natritess-normative, F-rich (7-14 wt%) carbonate melt and an extremely peralkaline (PI = 3.2-7.9), iron-rich nephelinite melt coexisted following degassing of a CO2 + H2O-vapor. We furthermore hypothesize that the degassing led to re-equilibration between the melt and liquid phases that remained and involved 1/ mixing between the residual (after degassing) alkali carbonate liquid and an F-rich carbonate melt and 2/ enrichment of the coexisting nephelinite melt in alkalis. We suggest that in the geological past similar processes were responsible for generating highly peralkaline silicate melts in continental rift tectonic settings worldwide.
DS202105-0798
2021
Bodnar, R.J.Wallace, P.J., Plank, T., Bodnar, R.J., Gaetani, G.A., Shea, T.Olivine-hosted melt inclusions: a microscopic perspective on a complex magmatic world.Annual Review of Earth Planetary Sciences, Vol. 49, pp. 465-484.MantleMagmatism

Abstract: Inclusions of basaltic melt trapped inside of olivine phenocrysts during igneous crystallization provide a rich, crystal-scale record of magmatic processes ranging from mantle melting to ascent, eruption, and quenching of magma during volcanic eruptions. Melt inclusions are particularly valuable for retaining information on volatiles such as H2O and CO2 that are normally lost by vesiculation and degassing as magma ascends and erupts. However, the record preserved in melt inclusions can be variably obscured by postentrapment processes, and thus melt inclusion research requires careful evaluation of the effects of such processes. Here we review processes by which melt inclusions are trapped and modified after trapping, describe new opportunities for studying the rates of magmatic and volcanic processes over a range of timescales using the kinetics of post-trapping processes, and describe recent developments in the use of volatile contents of melt inclusions to improve our understanding of how volcanoes work.
DS202107-1144
2021
Bodnar, R.J.Wallace, P.J., Plank, T., Bodnar, R.J., Gaetani, G.A., Shea, T.Olivine-hosted melt inclusions: a microscopic perspective on a complex magmatic world.Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Vol. 49, pp. 465-494.Mantlemagmatism

Abstract: Inclusions of basaltic melt trapped inside of olivine phenocrysts during igneous crystallization provide a rich, crystal-scale record of magmatic processes ranging from mantle melting to ascent, eruption, and quenching of magma during volcanic eruptions. Melt inclusions are particularly valuable for retaining information on volatiles such as H2O and CO2 that are normally lost by vesiculation and degassing as magma ascends and erupts. However, the record preserved in melt inclusions can be variably obscured by postentrapment processes, and thus melt inclusion research requires careful evaluation of the effects of such processes. Here we review processes by which melt inclusions are trapped and modified after trapping, describe new opportunities for studying the rates of magmatic and volcanic processes over a range of timescales using the kinetics of post-trapping processes, and describe recent developments in the use of volatile contents of melt inclusions to improve our understanding of how volcanoes work. Inclusions of silicate melt (magma) trapped inside of crystals formed by magma crystallization provide a rich, detailed record of what happens beneath volcanoes. These inclusions record information ranging from how magma forms deep inside Earth to its final hours as it ascends to the surface and erupts. The melt inclusion record, however, is complex and hazy because of many processes that modify the inclusions after they become trapped in crystals. Melt inclusions provide a primary archive of dissolved gases in magma, which are the key ingredients that make volcanoes erupt explosively.
DS201412-0373
2014
Bodnar, R.L.Howarth, G.H., Barry, P.H., Pernet-Fisher, J.F., Baziotis, I.P., Pokhilenko, N.P., Poikhilenko, L.N., Bodnar, R.L., Taylor, L.A., Agashev, A.M.Superplume metasomatism: evidence from Siberian mantle xenoliths.Lithos, Vol. 184-187, pp. 209-224.RussiaMetasomatism
DS2002-1581
2002
Bodner, R.J.Taylor, L.A., Sobolev, N..V., Ghazi, M., Anand, M., Bodner, R.J.The science of diamonds and their inclusions can such dat a be used to establish diamond provenance?Eos, American Geophysical Union, Spring Abstract Volume, Vol.83,19, 1p.BrazilDiamond - inclusions, sulphides
DS1999-0078
1999
Bodorkos, S.Bodorkos, S., Oliver, N.H.S., Cawood, P.A.Thermal evolution of the central Halls Creek Orogen, northern AustraliaAustralian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 46, June pp. 453-466.AustraliaGeothermometry, Halls Creek Orogen
DS2002-0178
2002
Bodorkos, S.Bodorkos, S., Sandiford, M., Oliver, N.H.S., Cawood, P.High T low P metamorphism in the Paleoproterozoic Halls Creek Orogen: the middle crustal response to mantle...Journal of Metamorphic Geology, Vol. 20, No. 2, pp. 217-38.Australia, northernGeothermometry - mantle related transient thermal pulse
DS200512-0099
2004
Bodorkos, S.Bodorkos, S., Reddy, S.M.Proterozoic cooling and exhumation of the northern central Halls Creek Orogen, Western Australia: constraints from a reconnaissance 40 Ar 39 Ar study.Australia Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 51, 4, pp. 591-609.AustraliaGeochronology
DS200612-0144
2005
Bodorkos, S.Bodorkos, S., Sandiford, M.Thermal and mechanical controls on the evolution of Archean crustal deformation: examples from western Australia.Benn, K., Mareschal, J-C., Condie, K.C. Archean Geodynamics and Environments, AGU Geophysical Monograph, No. 164, pp. 131-148.AustraliaGeothermometry
DS1991-0246
1991
Bodri, L.Cermak, V., Bodri, L.A heat production model of the crust and upper mantleTectonophysics, Vol. 194, No. 4, August 10, pp. 307-324GlobalMantle, Heat flow
DS1991-0247
1991
Bodri, L.Cermak, V., Bodri, L., Rybach, L.Radioactive heat production in the continental crust and its depthdependenceTerrestrial Heat Flow and the Lithosphere Structure, editors Cermak, V. and, Springer Verlag, pp. 23-69MantleCrust -hot spots, Depth
DS1992-0228
1992
Bodri, L.Cermak, V., Bodri, L.Crustal thinning during rifting: a possible signature in radiogenic heatproductionTectonophysics, Vol. 209, pp. 227-239MantleHot spots, Rift zones
DS1991-0924
1991
Bodrov, V.A.Kostrovitsky, S.I., Skripnichenko, V.A., Plusnin, G.S., Bodrov, V.A.Strontium, Carbon, and Oxygen isotope composition in kimberlites of the North Russian. USSRProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June, pp. 527-529RussiaGeochronology, Analyses
DS1975-1252
1979
Bodunov, YE.N.Vdovykin, G.P., Bodunov, YE.N., et al.Bitumens in the Mir Kimberlite PipeDoklady Academy of Sciences USSR, EARTH SCI. SECTION., Vol. 245, No. 1-6, PP. 206-210.RussiaBlank
DS2003-0663
2003
Boebel, T.Jokat, W., Boebel, T., Konig, M., Meyer, U.Timing and geometry of early Gondwana breakupJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B9, Sept. 16, 10.1029/2002JB001802RodiniaTectonics
DS200412-0922
2003
Boebel, T.Jokat, W., Boebel, T., Konig, M., Meyer, U.Timing and geometry of early Gondwana breakup.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 108, B9, Sept. 16, 10.1029/2002 JB001802Gondwana, RodiniaTectonics
DS1910-0263
1912
Boediker, C.Boediker, C.Die Verwertung der Suedwest afrikanischen DiamantenBerlin: Deutschen Kanzlei, 23P.Southwest Africa, South Africa, NamibiaHistory, Production, Mining Economics, Kimberley
DS1993-1809
1993
Boehler, R.Zerr, A., Boehler, R.Melting of (MgFe)SiO2 perovskite to 625 kilobars: indication of a high melting temperature in the lower mantle.Science, Vol. 262, No. 5133, October 22, pp. 553-554.MantleMelting, Perovskite
DS1994-1971
1994
Boehler, R.Yuen, D.A., Cadek, O.P., Boehler, R., et al.Large cold anomalies in the deep mantle and mantle instability in theCretaceous.Terra Nova, Vol. 6, pp. 238-245.MantleGeophysics -seismics, Tomography
DS1995-0163
1995
Boehler, R.Boehler, R., Chopelas, A., Zarr, A.Temperature and chemistry of the core-mantle boundaryChemical Geology, Vol. 120, No. 3-4, March 1, pp. 199-206.MantleBoundary, Geochemistry
DS1998-0135
1998
Boehler, R.Boehler, R., Zerr, A., Serghiou, Tschauner, HilgrenNew experimental constraints on the nature of DMineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 182-3.MantleCore mantle boundary layer, Perovskite
DS1998-0619
1998
Boehler, R.Hillgren, V.J., Boehler, R.high pressure reactions between light metals and silicates; Implications for the light element ....Mineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 624-5.MantleCore-mantle boundary, light rare earth element (LREE).
DS2001-0191
2001
Boehler, R.Chudinovskikh, L., Boehler, R.high pressure polymorphs of olivine and the 660 km seismic discontinuityNature, Vol. No. 6837, pp. 574-6.MantleBoundary
DS2002-0179
2002
Boehler, R.Boehler, R., Chudinovskikh, L., Hilgren, V.Earth's core and lower mantle: phase behaviour melting and chemical interactionsProceedings - International School of Physics Enrico Fermi, Vol. 147, pp. 627-42. Ingenta 1025439480MantleMelt
DS200712-0085
2005
Boehler, R.Boehler, R.Diamonds as optical windows to extreme conditions.In: Mineral Behaviour at Extreme Conditions, R. Miletich ed. ( total 488p) 24 Euros., TechnologyMineralogy
DS200712-0437
2007
Boehler, R.Hillgren, V.J., Schwager, B., Boehler, R.Potassium as a heat source in the core? Metal-silicate partitioning of K and other alkali metals.Plates, Plumes, and Paradigms, 1p. abstract p. A406.MantleGeochemistry
DS201809-1997
2018
Boehler, R.Boehler, R.Surprising" phase behavior of pure carbon: is diamond metastable at high pressures?Goldschmidt Conference, 1p. AbstractMantlemelting

Abstract: Flash laser heating in diamond anvil cells has been performed to melt diamond up to 37.5 GPa and 4500K using three different methods and three different starting materials: graphite, glassy carbon and diamond. In these experiments molten diamonds were confirmed by FIB/SEM images of the quenched samples. The melting slope of diamond is strongly negative, in contrast to all theoretical predictions. This is the first direct measurement of diamond melting temperatures at high pressure supporting early predictions based on analogies in the phase behavior of the group IV elements carbon, silicon and germanium. For diamond, these analogies had been dismissed for over 30 years based on theoretical grounds. The results imply that, at very high pressure, diamond, seemingly stable in all static and shock experiments, must be outside its thermodynamic stability field. This could be comparable to its behavior at ambient pressures, where diamond exhibits remarkable stability when heated to several thousand degrees even though the thermodynamically stable form of carbon is graphite.
DS1910-0337
1913
Boehm, J.Boehm, J., Weisfermel, W.Ueber Tertiare Versteinerungen von Den Bogenfelser Diamantfeldern.Beitr. Geol. Erf. Deut Schutzgeb., Vol. 5, PP. 59-111.Southwest Africa, NamibiaPalaeontology, Littoral Diamond Placers
DS1910-0364
1913
Boehm, J.Lotz, H., Boehm, J., Weissermel, W.Geologische und Palaeontologische Beitrage zur Kenntnis Der luederitz buchter Diamantablagerungen.Beitr. Geol. Erforsch. Deutsch. Schutzgeb., No. 5, 111P.Southwest Africa, NamibiaGeology, Palaeontology, Kimberley
DS1910-0581
1919
Boehm, J.Boehm, J.Mya Klinghardti Nov. Sp. Aus der Tertiaren Diamant fuehrenden Strand terrasse Bei Bogenfels in Suedwestafrika.Zeitschr. Deuts. Geol. Gesell., Vol. 71, P. 78.Southwest Africa, NamibiaStratigraphy, Paleontology, Littoral Diamond Placers
DS1920-0274
1926
Boehm, J.Boehm, J.Ueber Tertiare Versteinerungen von Den Bogenfelser Diamantfeldern.Die Diamantenwueste Suedwest Afrika, Kaiser, E. Ed., Vol. 2, PP. 55-106.Southwest Africa, NamibiaStratigraphy, Paleontology, Littoral Diamond Placers
DS201608-1390
2016
Boehnke, P.Bell, E.A., Boehnke, P., Harrison, T.M.Recovering the primary geochemistry of Jack Hills zircons through quantitative estimates of chemical alteration.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 191, pp. 187-202.AustraliaJack Hills REE

Abstract: Despite the robust nature of zircon in most crustal and surface environments, chemical alteration, especially associated with radiation damaged regions, can affect its geochemistry. This consideration is especially important when drawing inferences from the detrital record where the original rock context is missing. Typically, alteration is qualitatively diagnosed through inspection of zircon REE patterns and the style of zoning shown by cathodoluminescence imaging, since fluid-mediated alteration often causes a flat, high LREE pattern. Due to the much lower abundance of LREE in zircon relative both to other crustal materials and to the other REE, disturbance to the LREE pattern is the most likely first sign of disruption to zircon trace element contents. Using a database of 378 (148 new) trace element and 801 (201 new) oxygen isotope measurements on zircons from Jack Hills, Western Australia, we propose a quantitative framework for assessing chemical contamination and exchange with fluids in this population. The Light Rare Earth Element Index is scaled on the relative abundance of light to middle REE, or LREE-I = (Dy/Nd) + (Dy/Sm). LREE-I values vary systematically with other known contaminants (e.g., Fe, P) more faithfully than other suggested proxies for zircon alteration (Sm/La, various absolute concentrations of LREEs) and can be used to distinguish primary compositions when textural evidence for alteration is ambiguous. We find that zircon oxygen isotopes do not vary systematically with placement on or off cracks or with degree of LREE-related chemical alteration, suggesting an essentially primary signature. By omitting zircons affected by LREE-related alteration or contamination by mineral inclusions, we present the best estimate for the primary igneous geochemistry of the Jack Hills zircons. This approach increases the available dataset by allowing for discrimination of on-crack analyses (and analyses with ambiguous or no information on spot placement or zircon internal structures) that do not show evidence for chemical alteration. It distinguishes between altered and unaltered samples in ambiguous cases (e.g., relatively high Ti), identifying small groups with potentially differing provenance from the main Jack Hills population. Finally, filtering of the population using the LREE-I helps to more certainly define primary correlations among trace element variables, potentially relatable to magmatic compositional evolution.
DS201611-2099
2016
Boehnke, P.Bell, E.A., Boehnke, P., Harrison, T.M.Recovering the primary geochemistry of Jack Hills zircons through quantitative estimates of chemical alteration.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 191, pp. 187-202.AustraliaGeochemistry

Abstract: Despite the robust nature of zircon in most crustal and surface environments, chemical alteration, especially associated with radiation damaged regions, can affect its geochemistry. This consideration is especially important when drawing inferences from the detrital record where the original rock context is missing. Typically, alteration is qualitatively diagnosed through inspection of zircon REE patterns and the style of zoning shown by cathodoluminescence imaging, since fluid-mediated alteration often causes a flat, high LREE pattern. Due to the much lower abundance of LREE in zircon relative both to other crustal materials and to the other REE, disturbance to the LREE pattern is the most likely first sign of disruption to zircon trace element contents. Using a database of 378 (148 new) trace element and 801 (201 new) oxygen isotope measurements on zircons from Jack Hills, Western Australia, we propose a quantitative framework for assessing chemical contamination and exchange with fluids in this population. The Light Rare Earth Element Index is scaled on the relative abundance of light to middle REE, or LREE-I = (Dy/Nd) + (Dy/Sm). LREE-I values vary systematically with other known contaminants (e.g., Fe, P) more faithfully than other suggested proxies for zircon alteration (Sm/La, various absolute concentrations of LREEs) and can be used to distinguish primary compositions when textural evidence for alteration is ambiguous. We find that zircon oxygen isotopes do not vary systematically with placement on or off cracks or with degree of LREE-related chemical alteration, suggesting an essentially primary signature. By omitting zircons affected by LREE-related alteration or contamination by mineral inclusions, we present the best estimate for the primary igneous geochemistry of the Jack Hills zircons. This approach increases the available dataset by allowing for discrimination of on-crack analyses (and analyses with ambiguous or no information on spot placement or zircon internal structures) that do not show evidence for chemical alteration. It distinguishes between altered and unaltered samples in ambiguous cases (e.g., relatively high Ti), identifying small groups with potentially differing provenance from the main Jack Hills population. Finally, filtering of the population using the LREE-I helps to more certainly define primary correlations among trace element variables, potentially relatable to magmatic compositional evolution.
DS201902-0284
2019
Boehnke, P.Keller, C.B., Husson, J.M., Mitchell, R.N., Bottke, W.F., Gernon, T.M., Boehnke, P., Bell, E.A., Swanson-Hysell, N.L., Peters, S.E.Neoproterozoic glacial origin of the Great Unconformity.PNAS, pnas.org/cqi/doi/10.1073/ pnas.1804350116 10p.Mantlegeomorphology

Abstract: The Great Unconformity, a profound gap in Earth’s stratigraphic record often evident below the base of the Cambrian system, has remained among the most enigmatic field observations in Earth science for over a century. While long associated directly or indirectly with the occurrence of the earliest complex animal fossils, a conclusive explanation for the formation and global extent of the Great Unconformity has remained elusive. Here we show that the Great Unconformity is associated with a set of large global oxygen and hafnium isotope excursions in magmatic zircon that suggest a late Neoproterozoic crustal erosion and sediment subduction event of unprecedented scale. These excursions, the Great Unconformity, preservational irregularities in the terrestrial bolide impact record, and the first-order pattern of Phanerozoic sedimentation can together be explained by spatially heterogeneous Neoproterozoic glacial erosion totaling a global average of 3-5 vertical kilometers, along with the subsequent thermal and isostatic consequences of this erosion for global continental freeboard.
DS2001-0218
2001
Boener, D.E.Craven, J.A., Kurtz, R.D., Boener, D.E., et al.Conductivity of western Superior Province upper mantle in northwestern OntarioCan. Geological Survey Current Research, No. 200-E6, 15p.Ontario, northwestGeophysics
DS2003-0126
2003
Boer, M.Boer, M., Sherbourne, R.Getting the most out of our diamonds: Namibia, De Beers and the arrival of Lev LevievInstitute for Public Policy Research, Sept. 14p.NamibiaHistory, economy, De Beers, Samicor, Trans Hex, Diamond
DS200412-0174
2003
Boer, M.Boer, M., Sherbourne, R.Getting the most out of our diamonds: Namibia, De Beers and the arrival of Lev Leviev.Institute for Public Policy Research, Sept. 14p.Africa, NamibiaHistory, economy, De Beers, Samicor, Trans Hex, Diamond
DS1996-0146
1996
Boerner, D.Boerner, D., Kurtz, R., Craven, J., Jones, F.W.Electromagnetic results from the Alberta basement lithoprobe transectRoss, G.M. Lithoprobe Alberta, No. 51, pp. 61-70.AlbertaGeophysics - electromagnetic
DS1997-0107
1997
Boerner, D.Boerner, D., Craven, J., Kurtz, R., Jones, W.Electrical structure in the Precambrian crust and mantle of westernCanada.Geological Survey of Canada Forum 1997 abstracts, p. 8. AbstractAlberta, SaskatchewanMantle, Geophysics - magnetotellurics
DS2000-0835
2000
Boerner, D.Ross, G.M., Eaton, D.W., Boerner, D., Miles, W.Tectonic entrapment and its role in the evolution of continental lithosphere: an example from Precambrian...Tectonics, in pressAlberta, Western CanadaTectonics - lithopshere
DS1989-0721
1989
Boerner, D.E.Jones, A.G., Boerner, D.E., Kurtz, R.D.Electrical crustal structure at the edge of the North American cratonGeological Association of Canada (GAC) Annual Meeting Program Abstracts, Vol. 14, p. A104. (abstract.)OntarioTectonics, Kapuskasing Lithoprobe
DS1995-0164
1995
Boerner, D.E.Boerner, D.E., Kurtz, R.D., Craven, J.A., Rondenay, QianBuried Proterozoic foredeep under the Western Canada sedimentary basinGeology, Vol. 23, No. 4, April pp. 297-300Alberta, SaskatchewanGeophysics -electromagnetics, Precamrbian basement
DS1995-0165
1995
Boerner, D.E.Boerner, D.E., Kurtz, R.D., Craven, J.A., Rondenay, S.Buried Proterozoic foredeep under the Western Canada sedimentary basin?Geology, Vol. 23, No. 4, Apr. pp. 297-300.Western Canada, AlbertaBasin - sedimentary, Tectonics, Precambrian Basement, Geophysics, electromagnetics
DS1996-0147
1996
Boerner, D.E.Boerner, D.E., Kurtz, R.D., Craven, JJ.A.Electrical conductivity and Paleo-Proterozoic foredeepsJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 101, No. B 6, June 10, pp. 13, 775-91Canada, North AmericaProterozoic, Geophysics
DS1997-0976
1997
Boerner, D.E.Ross, G.M., Eaton, D.W., Boerner, D.E., Clowes, R.M.Geologists probe buried craton in western CanadaEos, Vol. 78, No. 44, Nov. 4, pp. 493, 4, 7.AlbertaCraton, Geophysics - seismics
DS1998-0136
1998
Boerner, D.E.Boerner, D.E., Craven, J.A., Kurtz, R.D., Ross, JonesThe Great Falls Tectonic Zone: suture or intracontinnental shear zone?Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 35, No. 2, Feb. pp. 175-183.Alberta, WyomingTectonics, Archean, Proterozoic, Geophysics - electromagnetic
DS1998-0137
1998
Boerner, D.E.Boerner, D.E., Kurtz, R.D., Craven, J.A., Ross, JonesGeophysical evidence of mantle involvement in Paleoproterzoic orogenesisAnnales Geophysicae, 23rd Meet abstracts 16. supp. p. 175.AlbertaGeophysics
DS1998-1257
1998
Boerner, D.E.Ross, G.M., Eaton, D.W., Boerner, D.E.Reflections on assembly of western LaurentiaGeological Society of America (GSA) Annual Meeting, abstract. only, p.A46.Northwest TerritoriesTectonic, Lithoprobe
DS2000-0094
2000
Boerner, D.E.Boerner, D.E., Kurtz, R.D., Craven, J.A., Ross, JonesA synthesis of electromagnetic studies in lithoprobe Alberta Basement Transect: constraints PaleoproterozoicCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol.37, no11, Nov.pp.1509-34.AlbertaTectonics - indentation, Geophysics - electromagnetics
DS200512-0284
2005
Boerner, D.E.Ferguson, I.J., Craven, J.A., Kurtz, R.D., Boerner, D.E., Bailey, Wu, Orellana, Spratt, Wennberg, NortonGeoelectric response of Archean lithosphere in the western Superior Province, central Canada.Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, Vol. 150, 1-3, May 16, pp. 123-143.Canada, OntarioGeophysics - magnetotelluric, North Caribou terrane
DS201012-0075
2010
Boesenberg, J.S.Brusentsova, T.N., Peale, R.E., Maukonen, D., Harlow, G.E., Boesenberg, J.S., Ebel, D.Far infrared spectroscopy of carbonate minerals.American Mineralogist, Vol. 95, pp. 1515-1522.TechnologyIR - not specific to diamonds
DS1960-0124
1961
Boeson, R.Boeson, R., Irving, E., Robertson, W.A.The Paleomagnetism of Some Igneous Rock Bodies in New Southwales.Royal Society. NEW SOUTH WALES Transactions, Vol. 94, PP. 224-232.AustraliaKimberlite, Non Kimberlitic Breccia Pipes
DS200812-0567
2008
BoettcherKietavainen, R., Woodard, J., Eklund, O., Hetherington, C.J., BoettcherApatite as a petrogenetic indicator for lamprophyres and carbonatites.Goldschmidt Conference 2008, Abstract p.A469.Europe, FennoscandiaChemistry - trace elements
DS1986-0082
1986
Boettcher, A.Boettcher, A.The relationship between alkali basalts (basanites) and gabbroic Xenoliths in the Cima volcanic field, eastern Mojave desert,CaliforniaGeological Society of America (GSA) Abstract Volume, Vol. 18, No. 2, p. 87. (abstract.)CaliforniaBasanite, Eclogite
DS1975-0653
1977
Boettcher, A.L.Windom, K.E., Boettcher, A.L.Lamprophyre Kimberlite Association Exemplified in Eclogite from Roberts victor Mine, South Africa: Evidence for Metasomatism in the Mantle.Geological Society of America (GSA), Vol. 9, PP. 1230-1231. (abstract.).South AfricaKimberlite Genesis, Petrology
DS1980-0068
1980
Boettcher, A.L.Boettcher, A.L., O'neil, J.R.Stable isotope chemical and petrographic studies of high pressure amphiboles and micas: evidence for metasomatism in the mantle sourceregions....American Journal of Science, Vol. 280-A, pp. 594-621.South AfricaAlkali Basalts, Kimberlites, Metasomatism
DS1980-0069
1980
Boettcher, A.L.Boettcher, A.L., Robertson, J.K., Wyllie, P.J.Studies in Synthetic Carbonatite Systems: Solidus Relationships for Cao Mgo Co2 H2o to 40 Kbar and Cao Mgo Sio2 Cos H2oto 10 Kbar.Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 85, No. B 12, DECEMBER 10TH. PP. 6937-6943.GlobalMineralogy
DS1980-0349
1980
Boettcher, A.L.Windom, K.E., Boettcher, A.L.Mantle Metasomatism and the Kimberlite-lamprophyre Association: Evidence from an Eclogite Nodule from Roberts Victor Mine, South Africa.Journal of Geology, Vol. 88, No. 6, PP. 705-712.South AfricaKimberlite Genesis
DS1983-0138
1983
Boettcher, A.L.Boettcher, A.L.Metasomatism of the Mantle and the Origin of Alkali BasaltsMantle Metasomatism And The Origin of Uktrapotassic And Rela, 1P.GlobalBlank
DS201012-0360
2010
Boettcher, I.Kietavainen, R., Woodard, J., Eklund, O., Boettcher, I.Apatite composition in post-collisional lamprophyres and carbonatites in the Fennoscandinavian Shield: insight into their petrogenesis.International Dyke Conference Held Feb. 6, India, 1p. AbstractEurope, FinlandCarbonatite
DS201012-0857
2010
Boettcher, I.Woodard, J., Boettcher, I.Determining depth of lamprophyre magma generation and emplacement: mica thermobarometry revisited.International Mineralogical Association meeting August Budapest, abstract p. 580.Europe, FennoscandiaGeothermometry
DS200912-0643
2009
Boettner, R.Ross, P., White, J.D., Lorenz, V., Zimanowski, B., Boettner, R., McClintock, M.Why lower diatremes in kimberlitic and non-kimberlitic systems are non-stratified, homogenized, and contain steep internal contacts: episodic burst and debris jets.GAC/MAC/AGU Meeting held May 23-27 Toronto, Abstract onlyMantleBoundary
DS200812-0919
2008
Boev, B.Prelevic, D., Boev, B., Zouros, N., Akai, C.Lamproites and alkaline rocks of southern Balkans and Aegean region.9th. IKC Field Trip Guidebook, CD 45p.Europe, Macedonia, Greece, TurkeyGuidebook - lamproites
DS201503-0135
2015
Bofan-Casanova, N.Bouhifd, M.A., Boyet, M., Cartier, C., Hammouda, T., Bofan-Casanova, N., Devidal, J.L., Andrault, D.Superchondritic Sm/Nd ratio of the Earth: impact of Earth's core formation.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 413, March 1, pp. 158-166.MantleGeochronology

Abstract: This study investigates the impact of Earth's core formation on the metal-silicate partitioning of Sm and Nd, two rare-earth elements assumed to be strictly lithophile although they are widely carried by the sulphide phases in reducing material (e.g. enstatite chondrites). The partition coefficients of Sm and Nd (DSmDSm and DNdDNd) between molten CI and EH chondrites model compositions and various Fe-rich alloys (in the Fe-Ni-C-Si-S system) have been determined in a multi-anvil between 3 and 26 GPa at various temperatures between 2073 and 2440 K, and at an oxygen fugacity ranging from 1 to 5 log units below the iron-wüstite (IW) buffer. The chemical compositions of the run products and trace concentrations in Sm and Nd elements were determined using electron microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Our results demonstrate the non-fractionation of Sm and Nd during the segregation of the metallic phases: the initial Sm/Nd ratio of about 1 in the starting materials yields precisely the same ratio in the recovered silicate phases after the equilibration with the metal phases at all conditions investigated in this study. In addition, DSmDSm and DNdDNd values range between 10-310-3 and 10-510-5 representing a low solubility in the metal. An increase of the partition coefficients is observed with decreasing the oxygen fugacity, or with an increase of S content of the metallic phase at constant oxygen fugacity. Thus, based on the actual Sm and Nd concentrations in the bulk Earth, the core should contain less than 0.4 ppb for Sm and less than 1 ppb for Nd. These estimates are three orders of magnitude lower than what would be required to explain the reported 142Nd excess in terrestrial samples relative to the mean chondritic value, using the core as a Sm-Nd complementary reservoir. In other words, the core formation processes cannot be responsible for the increase of the Sm/Nd ratio in the mantle early in Earth history.
DS201910-2262
2019
Boffa Ballaran, T.Gruninger, H., Liu, Z., Siegel, R., Boffa Ballaran, T., Katsura, T., Senker, J., Frost, F.J.Oxygen vacancy ordering in aluminous bridgmanite in the Earth's lower mantle.Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 46, 15, pp. 8731-8740.Mantlebridgmanite

Abstract: The lower mantle encompasses the largest region of the Earth's interior and is mainly composed of the perovskite-structured mineral (Mg,Fe,Al)(Al,Si)O3 bridgmanite. Its properties, therefore, control both the diffusive transport of elements and solid state flow in the lower mantle, which will be strongly influenced by point defects. We have identified and quantified defects in bridgmanite that arise from the replacement of silicon by aluminum and result in the creation of a vacant oxygen site. These oxygen defects are also found to form clusters in the structure, which in other perovskite structured minerals have been shown to strongly affect physical properties. As defect formation and ordering is dependent on composition and pressure, strong variations in physical properties may be expected within the upper 300 km of the lower mantle.
DS200712-0777
2007
Boffa Ballaran, T.Nestola, F., Longo, M., McCammon, C., Boffa Ballaran, T.Crystal structure refinement of Na bearing clinopyroxenes from mantle derived eclogite xenoliths.American Mineralogist, Vol. 92, pp. 1242-1245.RussiaDeposit - Udachnaya, Zagadochnaya
DS201112-0767
2011
Boffa Ballaran, T.Pamato, M.G., Boffa Ballaran, T., Frost, D.J., Kurnosov, A., Trots, D.M.The elasticity of hydrous minerals in the lower mantle.Goldschmidt Conference 2011, abstract p.1591.MantleWater recycling
DS201212-0078
2012
Boffa Ballaran, T.Boffa Ballaran, T., Kurosov, A., Glazyrin, K., Frost, D.J., Merlini, M., Hanfland, M., Caracas, R.Effect of chemistry on the compressibility of silicate perovskite in the lower mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 333-334, pp. 181-190.MantlePerovskite
DS201312-0247
2013
Boffa Ballaran, T.Ernok, A., Boffa Ballaran, T., Caracas, R., Miyajima, N., Bykova, E., Prakapenka, V., Liermann, H-P., Dubrovinsky, L.Pressure induced phase transitions in coesite.Goldschmidt 2013, AbstractTechnologyCarbonatite
DS201412-0297
2014
Boffa Ballaran, T.Glazyrin, K., Boffa Ballaran, T., Frost, D.J., McCammon, C., Kantor, A., Merlini, M., Hanfland, M., Dubrovinsky, L.Magnesium silicate perovskite and effect of iron oxidation state on its bulk sound velocity at the conditions of the lower mantle.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 393, pp. 182-186.MantlePerovskite
DS201603-0368
2015
Boffa Ballaran, T.Chang, Y-Y., Jacobsen, S.D., Bina, C.R., Thomas, S-M., Smyth, J.R., Frost, D.J., Boffa Ballaran, T., McCammon, C.A., Hauri, E.H., Inoue, T., Yurimoto, H., Meng, Y., Dera, P.Comparative compressibility of hydrous wadsleyite and ringwoodite: effect of H2O and implications for detecting water in the transition zone.Journal of Geophysical Research,, Vol. 120, 12, pp. 8259-8280.MantleRingwoodite

Abstract: Review of recent mineral physics literature shows consistent trends for the influence of Fe and H2O on the bulk modulus (K0) of wadsleyite and ringwoodite, the major phases of Earth's mantle transition zone (410-660?km). However, there is little consensus on the first pressure derivative, K0'?=?(dK/dP)P=0, which ranges from about 4 to >5 across experimental studies and compositions. Here we demonstrate the importance of K0' in evaluating the bulk sound velocity of the transition zone in terms of water content and provide new constraints on the effect of H2O on K0' for wadsleyite and ringwoodite by conducting a comparative compressibility study. In the experiment, multiple crystals of hydrous Fo90 wadsleyite containing 2.0 and 0.25?wt?% H2O were loaded into the same diamond anvil cell, along with hydrous ringwoodite containing 1.4?wt?% H2O. By measuring their pressure-volume evolution simultaneously up to 32?GPa, we constrain the difference in K0' independent of the pressure scale, finding that H2O has no effect on K0', whereas the effect of H2O on K0 is significant. The fitted K0' values of hydrous wadsleyite (0.25 and 2.0?wt?% H2O) and hydrous ringwoodite (1.4?wt?% H2O) examined in this study were found to be identical within uncertainty, with K0' ~3.7(2). New secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurements of the H2O content of these and previously investigated wadsleyite samples shows the bulk modulus of wadsleyite is reduced by 7.0(5)?GPa/wt?% H2O, independent of Fe content for upper mantle compositions. Because K0' is unaffected by H2O, the reduction of bulk sound velocity in very hydrous regions of transition zone is expected to be on the order of 1.6%, which is potentially detectible in high-resolution, regional seismology studies.
DS201610-1893
2016
Boffa Ballaran, T.Pamato, M.G., Kurnosov, A., Boffa Ballaran, T., Frost, D.J., Ziberna, L., Gianni, M., Speziale, S., Tkachev, S.N., Zhuravlev, K.K., Prakapenka, V.B.Single crystal elasticity of majoritic garnets: stagnant slabs and thermal anomalies at the base of the transition zone.Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 451, pp. 114-124.MantleSubduction

Abstract: The elastic properties of two single crystals of majoritic garnet (Mg3.24Al1.53Si3.23O12 and Mg3.01Fe0.17Al1.68Si3.15O12), have been measured using simultaneously single-crystal X-ray diffraction and Brillouin spectroscopy in an externally heated diamond anvil cell with Ne as pressure transmitting medium at conditions up to ~30 GPa and ~600 K. This combination of techniques makes it possible to use the bulk modulus and unit-cell volume at each condition to calculate the absolute pressure, independently of secondary pressure calibrants. Substitution of the majorite component into pyrope garnet lowers both the bulk (KsKs) and shear modulus (G ). The substitution of Fe was found to cause a small but resolvable increase in KsKs that was accompanied by a decrease in ?Ks/?P?Ks/?P, the first pressure derivative of the bulk modulus. Fe substitution had no influence on either the shear modulus or its pressure derivative. The obtained elasticity data were used to derive a thermo-elastic model to describe VsVs and VpVp of complex garnet solid solutions. Using further elasticity data from the literature and thermodynamic models for mantle phase relations, velocities for mafic, harzburgitic and lherzolitic bulk compositions at the base of Earth's transition zone were calculated. The results show that VsVs predicted by seismic reference models are faster than those calculated for all three types of lithologies along a typical mantle adiabat within the bottom 150 km of the transition zone. The anomalously fast seismic shear velocities might be explained if laterally extensive sections of subducted harzburgite-rich slabs pile up at the base of the transition zone and lower average mantle temperatures within this depth range.
DS201908-1788
2019
Boffa Ballaran, T.Liu, Z., Greaux, S., Cai, N., Siersch, N., Boffa Ballaran, T., Irifune, T., Frost, D.J.Influence of aluminum on the elasticity of majorite pyrope garnets.American Mineralogist, Vol. 104, pp. 929-935.Mantlegarnets

Abstract: The effect of aluminum (Al) on the elasticity of majorite-pyrope garnets was investigated by means of ultrasonic interferometry measurements on well-fabricated polycrystalline specimens. Both velocities and elastic moduli increase almost linearly with increasing Al content within analytical uncertainty. No significant variation of the velocities and elastic moduli is observed across the tetragonal-to-cubic phase transition at majorite with the pyrope content up to 26 mol% along the majorite-pyrope system. The elasticity variation of majorite-pyrope garnets is largely dominated by the Al content, while the phase transition as a result of cation ordering/disordering of Mg and Si via substitution of Al on octahedral sites cannot significantly affect elastic properties. Seismic velocity variations of a garnet-bearing mantle transition zone are therefore dominated by garnet composition (e.g., Al, Fe, Ca, and Na) rather than the tetragonal-to-cubic phase transition because of cation ordering/disordering.
DS201910-2243
2019
Boffa Ballaran, T.Amrstrong, K., Frost, D.J., McCammon, C.A., Rubie, D.C., Boffa Ballaran, T.Deep magma ocean formation set the oxidation state of Earth's mantle.Science, Vol. 365, 6456, pp. 903-906.Mantleredox

Abstract: The composition of Earth’s atmosphere depends on the redox state of the mantle, which became more oxidizing at some stage after Earth’s core started to form. Through high-pressure experiments, we found that Fe2+ in a deep magma ocean would disproportionate to Fe3+ plus metallic iron at high pressures. The separation of this metallic iron to the core raised the oxidation state of the upper mantle, changing the chemistry of degassing volatiles that formed the atmosphere to more oxidized species. Additionally, the resulting gradient in redox state of the magma ocean allowed dissolved CO2 from the atmosphere to precipitate as diamond at depth. This explains Earth’s carbon-rich interior and suggests that redox evolution during accretion was an important variable in determining the composition of the terrestrial atmosphere.
DS202105-0767
2021
Boffa Ballaran, T.Huang, R., Boffa Ballaran, T., McCammon, C.A., Miyajima, N., Frost, D.J.The composition and redox state of bridgmanite in the lower mantle as a function of oxygen fugacity.Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 30, pp. 110-136.Mantleredox

Abstract: The chemistry of bridgmanite (Brg), especially the oxidation state of iron, is important for understanding the physical and chemical properties, as well as putting constraints on the redox state, of the Earth’s lower mantle. To investigate the controls on the chemistry of Brg, the Fe3+ content of Brg was investigated experimentally as a function of composition and oxygen fugacity (fo2) at 25 GPa. The Fe3+/?Fe ratio of Brg increases with Brg Al content and fo2 and decreases with increasing total Fe content and with temperature. The dependence of the Fe3+/?Fe ratio on fo2 becomes less steep with increasing Al content. Thermodynamic models were calibrated to describe Brg and ferropericlase (Fp) compositions as well as the inter-site partitioning of trivalent cations in Brg in the Al-Mg-Si-O, Fe-Mg-Si-O and Fe-Al-Mg-Si-O systems. These models are based on equilibria involving Brg components where the equilibrium thermodynamic properties are the main adjustable parameters that are fit to the experimental data. The models reproduce the experimental data over wide ranges of fo2 with a relatively small number of adjustable terms. Mineral compositions for plausible mantle bulk compositions can be calculated from the models as a function of fo2 and can be extrapolated to higher pressures using data on the partial molar volumes of the Brg components. The results show that the exchange of Mg and total Fe (i.e., ferric and ferrous) between Brg and Fp is strongly fo2 dependent, which allows the results of previous studies to be reinterpreted. For a pyrolite bulk composition with an upper mantle bulk oxygen content, the fo2 at the top of the lower mantle is -0.86 log units below the iron-wüstite buffer (IW) with a Brg Fe3+/?Fe ratio of 0.50 and a bulk rock ratio of 0.28. This requires the formation of 0.7?wt.% Fe-Ni alloy to balance the raised Brg ferric iron content. With increasing pressure, the model predicts a gradual increase in the Fe3+/?Fe ratio in Brg in contrast to several previous studies, which levels off by 50 GPa. Oxygen vacancies in Brg decrease to practically zero by 40 GPa, potentially influencing elasticity, diffusivity and rheology in the top portion of the lower mantle. The models are also used to explore the fo2 recorded by inclusions in diamonds, which likely crystallized as Brg in the lower mantle, revealing oxygen fugacities which likely preclude the formation of some diamonds directly from carbonates, at least at the top of the lower mantle.
DS201312-0148
2013
Bogachev, V.I.Chanturia, V.A., Bogachev, V.I., Trofimova, E.A., Dvoichenkova, G.P.Mechanism and efficiency of water based removal of grease from diamonds during grease seperation.Journal of Mining Science, Vol. 48, 3, pp. 559-564.Russia, YakutiaDeposit - Mir
DS1995-1530
1995
Bogadikov, O.A.Puchtel, I.S., Bogadikov, O.A., et al.The role of crustal and mantle sources in the petrogenesis of continentalmagmatism: picrites OnegaPetrology, Vol. 3, No. 4, July-August, pp. 357-378Russia, Baltic shield, Karelia, KolaGeochemistry, Proterozoic
DS1996-0148
1996
Bogaert, P.Bogaert, P.Comparison kriging techniques in a space time contextMathematical Geology, Vol. 28, No. 1, Jan. pp. 73-86GlobalGeostatistics
DS2002-0289
2002
Bogaert, P.Christakos, G., Bogaert, P., Serre, M.L.Temporal GIS: advanced functions for field based applicationsSpringer, 220p.GlobalBook - GIS ( not specific to diamond), Bayesian maximum entropy
DS2003-0057
2003
Bogaerts, M.Auwera, J.V., Bogaerts, M., Liegeois, J.P., De Maiffe, D., Wilmart, E., Bolle, O.Derivation of the 1.0 0.9 Ga ferro potassic A type granitoids of southern Norway byPrecambrian Research, Vol. 124, 2-4, pp. 107-148..NorwayBlank
DS200412-0077
2003
Bogaerts, M.Auwera, J.V., Bogaerts, M., Liegeois, J.P., De Maiffe, D., Wilmart, E., Bolle, O., Duchesne, J.C.Derivation of the 1.0 0.9 Ga ferro potassic A type granitoids of southern Norway by extreme differentiation from basic magmas.Precambrian Research, Vol. 124, 2-4, pp. 107-148..Europe, NorwayAlkalic
DS1990-0163
1990
Bogardi, I.Bardossy, A., Bogardi, I., Kelly, W.E.Kriging with imprecise (Fuzzy) variograms. I. theory. II. ApplicationsMath. Geol, Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 63-79. pt. 2. 81-94GlobalGeostatistics, Kriging, variograM.
DS1998-1124
1998
BogatikovParsadanyan, K.S., Pervov, V.A., Bogatikov, KononvaGeochemical features of high magnesium alkaline rocks and their correlation with geological evolution - structureMineralogical Magazine, Goldschmidt abstract, Vol. 62A, p. 1137-8.Russia, Baltic ShieldAlkaline rocks, Geochemistry
DS2002-0876
2002
BogatikovKononova, V.A., Levsky, L.K., Pervov, V.A., Ovchinnikova, G.V., BogatikovPb Sr Nd isotopic systematics of mantle sources of potassic ultramafic and mafic rocksPetrology, Vol. 10, 5, pp. 433-47.RussiaAlkaline rocks, Geochronology
DS2002-0877
2002
BogatikovKononova, V.A., Levsky, L.K., Pervov, V.A., Ovchinnikova, G.V., BogatikovPb Sr Nd isotopic systematics of mantle sources of potassic ultramafic and mafic rocks in the north and east European platform.Petrology, Vol. 10, 5, pp. 433-47.Russia, UralsGeochronology, Alkaline rocks
DS2002-0878
2002
Bogatikov, A.Kononova, V.A., Levsky, L.K., Pervov, V.A., Ovchinnikova, G.V., Bogatikov, A.Pb Sr Nd isotopic systematics of mantle sources of potassic ultramafic and mafic rocksPetrology, Vol. 10, 5, pp. 433-47.Russia, Europe, Kola PeninsulaGeochronology
DS1985-0069
1985
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Makhotkin, I.L., Konova, V.A.Lamproites and their position in the classification of magnesium richpotassic rocks. (Russian)Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR Ser. Geol. (Russian), No. 12, pp. 3-10RussiaLamproite, Potassic
DS1986-0083
1986
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Eremeev, N.V., Makhotin, I.L., et al.Lamproites of Aldan and Central Asia.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol. 290, No. 4, pp. 936-940RussiaLamproite, Petrology
DS1986-0084
1986
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Eremeev, N.V., Makhotkin, I.L., Konova, V.A.Lamproites of Aldan and Middle Asia.(Russian)Doklady Academy of Sciences Akademy Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Vol 290, No. 4, pp. 936-940RussiaLamproites
DS1987-0063
1987
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Makhotkin, I.L., Eremeev, N.V.Rare earth and elements as indicators of the origin of lamproites of central Aldan (USSR).(Russian)Vulkanol. Seismol., (Russian), No. 1, pp. 15-29RussiaLamproites, Rare earths
DS1988-0065
1988
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Makhotkin, I.L.Lamproites. (Russian)Ultrabasic rocks, Magmaticheskiye Gornyye Porody, Izd. Nauka, Moscow, Vol. 5, pp. 217-229RussiaLamproites, Geochemistry
DS1988-0066
1988
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Yeremeyev, N.V., Makhotkin, I.L., Kononova, V.A.Lamproites of the Aldan and central AsiaDoklady Academy of Science USSR, Earth Science Section, Vol. 290, No. 1-6, March pp. 154-157RussiaLamproite, Analyses
DS1989-0132
1989
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A.Crystalline crust in space and in time. ..magmatism.(Russian)Moscow, Nayka, Monograph, (Russian), approx. 270p. Table of contents translated in EnglishRussiaUpper mantle, Magma
DS1989-0133
1989
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Makhotkin, I.L., Kononova, V.A.Lamproites: composition and petrogenetic questions. (Russian)Moscow, Nayka, Monograph, (Russian), pp. 92-100RussiaLamproites, Petrology
DS1989-0134
1989
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Makhotkin, I.L., Kononova, V.A.Lamproites, composition and aspects of petrogenesis.(Russian)Kristal. Kora V Prostranstve i vrement: magmatizm Dokl. Sov. Geol, pp. 92-100. Chem abstracts E1310:082300M CA 153003RussiaLamproites, Genesis
DS1989-0135
1989
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Makhotkin, I.P., Kononova, V.A.Lamproites, composition and petrogenetic questions.(Russian)in: Crystalline crust in space and time; magmatism, (Russian), Izd. Nauka, Moscow, pp. 91-100RussiaLamproites, Petrology
DS1990-0874
1990
Bogatikov, O.A.Kononova, V.A., Makhotkin, I.L., Malov, Y.V., Bogatikov, O.A.Lamproites and petrochemical series of potassium rocks.(Russian)Izves. Akad. Nauk SSSR, (Russian), Ser, Geol. No. 11, November pp. 55-65RussiaLamproites, Petrochemistry
DS1991-0137
1991
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Garanin, V.K., Kononova, K.A., Kudrjavtseva, G.P.Ore minerals from the lamproite ground massProceedings of Fifth International Kimberlite Conference held Araxa June 1991, Servico Geologico do Brasil (CPRM) Special, pp. 484-485Russia, Australia, SpainOxide mineral chemistry, Diamond evaluation
DS1991-0138
1991
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Konnonova, V.A.Lamproites. (Russian) languageIzd. Nauka, Moscow Publication, (Russian), 294pRussiaBook -Lamproites, Petrology
DS1991-0139
1991
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Lazko, Ye.Ye., Sharkov, Ye.V.Potential sources of subcrustal magmasDoklady Academy of Sciences USSR Earth Sci. Section, Vol. 313, No. 1, pp. 175-178RussiaMantle, Kimberlite
DS1993-0891
1993
Bogatikov, O.A.Lazko, Ye.Ye., Sharkov, Ye.V., Bogatikov, O.A.Mantle substrates: their geochemical classification and role in subcrustal magma formation.Geochemistry International, Vol. 30, No. 9, pp. 1-24.MantleGeochemistry, Xenoliths in basalts and kimberlites
DS1994-0175
1994
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., et al.Petrogenesis of Mesosoic potassic magmatism of the Central Aldan: a isotopic and geodynamic modelInternational Geology Review, Vol. 36, No. 7, July pp. 629-644Russia, AldanMagmatism, Geochronology
DS1994-0176
1994
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Pervov, V.A., ZhguralevPetrogenesis of Mesozoic potassic magmatism of the central Aldan: a isotopic and geodynamic model.International Geology Review, Vol. 36, No. 7, July pp. 629-644.Russia, AldanAlkalic rocks, Geochronology
DS1995-0992
1995
Bogatikov, O.A.Kononova, V.A., Bogatikov, O.A., Pervov, V.A., YeremeyevCentral Asian potassic magmatic rocks: geochemistry and formationconditions.Geochemistry International, Vol. 32, No. 2, pp. 23-42.Russia, AsiaAlkaline rocks, Geochemistry
DS1996-1066
1996
Bogatikov, O.A.Parasdanyan, K.S., Konnonova, Y.A., Bogatikov, O.A.Sources of heterogenous magmatism of the Arkanglesk diamondiferousprovince.Petrology, Vol. 4, No. 5, Sept-Oct., pp. 460-479.Russia, ArkangelskMagmatism
DS1996-1289
1996
Bogatikov, O.A.Sharkov, E.V., Bogatikov, O.A., Kovalenko, V.I., Bogina, M.Petrology and geochemistry of continental and oceanic magmatic and metamorphic rocks. - Early Prec. eclogitesRussian Geology and Geophysics, Vol. 37, No. 1, pp. 85-102.Russia, Kola Peninsula, SayanEclogites, Baltic Shield
DS1999-0079
1999
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Pervov, ParsadanyanUltramafic Diamondiferous rocks, Russian platform and geodynamicsStanley, SGA Fifth Biennial Symposium, pp. 1301-4.RussiaMelilitite, lamproite, lamprophyre, picrite
DS2000-0885
2000
Bogatikov, O.A.Sharkov, E.V., Bogatikov, O.A.Early Proterozoic magmatism and geodynamics - evidence of a fundamental change in Earth's evolution. Chapter 5In: Bogatikov Magmatism and Geodynamics, Overseas Publishing pp. 219-252.Russia, Norway, Kola, Baltic StatesMagmatism
DS2001-0117
2001
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Pervov, ZhuravlevSources, geodynamic setting of formation and diamond bearing potential of kimberlites from northern marginPetrology, Vol. 9, No. 3, pp. 191-203.RussiaPlate - Sr neodymium isotopic and ICP MS, Geochronology, geochemistry
DS2003-1256
2003
Bogatikov, O.A.Sharkov, E.V., Trubkin, N.V., Krasivskaya, I.S., Bogatikov, O.A., Mokhov, A.V.The oldest volcanic glass in the Early Paleoproterozoic boninite type lavas, KarelianDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 390, 4, May-June pp. 580-4.Russia, KareliaBoninite
DS200412-1317
2004
Bogatikov, O.A.Mineeva, R.M., Speranskii, A.V., Titkov, S.V., Zhilicheva, O.M., Bershov, L.V., Bogatikov, O.A., KudryavtsevaSpectroscopic and morphological characteristics of diamonds from the Grib kimberlite pipe.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 394, 1, Jan-Feb. pp. 96-99.Russia, Kola Peninsula, ArchangelDiamond morphology, deposit - Grib
DS200412-1794
2003
Bogatikov, O.A.Sharkov, E.V., Trubkin, N.V., Krasivskaya, I.S., Bogatikov, O.A., Mokhov, A.V.The oldest volcanic glass in the Early Paleoproterozoic boninite type lavas, Karelian craton: results of instrumental investigatDoklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 390, 4, May-June pp. 580-4.Russia, KareliaBoninites
DS200412-1795
2004
Bogatikov, O.A.Sharkov, E.V., Trubkin, N.V., Krassivskaya, I.S., Bogatikov, O.A., Mokhov, A.V., Chistyakov, EvseevaStructural and compositional characteristics of the oldest volcanic glass in the early paleoproterozoic boninite like lavas of sPetrology, Vol.12, 3, pp. 227-244.Russia, KareliaBoninites
DS200412-2192
2004
Bogatikov, O.A.Yutkina, E.V., Kononova, V.A., Bogatikov, O.A., Knyazkov, A.P., Kozar, N.A., Ovchinnikova, G.V., Levsky, L.K.Kimberlites of eastern Priazove ( Ukraine) and geochemical characteristics of their sources.Petrology, Vol. 12, 2, pp. 134-148.Europe, UkraineDevonian age, Arkangelsk, Terskii Bereg, Novolaspinakay
DS200512-0100
2004
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Golubeva, Zinchuk, Ilupin, Rotman, Levsky, Ovchinnikova, KondrashovVariations in chemical and isotopic compositions of the Yakutian kimberlites and their causes.Geochemistry International, Vol. 42, 9, pp. 799-821.Russia, Siberia, YakutiaGeochemistry
DS200512-0560
2005
Bogatikov, O.A.Kononova, V.A., Golubeva, Y.Y., Bogatikov, O.A., Nosova, Levsky, OvchinnikovaGeochemical diversity of Yakutian kimberlites: origin and diamond potential (ICP-MS dat a and Sr, Nd and Pb isotropy).Petrology, Vol. 13, 3, pp. 205-228.RussiaMineral chemistry
DS200712-0086
2007
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Nosova, A.A., Kondrashov, I.A.Kimberlites and lamproites of east European platform: petrology and geochemistry.Petrology, Vol. 15, 4, pp.EuropeLamproite
DS200712-0087
2007
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Nosova, A.A., Kondrashov, I.A.Kimberlites and lamproites of east European platform: petrology and geochemistry.Petrology, Vol. 15, 4, pp.EuropeLamproite
DS200812-0122
2008
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Dubinina, E.O., Nosova, A.A., Kondrashov, I.A.Nature of carbonates from kimberlites of the Zimnii Bereg field, Arkangelsk: evidence from Rb Sr C and O isotope data.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 421,1, pp. 807-811.Russia, Kola Peninsula, ArchangelDeposit - Zimnii Bereg
DS200812-0585
2007
Bogatikov, O.A.Kononova, V.A., Golubeva, Y.Y., Bogatikov, O.A., Kargin, A.V.Diamond resource potential of kimberlites from the Zimny Bereg field, Arkangelsk oblast.Geology of Ore Deposits, Vol. 49, 6, pp. 421-441.Russia, Kola PeninsulaDeposit - Zimny Bereg
DS200912-0059
2009
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Nusova, A.A., Kargin, A.V.Polygenetic sources of kimberlites, magma composition and diamond potential exemplified by the East European and Siberian cratons.Petrology, Vol. 17, 6, pp. 605-625.Russia, YakutiaChemistry
DS200912-0060
2009
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Sharkov, E.V., Bogina, Kononova, Nosova, Samsonov, ChistyakovWithin plate (intracontinental) and postorogenic magmatism of the East European Craton as reflection of the evolution of continental lithosphere.Petrology, Vol. 17, 3, May pp. 207-226.RussiaMagmatism
DS200912-0399
2009
Bogatikov, O.A.Kononova, V.A., Kargin, A.V., Nosova, A.A., Kondrashov, I.A., Bogatikov, O.A.Geochemical comparison of kimberlites from the Siberian and East European platforms: problems of genesis and spatial zoning.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 428, 1, pp. 1156-1161.Russia, EuropeKimberlite genesis
DS200912-0411
2009
Bogatikov, O.A.Kovalenko, V.I., Yarmolyk, V.V., Bogatikov, O.A.Regularities of spatial distribution of mantle hot spots of the modern Earth.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 427, 2, pp. 924-928.MantlePlume
DS200912-0412
2009
Bogatikov, O.A.Kovalenko, V.I., Yarmolyuk, V.V., Bogatikov, O.A.The recent supercontinent in the northern hemisphere of the Earth ( North Pangea): magmatic and geodynamic evolution.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 427, 2, pp. 897-901.MantleMagmatism
DS201012-0063
2010
Bogatikov, O.A.Bogatikov, O.A., Kononova, V.A., Nosova, A.A., Kargin, A.V.Polygenetic sources of kimberlites, magma composition, and diamond potential exemplified by the East European and Sibnerian cratons.Petrology, Vol. 17, 6, pp. 606-625.RussiaKimberlite genesis
DS201012-0410
2009
Bogatikov, O.A.Kovalenko, V.I., Yarmolyuk, V.V., Bogatikov, O.A.The recent supercontinent in the northern hemisphere of the Earth ( North Pangea): magmatic and geodynamic evolution.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., p. 151-157.MantleMagmatism
DS201012-0411
2009
Bogatikov, O.A.Kovalenko, V.I., Yarmolyuk, V.V., Bogatikov, O.A.Regularities of spatial distribution of mantle hot spots of the modern Earth.Deep Seated Magmatism, its sources and plumes, Ed. Vladykin, N.V., pp. 5-12.MantlePlume
DS201112-0535
2011
Bogatikov, O.A.Kononova, V.A., Bogatikov, O.A., Kondrashov, I.A.Kimberlites and lamproites: criteria for similarity and differences.Petrology, Vol. 19, 1, pp. 34-54.MantleGeodynamics - genesis
DS201112-0550
2010
Bogatikov, O.A.Kovalenko, V.I., Yarmolyuk, V.V., Bogatikov, O.A.Modern volcanism in the Earth's northern hemisphere and its relation with the evolution of the North Pangaea modern supercontinent and with the spatial ... hotspotsPetrology, Vol. 18, 7, pp. 657-676.MantleMantle plume, deep subduction
DS201504-0216
2015
Bogatikov, O.A.Sharkov, E.V., Bogatikov, O.A.Roots of magmatic systems in the large continental igneous Provinces.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 460, 2, pp. 154-158.Europe, SyriaMantle xenoliths
DS201601-0025
2015
Bogatikov, O.A.Kargin, A.V., Babarina, I.I., Bogatikov, O.A., Yutkina, E.V., Kondrashov, I.A.Paleproterozoic Kimozero kimberlite ( Karelian Craton): geological setting and geochemical typing.Doklady Earth Sciences, Vol. 465, 1, pp. 1135-1138.RussiaDeposit - Kimozero

Abstract: Geological and structural mapping of Paleoproterozoic Kimozero kimberlite with account for lithological facies and geochemical specialization provides evidence for the multiphase structure of the kimberlite pipe, which underwent fragmentation as a result of shear–faulti